Thoroughbred Owner Breeder

Page 1

THE £6.95 NOVEMBER 2021 ISSUE 207

A star is born

Cheveley Park Stud on the Classic trail with formidable filly Inspiral

PLUS

Yearling market review

John Boyce’s exclusive analysis

Terry Warner

‘I’d love another Festival winner’

First-crop foals

Sires set for sales test

www.theownerbreeder.com


Oasis Dream 2000 Green Desert - Hope (Dancing Brave)

Class is permanent Sire of 15 blacktype performers in 2021 including the unbeaten dual Gr.1 winner and Timeform’s highest rated 2YO Native Trail - an exciting Classic prospect for next season.

Contact Shane Horan, Claire Curry or Henry Bletsoe +44 (0)1638 731115 | nominations@juddmonte.co.uk

www.juddmonte.com


Welcome Editor: Edward Rosenthal Bloodstock Editor: Nancy Sexton Design/production: Thoroughbred Group Editorial: 12 Forbury Road, Reading, Berkshire RG1 1SB editor@ownerbreeder.co.uk www.theownerbreeder.com Twitter: @OwnerBreeder Instagram: ownerbreeder Equine Advertising: Giles Anderson UK: 01380 816777 IRE: 041 971 2000 USA: 1 888 218 4430 advertise@anderson-co.com Subscriptions: Keely Brewer subscriptions@ownerbreeder.co.uk 01183 385 686 The Owner Breeder can be purchased by non-members at the following rates: 1 Year 2 Year UK £60 £100 Europe £90 £150 RoW £120 £195 The Owner Breeder is published by a Mutual Trading Company owned jointly by the Racehorse Owners Association and Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association The Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association is a registered charity No. 1134293 Editorial views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the ROA or TBA Our monthly average readership is 20,000 Racehorse Owners Association Ltd 12 Forbury Road, Reading, Berkshire RG1 1SB Tel: 01183 385680 info@roa.co.uk • www.roa.co.uk

THE

Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association Stanstead House, The Avenue, Newmarket CB8 9AA Tel: 01638 661 321 • Fax: 01638 665621 info@thetba.co.uk • www.thetba.co.uk

£6.95 NOVEMBER 2021 ISSUE 207

A star is born

Cheveley Park Stud on the Classic trail with formidable filly Inspiral

PLUS

Yearling market review

John Boyce’s exclusive analysis

Terry Warner

‘I’d love another Festival winner’

First-crop foals

Sires set for sales test

www.theownerbreeder.com

Cover: Inspiral, a daughter of Frankel ex Starscope, makes it four from four with a decisive victory in the Group 1 Fillies’ Mile at Newmarket under Frankie Dettori Photo: Bill Selwyn

Edward Rosenthal Editor

NH stars are fitting tribute to Cheveley’s late founder I

f a job’s worth doing, it’s worth doing properly. I suspect the late David Thompson had a slightly more professional strategy in place when he started to assemble a team of exciting jumps prospects to entertain him over the winter months once the Flat season had finished, but you get my point. Mr T is unlikely to have suffered fools gladly. Such has been the impact of his National Hunt string in the Cheveley Park Stud silks that it is hard to believe the project only began in 2018. Outstanding performers including Envoi Allen, A Plus Tard, Ferny Hollow, Allaho, Quilixios and Sir Gerhard have all soared to great heights over jumps, with the presence of brilliant rider Rachael Blackmore in the saddle helping to raise their profile even higher. As ‘start-ups’ go, it has been a roaring success. David’s passing in late December has left the Cheveley team with an array of talent at its disposal, albeit in a branch of racing that traditionally it has had little involvement in, excluding Party Politics’ famous win in the 1992 Grand National in the silks of Patricia Thompson, the giant chaser a birthday present from her husband delivered just days before his Aintree triumph. The operation’s Newmarket nursery is renowned worldwide for the talented Flat performers it produces year on year, the latest star being Inspiral, unbeaten in four races this season and looking every inch a Classic contender for 2022 following her easy triumph in the Group 1 Fillies’ Mile at Newmarket on October 8. While the focus remains firmly on the Flat operation, the jumpers, some of which have yet to reach their potential, will be enjoyed over the next few seasons, with Patricia aided by son Richard and Managing Director Chris Richardson in mapping out targets for the new campaign. “We’ll keep them going in David’s memory but there are no plans to buy anything new,” Patricia tells Owner Breeder (The Big Interview, pages 30-32). “I don’t understand jump racing completely, but I’ve got more of an idea than I had. I enjoy watching it.

“Frankly, there’s no residual value. We’re trying to build families as we have done for years – that’s much more satisfying, really. And I’d much rather buy a nice filly!” Cheveley secured that nice filly at Book 1 of the Tattersalls Yearling Sale last month, forking out 825,000 guineas on a daughter of No Nay Never, seeing off Juddmonte Farms in the process to secure the prized youngster. Of course, Juddmonte lost its own founder and guiding light when Khalid Abdullah passed away earlier this year. For the British racing and breeding community it will have been heartening to see these two famous outfits battling it out in the sale ring, as they have done many times before on the racecourse. Long may it continue. Terry Warner’s colours will be known to nearly

“Such has been the impact it’s hard to believe the project only began in 2018” all racing devotees, carried by a succession of talented runners, not least the great Rooster Booster, scintillating winner of the Champion Hurdle under Richard Johnson in 2003. Now 89, Warner retains all his love for the game yet despite plenty of victories over the years – in addition to the Champion Hurdle he has won the Triumph Hurdle and the Cesarewitch twice – the financial return is often disappointing. “We know what the prize-money situation is when we go into ownership, so it’s no surprise,” he tells Graham Dench (The Finish Line, page 96). “But it needs to improve if we are to keep bringing more new owners in. Racing is my pleasure, and I can indulge myself, but despite averaging seven or eight winners a year, I’ve probably covered my costs only about three times in 50-odd years.”

THE OWNER BREEDER

1




Contents

November 2021

30

News & Views ROA Leader Racing's structure is failing the sport

TBA Leader Climate change concerns

News Trevor Hemmings remembered

Changes News in a nutshell

Howard Wright Relationship with bookmakers sought

Features continued 7 9 10

From Ascot and Longchamp

The Big Interview Cheveley Park Stud looks to the future

Yearling market review Analysing the trends this autumn

First-crop foal sires Study Of Man and co in the spotlight

Breeders' Digest Record returns at the sales

4

THE OWNER BREEDER

Round-up from the yearling circuit

14

Native Trail is a man among boys

67

Dr Statz 70

The Finish Line With owner Terry Warner

28

46

Caulfield Files

Book sizes rise again

Features The Big Picture

Sales Circuit

96

Forum ROA Forum

18 30

Updates to the Rules of Racing

74

TBA Forum Infectious disease service re-established

86

Great British Bonus

34

Latest news and winners

38

Philippa Cooper for Hurricane Lane

91

Breeder of the Month 92

Vet Forum 45

Neonatal maladjustment syndrome in foals

94


96

38

18

Did you know? Our monthly average readership is

20,000

THE OWNER BREEDER

5


FOR THE GRIT & THE GLORY Join us to celebrate the outstanding equine performers and their owners from the past 12 months. Secure your seat: www.roa.co.uk/ROAAwards2021

2021

THURSDAY 9 th DECEMBER 2021 BLACK TIE CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION THREE-COURSE DINNER CARRIAGES 1AM

The Royal Lancaster Hotel Lancaster Terrace London W2 2TY


ROA Leader

Charlie Parker President

Progress stifled by structural flaws

T

he prize-money agreements that once underpinned racecourses’ executive contributions expired many years ago. Since then, we have been looking to replace them as we try to improve total prize-money available to owners and other participants. Initial discussions ran aground when Covid hit, but newer solutions were being sought. Discussions were had with racecourses based on a more collaborative approach that focussed on revenue sharing. However, against the backdrop of behind-closed-doors racing, limited crowds and the sport’s longer-term recovery, progress has been slow. A new, innovative proposal was put forward, looking at a shortterm experiment that would hopefully result in increased prizemoney, more racing and additional revenues. This proposal also set out to prove that innovation and change could be delivered in racing whilst taking care to examine the impact and outputs for the future. Arena Racing Company came to the table offering to guarantee its 2019 executive contribution and, in addition, add an extra £9 million. This money would be targeted at different areas: National Hunt, all-weather, a revamped Racing League, changes to the All-Weather Championships, and some new ideas around a festival for jump racing. In return for this significant uplift, ARC requested changes to the Rules of Racing that would allow its all-weather courses to stage nine-race cards during the winter months (field sizes at those fixtures would be capped at 12 runners). The races in question, Classes 4, 5 and 6, would also receive an increase in the winner’s purse. Finally, there was to be a new weekly guaranteed £30,000 Class 3 race run within the nine-race cards. Originally, there were other conditions that were less attractive and needed to be ironed out. The new fixtures could impact the very end and beginning of the turf Flat season, while a proposed later final race time could have meant additional work for stable staff. Working together with other participants, though, I am pleased to say we were able to make changes to the proposal that eliminated these ‘red line’ issues. These compromises impacted the money available, but it was a better-balanced offer for racing and still a very exciting opportunity. The proposal appeared to be a ‘no-brainer’ and the ROA supported the new agreement, alongside the Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association (TBA), National Association of Racing Staff (NARS) and Racecourse Association (RCA). The RCA had its own issues to overcome. The proposed increase in races on the all-weather through the winter only impacts six courses, and therefore any benefits that may accrue are also limited. However, the RCA managed to get majority approval, required for the BHA

to change the Rules of Racing. The National Trainers Federation (NTF) and Professional Jockeys Association (PJA) have not yet been able to support the proposal, with objections over too much racing and the impact on field sizes, and while these should be considerations, we must look at how we innovate, progress and improve prize-money and the sport. Let’s hope that continuing discussions resolve the impasse. But, here we are – the majority support the deal. At the Horsemen’s Group a majority verdict is not enough as it must be unanimous. We have had robust discussions and compromises have been made to see a deal done. Yet still we cannot progress. The fact that the proposed deal has been derailed by these

“The proposal appeared to be a ‘no-brainer’ and the ROA supported the new agreement” two organisations highlights why the structure of British racing needs to be overhauled to allow change, progress and innovation. Racing must engage with racecourses – and bookmakers – to help them make their product more appealing to their customers. We need to work together as an industry to persuade Westminster to support levy development and aid the Levy Board in maximising the full impact of its funding into the sport. We also need to work with industry stakeholders to find pragmatic solutions to decisions that are in the best interests of British racing – solutions that will see prosperity for all. We can do this, but we need a structure that lets it happen and not one that stifles progress. This must now be top of the sport’s agenda. Fix that and maybe we can really start to grow again. For the full article see theownerbreeder.com.

THE OWNER BREEDER

7


EUROPE’S P R E M I E R BREEDING STOCK SALE featuring major consignments from

Godolphin, Juddmonte Farms and Shadwell Estates

TAT T E R SA L L S DEC E M BE R SA L E 2021 YEARLINGS: November 22nd FOALS: November 24th-27th BROODMARES, FILLIES IN TRAINING, etc: November 29th-December 2nd

T: +44 1638 665931 sales@tattersalls.com www.tattersalls.com


TBA Leader

Julian Richmond-Watson Chairman

Global warming poses new questions N

ot so long ago, the words climate and change would rarely have appeared in the same sentence, never mind next to each other. Now, they signify terminology that has become part of our everyday life, and climate change pops up in practically every news broadcast as either a reminder of its importance by scientists or protesters, or a reference to some weather-related event around the world. Strangely, climate change as a phrase is not very specific, when I believe most of those using it mean global warming and not climate cooling. We can debate the causes and who is to blame, but most of us accept that our local climate in Britain has been getting warmer recently. Long icy winters seem to be distant memories, and while I am sure there are advantages, there will be disadvantages, some of which we have not foreseen. Almost every commercial sector is on board with issues relating to the threat that such warming could bring to our planet, and businesses are taking various measures to alleviate their carbon footprint and reduce energy consumption. Some of the so-called solutions, such as carbon offsets and buying carbon credits, seem to be more examples of window dressing rather than accepting reality and doing something about it. It is both fascinating and encouraging to see how this relatively new issue has permeated the business sector, as well as everyday life, and there will undoubtedly be exciting innovations that make a difference, with battery storage and non-fossil fuel production of power sources advancing rapidly. Horseracing is not immune from the effects of global warming and its ancillary pursuit of sustainability. The point was demonstrated recently at the Horseracing Industry Conference organised by the Racing Foundation and University of Liverpool, tagged ‘Future-Proofing the Racing Industry: Protecting People & the Planet’, and the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities’ annual conference, which included a presentation by Dr Allen Hershkowitz, environmental science advisor to the New York Yankees baseball team. Their input to the debate can be found online, including a keynote address by BHA Chief Executive Julie Harrington, who highlighted some of the concerns facing the sport globally, such as warmer temperatures, scarcity of water for racetracks and gallops irrigation and the prospect of regulation on travel. Racing is an international industry and as such is currently a major user of fossil fuels, especially for the transport of horses but also in its use of feedstuffs from around the world. The breeding sector travels mares for covering, transports horses to sales and uses transport and machinery in everyday life, much of which

could change from fossil fuels to electrical power, with innovation. Even with that innovation, we must ask ourselves if there are more efficient ways of using power. Should the sport of racing, especially in Britain, really have to travel horses hundreds of miles to seek out low-quality opportunities, where second or third prize-money barely covers the costs of getting to the racecourse in the first place? Yes, opportunities for higher quality horses will be more limited, and therefore the need to travel significant distances is inevitable, but it can be argued that a programme for lower-rated horses should offer local opportunities. There is a real chance here for the new Racing Digital project to examine if opportunities can be matched to race programmes closer to home.

“There are many opportunities to improve breeders’ green credentials in how studs are managed” As the TBA’s own recent award-winning (2021 winner of British Association for Sustainable Sport’s Innovation; Initiatives and Products Award) environmental audit showed, there are many opportunities to improve breeders’ green credentials in how grassland and non-productive areas are managed on individual studs. However, that is only scratching the surface of what could be achieved. For example, how many studs have a windmill? I am sure the horses would soon get used to one! And what about having solar panels on the barn or stud building roof to charge the new electric stud vehicle or horsebox? We have the benefit of a green environment on our stud and are well placed to take advantage of the innovations on the way. The idea that we could describe our business as carbon neutral has to be an attractive opportunity and in all our minds.

THE OWNER BREEDER

9


News

Jump racing mourns passing of leading owner Trevor Hemmings

T

revor Hemmings, who died last month aged 86, was one of National Hunt racing’s biggest supporters, his passion funded by the wealth he accrued in property and other businesses. Hemmings’ yellow, green and white silks are among the most instantly recognisable on the racecourse, while he also owned Championship football team Preston North End, buying the then financially-troubled Lancashire club in 2010. His famous cloth cap was laid on the pitch before their home match with Derby as his commitment to the club was honoured. The race most associated with Hemmings is the Grand National; he captured the world’s most famous jumps race a record-equalling three times. First in 2005 with Hedgehunter, trained by Willie Mullins, then in 2011 with Donald McCain’s Ballabriggs, while Many Clouds, trained by Oliver Sherwood, was victorious in 2015. Trabolgan was a Hennessy Gold Cup

Trevor Hemmings and his colours have been a staple of National Hunt racing, with Many Clouds (left) and Albertas Run (right) just two of the runners to have excelled in the famous silks

winner for Hemmings, while The Last Fling and three-time Festival winner Albertas Run were other star names. Juveigneur, Cloudy Lane, Andreas, Old Benny, Ballabriggs, Carrickboy, Hawk High and Vintage Clouds this year were also Cheltenham Festival winners, of which he had a dozen in total. He won six Grade 1s, while his most successful seasons were 2007-08, when he had 51 winners, and 2010-11, when he was crowned champion owner. Mullins said: “It was a dream come true to win the National – it gave us one of the great days in my training career. He was a man who it was an honour and a pleasure to train for.”

10

THE OWNER BREEDER


Stories from the racing world Hemmings had horses with McCain’s late legendary father Ginger too, and the Cheshire trainer said upon hearing the news of his death: “It was a huge shock. He’d been in touch fairly recently and he even used to ring my mum now and again just to keep an eye on her. “He was fantastic to me. Dad trained for him in his latter years, but for me as a first-season trainer, to have horses for Trevor Hemmings was a huge thing, and he supported me through thick and thin every year I’ve been training. “He’s been a wonderful man for me and a lot of other trainers. He was very fair and, while it’s corny, he was just a gentleman. He was a wonderful supporter to me, you can’t underestimate the reason why he was so successful and that’s because he allowed you to train horses the way they should be trained. “It was no fluke he won three Grand Nationals, he allowed you to do the job, he never rushed you. He’s a great loss to National Hunt racing, in particular to the northern National Hunt racing scene.” Sherwood added: “He’d been in really good form recently, he hadn’t been in any ill health, so it was a huge shock. “We had some great days with Many Clouds and I’ll be forever in their debt. Without Trevor’s input I wouldn’t have even run him in the National because I thought it was a year too soon. I won’t forget that weekend for as long as I live. Trevor flew down the next day in his helicopter and celebrated with all the locals in Lambourn, paying for everybody to have a drink. “Trevor would be the first to say he was very lucky to have the horses he did, but then he enjoyed the highs and knew the lows that came with owning racehorses. He knew the game inside out. He was the perfect

owner. He let us get on with it.” Hemmings’ nurseries for his youngstock were in Cork and Lancashire, while he lived in the Isle of Man at his Ballaseyr Stud. He was born in Woolwich, south-east London, where his father worked at the Royal Arsenal. In 1940, aged five, he experienced the blitz before moving to Leyland in Lancashire. Combining schooling with two paper rounds, a role as a petrol pump attendant and delivering groceries by horse and cart – not all at the same time, it must be said – Hemmings started his working life proper as a bricklayer and went on to amass a fortune from property, his famously disciplined approach the cornerstone of his billionaire status. In 1960 he started his own business and never let sentiment get in the way of a good deal. He kept selling his businesses “as they became interesting to others”, his first to Christian Salvesen for £1.5 million, while housebuilder Ambrose was sold to Barratt for £5.7m. He joined Pontins as Property

Director – his former boss, Fred Pontin, owned 1971 Grand National winner Specify, which helped foster Hemmings’ love for the Aintree showpiece – and did well when it was sold to Coral in 1978. Within a decade he was leading a management buyout of the holiday company for £57m, soon selling it to Scottish and Newcastle for £90m. As head of the company’s leisure division, he bought the UK arm of Center Parcs, which he developed, while in 2000 he bought Pontins back, finally selling it for £46m. All the while his private companies were dealing in hotels, pubs and casinos, among other activities. He bought up parts of Blackpool and its tower, anticipating a ‘supercasino’ which did not materialise. Clearly, not every horse he backed as a businessman came in. Among dozens of charities he supported, invariably very generously, were the Red Cross, RNLI, Royal Preston Hospital and the Samaritans, while his involvement with the Princess Royal’s Carers Trust brought in 2011 the appointment of a CVO (Commander of the Royal Victorian Order) for personal services to the royal family. He is survived by wife Eve, sons Peter, Craig, Patrick and Philip, and daughter Carole.

››

THE OWNER BREEDER

11


News

Levy Board stumps up extra £10m for 2022

Fixture-related funding will total £90m next year

The Levy Board has agreed fixturerelated funding of up to £90 million for racing’s 2022 fixture list, of which up to £70m is for prize-money – £10m more than the sums allocated in 2018 and 2019. These totals do not include the additional grants for prize-money and those going towards regulation and integrity already announced following the Levy Board taking a £21.5m loan from the government’s Sport Winter Survival Package (SWSP). Taking these into account, the Levy Board is likely to contribute up to £75m in prize-money in 2022, which contrasts with around £60m in recent pre-Covid years. Investment by the Levy Board at such levels is unlikely to be possible in 2023, but the expectation is that racecourse revenues and consequently the ability of racecourses to contribute to prize-money will have recovered

further by then. In 2021, including the additional grants arising from the SWSP loan, the Levy Board expects to contribute around £81m to prize-money, Of the 2022 prize-money allocation of £67.2m, £55.8m is via a newlydeveloped ratecard mechanism, £6.9m for the Appearance Money Scheme, £3.5m for the Great British Bonus, a Divided Races Fund of £800,000, and an additional fund of £200,000 to support prize-money at tracks most affected by the new ratecard mechanism. Making up the total figure of £70m, there is also a £2.8m contingency that will be used to reward racecourse payments to prize-money should these prove to be significantly above estimated levels. Overall, even assuming none of the £2.8m contingency is used and excluding the extra grants arising from

the loan from the SWSP, the Levy Board’s support for fixtures is up by 10% on the 2020 pre-Covid budget of £80m. Paul Darling, Chairman of the Levy Board, said: “The Levy Board recognised the importance of maintaining its higher than usual allocations to prize-money in 2022 to support the ongoing recovery of the sport from the effects of the Covid period. “This adds to the substantial extra grants we have made in 2020 and 2021. In addition, by the end of 2021 the Board’s contribution to Covid-related regulatory costs is likely to have reached £3.7 million. “We’re pleased to have modernised and developed our funding arrangements with regard to prizemoney and the fixture incentive fund. Moving to a race-by-race basis for allocating all prize-money gives the Board, and indeed all of racing and betting, more transparency as to where levy funding is being allocated. “The additional payments that incentivise racecourse executive contributions are intended to encourage a return of total prize-money in 2022 towards pre-Covid levels.” He continued: “It must be recognised throughout the sport that although drawing again on our reserves makes it possible to continue with higher funding in 2022, the position in 2023 will be different. “The Board is required to make the first repayment to government of the Sport Winter Survival Package loan that was taken this year. That will be the first call on expenditure in 2023 and in the seven subsequent years.”

ARC announces prize-money increase Arena Racing Company (ARC) has announced prize-money investment plans which will see the group’s executive contribution increase by £4 million in 2022 (against 2019 values), to a total of £21.7m. Combined with levy and other funding, £41.5m in prize-money will be available at ARC racecourses across 2022, up from £31.4m in the pre-Covid year of 2019. The company also revealed that from next year the All-Weather Championships will be staged at Newcastle on Good Friday, moving from Lingfield, which will instead host

12

THE OWNER BREEDER

a ‘Vase’ meeting the same day consisting of Class 3 and 4 handicaps worth a total of £395,000. Also new at Lingfield will be a ‘Winter Million’ meeting comprising two days of jumping sandwiched by a Flat fixture, the highlight of which will be the new Coral Winter Oaks. Staged from January 21-23, the three days will offer a minimum of £1m in prize-money. ARC Chief Executive Martin Cruddace said: “We are delighted to confirm our investment plans for 2022 of an extra £4 million in executive contribution against 2019, which demonstrates our ongoing

commitment to the sport. “I would, of course, like to thank racehorse owners for their continued support of our racecourses alongside our partners in the online betting sector, who have all shown considerable support for the sport over the last 18 months.” He added: “After what has been a difficult period for the whole industry, we want to make sure we can continue to support our core race programme as well as embracing innovation, such as the Winter Million weekend and the All-Weather Vase at Lingfield Park on Good Friday.”


An eye for success

visit studlife online: tweenhills.com/studlife

November 2021

STAR WARS SEE SALES SUMS SOAR So far 16 Zoustar yearlings have changed hands for 6-figure sums at the recent European sales, including a 310,000gns colt who will join Joseph O’Brien. Zoustar’s European yearling average at the time of writing is over 3 times his initial stud fee. They also include a 280,000gns filly purchased by Amanda Skiffington; a 200,000gns colt bought by the Hong Kong Jockey Club; and a

185,000gns filly acquired by Peter and Ross Doyle. Lightning Spear stood his first season for 8,500gns but his yearlings currently average over £33,000. They are ‘spear’headed by a 78,000gns colt to be trained by George Boughey and a £50,000 colt bought by Sackville Donald. Zoustar’s 310,000gns colt from Yeomanstown Stud

MORE STAKES JOY FOR GOLD 2YOS Havana Golds 2-year-olds continue to fly high as October saw the granite-tough Chipotle win his second Listed race in Britain, Havana Red take the Listed Appel Au Maitre Fillies And Mares Stakes in Sweden and ex-Euro import Picota finish third in the Listed Zuma Beach in the US.

Chipotle cost 10,000gns as a yearling, Picota cost 20,000gns at the same age and Havana Red was a vendor buy-back for 7,000gns as a foal – with recent results on the track it’s no surprise Havana Gold has had yearling sell this year for £105,000, 92,000gns, 85,000gns etc.

Royal Ascot winner Chipotle won his second Listed race at Redcar

SHE’S NO SLOW MO! October also saw our in-training purchase Mo Celita finish an excellent fourth in the Gr.1 Prix de l’Abbaye at Longchamp’s Arc meeting. She has been an incredible success story for her trainer Adrian Nicholls this year, starting off winning sellers and landing a Listed race for David Redvers and David Howden.

A delighted Adrian and Claire Nicholls with our Abbaye fourth Mo Celita

WALL MARE DELIVERS PROMISE What an inspired decision it was from Tweenhills’ Bloodstock Manager Hannah Wall to stay around to buy the last lot on Day Two of last year’s Tattersalls December Mare Sale. Bought as a maiden for 27,000gns, Promise of Success has now won three times in Australia carrying the colours of Rosemont Stud and looks set to contest Group company next time.

Bryony, Alice, David, Hannah and Karen ahead of QIPCO British Champions Day at Ascot

Promise of Success

Back row: Alice, Karen and Kath Front row: Alex, Jodi, Lauren and Ivo enjoying a team day out

Tweenhills duo Ivo T left) and Joe Rob homas (third inso sell their pinhooke n (second left) d yearling colt fo r 30,000gns at Ta ttersalls

Tweenhills, Hartpury, Gloucestershire, GL19 3BG W: www.tweenhills.com T: + 44 (0) 1452 700177 M: + 44 (0) 7767 436373 E: davidredvers@tweenhills.com

11226 - Tweenhills Stud Life - Nov 2021_V3.indd 1

20/10/2021 14:13


Changes

Racing’s news in a nutshell

People and business Francis Graffard

Will succeed the retiring Alain de Royer-Dupre at the Aga Khan’s private training centre at Aiglemont in Chantilly from the end of 2021.

Robert Winston

Jockey who quit the saddle in 2019 after a career that yielded 1,627 winners, including four centuries, comes out of retirement.

Joshua Moore

Saffie Osborne

Up-and-coming apprentice rider is forced to sit out the rest of the Flat season owing to a persistent arm injury, which requires surgery.

Johnny Farrelly

Trainer is permanently excluded from British racing after being found in breach of six offences under safeguarding regulations.

Julian Lloyd

Manager of Kirsten Rausing’s Staffordstown Stud in Ireland will retire at the end of this year after 30 years in the role.

Set for extended spell on the sidelines after sustaining fractured vertebra and broken ribs in a fall at Plumpton on October 18.

Andrew Snell

Retires from his role as Cheveley Park’s Stud Manager after 32 years with the Newmarket-based operation.

John Best

Matt Griffiths

Colin Keane

Pat Eddery

Breaks Joseph O’Brien’s record for winners in an Irish Flat season on Power Under Me, providing the 27-year-old with victory number 127.

Sir Dragonet 5

High-class middle-distance performer for Aidan O’Brien who subsequently won the Group 1 Cox Plate in Australia for trainers Ciaron Maher and David Eustace.

Santa Barbara 3

Decor Irlandais 8

Kheleyf 20

Fujaira Prince 7

Son of Green Desert won the 2004 Jersey Stakes and went on to sire Group 2 winners Sayif and Penny’s Picnic.

14

THE OWNER BREEDER

Takes over from Richard Johnson as Jumps President of the Professional Jockeys Association.

Trainer links up with colleague Karen Jewell to operate under a joint licence at his Eyehorn Farm stable in Sittingbourne in Kent.

Horse obituaries

Daughter of Camelot was the winner of two Grade 1s in America this year for Coolmore and Aidan O’Brien.

David Bass

Talented hurdler for the Noel Kelly stable, winner of four races and placed in Grade 2 company.

Sheikh Obaid’s talented stayer, winner of five races including the 2020 Ebor Handicap for the Roger Varian stable.

Jump jockey reported to be in a stable but critical condition in hospital after being involved in a fatal car accident.

The late 11-times champion jockey who won 14 Classics in Britain is inducted into the QIPCO British Champions Series Hall of Fame.


SHALAA In 2021, Sire of Matron Stakes Gr.1 winner NO SPEAK ALEXANDER also Classic placed in the Irish 1000 Guineas Gr.1

MEHMAS Sire of 2021 Gr.1 Del Mar Oaks winner GOING GLOBAL and of 2-year-old Gr.1 winner SUPREMACY, from his first crop

THE GROUP ONE SIRES

GALILEO GOLD

TORONADO

In 2021, Sire of a 2-year-old Gr.1 winner from his first crop EBRO RIVER 1st Phoenix Stakes Gr.1 & 3rd Vincent O’Brien National Stakes Gr.1

In 2021, Sire of a Gr.1 winner in each hemisphere TRIBHUVAN 1st United Nations Stakes Gr.1 MASKED CRUSADER 1st William Reid Stakes Gr.1

OLYMPIC GLORY Sire of 2021 Gr.1 Prix Jean Romanet winner GRAND GLORY, also Classic-placed in the Prix de Diane Gr.1 and the sire of dual Gr.1 winner WATCH ME

AL SHAQAB STALLIONS

www.alshaqabracing.com


Changes

Racehorse and stallion

Movements and retirements

No Speak Alexander

Daughter of Shalaa, winner of this year’s Group 1 Matron Stakes for trainer Jessica Harrington, is retired aged three.

Palace Pier

Kingman’s brilliant son, winner of nine of his 11 starts including five Group 1s, retires to Dalham Hall Stud for 2022.

Nakeeta

Stalwart for the Iain Jardine stable whose biggest victory came in the 2017 Ebor Handicap for owners Alex and Janet Card is retired aged ten.

Roksana

Tough and talented mare, winner of the Grade 1 mares’ hurdle at the 2019 Cheltenham Festival for trainer Dan Skelton, is retired aged nine.

St Mark’s Basilica

Outstanding son of Siyouni, winner of the French 2,000 Guineas, French Derby, Coral-Eclipse and Irish Champion Stakes, is retired aged three.

Starman

Crack sprinter, winner of this year’s July Cup, suffers a minor setback before Champions Day and is retired aged four to stand at Tally-Ho Stud.

Brando

Angie Bailey’s sprinting star, winner of nine races including the Group 1 Prix Maurice de Gheest for trainer Kevin Ryan, is retired aged nine.

Victor Ludorum

Son of Shamardal, winner of the Prix Jean-Luc Lagardere at two and French 2,000 Guineas at three, is retired to Haras du Logis in Normandy.

People obituaries

Min

Top-class chaser for Rich Ricci, winner of seven Grade 1s including the Melling Chase and Ryanair Chase, is retired aged ten.

Lady Bowthorpe

Emma Banks’ top-class mare, winner of the Group 1 Nassau Stakes in July, is retired after her fine third in the Champion Stakes at Ascot.

Bangkok

Son of Australia, winner of the Group 2 York Stakes in July, is retired to stand as a dual-purpose sire at Chapel Stud in Worcestershire.

Unowhatimeanharry

High-class hurdler for trainer Harry Fry, winning four Grade 1s including Punchestown’s Champion Stayers Hurdle twice, is retired aged 13.

Poetic Flare

Jim Bolger’s homebred 2,000 Guineas and St James’s Palace Stakes victor is retired aged three and sold to take up stud duties in Japan.

16

THE OWNER BREEDER

Wally Sturt 90

His blue and white check silks were carried by a number of classy jumpers, notably Champion Hurdle hero Collier Bay.

Donie Sheahan 95

Ian Willows 77

Long-serving travelling head lad to Luca Cumani who took the yard’s Derby winners Kahyasi and High-Rise to Epsom.

Trevor Hemmings 86

Owner of prolific racemare For Bill had a long association with Listowel racecourse in County Kerry.

National Hunt devotee enjoyed three Grand National victories with Hedgehunter, Ballabriggs and Many Clouds.

Dan McLarnon 86

John Enright 74

With Joe Craig he was joint-owner of superb chaser Beef Or Salmon, trained by Michael Hourigan to win ten Grade 1s.

Former jockey rode for Arthur Stephenson, partnering Rigton Prince to victory in the 1971 Topham Chase at Aintree.


S U C C E S S

B E G I N S

W I T H

T H E

N O V

4

& 5 ,

B R E E D E R S ’

2 0 2 2

C U P

K E E N E L A N D

Visit members.breederscup.com to learn more about our nominations and racing programs. 2 02 2 S TA L L I O N N O M I N AT I O N S D E A D L I N E : D E C E M B E R 1 5 , 2 02 1 N E W LY R E T I R E D S TA L L I O N S H AV E 9 0 DAYS A F T E R T H E I R F I R S T COV E R .

When you nominate a stallion to the Breeders’ Cup you are creating a legacy of success, increasing the value of your stallion’s progeny and ensuring that they can be eligible for up to $31 million annually in Breeders’ Cup purses and awards. All 2023 foals will be eligible for nomination.

N O M I N AT E YO U R S TA L L I O N N OW A N D E N J OY S U CC E S S TO M O R R OW

M E M B E R S . B R E E D E R S C U P . C O M

·

8 5 9 · 5 1 4 · 9 4 2 3

N O M I N AT I O N S @ B R E E D E R S C U P . C O M · F A X : 8 5 9 • 2 2 3 • 3 9 4 5

21-140-072 2021_StallionNominations_ThoroughbredOwnerBreeder_210x297mm_3.indd 1

10/18/21 1:17 PM


The Big Picture

18

THE OWNER BREEDER


QIPCO British Champions Day

True grit from Trueshan Having had reigning champion stayer Stradivarius behind him in the Prix du Cadran at Longchamp (inset with James Doyle), the opening race at Ascot on QIPCO British Champions Day posed a question: could Trueshan inflict another defeat? The answer was an emphatic ‘yes’ as the five-year-old, trained by Alan King, streaked clear under Hollie Doyle to finish near enough the same distance in front of Stradivarius, who had to settle for third here after a far from trouble-free run under a frustrated Frankie Dettori. The duo were split by 50-1 shot Tashkhan. Photos Bill Selwyn

THE OWNER BREEDER

19


The Big Picture Baaeed remains unbeaten It was hard to say whether the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes or the Champion Stakes deserved top billng before QIPCO British Champions Day, but there’s no doubt the mile race delivered, with the finish fought out between the big two, Palace Pier and Baaeed. It was the younger, unbeaten colt who came out on top, by a neck, with Baaeed (right) the highlight of a fabulous treble for Jim Crowley and Shadwell. Palace Pier and Lady Bowthorpe, who was a fine third, retired with their heads held high. Photo Bill Selwyn

20 THE OWNER BREEDER


QIPCO British Champions Day

THE OWNER BREEDER

21


The Big Picture

22 THE OWNER BREEDER


QIPCO British Champions Day

The force was with them at Ascot Creative Force (main image) stamped himself as a sprinter to be reckoned with when keeping William Buick’s champion jockey hopes alive with a one-length success over last year’s winner Glen Shiel in the QIPCO British Champions Sprint Stakes, but the rider ultimately had to play second fiddle to Oisin Murphy (below left), who lifted the trophy for the third consecutive year. Moving along the line of photos below, two past champions, Lester Piggott and Frankie Dettori, enjoyed a catch up, while this year’s leading apprentice Marco Ghiani was there to collect his trophy, supported by partner Brooke Brown and son Louis. The Queen was, as ever, centre stage, never more so than when presenting the prizes for the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes, including to Baaeed’s trainer William Haggas. Photos Bill Selwyn

THE OWNER BREEDER 23


The Big Picture

Sealiway is just Champion Having contested the Arc less than a fortnight previously, it seemed a tall order awaited Adayar and Sealiway (yellow and green), who had been fourth and fifth at Longchamp, in the QIPCO Champion Stakes. Yet the Cedric Rossi-trained three-year-old, owned by Le Haras de la Gousserie, produced a dazzling display at Ascot under Mickael Barzalona, fending off the supplemented Dubai Honour by three-quarters of a length to claim the biggest victory of his career. Adayar was fifth, a place behind favourite Mishriff. Pauline Chehboub and Charlotte Chehboub (above) collected the owner’s prize from Sheikh Fahad Al Thani and his mother, Sheikha Amna Bint Mohammed Al Thani. Photos Bill Selwyn

24 THE OWNER BREEDER


QIPCO British Champions Day

THE OWNER BREEDER 25


The Big Picture

26 THE OWNER BREEDER


Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe

Tasso’s triumph In the build up to Europe’s most valuable prize, the Qatar Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, most of the talk had centred on the big three of Tarnawa, Hurricane Lane and Adayar, though this year’s race had looked an especially deep contest. That star trio ran well to be second, third and fourth, but they were all stunned by German raider Torquator Tasso, who had two Group 1s on his CV but was sent off the second-biggest longshot in the race at 72-1. He belied those odds, sweeping down the outside to outstay his rivals under Rene Piechulek, with jockey and trainer Marcel Weiss both striking at the first attempt at the race. Connections were understandably thrilled, and their hero will have the chance to prove it was no fluke as he stays in training next year. Photos Bill Selwyn

THE OWNER BREEDER 27


The Howard Wright Column

Will racing gamble on making bet buddies?

STEVE DAVIES

E

ven millennials will have heard of the smash-hit comedy film of 1984 whose theme music included lyrics such as “If there’s something strange in your neighbourhood, who ya gonna call? If it’s something weird an’ it don’t look good, who ya gonna call?” The answer was Ghostbusters, which could also be the answer to the conundrum of who to contact as British racing engineers its future relationship with betting operators. One of BHA Chief Executive Julie Harrington’s most significant pronouncements during her first major public address at the industry conference organised by the University of Liverpool and Racing Foundation at Windsor in September was that “racing had to work closely with the betting industry” as part of making up a forecast revenue shortfall of over £160 million up to 2024. Fine, but who ya gonna call? The days are long gone when familiar names were in charge of major bookmaking firms, leaders who were visible, voluble and sensible. Men such as Chris Bell at Ladbrokes, John Brown and Ralph Topping at William Hill, and John Whitaker at Stanleybet, who came through the bookmaking ranks and loved horseracing. Fred Done still ploughs an independent furrow at Betfred, but apart from William Hill Chairman and Pyledriver partowner Roger Devlin, the deep-down connect with racing has been lost to personalities who graduated in accountancy, marketing and computer studies. Even Devlin’s influence is on the wane, given that Hills was bought out by the US giant

Julie Harrington says racing must work with the betting industry

Real champions do their talking on the track Championships, what’s the point? At least in terms of horseracing events, where failure to live up to expectations is a given eight or even nine times out of ten. The tenth time is the exception that proves the rule. Take last month’s Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, which had been heralded as the race of the season, if not the century. The same outstanding horses who were lauded in the days before the race went to post and crossed the winning line, yet they were led home by the 72-1 shot Torquator Tasso. A champion? No thanks. Horseracing bears no comparison to those team or individual events in which championships are generally decided by the right entities. The top events in football, rugby and cricket involve teams that face each other in regular succession, and the same goes for standard competitions among

28 THE OWNER BREEDER

individuals, such as in tennis, boxing, darts, snooker and the like. The nearest equivalent in horseracing are the annual championships decided among owners, trainers, jockeys and breeders. Yet they have different criteria, being decided on different season lengths – even to the extent of inventing a jockeys’ championship based on the purely arbitrary period of the British Champions Series – and different measures. As a sport, horseracing has a different element from the rest; the clue is in the name. Its central athletes, who cannot express their feelings in the same way as their human counterparts, appear relatively sporadically, and the conditions under which they do so are rarely exactly the same. Yet the marketeers have had their way and set up promotional tags that

attempt to purvey an air of special finality. So, the Breeders’ Cup has become the Breeders’ Cup World Championships, and Britain and Ireland have created Champions Days. You can fool some of the people some of the time… There’s even a Future Champions Festival, which ambitious tag the Jockey Club dream-makers plucked out of the reconstitution of autumn events at Ascot and Newmarket, as if anyone bar the immediate connections and those who backed the winners will remember the accolade when the next promotional fiddle-faddle comes around. How much better to scrap the search for the generally unattainable and often unachievable and instead celebrate individual performances for their own sake and in their own right. They happen every day of the week, not just once in a blue moon.


Caesars Entertainment in April and has since divested its UK arm, including the retail side, to online operator 888. True, betting remains the strongest commercial entity supporting sponsorship in British racing, but its emphasis and target audience have changed radically over the last two decades. Take the second weekend in October, when sponsors included online behemoth bet365, firms called Casumo and Ne-bet.com (who?), and Coral, which with Ladbrokes now belong to Entain, recently retitled from GVC and contemplating a $22 billion buy-out from US gambling giant DraftKings at the time of writing. Adverts for MansionBet, BetUK.com (another who?) and Paddy Power, which merged with Betfair to become Flutter Entertainment before they scooped up the Stars Group in the US to set itself on the path of world domination, punctuated TV coverage, and a news item noted that trainer Fergal O’Brien had partnered with BresBet, a new sports-betting company, whose chief claim to sponsorship fame seemed to be their backing for greyhound events at Yarmouth and Sheffield. So, who ya gonna call, now that Kenny Alexander, the brains behind GVC and owner of top hurdler Honeysuckle, has left the betting arena? The BHA and Levy Board would be obvious answers, but there are drawbacks. The BHA has set up a levy reform group

“The days are long gone when familiar names such as Chris Bell and John Brown were in charge of major bookmaking firms” chaired by Independent Director Joe Saumarez Smith, who is well versed in the betting industry, but any mention on the governing body’s website of the group’s constitution or progress are so scant as to be non-existent to this naked eye. Although the Levy Board, which scrapped its Bookmakers’ Committee under new legislation in 2017, retains a member appointed by the Betting and Gaming Council, its present incumbent Mike O’Kane has been on the board since 2010 but has not worked full-time in the betting industry since completing 42 years with Ladbrokes in 2017. So, who ya gonna call? How about the Racecourse Association office in Ascot, where last month Wilf Walsh took over as Chairman. That’s Wilf Walsh, former Chief Executive of Carpetright, where he learned a thing or two about conflict, before becoming Chairman of its parent company Nestware Holdings in March this year. But it’s also Wilf Walsh, for a combined 14 years Managing Director and non-Executive Director of Coral, as well as for six years Chairman of Netherlands-based Fortuna Entertainment, the largest Central European betting operator. Lest other factions should regard this as an inflammatory suggestion, it should be remembered that this is also Wilf Walsh, racehorse owner, Racing For Change board member and senior Independent Director-designate of the ill-fated Racing Authority. He knows his way around British horseracing politics, and he probably “ain’t afraid o’ no ghost.”

EUROPEAN ROAD TO THE KENTUCKY DERBY 2021-22 Earn points for a spot in the Churchill Downs starting gate on the first Saturday in May by competing in these races: DATE

RACE

POINTS AWARDED

25/9/21

Juddmonte Royal Lodge Stakes at Newmarket

10 • 4 • 2 • 1

25/9/21

Alan Smurfit Memorial Beresford at Curragh

10 • 4 • 2 • 1

3/10/21

Prix du Jean Luc Lagardere at Longchamps

10 • 4 • 2 • 1

22/10/21

Vertem Futurity Trophy at Doncaster

10 • 4 • 2 • 1

March 2022

Patton Stakes at Dundalk

20 • 8 • 4 • 2

March 2022

Road to the Derby Condition Stakes at Kempton

20 • 8 • 4 • 2

March 2022

Cardinal Condition Stakes at Chelmsford City

30 • 12 • 6 • 3

To be eligible to run in the Kentucky Derby, horses must be nominated to the 2022 Triple Crown.

First Closing: January 22, 2022 Nomination Fee: $600 Second Closing: March 28, 2022 Nomination Fee: $6,000 For more information, contact:

Hunter Rankin, Executive Director of Racing hunter.rankin@kyderby.com, +1.502.394.1057

THE OWNER BREEDER 29


The Big Interview

Park

LIFE

With a genuine Classic prospect in its ranks, an exciting young stallion making waves on the racecourse and a squad of outstanding jumps horses ready to be unleashed, there is rarely a dull moment for the team at Cheveley Park Stud Words: Edward Rosenthal • Photos: Bill Selwyn

N

ovember is a month of transition within the British racing landscape when the fleet-footed, blue-blooded thoroughbreds that have enthralled and entertained us over the summer months sign off for the season and their National Hunt counterparts emerge from hibernation en masse, ready to fulfil their owners’ dreams of big-race glory at the Cheltenham and Aintree festivals. Until relatively recently, the dawn of a new jumps season would have meant little – certainly in terms of direct involvement – to the Thompson family’s Cheveley Park Stud, the Newmarket-based racing and breeding operation whose iconic red, white and blue silks have been associated with any number of outstanding performers on the Flat. All that changed in 2018 when David Thompson, the entrepreneur and businessman who bought Cheveley Park – then in receivership – with wife Patricia in 1975 decided he’d rather like to prolong the fun and have something to keep him occupied over the winter months. So, a team of jumps horses was assembled over the course of the year and dispatched to some of Ireland’s premier trainers. As befits a man whose brilliant business brain helped turn Hillsdown Holdings into a FTSE 100 company with an annual turnover of £4 billion, the results have been sensational, showing seven Cheltenham Festival winners in three years and 13 Grade 1s in total. Not bad going for what his son, Richard, who has inherited his father’s entrepreneurial spirit,

30 THE OWNER BREEDER

calls a “one-off project’. Sadly, David died in late December aged 84, leaving his family with perhaps the most exiting team of National Hunt horses in Europe. A chat with Patricia and Richard Thompson, along with the stud’s Managing Director Chris Richardson, at the Tattersalls Book 1 Sale helps to clear up the future of the jumps operation. “We’ll keep them going in David’s memory but there are no plans to buy anything new,” Patricia says. “I don’t understand jump racing completely, but I’ve got more of an idea than I had. I enjoy watching it. “Frankly, there’s no residual value. We’re trying to build families as we have done for years – that’s much more satisfying, really. And I’d much rather buy a nice filly!” Indeed, on the opening day of Book 1, Mrs T – as Richardson calls her – did splash out on a nice filly, seeing off Juddmonte Farms to land a daughter of No Nay Never out of the English Channel mare Lady Ederle for 825,000 guineas. For an outfit that presides over one of Britain’s premier broodmare bands, it was a statement of intent that Cheveley Park Stud remains focused on its core goal of breeding top-class racehorses. Of the purchase, Patricia explains: “It just sort of happened – I wasn’t really thinking of buying anything. Chris showed me four very nice fillies. I liked the first of the four and sometimes you just have to go for it. “It’s a very nice outcross pedigree. Even if she doesn’t race, she still has a lot of residual value.”

The Cheveley Park Stud policy for the last 20 or so years has been to retain its fillies to race and sell all its colts at public auction. This year’s Book 1 draft featured nine yearlings; seven found new homes for an aggregate of 1,752,000 guineas, or 250,000gns each, with top billing going to a son of Showcasing ex Furbelow – dam of three-time Group 1 victor Advertise – at 450,000gns. Among the other colts to catch the eye of buyers ringside was lot 247, a 300,000gns son of Ulysses out of the Blame mare Sacre Caroline. He is a halfbrother to high-class filly Sacred, winner of the Group 2 Hungerford Stakes in the stud’s silks at Newbury in August. More than a few eyebrows were raised in 2017 when Ulysses, bred in the purple


Cheveley Park Stud

All smiles: Patricia Thompson and Frankie Dettori with Group 1 Fillies’ Mile winner Inspiral, held by groom Sawai Singh

by Galileo out of Oaks heroine Light Shift, was retired to stand at Cheveley in partnership with his breeder the Niarchos family’s Flaxman Stables, who retain a 25% stake in the horse. The operation had been renowned for its sprint stallions, a pattern that began with its first sire Music Boy, immortalised in a bronze statue that sits outside the stud office, and reached its zenith with the outstanding Pivotal. However, set against a bloodstock industry that can apparently make up its collective mind on the commercial merits of a stallion in the blink of an eye, the recruitment of Ulysses, who excelled over a mile and a quarter when trained by Sir Michael Stoute, could just prove to be inspired. His initial crop has produced 13 winners

of 15 races at the time of writing, placing him in the top eight of first-season sires in Britain and Ireland. Of his winners, five scored at the first time of asking, including Piz Badile, narrow runner-up in the Group 3 Eyrefield Stakes at Leopardstown on October 23. Richardson says: “If you look at our broodmare band, the influence of Dutch Art and Pivotal is significant. We’ve witnessed the success of Galileo on Pivotal with Coolmore. So, to have our own son of Galileo, mated to our own mares, is very exciting. “With his breeding, Sir Michael aimed him at the Derby, but he brought him back in trip and he was most effective over ten furlongs. I believe his progeny will be more mile, mile-and-a-quarter horses,

with some obviously mile-and-a-half horses, but he’s also capable of getting some earlier types. “Where we have worked extremely hard with Ulysses is to manage to get him 120 mares every year for four years, which has given him a great platform to have 80-95 runners coming on stream every year. “We have supported the horse with some of our own very nice mares, which we have the advantage of being able to do, and he had a phenomenal book of mares in his first season. We’re also seeing hugely important support from domestic breeders like Meon Valley and Hascombe and Valiant, for example.” He continues: “The feedback we’ve received from our trainers has been most

THE OWNER BREEDER

31

››


The Big Interview ›› encouraging. They then talk to other

breeders who have horses with them and suddenly you have people going to the sales and spending 300,000gns on a son of Ulysses. It shows he has caught people’s imagination. We hope that he will be one of the sons of the late Galileo – along with the likes of Australia, who is also doing well – to carry the mantle.” Time will tell whether any of the 29 two-year-olds by Ulysses that Cheveley has in training will develop into high-class performers at three. At present they’ll all have to go some to outrank star filly Inspiral, a daughter of Frankel unbeaten in four races this year and most recently seen recording a decisive success in the Fillies’ Mile at Newmarket on October 8. Inspiral will bid to carry the Cheveley silks to a first Classic victory since Confidential Lady and Seb Sanders captured the 2006 Prix de Diane at Chantilly. Yet as a Group 1 winner already, her future in the paddocks is assured for an operation that is always trying to raise the bar. “We’re pruning slightly, but we started that before the pandemic so that we have a more elite broodmare band,” Patricia explains. “We had so many at one point

“My father did stuff that was outside the box – and it came off” they couldn’t fit within our own grounds.” Richardson adds: “We hope to have around 100 mares by the end of the year. Some will be sent to the December sales – we are certainly focusing on quality over quantity. “We have fewer stallions, so we have less need for the sort of mares required to support certain sires in their fourth or fifth year. A figure of 100 mares allows around 70 foals each year. That’s 60 yearlings, 30 colts and 30 fillies. The fillies will go into training and the colts will be offered at the sales.” Such a considered approach to breeding and racing does not always seem to be reflected in an industry where the ‘more is better’ philosophy usually triumphs. Mention of Music Boy is a reminder that stallions in this country once covered book sizes of around 50

32 THE OWNER BREEDER

Allaho is one of Cheveley’s NH stars

at a time when a variety of bloodlines prevailed. Patricia says: “It used to be more fun, I think. The gene pool was certainly healthier. What do I think of the situation now? It’s concerning and I wish we could go back. “We’d all like to see limits [on book sizes] or the industry will eat itself. But I think, quite naturally, everyone is thinking of themselves. It’s about dominance and money. “We should be taking the longer-term view, but nobody will agree to limits while they are making lots of money by so many coverings. I’ve seen it all before in business. In an ideal world we would be working together for the sake of the industry, but that’s not happening. I believe you weaken the market with too many horses by the same stallion for sale.” Richardson adds: “The commercial world of breeding has changed the concept of how one should do business in a more sensible way. Now people stand a stallion and take a view that their investment must be returned within one or two seasons. “You need as many on the ground as possible – firstly to bolster your income and secondly to compete with the other stallions that have high numbers as well. Otherwise you’re at a serious disadvantage. “The stallion market has changed drastically and Ireland has become very strong. The Irish are prepared to take a chance on a good two-year-old and retire that horse after its juvenile career. “It’s worked very well with the likes of Mehmas. Suddenly their progeny are all the rage. We looked at doing that with [Group 1-winning two-year-old] Unfortunately. Now he’s in Ireland and his first crop are yearlings.”

Cheveley Park Stud Back to the jumpers and there are a host of established stars and upcoming talents to look forward to this season, including Allaho, Quilixios and Sir Gerhard, the trio that enjoyed Grade 1 glory at the Cheltenham Festival in March, helping Cheveley to leading owner honours. Yet it’s a different animal that is uppermost in the thoughts of Richard Thompson, and for good reason. “I’ll put my hand up for A Plus Tard,” he says. “The Grade 1 Savills Chase [in December 2020] is the last race my father ever watched. For me personally that’s the one. “Of course, Envoi Allen and Allaho and the younger horses are up there, but A Plus Tard is the one. For that to be the last race he watched on TV… it was just so exciting. When we bought the jumpers that was exactly the sort of race we were looking to win. “Dad always liked jump racing, but he had previously bought older horses and sometimes they came with a few injuries or weren’t quite right – this time he bought younger horses, which is incredible because he was in his 80s, when he could have bought younger horses ten or 20 years ago. But that was him.” Richard continues: “My father had a bit of magic dust. He did stuff occasionally that was outside the box. And it came off. He had that streak of something that was unusual. Our Grand National winner Party Politics [bought as a birthday present for Patricia only a few days before he lined up in the big race at Aintree in 1992] was a great example. “A lot of it was raw instinct, from the gut. He had a huge appetite for calculated risk – and he could make his mind up very quickly. That was his USP and the advantage he had over other people; weighing things up, making a decision and going for it.” That attitude towards calculated risk was encapsulated in the identification and purchase of the No Nay Never filly at Book 1. Patricia Thompson remains steadfast in her commitment to racing and breeding thoroughbreds despite the loss of her biggest supporter. “I met David at 18 and we were married for a week shy of 59 years,” she says. “Of course, it could be exhausting at times, but I think I would have been bored with anyone else. “It has been quite a stressful period and there has been an awful lot to do, but we’ll keep trying to improve all the time. “I’m not ready to retire yet. I’m happy to watch the jumpers and let Chris and Richard manage them.”



Yearling market review

Bounce BACK

A No Nay Never filly provided one of the scores of the year, rising in value from €265,000 as a foal to 825,000gns as a yearling for Philipp Stauffenberg

A relentless demand for yearlings has ensured that last year’s Covid-challenged sales season has become a distant memory Words: John Boyce

T

here is no doubt that yearling vendors are happier after the latest round of sales. The big five yearling auctions – Arqana August, Goffs Orby, Goffs UK Premier, plus Tattersalls Books 1 and 2 – all comfortably outscored their 2020 positions, when it came to aggregate, average price and clearance rates. All five sales combined produced an average price of £112,329, which was 8% up on the 2020 average of £103,842, albeit still shy of 2019’s pre-Covid average of £121,278, a gap of 7.4%. But other things were afoot too. The failure to match the 2019 average price was caused by weaker than usual

demand for the top yearlings. Arqana and Tattersalls October Books 1 and 2 sales failed to better the average posted last year and in 2019, by the top 10% segment of their offerings. The top 37 yearlings at Book 1 averaged £748,000, down from £994,000 last year and from £1,022,000 in 2019. This was a trend also seen earlier at the Keeneland September Sale, where buyers were reluctant to go overboard and often formed partnerships that curtailed excessive selling prices. But, as they say, every cloud has a silver lining, and in the case of European yearling sales that took the form of money spilling down through

Leading Sires by Average Yearling Price (5+ sold to end of Tatts Book 4) Sire

Crop

Off

Sold

(%)

High (£)

Avg (£)

Med (£)

Fee (£)

Profit

(%)

AvgXFee

DUBAWI

14

26

22

84.6

2,041,931

545,534

446,250

250,000

18

81.8

2.2

GALILEO

18

20

20

100.0

1,280,059

515,331

400,443

Private

-

-

-

FRANKEL

7

37

28

75.7

971,250

350,471

256,878

175,000

20

71.4

2.0

KINGMAN

5

75

58

77.3

1,155,000

259,864

204,750

75,000

44

75.9

3.5

SEA THE STARS

10

76

66

86.8

1,575,000

207,239

150,303

121,512

34

51.5

1.7

LOPE DE VEGA

9

90

82

91.1

761,250

191,953

157,500

72,007

67

81.7

2.7

SIYOUNI

9

44

35

79.5

1,276,207

190,311

161,653

90,009

22

62.9

2.1

NO NAY NEVER

5

59

51

86.4

971,250

189,838

128,006

90,009

31

60.8

2.1

CAMELOT

6

40

33

82.5

1,024,047

173,984

136,129

36,003

27

81.8

4.8

MENDELSSOHN

1

5

5

100.0

277,346

133,561

110,250

27,457

4

80.0

4.9

WOOTTON BASSETT

8

27

25

92.6

425,402

127,624

110,605

36,003

20

80.0

3.5

INVINCIBLE SPIRIT

17

35

26

74.3

504,000

123,324

87,293

108,011

9

34.6

1.1

ALMANZOR

2

27

22

81.5

446,250

111,518

80,826

31,503

17

77.3

3.5

KODIAC

13

120

108

90.0

493,500

110,260

80,535

58,506

57

52.8

1.9

DARK ANGEL

12

78

60

76.9

787,500

110,192

78,750

76,507

23

38.3

1.4

GALIWAY

4

7

6

85.7

323,306

109,623

56,153

2,700

4

66.7

40.6

34 THE OWNER BREEDER


the sales and making a lot of middle- and lower-tier vendors very happy indeed. Tattersalls Book 2, 3 and 4 sellers were the beneficiaries as buyers sought to fill orders. Book 2’s top 10% segment just failed to set a record average, but the remaining nine 10% segments outsold everything that came before at this sale and the average got better the further down the market you went, even when compared to pre-Covid prices. The gains were of the order of +7%, +5%, +3%, +12%, +12%, +16%, +19%, +22% and +41%. That trend had begun in Book 1, where the bottom 60% of the market had also eclipsed anything that had gone before. Conversely, neither of the two sales

held in August – Arqana and Goffs UK Premier – managed to improve on their 2019 figures, but when Goffs Orby rolled around buyers started to get serious and drove the bottom half of that market to levels beyond those recorded in 2019. In essence, the £233 million spent at these five sales may have been down £23m on 2019 but it was more equitably distributed, benefitting many more sellers. As we can deduce from the figures, the yearling sales have bounced back with a vengeance. Even without the buying power of Shadwell Estates, there has been a strong demand that has cascaded down the ranks. Predictably, stallion averages and medians have also benefitted, particularly for mid-ranking stallions, many

of whom had more six-figure yearlings than normal. Using our basket of five main sales to analyse how stallions fared compared to both 2020 and, more importantly, 2019, the results are indeed encouraging. But before we take you down this road, it may be worthwhile looking at the market for nominations relating to the current crop of yearlings. Ten years ago, the 30th most expensive stallion in Britain and Ireland had an advertised fee of just €15,000. By 2019, the 30th most expensive stallion stood at €30,000. What’s more, the average listed nomination cost for all mares visiting a top-30 sire in 2011 was only £44,000, compared to the £81,000

THE OWNER BREEDER 35

››


Yearling market review

Mehmas: 85% of his yearlings have made money for their vendors this year

to their foal price. That compares to 58% in 2020, a year when there was a reduced number of foals offered as yearlings at the big five sales.

“58 stallions posted an average of at least three times their fee” But again there were structural differences this time around in that there were fewer jackpot yearlings. Only ten

TATTERSALLS

Even more startling is the fact that there were only 3,624 mares covered in 2011 by the top 30 stallions, compared to 4,202 in 2019. So, we can see that investment in nominations in the 30 most sought-after stallions has actually doubled between 2011 and 2019, from about £100 million to £218 million, allowing for barren mares and fee discounts. That’s an increase of 118% and is way more than the increase in average yearling price at the related five main yearling sales, which rose from £84,000 in 2013 to £112,000 this year, a jump of just 33%. Ordinarily we would be over the moon that the yearling market grows as consistently as it does, Covid year notwithstanding, but given the surge in nomination investment it is easy to understand the relentless pressure increasing stud fees place upon profitability. Despite the 33% increase in average price at the five main sales since 2013, the profitability score of 64% – those making more than their conception fee, plus £20,000 upkeep – has not increased. Bringing the comparison up to date, the 64% of profitable yearlings at the big five sales this year comfortably exceeded the 58% of last year, but is marginally behind the 65% recorded in 2019, before the effects of Covid intervened. So, it seems, we need consistent growth in the yearling market just to maintain any prospect of preserving profit margins. Not all yearlings are sold by their breeders, so our stallion profitability figures are in some instances notional, but nonetheless still very useful. Not so our foal-to-yearling analysis as this deals in cold hard facts. Again using our top five yearling sales, we note that traders enjoyed much better market conditions than they did last year. No fewer than 66% of pinhooked yearlings made money for their sellers after a £10,000 fee is added

TALLY-HO STUD

›› for the class of 2019.

A total of 66% of pinhooked yearlings have made money for their sellers

36 THE OWNER BREEDER

yearlings at the big five sales sold for a price £200,000 or more than their foal price. There were 13 last year and 22 in 2019. The 54 yearlings clearing £100,000 profit recovered from 42 a year ago, but is still marginally down from 55 in 2019. Incidentally, fewer yearlings (63%) turned a profit in 2019, so once again more traders made money this time around, but fewer hit the jackpot. Given the strong demand for yearlings this year, we can expect pinhookers to be well armed come the foal sales later this year. It is quite possible, however, that we will see some aversion to paying high prices. Among the big winners from the ranks of individual stallions were Dubawi, who posted the best average of any sire, something he does regularly. Unsurprisingly, Mehmas, working off a low fee and after a fantastic year on the racecourse, saw 85% of his yearlings making money after £20,000 upkeep has been applied – again the best in the business by this criteria. He was also high on the leaderboard by how much his yearling average eclipsed his fee (9.5 times), but he couldn’t quite match Darley’s Farhh, whose average price of £109,623 was 10.5 times his 2019 fee. All told 58 stallions managed to post an average of at least three times their fee. Saxon Warrior and Roaring Lion, rivals on the track, rejoined their battle at the sales and were the two most sought after first-season sires, while Cracksman and Harry Angel did particularly well with their first yearlings.


THE AGA KHAN STUDS Success Breeds Success

The Aga Khan Studs BREEDING STOCK SALES at the

37

horses sold by the Aga Khan Studs or bred from Aga Khan sold mares have won or placed in Stakes races in 2020-2021 including:

SHANTISARA • Gr.1 winner AMSCHEL • Gr.1 placed GOLD TRIP • Gr.1 placed MARIE’S DIAMOND • Gr.1 placed PASSION • Gr.1 placed

SONAIYLA • Gr.1 placed ZARKAREVA • Gr.1 placed FOUR MOVES AHEAD • Gr.2 winner ROYAL PATRONAGE • Gr.2 winner WALIYAK • Gr.3 winner, etc.

See our 2021 drafts for Goffs and Arqana at

www.AgaKhanStuds.com/Sales


First-crop foal sires

Market

Group 1 sprints at Royal Ascot. This champion sprinter won 11 races in total, ranging from the Gimcrack Stakes at two to a pair of King’s Stand Stakes as an older horse. In a testament to his constitution, his second win in that race was backed up by an equally authoritative score in the Diamond Jubilee Stakes at that same 2019 Royal Ascot meeting. A horse that physically resembles his sire Shamardal, Blue Point’s first book contained 82 black-type performers. In return, he boasts strong representation at the foal sales that is crowned by a 17-strong entry to the Tattersalls December Sale; the list includes the halfsiblings to the high-class filly Indie Angel and Group 1 sprinter Forever In Dreams.

TEST

Buyers have the opportunity to evaulate the first crops of an array of stallions at this year’s foal sales – and there are some big names among them Words: Nancy Sexton

SPEED IS OF THE ESSENCE ADVERTISE Showcasing - Furbelow (Pivotal)

Stands: The National Stud 2020 fee: £25,000 A Group 1 performer at two and three, Advertise beat all bar Calyx in the Coventry Stakes at Royal Ascot before

landing the July and Phoenix Stakes. After signing off that productive juvenile season with a second to Too Darn Hot in the Dewhurst Stakes, he trained on to great effect to add the Commonwealth Cup and Prix Maurice de Gheest at three. The son of Showcasing was well supported in his first season, his 140-strong book consisting of 67 blacktype performers and/or producers. A number of the resulting foals will come under the hammer over the next few weeks, including the half-siblings to stakes winners such as Simply Breathless, Global Applause and Alwasmiya.

GEORGE SELWYN

I

t’s that time of year where the latest intake of young stallions come under market scrutiny. As the first public arena where early impressions are made, a strong auction performance for such horses is vitally important and can set the tone for his popularity over the seasons to come. Below are those stallions, ranging from top sprinters Blue Point and Ten Sovereigns to Derby winners Masar and Study Of Man, for whom this winter’s auctions host such a test.

Calyx: first son of Kingman to stud

CALYX Kingman - Helleborine (Observatory)

Stands: Coolmore 2020 fee: €22,500 The first indication that Kingman could be out of the ordinary in his second career at stud, Calyx was one of the most impressive winners of the Coventry Stakes of the recent era, quickening clear of Advertise to win unchallenged despite racing alone on the stands’ side. Unfortunately, he wasn’t seen again that season but when he did reappear in the Pavilion Stakes at Ascot the following May, his exceptional turn of foot was once again on show, propelling him four lengths clear of the chasing pack. The first son of Kingman to stud and supported by a fine Juddmonte family, Calyx covered approximately 170 mares in his first season.

BLUE POINT Shamardal - Scarlett Rose (Royal Applause)

Stands: Kildangan Stud 2020 fee: €45,000 Blue Point is, notably, the only horse to have ever been successful in three

EQTIDAAR

GEORGE SELWYN

Invincible Spirit - Madany (Acclamation)

Eqtidaar: Commonwealth Cup hero represents one of Shadwell’s most successful families

38 THE OWNER BREEDER

Stands: Nunnery Stud 2020 fee: £6,500 Shadwell’s Commonwealth Cup hero Eqtidaar offers the appealing combination of top-level speed and pedigree as a Group 1-winning sprinter


by Invincible Spirit, whose sire line is going from strength to strength via the likes of Kingman and I Am Invincible. This half-brother to 2,000 Guineas runner-up Massaat will also no doubt benefit from the support of Shadwell but, in the meantime, he is well represented at Tattersalls, where his 20 entries include the half-siblings to stakes winners Aqlaam Vision and Fashion Queen.

book, among them 60 stakes performers and/or producers, this true-breeding bay is another who possesses strong representation at both Goffs and Tattersalls.

INNS OF COURT

Richmond Stakes winner Land Force has caught the imagination of breeders, who between them sent him 155 mares in his first season. Such support has translated into a wealth of representation in the sales ring this winter, particularly at Tattersalls where his 39 entries include the close relations to the Queen’s 2022 Classic hope Reach For The Moon, Group 1 winner Meandre and top sprinters Regal Parade and Dominica. Precocious, fast and tough, Land Force is the first son of No Nay Never to stud in Britain and hails from the family of successful sire Verglas via blue hen Cassandra Go.

LAND FORCE No Nay Never - Theann (Rock Of Gibraltar)

Stands: Highclere Stud 2020 fee: £6,500

Invincible Spirit - Learned Friend (Seeking The Gold)

Stands: Tally-Ho Stud 2020 fee: €7,500 Another fast son of Invincible Spirit, Group 2-winning sprinter Inns Of Court is the latest stallion to come under scrutiny from Tally-Ho Stud, the home of Kodiac and Mehmas in addition to this year’s successful first-crop sires Cotai Glory and Galileo Gold. Inns Of Court won Group races over 5f, 6f and 7f, capped by the Prix du GrosChene. Yet he was also versatile enough to run a nose second over a mile at the top level in the Prix Jacques les Marois. He was the most popular Flatorientated first-season sire of 2020, covering 218 mares, and is well represented across both Goffs and Tattersalls as a result.

Invincible Spirit - Rajeem (Diktat)

Stands: Yeomanstown Stud 2020 fee: €10,000 The ever-popular Invincible Spirit sire line is also represented by hardy sprinter Invincible Army, a son of Group 1 winner Rajeem. He was an excellent two-year-old, when his performances included a win in the Sirenia Stakes, and trained on into a high-class sprinter for James Tate thereafter, winning the Pavilion Stakes at three and Duke of York and Chipchase Stakes at four. The recipient of 140 mares in his first

No Nay Never - Seeking Solace (Exceed And Excel)

Stands: Coolmore 2020 fee: €25,000 The commercial package of precocity, speed and the Scat Daddy sire line sits behind Ten Sovereigns, who stands alongside his sire No Nay Never at Coolmore. The Aidan O’Brien-trained colt capped an unbeaten juvenile season with an emphatic win in the Middle Park Stakes, won in the third ever fastest time for the race, and developed into a fine sprinter at three, when he won the July Cup, again run in a very fast time. He covered 214 mares in 2020, among them a number belonging to his trainer Aidan O’Brien. As such, he is numerically well represented at the sales, where his collection of entries include the halfsiblings to champion Djumama and Group winner Treasuring.

Shamardal - Octave (Unbridled’s Song)

Stands: Hedgeholme Stud 2020 fee: poa Portamento commenced stud duty in April 2020 and so possesses a restricted first crop. Regally-bred as a Shamardal son of top American racemare Octave, this Group 2-placed sprinter was an admirably tough performer, winning six of 38 starts in Britain and Dubai over the course of six seasons.

TOP MILERS

SOLDIER’S CALL

LE BRIVIDO

Showcasing - Dijarvo (Iceman)

Siyouni - La Bugatty (Doyen)

Stands: Ballyhane Stud 2020 fee: €10,000

Stood: Overbury Stud 2020 Fee: £7,000

Soldier’s Call was a precocious twoyear-old, as befits his breeding,

The Classic-placed Le Brivido spent a single season at Overbury Stud before switching to Haras de la Haie Neuve in France. A pricey breeze-up purchase, the son of Siyouni fell only a head short of winning the Poule d’Essai des Poulains on his third start for Andre Fabre before landing a typically competitive renewal of the Jersey Stakes at Royal Ascot. A half-brother to Dubai World Cup winner Prince Bishop and the progeny of stakes winners Arbella, Blue Maiden, Firebelly and Miss You Too, all of whom are offered by Overbury Stud, sit within his 11-strong draft at Tattersalls.

GEORGE SELWYN

INVINCIBLE ARMY

TEN SOVEREIGNS

PORTAMENTO

LARAGH DE BURGH

Inns Of Court: Group 2-winning sprinter

showing a great constitution during his first season to sweep the Windsor Castle Stakes, Prix d’Arenberg and Flying Childers Stakes before running only a neck short of the older Mabs Cross in the Prix de l’Abbaye. Nor was he just a two-year-old, as his performances at three included placings in the Nunthorpe Stakes and King’s Stand Stakes. From the same stud that launched Dandy Man, Soldier’s Call covered 164 mares in 2020 and, with a number of well-connected individuals catalogued, looks primed to make an impact at the foal sales.

Soldier’s Call: covered 164 mares in 2020

THE OWNER BREEDER 39

››


GEORGE SELWYN

First-crop foal sires

Magna Grecia skips clear of a typically competitive 2,000 Guineas field

Invincible Spirit - Cabaret (Galileo)

Stands: Coolmore 2020 fee: €22,500 A dual Group 1-winning Invincible Spirit half-brother to St Mark’s Basilica, Magna Grecia was popular in his first season as the recipient of 180 mares; a number of the resulting foals will be on show at this winter’s sales, among them the half-siblings Coventry Stakes winner Nando Parrado and German Oaks heroine Well Timed. A 340,000gns foal purchase himself, Magna Grecia defeated Phoenix Of Spain when landing the Vertem Futurity at two and returned at three to win the 2,000 Guineas. It was a performance that promised much for the future, so it was unfortunate that injury restricted him to only two further starts.

PHOENIX OF SPAIN Lope De Vega - Lucky Clio (Key Of Luck)

Stands: Irish National Stud 2020 fee: €15,000 The dominant Irish 2,000 Guineas winner of 2019, when Magna Grecia and Too Darn Hot were among his victims, Phoenix Of Spain also won the Acomb Stakes and ran second in the Vertem Futurity at two. He is supported by a group of powerful players, including SF Bloodstock and the Irish National Stud, which translated into a first-year book of 148 mares.

Stands: Lanwades Stud 2020 fee: £15,000

MIDDLE-DISTANCE STARS MASAR New Approach - Khawlah (Cape Cross)

Stands: Dalham Hall Stud 2020 fee: £15,000 Galileo’s relation Masar is particularly well represented at the Tattersalls December Sale, where his 27 entries

Study Of Man: backed by Kirsten Rausing

Masar: a precocious Derby winner

Study Of Man, who is bred on the same Deep Impact - Storm Cat cross as top young Japanese stallion Kizuna, has received every chance to make his own impact as the recipient of an array of high-performing and well-related mares belonging to various outside breeders in addition to Lanwades Stud and the Niarchos family – the same combination that managed Hernando to such good effect. He has five entries in the Tattersalls December Sale and on paper it is a quality group, consisting of a half-sister to Listed winner Mangiapregaama and a grandson of Group 1 winner Quiza Quiza Quiza.

GEORGE SELWYN

Dubawi - Dar Re Mi (Singspiel)

Stands: Dalham Hall Stud 2020 fee: £50,000

40 THE OWNER BREEDER

Deep Impact - Second Happiness (Storm Cat)

The only British-based son of Deep Impact, Prix du Jockey Club winner Study Of Man boasts the female family to complement as a grandson of the Niarchos’ outstanding racemare Miesque, herself dam of leading sire Kingmambo.

Darn Hot is a Dubawi son of Watership Down Stud’s multiple Group 1 winner Dar Re Mi, herself a close relation to influential sire Darshaan. He was brilliant at two, when sweeping the Solario, Champagne and Dewhurst Stakes, and went on to add the Prix Jean Prat and Sussex Stakes at three. He was keenly supported in his first year by an array of leading breeders, who between them sent him 172 mares including 70 black-type winners. Several will go under the hammer this month, notably at Tattersalls, where his 13 entries include the progeny of stakes winners Astonishing, Dazzling and Lixirova and a half-brother to high-class miler Aljamaaheer.

TOO DARN HOT

An unbeaten champion two-year-old and elite miling talent at three, Too

STUDY OF MAN

LANWADES STUD

›› MAGNA GRECIA

include a colt out of Great Hope, also the granddam of Subjectivist and Sir Ron Priestley, and a half-brother to Group 2-winning two-year-old Beckford. Masar’s crowning moment came in the Derby, won at the expense of Roaring Lion and Saxon Warrior. However, it must not be forgotten that he was also precocious enough to break his maiden over 6f in May of his juvenile year, when beating Invincible Army at Goodwood, before following up in the Solario Stakes.

››


CABLE BAY

Invincible Spirit

Sire of GROUP 1 HORSES

DRAGON SYMBOL 1

st

past the post in Gr.1 Commonwealth Cup

(placings reversed)

LIBERTY BEACH

Just behind Champion Battaash in Gr.1 King’s Stand

Sire of 17 INDIVIDUAL STAKES HORSES inc. LANEQASH, ATALIS BAY, COLLINSBAY, JOUSKA, KING’S LYNN, UNCOMMON JAMES, ROPEY GUEST, SEPARATE, VISAYAS, BELLE ANGLAISE, ISABEAU, LIVE ON STAGE, NATASHA ROMANOVA, SCHRODERS MISTAKE, TOMFRE etc.

LAND FORCE

No Nay Never

A Leading Sire in the Making... ROCK SOLID NUMBERS

155 covered in year 1 | 118 covered in year 2

OUTSTANDING FIRST FOALS 81/118 mares in his 2nd crop came from breeders who used him in year 1

FANTASTIC SUPPORT Croom House, Highclere, Stetchworth & Middle Park, Fonthill, Ted Voute, New England, Oakgrove, The Royal Studs, Fittocks, Paul Shanahan, Brook Stud, W&R Barnett, Bill Dwan, Nick Bradley, Stringston, Brightwalton, Sheikh Isa, Sheikh Khalid, Mickley, H Bedford etc.

BRILLIANT PEDIGREE & FORM Gr.2-winning, Gr.1-placed 2yo by No Nay Never, from one of the best pedigrees in the stud book

Contact: Jake Warren +44 (0)7730 272 895 www.highclerestud.co.uk

+44 (0)1635 253 212 jake@highclerestud.co.uk

Follow us on social media

Available for both sires


First-crop foal sires ›› WALDGEIST

Galileo - Waldlerche (Monsun)

Stands: Ballylinch Stud 2020 fee: €17,500 Waldgeist’s connections - notably Ballylinch Stud, Gestut Ammerland and Newsells Park Stud - have thrown their weight behind this stallion. Indeed, Newsells Park’s Tattersalls draft contains a daughter of Grade 1 winner Dynaforce, while Ballylinch will send through a colt out of its multiple stakes winner Modeeroch. Champion Waldgeist is best remembered for his defeat of Enable in the 2019 Arc. However, he was also a top-class two-year-old who defeated four subsequent Group 1 winners in the Criterium de Saint-Cloud and was Classic-placed at three when denied by only a short head in the Prix du JockeyClub. A durable performer, as befits his background as a Galileo member of Gestut Ravensberg’s ‘Waldrun’ family, his Group 1 haul also included the Grand Prix de Saint-Cloud and Prix Ganay.

DUAL-PURPOSE POWER CRYSTAL OCEAN Sea The Stars - Crystal Star (Mark Of Esteem)

Stands: The Beeches 2020 fee: poa Crystal Ocean covered 281 mares in his first season under Coolmore’s jumps wing (and another 302 this year). Although primarily the focus of jumps breeders, he also received several Flat mares and, as such, boasts representation at the foal sales. It is a sign of the times that Crystal

AMERICAN GEMS The Kentucky stallion ranks were enhanced by the addition of seven new names at a fee of $20,000 or above for the 2020 season. They were led by a trio of highprofile retirees to Spendthrift Farm, among them the Breeders’ Cup Classic hero Vino Rosso ($30,000), a champion son of Curlin who also won the Grade 1 Gold Cup at Santa Anita and was first home in the Jockey Club Gold Cup. While Vino Rosso covered 238 mares in his first season, fellow champion Mitole ($25,000) was similarly popular as the recipient of 230. The son of Eskendereya was the only male horse in America to win

42 THE OWNER BREEDER

Ocean’s appeal at stud lies over jumps. A durable performer who never ran out of the first three in 17 starts, Sir Evelyn de Rothschild’s homebred won seven Pattern races for Sir Michael Stoute, including the 2019 Prince of Wales’s Stakes. He also fell only a neck short of victory in the King George on two occasions, most notably in 2019 following a memorable tussle with Enable.

FLAG OF HONOUR Galileo - Hawala (Warning)

Stands: The National Stud 2020 fee: £4,500 Flag Of Honour’s Group 1 success arrived in the 2018 Irish St Leger, when Latrobe was among his victims. However, he was also a Group 3-winning two-year-old for Aidan O’Brien and also second to Magical in the Tattersalls Gold Cup at four. A half-brother to Group 1 sire Air Chief Marshal, Flag Of Honour stands as a dualpurpose option at the National Stud.

NOT FORGETTING SOGANN Frankel - Rumored (Royal Academy)

Stands: Norton Grove Stud 2020 fee: £2,000 Unraced Sogann, who has one entry in the Tattersalls December Sale, boasts a pedigree out of the top drawer as a Frankel half-brother to leading French sire Dabirsim. A grandson of Italian Oaks heroine Bright Generation, €550,000 yearling Sogann is also related to Coventry Stakes winner Arizona and champion Sea Of Class.

four Grade 1 races on dirt in 2019 namely the Churchill Downs Stakes, Metropolitan Handicap, Forego Stakes and Breeders’ Cup Sprint. The most expensive of the Spendthrift group for 2020, however, was Omaha Beach at $40,000. The son of War Front swept the Grade 1 Arkansas Derby, Santa Anita Sprint Championship and Malibu Stakes during his outstanding three-year-old campaign, and attracted 215 mares as a result. Also popular among the 2020 intake was WinStar Farm’s Audible ($25,000), the Grade 1 Florida Derby winner and Kentucky Derby third. One of the best runners sired by Into Mischief, his first book consisted of 221 mares.

SPRINTERS TO LIGHT UP EUROPE As a quick son of Siyouni, City Light caught the imagination in his first year at Haras d’Etreham, covering 137 mares at €7,000. A tough seven-time winner, he struck at Group 3 level in the Prix de Saint-Georges and Prix du Pin but also fell only a head short of Group 1 glory in the Diamond Jubilee Stakes at Royal Ascot. Similarly, Haras de la Barbottiere’s Donjuan Triumphant (€4,000) was a top sprinter on his day, as illustrated by his win in the QIPCO British Champions Sprint Stakes. Also a Group 2 winner at two, he represents the Known Fact sire line as a son of Dream Ahead. Haras de la Barbottiere is also home to fellow Group 1 winner Robin Of Navan (€3,000), winner of the Criterium de Saint-Cloud. Nor do they come much better bred than Haras de la Haie Neuve’s Taj Mahal (€4,000), a brother to Gleneagles from the immediate family of Giant’s Causeway. He also possessed his share of talent, striking twice in Group 2 company in Australia. Germany, meanwhile, is home to globe-trotter Best Solution (Gestut Auenquelle: €6,500). A Group 3 winner at two, the son of Kodiac went on to land a pair of German Group 1 races as an older horse alongside the Caulfield Cup in Australia.

The ever popular Hail To Reason line is represented by Catholic Boy (Claiborne Farm: $25,000) and Yoshida (WinStar Farm: $20,000). Both were extremely versatile; Catholic Boy, by More Than Ready, was a Grade 1 winner on different surfaces, landing the Belmont Derby on grass and Travers Stakes on dirt, while Yoshida, a grandson of Sunday Silence, captured the Grade 1 Old Forester Turf Classic before switching to dirt to take the Grade 1 Woodward Stakes. Both covered over 130 mares in their first year as did Catalina Cruiser ($20,000), a multiple Grade 2 winner from six furlongs to an extended mile who stands alongside his sire Union Rags at Lane’s End Farm.


BOBBY’S KITTEN Bay 2011 by Kitten’s Joy – Celestial Woods (by Forestry)

Sire of a dual Group winning 2yo in 2021 ❚ ONLY 3YO EVER to win the Gr.1 Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint ❚ Sire of 2yo filly SANDRINE, winner of the Gr.2 Duchess of Cambridge Stakes and the Gr.3 Albany Stakes in 2021 ❚ Also sire of 23 first crop winners and 8 second crop 2yo winners to date in 2021, incl.: HEAT OF THE MOMENT, HELVETIQUE, MELODRAMATICA, BOONDOGGLE, SILVER KITTEN, FIGHTING KING and CECIL STREET LAD

SEA THE MOON

Bay 2011 by Sea The Stars – Sanwa (by Monsun)

A Leading European Group 1 Sire ❚ Sire of 33 Black-type horses including: Gr.1 and Gr.2 winnner ALPINE STAR. His 2021 Black-Type winners include: Gr.2 winner PRETTY TIGER, Gr.3 winners SAGAMIYRA and FAVORITE MOON, and Stakes winners MERCEDES, NOBLE MUSIC and PADOVANA ❚ Yearlings sold at 2021 Tattersalls October Sales Book 2 made 300,000gns, 280,000gns, etc.

SIR PERCY

Bay 2003 by Mark of Esteem – Percy’s Lass (by Blakeney)

A Potent Mix of Speed & Stamina ❚ Undefeated Champion 2yo; Champion 3yo and Derby winner ❚ Sire of 49 Black-type horses including: Gr.1 winners SIR JOHN HAWKWOOD and WAKE FOREST; and Group winners ALYSSA, LADY TIANA, SIR ANDREW, PANTSONFIRE, LADY PIMPERNEL, ALLA SPERANZA, etc. ❚ Also sire of 87 lifetime individual 2yo winners ❚ Yearling sold at 2021 Tattersalls October Sales Book 2 made 120,000gns

STUDY OF MAN

Bay 2015 by Deep Impact – Second Happiness (by Storm Cat)

Son and Grandson of Legends ❚ Winner of 3 races at 2 & 3, including the ‘Stallion Making’ Gr.1 French Derby (2,100m; 10½f), and £1,033,142 ❚ The only son of DEEP IMPACT (Japanese Super Sire & multiple Champion) at stud in England ❚ Supported by Europe’s leading breeders in his first season

Exceptional First Foals in 2021

LANWADES

The independent option TM

i n fo @l a n wa d es .co m • www.lanwade s.c om • Te l : + 44 (0)1638 750222


STARMAN The NEW

“Only 3 horses have surpassed STARMAN in 6f sprints in the last 10 years...”

for 2022

Racing Post - 4th Sep. 2021

Winner of: Group 1 July Cup Group 2 Duke of York Stakes Listed Garrowby Stakes 2nd Group 1 Sprint Cup 3rd Group 1 Prix Maurice de Gheest He also broke the track record at Doncaster at 3, over 6 furlongs Timeform rated: 125

“He looks like what a sprinter should look like – he’d be a USAIN BOLT of the equine world.” Trainer, Ed Walker

New to stud for 2022, alongside: Cotai Glory • Galileo Gold • Inns Of Court • Kessaar • Kodiac • Mehmas

phone +353 (0) 4493-48450 Envelope info@tallyhostud.com Globe www.tallyhostud.com


Breeders’ Digest

Nancy Sexton Bloodstock Editor

Yearling sales season defying the odds with record returns

Godolphin or Shadwell Estates. The current health of the North American yearling market is easy enough to fathom given the prize-money on offer across the US; for instance, just days before Keeneland opened, the southern Kentucky-based track Kentucky Downs was hosting maidens worth $120,000. Unfortunately, as we all know, the same can’t be said for British racing. For many owners, racing is a passion, not a path to financial riches. Quite often, the finances make sense only when a horse is sold to race abroad and for that, it’s lucky that Britain and Ireland remain in the privileged position of being regarded as home to some of the best bloodstock in the world. In return, our yearling sales continue to benefit from such popularity, with an increasing number of American and Australian buyers travelling to Britain and Ireland to purchase at source. Agent Mike Ryan has been the Americanbased trailblazer of the recent era in that regard, and with great success. Plenty of others have since followed suit, notably Liz Crow, Solis/Litt, Glen Hill Farm and Bridlewood Stables. By my reckoning, American-based interests came away with at least 10.5 million guineas worth of stock out of last month’s Book 1. Similarly, American buyers were also a major force at the Goffs Orby Sale, which rebounded to its 2019 levels following a challenging Doncaster-based renewal in 2020. The Goffs team went

as far as to charter a plane out of New York into Dublin this time around and were rewarded with the sale of around €7 million worth of stock to American interests. Particularly active was trainer Kenny McPeek, whose five purchases included a €900,000 Frankel colt. As for Australian interests, they came away with at least 30 yearlings out of the Tattersalls October Sale. The past few weeks have provided the industry with much cause for encouragement, not least as a further testament to the quality of our bloodstock and the fact that Britain and Ireland is home to many of the world’s top stallions. However, it would be wise not to disregard the sense that such buoyancy is also papering over various cracks. The depth of international investment does mean that Britain continues to lose a share of its better stock overseas. And nor is it just international buyers who are taking horses out of the domestic pool; for example, Kent-based owner Noel Wilson spent 250,000gns on a Lope De Vega colt to race in Australia. Additionally, from a vendor’s perspective it remains as hard as ever to sell what the market perceives to be ordinary stock, for all that the Great British Bonus scheme continues to do its bit to support the filly market. Yes, the 2021 sales season has so far wonderfully defied all expectations. But the warning signs are still there as well.

TATTERSALLS

T

he thought of reduced Maktoum participation against the backdrop of a market still grappling with the effects of Covid was not a prospect that instilled much confidence heading into this year’s yearling sales season. But how wrong the doubters, myself included, were. Starting with Goffs UK’s Premier Sale in Doncaster in August through to the Goffs Orby Sale in Ireland and two-week Tattersalls October Sale in Newmarket, demand for yearlings at differing levels of the market remained surprisingly competitive. Each of the major yearling auctions held to date have taken a step forward from 2020, with several going as far as to return to pre-Covid levels. That was achieved despite reduced activity from the Maktoum family, whose investment has supported the domestic market for so long. Shadwell Estates have yet to purchase a single yearling this year following the death of its principal Sheikh Hamdan in March; by contrast, the operation is set to offer 28 homebreds at the upcoming Goffs Autumn Yearling Sale and another batch at the Tattersalls December Yearling Sale. Fears back in the summer that its absence from the buying bench would adversely affect various yearling auctions, notably the Tattersalls October Book 2, Goffs UK Premier and Goffs Orby Sales, were legitimate, particularly ahead of Book 2 where Shadwell had spent approximately 20 million guineas on stock from 2017 to 2020. Instead, however, Book 2 returns soared to record-breaking levels, with turnover pushing past the 50 million guineas mark for the first time in the sale’s history and the average winding up at a record high of 83,865gns. Its performance followed a similarly strong Book 1 and ensured a trickle down effect into Book 3, which featured a recordbreaking trade of its own. Over in Kentucky, the Keeneland September Sale experienced a similar resurgence, with $352.8 million turned over on the sale of 2,672 yearlings at a record average of $132,045. For the first time in over four decades, not one yearling was knocked down to either

Each of the major yearling sales so far this year have taken a big step forward from 2020

THE OWNER BREEDER 45


Sales Circuit • By Carl Evans

TATTERSALLS

Measured top end offset by strong middle market

Tattersalls October Sale Book 1

TATTERSALLS

A very satisfactory set of results with strength through the middle market, but conservatism at the top end, summarises Europe’s highest-grossing auction of yearlings. This can be seen in a 23% rise in the median figure to 160,000gns, and a top price which, at 1,500,000gns, was the lowest since 2010. Turnover in excess of 86 million guineas was up five per cent year on year, but some way down on the

Mike Ryan: flanked by wife Mary and Amy Marnane, he spent 3,750,000gns

46 THE OWNER BREEDER

102 million guineas achieved in 2019, when 54 yearlings sold for a sum in excess of 500,000gns – a total of 30 breached that mark at this latest edition. On the plus side, the average price went up three per cent in comparison with last year’s figure, reaching 230,817gns. These ups and downs have to be set against the backdrop of a pandemic which continues to hamper international travel and prevented visitors attending from such key racing nations as Japan and Australia. Horses were sold to those two countries through online bids or via local agents, with Japanese buyers taking six lots via the push of a computer button, but they trod more carefully than in recent pre-Covid years. Also showing caution were those twin behemoths Godolphin and Coolmore, which took each other on for several lots, but not to the level of some previous showdowns. It was their joust for a Sea The Stars filly, consigned by Newsells Park Stud on behalf of breeder Robert Barnett, which created the aforementioned 1,500,000gns sale high. Godolphin buyer Anthony Stroud outbid

TATTERSALLS

A Sea The Stars daughter of champion juvenile Best Terms set the seal on Book 1 of the Tattersalls October Sale, selling for 1,500,000gns

Graham Smith-Bernal: on hand to see Newsells Park Stud reign as leading vendor

Coolmore’s MV Magnier, gaining a filly whose dam, Best Terms, won the Queen Mary and Lowther Stakes. Some of the American buyers who travelled to Ireland for the Goffs Orby Sale continued on to Tattersalls’ Newmarket sales complex where they accounted for 50 lots, a sign of the growing importance of turf racing across the Atlantic, but also of the prize-money opportunities which they have and Britain cannot match. US


agents Mike Ryan, Ben McElroy, Liz Crow and Justin Casse were among the agents working the grounds at Tattersalls, as was racehorse owner and breeder Craig Bernick among others. Staying at home, but far from inactive, were US-based Peter Brant and Bill Farish. Brant’s buys for his White Birch Farm included sharing with Coolmore’s MV Magnier a 1,100,000gns Kingman colt from Corduff Stud, while Farish engaged Charlie Gordon-Watson to buy him a 1,200,000gns son of Sea

NEWSELLS PARK STUD

TATTERSALLS

Sheikh Mohammed: leading buyer attended this year’s sale in person

The Stars from the Lloyd-Webbers’ Watership Down Stud. Farish’s decision to bid on the colt was relayed to Gordon-Watson 90 minutes before the colt entered the ring, and there could have been no more apt emissary. Gordon-Watson’s purchase in 1994 of Darara for the Lloyd-Webbers created a dynasty for their breeding operation. Darara’s name appeared on the catalogue page as third dam of the yearling bought by Farish for his Woodford Racing syndicate. The first dam, So Mi Dar, is a sister to stallion Too Darn Hot. Another welcome buyer was Sheikha Fatima bint Hazza of Abu Dhabi’s Al Shira’aa Farms, which had previously purchased at this sale through agent Shawn Dugan. The Sheikha upped her investments this time around to include a 1,250,000gns Dubawi half-sister to Arc winner Waldgeist and a 925,000gns No Nay Never filly from Flash Conroy’s Glenvale Stud. Whatever they achieve on the racecourse they are assured of a place among Al Shira’aa’s broodmare band at County Kildare’s Meadowcourt Stud, which was bought by the Sheikha from Eimear Mulhern in 2016. Newsells Park Stud became the sale’s leading consignor by trading 22 lots for

Al Shira’aa Farms went to 1,250,000gns for the Dubawi half-sister to Waldgeist

10,785,000gns – the stud’s new owner, Graham Smith-Bernal, was on the sales grounds each day and seemed to greatly enjoy being head of a continuing success story. Sheikh Mohammed’s Godolphin was leading buyer with 15 purchases at an aggregate of 9,375,000gns, just over 8,000,000gns less than it spent in 2019. Sheikh Hamdan’s death has led to a reorganisation within his Shadwell Estates racing and breeding operation, and it did not make a purchase.

Tattersalls October Sale Book 1 Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

Price (gns)

Buyer

F Sea The Stars - Best Terms

Newsells Park Stud

1,500,000

Godolphin

F Dubawi – Waldlerche

Newsells Park Stud

1,250,000

Al Shira’aa Farms

C Sea The Stars - So Mi Dar

Watership Down Stud

1,200,000

C Gordon-Watson/Woodford Racing

C Kingman - Turret Rocks

Corduff Stud

1,100,000

MV Magnier/White Birch

C Galileo - Anthem Alexander

Mountarmstrong Stud

1,100,000

MV Magnier

C Frankel – Qushchi

Newsells Park Stud

925,000

MV Magnier

F No Nay Never - Alta Anna

Glenvale Stud

925,000

Al Shira’aa Farms

C Frankel - As Good As Gold

Newsells Park Stud

900,000

Godolphin

F No Nay Never - Lady Ederle

Stauffenberg Bloodstock

825,000

Cheveley Park Stud

F Dubawi – Longina

Newsells Park Stud

800,000

Juddmonte Farms

F Galileo - Quiet Oasis

Barronstown Stud

800,000

A C Elliott, agent

Figures

Year

Sold

Agg (gns)

Average (gns)

Median (gns)

Top price (gns)

2021

375

86,369,000

230,317

160,000

1,500,000

2020

369

82,385,000

223,266

130,000

3,400,000

2019

397

102,429,000

258,008

150,000

3,600,000

2018

392

106,503,000

271,691

167,500

3,500,000

2017

349

102,290,000

293,095

165,000

4,000,000

THE OWNER BREEDER 47

››


Sales Circuit

TATTERSALLS

Book 2 delivered once again for breeders and pinhookers, drawing numerous buyers and producing record figures in most of the key categories. In many ways it followed a trend seen at other yearling sales, with a strong middle market but a decline in top-end prices. In 2019 a pair of Book 2 yearlings sold for 1,050,000gns and 900,000gns, and while Covid’s lingering presence has coincided with a show of conservatism by big spenders, there is little sign of diminishing demand. The top price at this edition of Book 2 was 525,000gns, yet over three days 736 horses were offered and 650 sold for a very good clearance rate of 88%, up three points on last year’s excellent sale. The median showed a 24% rise at 62,000gns while the average price of 83,865gns was up ten per cent. Turnover gained 13% at just over 54.5 million guineas – the first time 50 million guineas had been breached – and that despite a hold on buying horses by Shadwell while it reorganises following Sheikh Hamdan’s death earlier this year. Last year the Sheikh’s advisor, Angus Gold, bought 36 Book 2 yearlings for 5,327,000gns. Despite realignment in absolute peak prices, a steady parade of lovely horses, resulting from covers by leading European stallions and beautifully prepared by professional consignors, created strong competition among buyers. Pinhookers experienced the usual mix of results, once again proving the adage that you can get lucky with one horse, but there’s more chance if you play a numbers game. Breeders with a loose-moving, good-sized horse were also often rewarded well beyond expectations. Adrian and Philippa O’Brien’s Hazelwood Bloodstock, which opened

Simon Mockridge: signed for a handful of high-profile lots on behalf of Juddmonte

48 THE OWNER BREEDER

TATTERSALLS

Tattersalls October Sale Book 2

This Kingman colt emulated his brother, King Leonidas, by topping the Book 2 Sale

for business as a boarding and consigning operation at Exning near Newmarket in 2016, topped Book 2 in 2018 with a Kingman colt who sold for 750,000gns, and three years later they were back in pole position when trading that horse’s full-brother to a bid from

TALKING POINT

Juddmonte Farms. A No Nay Never colt received a well-timed update when his half-sister, Prosperous Voyage, took second place in the Group 1 Fillies’ Mile just ahead of the sale, and it took a bid of 450,000gns by agent Ross Doyle to buy him for an

• While Book 2 was rolling out in Newmarket, Britain and Europe were playing ping-pong in a bid to resolve differences relating to the Northern Ireland protocol. If the two sides can agree on greater freedom of movement and a reduction in paperwork when goods cross from Britain into Northern Ireland, while at the same time keeping an open border with southern Ireland, it could in time lead to easier movement of horses from the UK into the EU and back again. Speaking during a successful sale at Book 2, Philipp Stauffenberg, who buys foals in Britain, takes them home to Germany and then brings them back to sell as yearlings, relayed the difficulties he has experienced, saying costs had risen since Brexit and red tape had increased. Differences between Europe and Britain over the Coggins test, which detects antibodies to the disease Equine Infectious Anemia, was another issue, and resulted in one of his yearlings being listed as having not passed a Coggins test when it entered the ring. It had passed, but in Europe not Britain. Stauffenberg complained saying his horses had also undergone the British test, but the results had not been received, and the rest of his draft were not singled out. Meanwhile, VAT implications and the need for vets to be at ports to take blood tests – one transporter said that was no problem entering Ireland, but that French vets are less amenable to out-of-hours work – continue to present challenges. Part of the current strength of European bloodstock is the way in which horses from Britain, Ireland and France race against each other, and purchasers from each of those countries buy and sell horses with their neighbours. They also cross borders to mate mares with stallions and coordinate auction dates. A Northern Ireland protocol solution could ensure that happy balance is not put in jeopardy.

››


Showcasing - Roodeye (Inchinor)

Explosive Miler

Won a vintage renewal of the Group 1 Sussex Stakes in a faster time than Kingman

Exceptional Talent

Group winner at two, three and four

Strong Foundations

Covered a top-class, full book of mares in 2021

His Sire’s Best Son

OR: 123 | TF: 129

Contact Tom Pennington for the best deal +44 (0)7736 019914 | tpennington@shadwellstud.co.uk www.shadwellstud.com


Sales Circuit undisclosed client from County Tipperary’s Camas Park Stud draft. However, one of the sale’s best stories came out of County Limerick. It revolved around the week’s outstanding pinhook, which was pulled off by John Foley of Ballyvolane Stud, who bought Time Test’s highest-priced foal of 2020 for 56,000gns and resold him for 400,000gns – the sire’s excellent first-crop racecourse results did the

yearling’s value no harm. The buyer was Alastair Donald, acting for King Power Racing. It was a brilliant throw of the dice by Foley, and his best result in “17 or 18 years of pinhooking”, but that sums up why he and his father, also John, aged 77 and mucking out six or seven stables daily, deserve such a triumph. That is many years of hard graft, early starts and long days – plus good and bad results.

Anthony Stroud and Matt Coleman of Stroud Coleman were busy throughout and bought 20 horses for 3,240,000gns – some will have been destined to go under the Maktoum umbrella – while the O’Callaghan family’s Tally-Ho Stud, which will stand this season’s July Cup winner Starman next year alongside the likes of Kodiac and Mehmas, headed consignors by selling 25 horses at this sale for 2,189,000gns.

Tattersalls October Sale Book 2 Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

C Kingman – Reem

Hazelwood Bloodstock

Price (gns) 525,000

Buyer Juddmonte Farms

C No Nay Never – Seatone

Camas Park Stud

450,000

Peter & Ross Doyle Bloodstock

C Time Test – Aurelia

Ballyvolane Stud

400,000

SackvilleDonald

C Night Of Thunder - Harlequin Girl

Rathbarry Stud

375,000

Dwayne Woods

C Gleneagles - Swirral Edge

Redpender Stud

350,000

Stroud Coleman Bloodstock

C Ribchester – Vitello

Barton Stud

350,000

Hong Kong Jockey Club

F Zoffany – Curtsy

Kilcarn Park

350,000

Thady Gosden

F Wootton Bassett - Dance Toupie

Haras D’Etreham

350,000

Stroud Coleman Bloodstock

F Kodiac – Shehila

Tally-Ho Stud

340,000

Ben McElroy

F Galileo - Mrs Danvers

Manister House Stud

320,000

BBA Ireland/Yulong Investments

Figures Year

Sold

Agg (gns)

Average (gns)

Median (gns)

Top price (gns)

2021

650

54,512,000

83,865

62,000

525,000

2020

637

48,362,500

75,922

50,000

675,000

2019

620

48,499,000

78,224

55,500

1,050,000

2018

613

48,022,000

78,339

55,000

750,000

2017

613

48,022,000

78,339

55,000

850,000

Tattersalls October Sale Books 3 & 4

At risk of sounding repetitive, Book 3 proved another superb leg in Tattersalls’ four-tier October Yearling Sales, and matched Book 2 in posting record figures. Gone are the days when Book 3 was dismissed as a clearance store for moderate yearlings, and with prices at Books 1 and 2 often foiling even quite deep pockets, it has become a good opportunity to buy a racehorse within a budget. Leading consignors are happy to offer good quality yearlings, and buyers come from across the range. However, Book 3 also offers small or fledgling consignors an opportunity to make a mark at Europe’s biggest bloodstock auction house. So step forward and take applause David and Geraldine Hegarty of Hegarty

50 THE OWNER BREEDER

TATTERSALLS

››

This Ulysses colt provided a memorable pinhook turn when reselling for 150,000gns

Bloodstock, which reaped a jumbo reward of 150,000gns when trading the sale topper, a Ulysses colt who they bought for just 4,000gns at the

Tattersalls December Sale. His fullbrother, Gwan So, had given the page a lift when gaining a Listed placing after the catalogue was printed, but the

››


OAK LODGE & SPRINGFIELD HOUSE STUD

UNFORTUNATELY BY SOCIETY ROCK A Cheveley Park Stud Stallion

The only Group 1 winning son of Society Rock at stud Yearlings bought by Peter & Ross Doyle, Richard Hannon, Karl Burke, Kevin Ryan, Al Shaqab, Con Marnane, R Fahy etc. STANDING AT: www.oaklodgestud.com UNFORTUNATELY A4 Advert July 2021.indd 1

19/08/2021 14:36


Sales Circuit

TATTERSALLS

TALKING POINTS

David Hegarty: prepared and sold the Book 3 sale-topper for a popular result

›› Hegartys’ yearling prep was crucial.

Matt Coleman of Stroud Coleman signed for the colt while acting for US-based agent Sean Clancy. His client, owner Bill Mathis, will put the colt into training with Charlie Fellowes. This Book 3 highlight was the icing on a particularly edible cake, for while just nine additional lots walked the ring compared to last year’s sale, turnover leapt 44% to a figure of 10,593,150gns. The average rose 40% to 22,490gns, while the median price went into another orbit, gaining 64% at 18,000gns and confirming solid belief in Book 3 horses. It is certainly not a clear-out occasion, and on that note a clearance rate of 86% was highly worthy considering how many yearling orders will have been fulfilled in the previous seven weeks. A son of Ballylinch Stud stallion New Bay bred by the China Horse Club became another six-figure lot when changing hands for 100,000gns en route from Baroda Stud’s consignment to a place within Steve Parkin’s Clipper Logistics’ racing string. Parkin’s advisor, Joe Foley, brought the hammer down. Time Test’s ascendancy as a stallion also continued when one of his sons was sold for 95,000gns to head the second session.

• The tale of Book 3’s top lot is an inspiring one, but anyone thinking of throwing a few grand down on a foal at the upcoming sales in order to perform ‘a Hegarty’ should tread cautiously. Geraldine Hegarty of Hegarty Bloodstock works in a school, but her husband David is employed full-time at the Swinburn family’s Genesis Green Stud, one of the industry’s leading consigning operations. He will certainly have learned a lot about foals and how to convert them into yearlings of presence, which in part explains how he managed to turn a 4,000gns Ulysses weanling into a 150,000gns yearling. It was not all luck. It is also worth noting that the Hegartys did so in a partnership on the colt with Trickledown Stud’s Paul and Sara Thorman, two of the wisest owls on the circuit. Surrounding yourself with astute brains who have good connections is key to success in any industry, and never more so than when trading a commodity which can be a gosling one day, and a swan some months later. That is before you factor in stallion fashions and how success for a family member can massively alter a horse’s value. Anyone hoping to spin the coin at forthcoming foal sales would be foolish not to bear that in mind. • A tremendous run of results at bloodstock sales is being played out against the backdrop of a pandemic which continues to create lockdowns and restrictions on travel in some parts of the world. Add in challenges in supply chains – which the British are told is a global issue – and battles over energy prices (definitely an international matter), and you could listen to the news and believe an epic collapse in western civilisation and capitalism is upon us. Yet bloodstock auctions sail serenely on. Asked for his view of trade at Book 3, Joe Foley of Ballyhane Stud said: “There has been a huge trade all season. Trade has been so heartening. It is fantastic to see. This sale has been the cherry on the top, it has just been great trade all the way through, the best I have seen in years.” He added: “Maybe the perceived absence of some of the big players has attracted people in and they feel they can compete to buy the best horses. Maybe people see the green shoots of a more competitive industry.” to Robin O’Ryan for 85,000gns. Amy therefore stayed on for Book 4, where her attention again focussed on a Throckmorton foal by Ardad, and this one, a filly, dropped their way with a saletopping bid of 20,000gns. Book 4’s small catalogue, held on the Saturday morning after Book 3’s completion the night before, produced gains in several categories. Seventy-four lots went under the hammer, nine more than in 2020, and turnover gained 20% at 184,200gns. The average and median prices also gained 20% at 4,004gns and 3,000gns respectively, although the 62% clearance rate was down three points.

Consigned by the Player family’s Whatton Manor Stud on behalf of breeder Nicky Welby, this colt was knocked down to Montgomery Motto, who trained a small string in Florida until folding his operation a few years ago. He also bought four yearlings at Goffs, and said the group would be going into pre-training before decisions about their racing careers were made. Con and Amy Marnane of Bansha House Stud were keen to buy progeny of Ardad, whose first crop has been little short of a revelation on the track, but were outbid on a colt of his from Throckmorton Court Stud, who was sold

Tattersalls October Sale Book 3 Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

C Ulysses - Regal Heiress

Hegarty Bloodstock

150,000

Stroud Coleman/Clancy Bloodstock

C New Bay - D’oro Princess

Baroda Stud

100,000

Joe Foley

C Time Test – Purest

Whatton Manor Stud

95,000

Montgomery Motto

C Havana Gold – Storybook

Lodge Park Stud

92,000

Federico Barberini

C Ardad - Night Affair

Throckmorton Court Stud

85,000

R O’Ryan

52 THE OWNER BREEDER

Price (gns)

Buyer

››



Sales Circuit Figures Year

Sold

Agg (gns)

Average (gns)

Median (gns)

Top price (gns)

2021

471

10,593,150

22,491

18,000

150,000

2020

459

7,367,200

16,051

11,000

130,000

2019

434

7,007,900

16,147

10,000

145,000

Tattersalls October Sale Book 4 Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

Price (gns)

Buyer

F Ardad - Belle Dormant

Throckmorton Court Stud

18,000

Con Marnane

F Pearl Secret – Rocknahardplace

The Castlebridge Consignment

13,000

Meah/Lloyd Bloodstock/Howard Duff

c Storm The Stars – Taaqah

The Castlebridge Consignment

10,000

Sultan Harib/Andre Vale Pereira

Figures Year

Sold

Agg (gns)

Average (gns)

Median (gns)

Top price (gns)

2021

46

184,200

4,004

3,000

18,000

2020

65

153,500

3,655

2,500

11,000

2019

51

219,700

4,308

2,200

11,000

Goffs Orby Sale

GOFFS

Once the catalogue was revealed for Ireland’s highest-grossing yearling sale, it became apparent that vendors were determined to get it back on its feet. The Orby had been taken to Goffs UK’s headquarters in Doncaster in 2020 due to Covid-related travel difficulties, and it suffered disappointing results – given that the Premier Sale achieves such good things at the same venue that was something of a surprise, but it underlines the difference between blue-blooded horses by the very best stallions and the people who covet them, and racehorses of the type that typify ‘the Donny yearling’. However, back in its home at Kill in Kildare, the Orby returned to its place

GOFFS

MV Magnier went to €1.5 million to secure this Galileo filly out of Grade 1 winner Nickname

Kenny McPeek: American trainer came away with five yearlings worth €1.71 million

54 THE OWNER BREEDER

as one of the world’s leading yearling auctions, and Goffs Group CEO Henry Beeby put that down to vendor support and the carrot of the Goffs Million, a re-instigated €1 million race for twoyear-olds at the Curragh for graduates of the sale. He also put in a word for his company’s new US agent, Jacob West, who “attracted unprecedented numbers [of buyers] from across the Atlantic”. West did more than that, buying fillies by Lope De Vega and No Nay Never for a total of €450,000 under his West Bloodstock agency, and, no less

importantly, finishing as underbidder on the sale’s top lot. This was a €1.5 million Galileo filly consigned by David and Tamso Cox’s Baroda Stud and bought by Coolmore Stud’s MV Magnier. The Camelot-sired two-year-old Luxembourg, who won the Group 2 Beresford Stakes a week before this sale for Aidan O’Brien, had provided a notable update for his yearling fullbrother who was in this catalogue. He became the sale’s other sevenfigure horse when making €1.2 million, with Magnier again signing the ticket. Offered by The Castlebridge

››


SUPREMACY

Brilliant 2YO by Mehmas

NEOW R F 2021

TOP RATED 2YO 2020 TF 118 HHH WON Middle Park Stakes Gr.1 HHH WON Richmond Stakes Gr.2 Yeomanstown Stud, Naas, Co. Kildare, Ireland Tel: +353 (0)45 897314, Fax: +353 (0)45 897708 Email: office@ yeomanstown.ie • www.yeomanstown.ie A4 TOB Supremacy.indd 1

26/10/2021 10:40


››

Consignment, he was bred and sold by Ben Sangster, while Marlhill House Stud, which is managed by Brian McConnon, sold a Frankel colt for €900,000 to US trainer Kenny McPeek, who will take him back to the US. It will be interesting to see if he proves best on dirt or turf, a prospect that intrigued the buyer. McPeek bought five lots over the two days, spending €1,710,000 and finishing third on the leading buyers’ table. MV Magnier finished top with six buys for a total of €3,815,000, and while Middleham trainer Mark Johnston spent about a third of that sum, he did leave with 21 yearlings. The Castlebridge Consignment traded 43 yearlings to finish as top consignor after adding €5,564,000 to the sale’s turnover, which reached a sum just shy of €41 million, up no less than 74% year on year. The average price of €109,090 was a rise of 46% while the median improved 44% at €75,000. A 91% clearance rate completed an excellent two days.

GOFFS

Sales Circuit

This €1.2 million Camelot colt gained a timely catalogue update as a brother to Luxembourg

Goffs Orby Sale Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

Price (€)

Buyer

F Galileo – Nickname

Baroda Stud

1,500,000

MV Magnier

C Camelot – Attire

The Castlebridge Consignment

1,200,000

MV Magnier

C Frankel – Belesta

Marlhill House Stud

900,000

Kenny McPeek

F Frankel - Sophie Germain

Galbertstown Stables

650,000

Al Shira’aa Farms

C Footstepsinthesand - Queen Of Carthage

Coulonces Sales

630,000

BBA Ireland/Yulong Investments

C No Nay Never - Sweet Charity

Camas Park Stud

620,000

MV Magnier

C Saxon Warrior - Cassandra Go

Ballyhimkin Stud

540,000

BBA Ireland

F Kingman - Finsceal Beo

M Ryan from Al Eile Stud

500,000

Johnny Murtagh/Eddie Linehan

C Galileo – Pocketfullofdreams

Manister House Stud

440,000

Kenny McPeek

F Galileo - Take Me With You

The Castlebridge Consignment

360,000

Newtown Anner Stud

C Churchill - Arya Tara

The Castlebridge Consignment

360,000

Justin Casse

Figures Year

Sold

Agg (€)

Average (€)

Median (€)

Top price (€)

2021

372

40,581,500

109,330

75,000

1,500,000

311

£21,142,000

£67,981

£47,000

£450,000

2019

364

42,927,500

117,933

65,000

3,000,000

2018

328

43,497,000

132,613

80,000

3,200,000

2017

373

40,702,500

109,122

65,000

1,600,000

*2020

*held in Sterling at Doncaster

56 THE OWNER BREEDER

››



THE BEST GALILEO SINCE FRANKEL

WALDGEIST. See what some of EUROPE’S BEST BREEDERS have to say

“Our filly is strong, correct and a good walker. I like her so much, I sent three mares to Waldgeist this year!”

In his first 2 seasons at stud he covered:

MARES WITH BLACKTYPE

212

BLACKTYPE

105

STAKES

41

under their first dam

Derek Veitch, Ringfort Stud

“Of all the Classic-type stallions in Europe yet to have runners, I believe Waldgeist has the greatest potential!” Luke Lillingston, Mount Coote Stud

“I have heard the Waldgeist foals are very nice, but I can’t believe many are nicer than our filly. She just oozes class, being attractive, scopey and really athletic.”

PERFORMERS or PRODUCERS PERFORMERS

20 GR.1 WINNERS 5 THE DAMS OF GR.1 HORSES

THEIR PROGENY WILL BE RUNNING,

WHEN YOU’RE SELLING!

Julian Dollar, Newsells Park

WALDGEIST beats the outstanding multiple Gr.1 winners ENABLE, SOTTSASS and GHAIYYATH in a vintage Gr.1 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe

BALLYLINCH STUD

Thomastown, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland • Tel: +353 (0)56 7724217 • info@ballylinchstud.ie • www.ballylinchstud.com


Sales Circuit Following on from the Orby Sale this two-day auction of yearlings matched its glossier colleague by producing some excellent figures. It too was returned to Goffs’ HQ in Kildare, and produced figures that soared away from those achieved in 2020 when the event was held in Doncaster a week before the Orby. The figures it generated back on home ground matched those achieved in preCovid times. The first session’s turnover of nearly €4 million was better than the sum achieved at the entire sale last year, while the two-day figure, a fraction under €7 million, was 40% up on the 2019 edition. The average of €20,674 was up 21% on the sale of two years ago, while the median of €16,000 was a gain of 23%. County Offaly-based Lumville Farm, an offshoot of Shadwell’s Derrinstown Stud, consigned the sale-topper, a

GOFFS

Goffs Sportsman’s Sale

A Shadwell-bred daughter of Dark Angel headed the Goffs Sportsman’s Sale

€140,000 daughter of Dark Angel and a Listed-winning mare who sold to Cathy Grassick. She was acting for Champion Thoroughbreds, which owns the Joseph

O’Brien-trained I Siyou Baby, a threetime winner this year. Underbidder Tom Whitehead had better luck when placing an offer of €105,000 on a Siyouni colt who is earmarked for breezing, while the second day was headed by a son of Belardo who realised €100,000 to Alex Elliott and Ben McElroy. Wesley Ward will train the colt, said Elliott. As at the Orby Sale, the Castlebridge Consignment headed consignors by selling 19 lots for €434,000, while Peter Nolan was the leading buyer, gaining seven yearlings for €199,500. Nick Bradley, who has enjoyed a good year with his syndicated horses, pops up at sales around Europe. At this one he bought five horses for €185,000, while Nigel Tinkler’s good 2020 season with Acklam Express and Ubettabelieveit has resulted in increased buying activity at public sales, and he left with five for €155,500.

Goffs Sportsman’s Sale Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

Price (€)

Buyer

F Dark Angel – Ghazawaat

Lumville Farm

140,000

Brian Grassick Bloodstock

C Siyouni - Miss Aiglonne

The Castlebridge Consignment

105,000

Powerstown Stud

C Belardo - Tough Spirit

Parkway Farm

100,000

Elliott/McElroy

C Galileo Gold - Dutch Monarch

Vinesgrove Stud

95,000

Peter Nolan Bloodstock

F Bungle Inthejungle - Princess Janie

Rathasker Stud

90,000

Rodrigo Goncalves/Aguiar BS

Figures Year

Sold

Agg (€)

Average (€)

Median (€)

Top price (€)

2021

337

6,967,300

20,674

16,000

140,000

*2020

185

£2,468,900

£13,345

£10,000

£72,000

2019

283

4,854,900

17,155

13,000

135,000

*held in Sterling at Doncaster

Tattersalls Ireland September Yearling Sale

Tattersalls Ireland is keen to get this sale back on its side of the Irish Sea, but its two Covid-enforced visits to Newmarket have produced excellent results. The market seemed a little unsure at the 2020 sale where the figures dipped, although not alarmingly. However, bidding was far more confident at the latest edition, and there were records in all the key indicators. Selling took place in sterling, and an additional 52 offered lots helped turnover rise 60% to £10,877,978 from sales of 402 yearlings. That was a 90% clearance rate. The average rose 24% to £27,150,

while the median gained 25% at £20,000, and six horses changed hands for a six-figure sum, two more than last year and three more than in 2019 when the auction most recently took place at its traditional Fairyhouse home. Heading trade was a daughter of Exceed And Excel whose sale for £200,000 was a fillies’ record for the event. But given she was a half-sister to Zain Claudette, a £20,000 graduate of Goffs UK’s Premier Sale and winner of August’s Group 2 Lowther Stakes at York, her valuation was not a total shock. The buyer was Saeed Al Tayer, Zain Claudette’s owner and part of the Rabbah Bloodstock umbrella of UAE

racehorse owners. Ismail Mohammed, who trains Zain Claudette, will handle the younger sibling. Both fillies were bred by Ukraine’s Andriy Milovanov and consigned by Coolmore’s Castlehyde Stud. Castlehyde also consigned the top colt, a £130,000 son of No Nay Never who was knocked down to Adam Driver’s Global Equine, which also purchased a £110,000 Churchill colt from Mark Hanly’s Grange Hill Stud. Yet the sale of an Ardad colt threw up the best pinhook when he zoomed up in value from 7,500gns as a foal to £105,000. The vendors were Leon Carrick

THE OWNER BREEDER 59

››


Sales Circuit ›› and Michelle Gibbons, who buy a few

TATTERSALLS IRELAND

inexpensive foals each year to prep on a farm in Ireland. Owning a son of Ardad, who has enjoyed a superb season on the track with his first crop, played its part, and Robson Aguiar brought the hammer down on behalf of Amo Racing. Tally-Ho Stud led consignors when selling 19 lots for £752,000 while Peter and Ross Doyle Bloodstock were the leading buyers, taking 16 yearlings for £834,000. Part II of Tattersalls Ireland’s September Sale commanded a standalone session until last year when, following Covid’s intervention, vendors of inexpensive yearlings opted to withdraw their horses rather than run

TATTERSALLS IRELAND

A half-sister to high-class juvenile Zain Claudette set a sale record for a filly at £200,000

Ross Doyle, pictured with Richard Hannon, was the sale’s top buyer with father Peter

to the expense of crossing the Irish Sea to reach Newmarket. The sale’s 81 lots were therefore tacked onto the end of the September Sale, and it was the same story this year. However, the figures were much improved, with turnover almost doubling to £575,897 and there were 60% gains in the average and median prices. The clearance rate was 77%. A War Command colt from Croom House Stud headed trade with a £36,000 valuation. The buyers were Demi O’Byrne and Sean Grassick.

TALKING POINT

• At the conclusion of his company’s September Yearling Sale, Tattersalls Ireland’s CEO Simon Kerins assured the trade that Fairyhouse in County Meath will be the location for the sale next year, when “extensive renovation”, which will be completed in time for this year’s November Flat Sale, will benefit vendors and consignors.

Tattersalls Ireland September Yearling Sale Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

Price (£)

Buyer

F Exceed And Excel – Claudette

Castlehyde Stud

200,000

Rabbah Bloodstock

C No Nay Never - Pink Damsel

Castlehyde Stud

130,000

Global Equine Group

C Smooth Daddy – Silesie

Kildallan Farm

120,000

Johnston Racing

C Churchill – Komedy

Grange Hill Stud

110,000

Global Equine Group

C Ardad - Mara Grey

Leon Carrick Bloodstock

105,000

Robson Aguiar/Amo Racing

C Mehmas - Drifting Spirit

Tally-Ho Stud

105,000

JS Bloodstock/G Scott Racing

Figures Year

Sold

Agg (€)

Average (€)

Median (€)

Top price (€)

*2021

402

12,779,580

31,790

23,496

233,251

*2020

333

8,009,140

24,051

17,582

358,290

2019

388

9,415,500

24,267

20,000

165,000

2018

411

10,488,000

25,518

20,000

275,000

2017

401

11,451,000

28,556

23,000

230,000

held in Sterling and converted to Euros

60 THE OWNER BREEDER

››


Galileo - Pearling (Storm Cat)

ZAIN NIGHTS Won Novice Stakes at Newbury It’s always an extra thrill to win with the progeny of horses that you have trained like Decorated Knight who won three very memorable Group One races for Beckhampton. His son Zain Night showed himself like his sire to be tough and talented in winning at Newbury and I’m sure he will progress again next year. Roger Charlton, trainer

DAMAAR Won Novice Stakes at Sandown

SIRE OF 7 WINNERS OF 9 RACES and OVER £110,000 OVER 70%

WIND YOUR NECK IN Won Novice Stakes at Salisbury Won Future Stayers Nursery Handicap at Newmarket Placed in course and distance novices on his first two starts and the pick of these weights on adjusted RPRs, won well... a useful performance - he was strong at the line. Racing Post David Evans, trainer

SILVER BULLET LADY Won Conditions Stakes at Salisbury Silver Bullet Lady was very impressive today... once she got into the stride of things and hit the cutaway she showed a great turn of foot to make up a lot of ground. Hollie Doyle, jockey Silver Bullet Lady produced a very impressive performance to win on debut at Salisbury. A great start for Decorated Knight with his first runner to produce a 5f winner out of a mare Desert Icon who stayed 10f. Roger Charlton, trainer

winners / placed to runners from his first crop Statistics by Hyperion to 21.10.21

BIGGER & BETTER Crops still to come

Contact: Gary Swift or Conor Hyland at Irish National Stud Tel: +353 (0)45 521251 • www.irishnationalstud.ie/stallion/decorated-knight

full pg TOB DK Nov.indd 1

26/10/2021 10:52


Sales Circuit A filly and colt from Jean-Claude Rouget’s stable headed trade at this annual eve of Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe sale held at Saint-Cloud. The filly, three-year-old Penja, was set to run in the following day’s Prix de l’Opera on the Arc card, but after changing hands for €1.2 million, was withdrawn. Blandford Bloodstock’s Stuart Boman signed for the daughter of Camelot on behalf of German racehorse owner Jurgen Sartori. She had been bought for €90,000 at Arqana’s October Yearling Sale in 2019 and had won that back and more with four victories, including in the Group 3 Prix de Psyche. The second-highest price of the sale was a €575,000 bid for Saiydabad, another member of Rouget’s string. Emmanuel de Seroux of Narvick International signed for the son of Blame, who had finished seventh in that afternoon’s Prix Dollar at Longchamp in the colours of his owner-breeder, the Aga Khan. He had won the Prix du Prince d’Orange at Longchamp in September. Charlie Gordon-Watson’s bid of €420,000 gained the dual-winning, Group 3-placed two-year-old Scherzo from the stable of Yann Barberot, while Tabera, who had won twice at Group 3 level, found a buyer in the shape of Michel Zerolo’s Oceanic Bloodstock, which posted a bid of €400,000. The filly will now join the broodmare band at Haras des Capucines, and the buyer

ARQANA

Arqana Arc Sale

Penja: Prix de la Nonette heroine sold for €1.2 million to race on for Jurgen Sartori

suggested Wootton Bassett or No Nay Never are possible mates for her next year. Just 19 lots went under the hammer at the sale last year, but that had risen to 34 at the latest edition and 21 found

a buyer (including two private sales). Turnover reached €5,690,000, and while there were falls in the average and median price that was more likely a reflection of the catalogue than a decline in demand for horses-in-training.

Arqana Arc Sale Top lots Name/Age/Sex/breeding

Vendor

Price (€)

Buyer

Penja 3 f Camelot - Just With You

Rouget

1,200,000

Saiydabad 3 c Blame – Sarkiyla

Rouget

575,000

Narvick International Inc

Lady Day 3 f Motivator - Toride

Head

425,000

Bradley Thoroughbreds LLC (private sale)

Scherzo 2 c Wootton Bassett - Persian Belle

Barberot

420,000

Charlie Gordon-Watson

Tabera 4 f Gleneagles – Temida

Litex Commerce

400,000

Oceanic Bloodstock

Blandford Bloodstock

Figures Year

Sold

Agg (€)

Average (€)

Median (€)

Top price (€)

2021

21

5,690,000

261,842

160,000

1,200,000

2020

11

3,050,000

277,273

260,000

975,000

2019

25

6,300,000

252,000

150,000

850,000

62 THE OWNER BREEDER

››


An exciting 2yo prospect for 2022! Dandy Man filly ex Xinji She’s from a family we know well - as we trained her half sister Chuck Willis to win as a 2yo. Chuck Willis has now won 5 races, over £94,000 in prize money, was placed in Listed Rose Bowl Stakes and is now running in Grade 1 company in Canada. Barry Hills purchased this well made Dandy Man filly for just 28,000gs at Tattersalls Book 2 (Lot 1124).

Watch her video and learn about the other yearlings we have for sale charleshills.com/horses or call us on 01488 71548 for more details NATURE’S LIGHT Delivered using smart Stable Lights and award-winning Light Masks. Effective light therapy for pregnant mares We have been breeding Thoroughbreds for 25 years and have never had a foal arrive on time, let alone early, as our mares are predisposed to late foaling. Using Equilume Light Masks this year had a dramatic effect on our mares’ gestation lengths, with reductions of 19 and 24 days, and the production of mature, healthy foals. We are delighted and only wish we had started using Equilume sooner. This technology works and the customer support is second to none.” Brent and Fiona Williams, Breeder, UK info@equilume.com

www.equilume.com

Health. Breeding. Well-being.

THE OWNER BREEDER 63


The Leading Equine Biosecurity Specialist OUR PRODUCT - Specialist Equine BIO Fluid disinfectant: Equine BIO Fluid has been efficacy tested at the Irish Equine Centre (IEC) under clean and dirty conditions with the use of an equine serum. This is an equine product, for equine use, brought to you by people in the equine industry. 100% biodegradable, organic compliant and without the use of Benzalkonium Chloride. Safe to dispose of into the drains – kill the germs not the environment! Clean, secure and highly effective…good for dipping bridles, use in washing machine or through spraying devices…one stop solution for all yard requirements.

For more information on our products or services call us on: +44 (0)7796 358 202 email: ben@equine-bio-genie.co.uk or visit us at: www.equine-bio-genie.co.uk

64 THE OWNER BREEDER


Sales Circuit A yearling filly from the family of Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe winner Torquator Tasso headed trade at this two-day mixed sale which achieved gains across the board. Hailing from the first crop of German Group 1 winner Guiliani, who stood one season at Gestut Schlenderhan before moving to Gestut Erftmuhle, the filly was sold for €135,000 to Gregor and Julia Baum’s Gestut Brummerhof. Her dam, Tucana, is the granddam of Torquator Tasso, who had scored twice at the highest level before his recent triumph at Longchamp. The filly’s sale was one of two six-figure results, the other being a €105,000 transaction which dissolved a partnership in a Sea The Stars filly foal. The consignor was Gestut Karlshof and the buyer was HFTB Agency’s Holger Faust, whose family own Karlshof. Faust became the sale’s leading buyer, leaving with seven lots for €330,000. While higher-priced lots were bought to remain on home soil, a number of international visitors were present. They included Kazakhstani buyer Aziz Achmetov, who gained no fewer than 17 horses for a combined spend of €121,000. Moanmore Stables’ Peter Vaughan also gained a Sea The Moon yearling colt for €28,000 from Gestut Gorlsdorf, while Dave Futter bought eight lots. Futter’s collection included five inexpensive but well-bred mares, plus a trio of yearling colts who could gain a place at his Yorton Stud auction of yearling and two-year-old jumping

BBAG

BBAG October Sale

Headed by two six-figure lots, BBAG’S October Sale experienced gains across the board

stores. Futter’s pick on price was a €26,000 Protectionist yearling colt from Gestut Schlossgarten. A jump in the clearance rate to 71%, up ten points, and big increases in all the other key figures was a sign of

demand for German bloodstock. BBAG’s Managing Director Klaus Eulenberger said he was “over the moon” at results which revealed a 65% rise in turnover to €2,803,400, and 33% gains in the average and median.

TALKING POINT

• After Torquator Tasso’s long-priced victory in the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, watch out for Sisfahan in the Breeders’ Cup Turf. A Deutsches Derby winner by Isfahan, who also won Germany’s top race for three-year-olds, Sisfahan was beaten just a length by Torquator Tasso in September’s Group 1 Grosser Preis Von Baden. Trainer Henk Grewe had a Breeders’ Cup sighter when sending Donjah to the Turf last year, although she finished last of ten. For now the only Germanbred Breeders’ Cup winner is Shirocco, who was trained in France by Andre Fabre when taking the Turf in 2005.

BBAG October Sale Top lots Sex/breeding

Vendor

Price (€)

Buyer

F Guiliani – Tucana

Gestut Schlenderhan

135,000

Gestüt Brümmerhof

C Sea The Stars – Seductive

Gestut Karlshof

105,000

HFTB Racing Agency

C Counterattack – Alwina

Gestut Karlshof

75,000

HFTB Racing Agency

F Polish Vulcano - Sweet Montana

Gestut Idee

52,000

Andrea Kötz

Figures

Year

Sold

Agg (€)

Average (€)

Median (€)

Top price (€)

2021

222

2,803,400

12,628

12,670

135,000

2020

178

1,698,500

9,542

9,466

75,000

2019

232

2,015,550

8,688

8,698

61,000

THE OWNER BREEDER 65



Caulfield Files

Bloodstock world views

he saying goes that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. But a deeper, more profound knowledge isn’t always a route to safety and success, at least not in the world of bloodstock breeding, as I learned during my 20-odd years advising on Juddmonte Farms’ matings. During that time I saw plenty of the descendants of the winning Nijinsky mare Musicanti, including her talented daughter New Orchid (by Quest For Fame). And with that knowledge, I rather doubt that I would have approved when the team at Haras d’Haspel decided to send New Orchid’s unraced daughter Needleleaf to Oasis Dream in 2018. Of course, the joke would be on me, as the mating resulted in the imperious Native Trail, who has surely secured the title of champion European two-year-old with his sequence of four victories, including the Group 1 National Stakes and Group 1 Dewhurst Stakes. Native Trail’s trainer Charlie Appleby has made no secret of the fact that his youngster already weighs in at 540kg, compared to the average of roughly 480kg, even though the colt is only two. Francesca Cumani put it well when she said that the colt has the wow factor, because he is taller, with more presence and more bulk, than the rest of them. Appleby succinctly describes Native Trail as a man among boys, a heavy-topped horse with a big shoulder who hits the ground hard. Apparently Native Trail already weighed 540kg when he was bought for 210,000gns at the Tattersalls Craven Breeze-Up Sale. The youngster had been pinhooked for 67,000gns by the former top-class jump jockey Norman Williamson with Mags O’Toole. Williamson, who now operates Oak Tree Farm in County Meath, explained that “he hasn’t changed a lot from a yearling. He was a huge yearling, he’d a huge, big backside on him and that’s why I took the chance of breezing him, I thought he’s so strong maybe he won’t need time and he didn’t.” Native Trail has clearly inherited oodles of class and precocity from his sire, the champion two-year-old Oasis Dream. But Oasis Dream is a 15.3-hands

GEORGE SELWYN

History repeats itself in Native Trail’s Dewhurst score T

Native Trail: unbeaten colt appears to have inherited plenty of size from his female family

son of the 15.2-hands Green Desert, himself a son of the 15.3-hands Danzig. Native Trail must clearly have inherited his size and tallness from another part of his pedigree and we need look no further than the colt’s second dam New Orchid and third dam Musicanti. Musicanti was produced for Juddmonte from a mating between the sizeable Nijinsky and Populi, who was acquired by James Delahooke for $2,000,000 as an eight-year-old in 1983. Unfortunately, Populi failed to produce anything for her new owner which matched the quality of her first three foals, a trio of stakes winners headed by the top middle-distance horse Vanlandingham. Musicanti, though, won over 2,900 metres at Saint-Cloud and was beaten little more than a length when fourth in a Listed race. Tried on dirt and turf after being switched to the US, Musicanti failed to win any of her seven American starts before joining Juddmonte’s broodmare band in Kentucky. It’s fair to say that Musicanti wasn’t the most attractive of mares. Standing 16.2-hands high, she was big, plain and lengthy, but she inherited Populi’s deep shoulder. She was no more attractive on the move, as she had a pounding action.

However, Musicanti wasted no time in proving her worth as a broodmare. One of Juddmonte’s resident stallions, Distant View, seemed to be a good match both from the viewpoint of physique and pedigree. The neat, strong Distant View stood 15.3 hands and he was a son of Mr Prospector, who sired nine black-type winners – an attractive 15% – from Nijinsky mares. Thanks to Musicanti, Distant View was to join several other sons of Mr Prospector, including Kingmambo, Seeking The Gold, Fappiano and Woodman, by siring a Group or Grade 1 winner from a Nijinsky mare. Her first foal, the tall, good-shouldered Distant Music, inherited plenty of size from Musicanti and stood around 16.2 hands. But that didn’t stop him enjoying an unbeaten juvenile career which culminated in victories in the Group 2 Champagne Stakes and Group 1 Dewhurst Stakes, so there are distinct parallels between Distant Music and Native Trail. Like his younger relative, Distant Music won his races with a telling burst of acceleration – just as Distant View had done when he landed the Sussex Stakes. Musicanti was to produce ten further foals, including four more by Distant

THE OWNER BREEDER 67

››


Caulfield Files impressive start. Only one of the ten – her Quest For Fame filly New Orchid – was to earn black type, when third in the Group 3 Lancashire Oaks and a close second in the Listed Aphrodite Stakes, both over a mile and a half. If anything, New Orchid was even bigger than Musicanti and she stood just under 17 hands and she too had her dam’s pounding action. Naturally, attempts needed to be made to pull her progeny down in size, and once again Juddmonte appeared to have an ideal candidate among its own stallion team, in the shape of Observatory. This conqueror of Giant’s Causeway in the millennium Queen Elizabeth II Stakes had the dual attraction of being a son of Distant View and of standing only 15.3 hands. His dam Stellaria was small, strong and low to the ground. As with Musicanti, New Orchid made a great start, her first foal being the Group 1 Haydock Sprint Cup winner African Rose. The filly’s trainer Criquette Head did well to recognise that she was a sprinter, considering that her sire had won at up to 9.2 furlongs and her dam had stayed a mile and a half. New Orchid came close to repeating the magic with Helleborine, her second daughter by Observatory. With three wins from three starts, including a five-length victory over Immortal Verse in the Group 3 Prix d’Aumale, Helleborine started odds-on to land the Group 1 Prix Marcel Boussac and was far from disgraced in finishing second to future Classic winner Misty For Me. Unfortunately, as with Musicanti, New Orchid was unable to maintain the magic and she was eventually sold as a 15-year-old. Part of the problem was that she consistently produced very big foals, mostly weighing more than 140lb (roughly 64kg) despite her being mated mainly to medium-sized stallions. A perfect example was Sand Blast, her 2011 colt by Oasis Dream who weighed in at a whacking 159lb (72kg). He was so big that it was decided he didn’t have a future as a Flat performer and he was consequently dispatched to Doncaster’s Spring Sale in the hope that he would appeal to National Hunt buyers. After selling for £10,000, he eventually managed to win a two-and-a-half mile novices’ hurdle at Worcester. New Orchid was naturally returned to Observatory on several occasions, producing two further daughters and a son. The son, Forecast, has won a novice chase this year but neither of the daughters – Conservatory and Needleleaf

68 THE OWNER BREEDER

– made it to the races and were both sold for 60,000gns (Conservatory at three, Needleleaf at two). Both were sold before their older sisters had had much chance to prove themselves as broodmares. African Rose began her broodmare career with a visit to none other than Oasis Dream but again the chemistry failed to work and her filly, African Plains, was still without a win at the end of a seven-race career. However, African Rose’s fourth foal was Fair Eva, the

“Like Native Trail, Distant Music won his races with a burst of acceleration” Frankel filly who ran away with the Group 3 Princess Margaret Stakes. Helleborine also came good with her fourth foal, the exhilarating Group 2 Coventry Stakes winner Calyx. It is worth mentioning that Calyx’s sire, Kingman, is bred along similar lines to Oasis Dream, with Oasis Dream’s sire being the grandsire of Kingman and Oasis Dream’s dam Hope being the second dam of Kingman. Of course, I shouldn’t have written off Oasis Dream as a suitable mate for this family after just a couple of failures. Oasis Dream is currently credited with 128 black-type winners from 1,643 foals, which equates to 7.8%. That means that nearly one in every 13 of his progeny fail to win a stakes race, so it isn’t fair to judge a nick’s worth on a very small

sample (even if it is perfectly understandable for a breeder to make a hasty evaluation, in a bid to stop throwing good money after bad.) For the record, Oasis Dream’s other foals from this family include the non-winning Sunset Stanza and fair miler Country Western, both out of New Orchid’s half-sister Musical Horizon, and Uphold, a durable middle-distance winner out of New Orchid’s half-sister Allegro Viva. Oasis Dream also has a 2020 colt out of Calyx’s half-sister Sandstone, and a 2020 filly out of Conservatory, a sister to Native Trail’s dam, who sold for 40,000gns as a foal. There is also a Kingman yearling out of Needleleaf, who is a more-than-half-sister to Native Trail. Godolphin were clearly aware that Native Trail hadn’t revealed the full extent of his talent in winning the Superlative Stakes in July, because they snapped up the filly for €950,000 at Arqana in August. The questions now are whether Native Trail will dominate his generation to the same extent next year and how far will he stay? There is obviously an argument that some of his opponents are not nearly so physically advanced, so Native Trail will be a man among men, not boys, as a three-year-old. That said, the similarly big and advanced Zafonic had no difficulty in adding the 2,000 Guineas to his juvenile Group 1 successes, including the Dewhurst Stakes, and the same could be said of the 16.2-hands Churchill. As to stamina, there can be little doubt that Native Trail is going to be very well suited by a mile and his style of racing suggests that he may in time get another quarter of a mile, as did Oasis Dream’s Group 1 or Group 2 winners Midday, Lady Jane Digby, Monitor Closely, Free Port Lux, Hard Dream, Sri Putra, Querari and Folega.

ALEC RUSSELL

›› View, without managing to duplicate her

Distant Music: Juddmonte-bred colt, also a descendant of $2 million purchase Populi, capped his unbeaten juvenile season in 1999 with victory in the Dewhurst Stakes


SUPPLEMENTING FOR BREEDING SUCCESS

BREEDING

CAL-GRO Support the mare and developing foal through pregnancy and lactation with key minerals and antioxidants

DIGESTION

KENTUCKY KARRON OIL Superior quality readily absorbed Omega 3 & 6 to support digestive function, fertility and overall well-being

VITAMINS & MINERALS

COPPER-MAX Chelated Copper and Zinc paste for optimal absorption to support fertility

FEATURES & BENEFITS

• Calcium & Phosphorus – to optimise bone growth • Vitamin E – powerful antioxidant • Manganese – supports healthy joints • L-Lysine – important for sufficient milk

Supporting the mare and foal through pregnancy and beyond, for benefits that last

production • Silicon – supports tendon and ligament elasticity • Chelated Copper - vital throughout pregnancy to maximise the foal’s own stores • Zinc – supports the immune system

SIZES AVAILABLE

20

53

days*

days*

3kg

8kg

16kg

FEATURES & BENEFITS

Gold standard omega oil, for shining condition

> Balanced ratio of Essential Fatty Acids to support: • Digestive function • The immune system • Skin and coat condition • Fertility • Joint health

SIZES AVAILABLE

333

166

75

days*

days*

days*

20L

10L

4.5L

> Fortified with Calcium Hydroxide to improve digestibility

THE 4.5L INCLUDES A PUMP WHICH SUPPLIES 30ML

FEATURES & BENEFITS

Chelated Copper & Zinc – in their most bioavailable forms ensuring optimal absorption

106

days*

1

day*

> Chelated Copper supports: • Fertility • Bone and connective tissue development • Red blood cell production • Hoof health

30g

For convenient copper supplementation, choose COPPER-MAX

> Chelated Zinc supports: • The immune system • Skeletal development

CONTACT OUR SPECIALIST THOROUGHBRED TEAM: UK: Adam Johnson T: +44 7860 771063 Ire: Lorraine Fradl T: +353 87 2575398 Email: info@foranequine.com

www.foranequine.com

EQUINE SUPPLEMENTS & HEALTHCARE

#OURSCIENCEYOURSUCCESS

FE A4 TOB A4 Ad.indd 1

14/10/2021 12:33


Dr Statz

John Boyce cracks the code

Proven names all the rage as book sizes rise again

B

y my reckoning, Tally-Ho Stud’s Mehmas has set a new record for the number of mares covered in a single season by a mainstream Flat stallion, his figure being 290 in 2021. If ever-larger books are of concern to us, then I’m afraid to say that this year saw a continuation of that trend in Britain and Ireland. Ten years ago, the top 30 stallions by number of mares covered had an average book size of 155. Five years later it had risen to 167 and this year that average stood at 176. But that debate is for another day. No one could be surprised at the run on Mehmas nominations this spring. After all, he provided all the right answers for commercial breeders with his first crop of two-year-olds last season. A record haul of winning youngsters – 56 in all – was supplemented with plenty of classy two-year-olds, many of whom, including Group 1 Middle Park hero Supremacy, were just reaching their peak at season’s end. And while there is still a question mark as to how well the Mehmas stock train on from two to three, four more juvenile Group winners from his second crop will do absolutely nothing to dampen breeders’ enthusiasm for the son of Acclamation in 2022. Mehmas aside, two other stallions topped the 200-mare mark. One, Kodiac, was expected as he has covered more than 200 mares on five previous occasions. But Wootton Bassett, standing at €100,000, was more of a surprise with his 242 mares. That is in stark contrast to the 153 he was bred to during his final season at Haras d’Etreham. Moreover, the quality of his mares has also gone through the roof in 2021 with as many as 126 that can be classed as an elite mare – one judged by the quality of her progeny or pedigree for younger mares to be among the top 15% of the population. His tally of 126 elite mares is almost as many as he served in his previous four years at his higher French fees and it is also significant in that it is the most of any British or Irish stallion this year. On that same metric, Dubawi was runner-up with 120, followed by Lope De

70 THE OWNER BREEDER

GB-IRE STALLIONS RANKED BY ELITE MARES COVERED IN 2021 Stallion

Stud

CC

Mares

Elite

WOOTTON BASSETT

Year

10

Coolmore

IRE

€100,000

Fee

242

126

DUBAWI

16

Dalham Hall

GB

€250,000

136

120

LOPE DE VEGA

11

Ballylinch

IRE

€125,000

191

118

KINGMAN

7

Banstead Manor

GB

£150,000

172

117

FRANKEL

9

Banstead Manor

GB

£175,000

151

99

SEA THE STARS

12

Gilltown Stud

IRE

€150,000

165

97

NIGHT OF THUNDER

6

Dalham Hall

IRE

€75,000

175

86

TOO DARN HOT

2

Kildangan

GB

£45,000

162

74

PINATUBO

1

Dalham Hall

GB

£35,000

150

66

MEHMAS

5

Tally-Ho Stud

IRE

€25,000

290

61

KODIAC

15

Tally-Ho Stud

IRE

€65,000

233

52

NO NAY NEVER

7

Coolmore

IRE

€125,000

176

50

BLUE POINT

2

Kildangan

IRE

€40,000

182

49

CAMELOT

8

Coolmore

IRE

€45,000

152

48

DARK ANGEL

14

Yeomanstown

IRE

€60,000

180

48

SEA THE MOON

7

Lanwades

GB

£22,500

172

47

GHAIYYATH

1

Darley

IRE

€30,000

137

43

Vega (118), Kingman (117) and Frankel (99). On that same metric the firstseason sires Pinatubo (66) and Ghaiyyath (43) did best of all, followed by Sottsass (40) and Earthlight (29), giving Darley a particularly strong hand for 2024 and beyond. In our polarised bloodstock world where second-season sires are all but neglected, it speaks volumes when breeders come back in both numbers and quality for a year-two stallion. That is precisely what has happened to Too Darn Hot, who attracted a handsome tally of 74 elite mares among his book of 162 this year. In fact, this number is good enough to be second only to the 97 elite mares covered by Frankel in his second year back in 2014. Kildangan Stud’s Blue Point made a one-two for Darley stallions with his 49 elite mares from a book of 182. The second book covered by Lanwades Stud’s Deep Impact stallion Study Of Man also held up well, increasing on year one despite a fall in fee. Typically, breeders were even more wary of third-season sires and only three covered more than ten elite mares, Saxon Warrior counting only 16 among his 179 mares. Zoustar had 12 from 59 and Cracksman ten from his book of 84.

Ironically, all three did well with their first yearlings this year, posting top prices of €540,000, 310,000gns and 410,000gns respectively. Not surprisingly, there was little change in the battle of the studs as Coolmore and Darley continue to dominate the landscape. Coolmore edged the numbers game by 2,611 to 2,508, but Darley got the upper hand in the quality stakes, attracting 599 elite mares compared to Coolmore’s 452. Juddmonte Farms, with its boutique offering of stallions, attracted 276 elite mares, followed by Ballylinch (196) and Tally-Ho Stud (120). Although Darley and Coolmore both stood 25 stallions in 2021, Darley accounted for the top two first-season sires and the two best second-season sires alongside proven names Dubawi and his son Night Of Thunder, who continued to be go-to stallions. Among the top 30 stallions ranked by elite mares covered, Darley had eight compared to Coolmore’s six. Finally, the prize for the best quality book overall goes to Dubawi for the seventh straight year. Not since Dansili in 2014 and Frankel in 2013 has the Darley stallion failed to attract the best book of mares in Europe.


IT’S TIME TO GET ON THE RIGHT TRACK

FROM BREEDING SHED TO WINNING POST, WE’VE GOT THE RIGHT TRACK RECORD From conception to the sales ring or racetrack, correct nutrition plays a vital part in enabling the horse to achieve their maximum potential. Connolly’s RED MILLS work with leading breeders, consignors and trainers across the globe and understand what it takes to succeed!

Contact our specialist thoroughbred team: UK: Adam Johnson +44 7860 771063 IRL: Lorraine Fradl +353 87 2575398 FR: Sylvain Prouvoyeur +33 6 9867 5138 Goresbridge, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland. Email: info@redmills.com

CRM A4 Right Track Ad.indd 1

www.redmills.com

20/10/2021 16:54


s ' e f i l f I a sport, who's on ? e d i s r you

The thoroughbred industry has its own specific rules on tax and accounting matters. We have a team at Smith & Williamson that share your passion for bloodstock and can give you industry specific advice. Our Bloodstock team can give specialist advice on structuring the purchase of a stud business in the most tax efficient way, to VAT advice on cross border transactions. We can assist you with your annual accounts and tax obligations using our industry knowledge. Our aim is to work alongside you to develop longterm strategies to grow your business and help you achieve your financial goals. To find out more, please contact: Penelope Lang, Partner Smith & Williamson LLP penelope.lang@smithandwilliamson.com 01722 431064 smithandwilliamson.com

You & The value of investments and the income from them can fall as well as rise and investors may not receive back the original amount invested. © Tilney Smith & Williamson Limited 2020. Smith & Williamson LLP Regulated by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales for a range of investment business activities. Smith & Williamson LLP is a member of Nexia International, a leading, global network of independent accounting and consulting firms. Please see https:// nexia.com/member-firm-disclaimer/ for further details. Smith & Williamson Financial Services Limited authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Smith & Williamson Investment Management LLP authorised and regulated in the United Kingdom by the Financial Conduct Authority. The Financial Conduct Authority does not regulate all of the products and services referred to in this document, including Tax, Assurance and Business Services.


, s e y e y m h g u o r h t S ee , s d ee n y m d n a u n d e r st . e l p m i s x e l p m o c e h t e k a m Running your estate is like managing a complicated business. It can involve large numbers of people, complex family arrangements and demands. There’s also the added responsibility of preserving your estate for future generations. You need an adviser who is committed to your relationship for the long term. We are unique in our ability to offer a full range of services, across accountancy, tax, financial planning and investment management — covering your full business and personal needs. We will work alongside you to develop long-term strategies which aim to protect your estates’ assets and help you achieve your financial needs. The advice you receive from us will be as unique as your family and your estate. To find out more, please contact: Aloysia Daros, Partner Smith & Williamson LLP Aloysia.daros@smithandwilliamson.com 01722 431 036 smithandwilliamson.com

You & The value of investments and the income from them can fall as well as rise and investors may not receive back the original amount invested. © Tilney Smith & Williamson Limited 2021. Smith & Williamson Investment Management LLP authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Smith & Williamson LLP regulated by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales for a range of investment business activities. Smith & Williamson LLP is a member of Nexia International, a leading, global network of independent accounting and consulting firms. Please see https://nexia.com/member-firm-disclaimer/ for further details. Smith & Williamson Financial Services Limited authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. The Financial Conduct Authority does not regulate all of the products and services referred to in this document, including Tax, Assurance and Business Services.


ROA Forum

UPDATES TO THE RULES OF RACING T he BHA shared a number of updates to the Rules of Racing last month, which were approved by the BHA board following engagement with and feedback from participants and stakeholders. In the case of updates to passport and vaccination requirements for horses in training, these will be handled by trainers on their owners’ behalf.

Signing horses out of human food chain

It will be a requirement from January 1, 2022 for all horses entered to run in a race to be signed out of the human food chain in Section IX of its passport. From this date, any entry for a race, or confirmation of entry in respect of early closers, will not be accepted for any horse unless it has been declared as not intended for human consumption via the Weatherbys App and horse’s passport. This process can be completed immediately for both the app and paper passport. The decision to permanently exclude horses entered to run from the human food chain was agreed unanimously by the BHA Veterinary Committee at its meeting on January 28, 2021 further to wider industry consultation and approval by the Rules Committee and BHA board. The rule applies to all horses trained in Great Britain. The BHA is also liaising with international jurisdictions and examining EU legislation regarding the practical implementation of this rule to include all international runners.

Equine influenza vaccination requirements

From January 1, 2022 the primary course and booster interval schedule for Equine Influenza vaccinations will be amended as follows: Current Interval

Interval from JANUARY 1, 2022

V2

21 – 92 days

21 – 60 days

V3

150 – 215 days

120 – 180 days

Booster

Not more than 1 year apart Not more than 6 months apart

V1

The European Horserace Scientific Liaison Committee (EHSLC) Board approved the above changes to vaccination protocols in October 2019, following consideration of advice from experts in equine infectious disease. It was initially proposed that the harmonisation changes come into effect from January 2021, subject to consultation with participants in each racing jurisdiction, which was subsequently delayed by the BHA due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The harmonised EHSLC primary course and six-monthly booster intervals will be published in the Rules of Racing from January 1, 2022. The BHA and Irish Horseracing Regulatory Board

74 THE OWNER BREEDER

GEORGE SELWYN

The special section for ROA members

Racehorses must be signed out of the human food chain in 2022

(IHRB) are taking a coordinated approach to implementation. Full details of implementation and transition from current intervals to new can be found at www.britishhorseracing.com. The new primary course and booster intervals were implemented in both France and Germany on May 5 so horses entered to race in those jurisdictions must be compliant with the new requirements. There is no requirement for the administration of EHV vaccinations under the Rules of Racing. This is reviewed on a regular basis by the BHA Veterinary Committee. Any questions relating to vaccinations can be directed to equine@britishhorseracing.com. Urgent queries should be made via the Equine Health and Welfare Department on 020 7152 0090.

Bisphosphonates – amendment to Rule (Paragraph 7) The rule for the administration of bisphosphonates will be updated in line with the EHSLC harmonised position, to be applied when bisphosphonates are detected in horses under the age of four. Effective immediately, a horse must not have been administered with any bisphosphonate: • before it is aged four years (as of January 1 of the horse’s year of birth); • on raceday or any of the 30 clear days before. The BHA Notice on Bisphosphonates has been updated as follows, to reflect the EHSLC harmonised position: Any horse to which therapeutic bisphosphonates are administered under the age of four years will not be qualified to run under the BHA Rules of Racing until: • For horses aged four years or over: receipt of a negative test; • For horses aged between two and four years: completion of a 12-month suspension from racing and receipt of a negative test; and • For horses aged under two years: completion of a minimum 12-month suspension from racing, reached three years of age and receipt of a negative test.

Owners’ representatives

A minor amendment has been made to Rule (C) 9 which covers the administration of owners’ representatives and the refusal or cancellation of an application. From October 1, wording was amended to include reference to the ‘cancellation’ of an application to register an individual as an owner’s representative. This provision already exists within the Rules, with the revision simply providing additional clarity.


New contact details:

www.roa.co.uk • 01183 385680 • info@roa.co.uk @racehorseowners

RacehorseOwnersUK

Racehorseownersassociation

Brexit Steering Group report

The BHA has introduced new rules to protect syndicate and racing club members

BILL SELWYN

The Thoroughbred Industries Brexit Steering Group has welcomed the publication of a report by the House of Commons Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee that calls on the UK government to support the British thoroughbred sector through securing a replacement to the Tripartite Agreement, and engaging with the industry on its digital solutions to support expedited thoroughbred movement. Entitled Moving Animals Across Borders, the cross-party report published last month also makes clear the need for the government to do more to investigate the causes and scale of illegal horse movements, which can also be tackled through embracing the implementation of a digital identification system for horses. The report recommends that “the government should work with the EU to formulate an agreement on ‘high health status’ horses as quickly as possible”, with British, Irish and French racing and breeding industry leaders in agreement that such a development would benefit all parties. The report highlights that the thoroughbred industry already has in place the Weatherbys e-passport system, which is capable of acting as a lifetime digital document, encompassing identification, vaccination, medical records, movement and ownership information that could interact with any new government system. Finally, the report goes on to say that Defra should “investigate non-compliant horse movements and quantify the scale and causes of the practice”, with work to take place in collaboration with organisations such as World Horse Welfare and others with intelligence and expertise in the field.

Shared ownership regulation In May the BHA launched a new Code of Conduct for syndicates to strengthen regulation, following a shared ownership consultation. The first phase of implementation was extended to cover new terms and a new Racing Club Code of Conduct was introduced. As part of these changes, for the first time, syndicate members who accumulate bad debt can be added to the forfeit list. This prevents an individual who defaults from simply moving to a new ownership and doing the same again. In addition, to ensure the BHA could better monitor the payment of prizes to syndicate and club members, whenever a shared ownership entity wins a significant amount of prize-money the BHA contacts the manager to confirm how and when the monies will be paid to members. In September, the second phase of implementation began with new questions being added into the syndicate and racing club registration process. This will enable the BHA to better understand how each new shared ownership will operate. The questions explore the financial arrangements of the new entities and the accountabilities of those involved, how shares (for syndicates) or membership (for

racing clubs) will be divided and sold, and how the ownership is to be promoted. Simultaneously the new registration forms serve to highlight the responsibilities of the syndicators/club managers in abiding by their respective Code of Conduct and promote what is required in any contract. Work continues on the third phase of implementation, which is set for Q1 2022. This will include beginning to audit a proportion of syndicates/racing clubs contracts to ensure compliance with the Codes of Conduct and requiring syndicate members and their percentage shares to be recorded with the BHA through the Racing Admin system. Following these changes being launched, syndicate members with ≥2% share will then be able to access the Racing Admin system to view their ownerships online. The development required to facilitate these improvements is currently under review to ensure that they do not lead to an undue increase in the administrative burden of syndicators, but simultaneously ensure that the right information is collected. Any changes will be clearly communicated in advance to all stakeholders with clear lead in times, in addition to help and support for syndicators/club managers to ensure compliance.

THE OWNER BREEDER 75


ROA Forum

EXCLUSIVE OFFERS AND BENEFITS GEORGE SELWYN

Fakenham: now providing free entry to ROA members

Fakenham pledge

We’re delighted to confirm that Fakenham has been added to our list of racecourses offering free admission to members on days without a runner. Members will be able to enjoy one complimentary day badge at seven remaining fixtures this season. Please check the discount code in the members area at roa.co.uk. The code will be active from the day following the preceding race meeting until 48 hours before the fixture in question. Fakenham next race on November 16 and December 19. Fakenham will contribute at least £400,000 into prize-money on top of all Levy Board, BHA or other central funding. The total will be spread over the 12 fixtures in the 2021-22 season. As part of their pledge to owners, entry for all races is free. This means owners do not contribute any money towards Fakenham’s prize-money. Each race day will have two handicap races assigned as ‘Double Up Bonus’ races. If the winning horse of both races is trained by the same trainer (owners can be different), then the winning owners of both races will each receive an additional £2,000 in prize-money. There must be a minimum of eight runners in each race for the Double Up Bonus to be paid. Owners with a runner will be allocated six complimentary owners’ badges and can enjoy a complimentary lunch in The Cool Roxy Bar. Winning owners will be given a bag of local beverages irrespective of whether the race has a trophy or sponsor’s prize (one per race). Winning connections of all races will be personally entertained by Fakenham’s Chairman immediately after each race, with celebratory champagne, sandwiches and cakes. Winning owners will receive a photograph of their winning horse and a USB card of the race. A bottle of local

76 THE OWNER BREEDER

Archangel Gin will be offered to placed connections.

Newbury hospitality

Newbury is offering ROA members a choice of two hospitality offers for the Ladbrokes Winter Carnival on November 26 and 27. On Gentleman’s Day, Friday, November 26 the Racegoers Package includes entry to the Grandstand enclosure, a private table in the Racegoers Restaurant overlooking the racecourse and a threecourse lunch, coffee and racecard. Hints and tips for the day’s racing will be provided by the resident tipster. The package is priced at £95.50 per person inc VAT (normally £105). The Racegoers Package for Ladbrokes Trophy Day on Saturday, November 27 replicates the package above and also includes a champagne reception, sweet fancies and glass of port or brandy. This package is priced at £179 per person inc VAT (normally £199). Initially 20 places will be held on both dates in the Racegoers Restaurant, on shared tables. Each table will accommodate a maximum of 12. Bookings can be made by calling the ROA or see www.roa.co.uk.

Complimentary admission on days without a runner – Registered owners

ROA members who are registered owners, regardless of any percentage of horse or horses owned, are able to enjoy free admission, often with a guest, to a host of racing fixtures through the Racecourse Badge Scheme for Owners (RBSO). To check upcoming fixtures and the number of complimentary badges, go to the members area at roa.co.uk and follow Racecourse Badge Scheme for Owners/ Participating Fixtures.

Badges can be pre-booked via the PASS website (rcapass.com) at the entry stage, five days before racing or by following guidance as outlined on the ROA website. Please note that Cheltenham, Kelso and Hexham do not operate the PASS system. Therefore, if you are qualified for the RBSO and wish to attend a fixture at these courses, please complete the specific form in the members area at roa. co.uk in the RBSO section. The deadline for applications is 4pm the weekday prior to the race meeting. Please note, Saturday, November 13 of Cheltenham’s November meeting is not included in the RBSO, but November 12 and 14 are included, as usual.

Non-registered owners

Members who are not registered owners, including syndicate members and racing club members, can also enjoy free admission to many fixtures through the ROA Pre-Booked Admission Scheme. Again, many of these enable you to take a guest racing for free. Courses offering complimentary admission include ARC and Jockey Club Racecourses, Ascot, Cartmel, Fakenham and Newbury. Members can access online forms and discount codes in the members area to pre-book complimentary tickets online. Details of participating fixtures and how to attend can be found on the racecourse discounts page in the members area at roa.co.uk. Please note that members will not be granted entry on the day without having pre-booked.

Racing TV offers

In a partnership with Racing TV, ROA members can enjoy free day passes which can be used on days when you have a runner. You can then either access the main Racing TV channel or dedicated live feed from the track your horse is running at with Racing TV Extra, where you can watch all the build-up from the paddock and down at the start, and continue after the race with expert analysis from Racing TV’s pundits and presenters. The free day pass can be used online or through your Sky TV, website, mobile or TV apps (the free day pass cannot be used on Virgin TV). For only £15/€18 per month members can enjoy every race live from 34 of the UK’s premier racecourses, including Aintree, Cheltenham, Goodwood, Newmarket and York. That’s more than a 34% saving for 12 months, plus with Racing TV Anywhere you can enjoy the best racing coverage on your TV, tablet and mobile for no extra cost.


This offer is only available to new and reinstating residential customers in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. A 12-month minimum term applies. Full details of both offers can be found in the members area at roa.co.uk.

ROA Awards 2021

Racehorse Owners Compensation Scheme

A partnership between the Racehorse Owners Association and the bloodstock insurance broker Lycetts enables ROA members to take advantage of the cover provided by the Racehorse Owners Compensation Scheme (ROCS). This insurance policy is designed specifically for horses in training and is unique in the cover that it gives. ROCS provides: • Financial compensation for the owner of a racehorse that is injured, either temporarily or permanently. • The costs of treating the horse at a top veterinary clinic. • The value of the horse if it dies. For further details of options available and premiums see the downloadable brochure at roa.co.uk or contact the Lycetts Newmarket office on 01638 676700.

News in brief BHA annual report

The BHA published its 2020 annual report and accounts at the end of September, with a summary of the year provided by Chief Executive Julie Harrington. See britishhorseracing.com for more details.

Vintage racing silks

A range of vintage racing colours are available to buy through the BHA website. This functionality comes as part of the BHA’s continued commitment to liberalise owners’ colours and make it easier for owners who are keen to sell their silks. The new online facility allows owners to advertise their silks for other prospective owners to purchase. All vintage silks have been registered for over five years. A list of all vintage silks currently available can be found at britishhorseracing. com. If you would like to list your colours or require more information email colours@britishhorseracing. com. Full terms and conditions can be found on the BHA website.

JP McManus and Sir Anthony McCoy pictured at the 2019 ROA Horseracing Awards

The ROA Horseracing Awards will be held on Thursday, December 9 at The Royal Lancaster, London. The prestigious black-tie event will pay homage to the outstanding equine performers of 2021 and their owners, trainers and all connections. The evening will start with a champagne reception, followed by a three-course dinner with wine, which is then followed by the awards ceremony. The evening will finish with dancing to the ever-popular Chance Band through until 1am. Don’t miss out on racing’s big night out! Tickets are priced at £195 per person. Tables of ten are available for £1,800. For ticket bookings and enquiries contact Ruth Diver at ruth@roa.co.uk or 01183 385680.

Welsh Horse Racing Awards

The ROA is headline sponsor of the Welsh Horse Racing Awards taking place on Friday, November 19 at Chepstow racecourse. The evening will begin with a drinks reception, and a three-course dinner will be followed by the award ceremony, compered by Hayley

Moore. The awards will recognise the equine performers of the season, their owners, trainers, racing staff, riders and breeders. For ticket enquiries please call 01291 622260.

Epsom Awards

The ROA is also headline sponsor of the Epsom Owners & Trainers Awards on Saturday, November 27. The black-tie evening at Epsom Downs racecourse sees the region’s racing community of owners, trainers, jockeys and stable staff as well as other professionals come together to celebrate the racing success on and off the racecourse in Epsom. The awards ceremony will be compered by Hayley Moore. The evening is organised by Racing Welfare and fundraising on the evening will raise money for the charity whose mission is to provide enabling and proactive support for racing’s workforce. The evening will feature a silent auction. For more information and for ticket enquiries contact Clare Kingston at ckingston@racingwelfare.co.uk or 07891 186494.

THE OWNER BREEDER 77


ROA Forum

MAGICAL MOMENTS

Trueshan: fabulous season concluded with victory in the Long Distance Cup, to the delight of partowner David Hill (inset, left)

S

tradivarius has been at the top of the stayers’ tree for three years, but 2021 has brought a proper rival in the shape of Trueshan, winner of the Goodwood Cup, Prix du Cadran, in which he downed Stradivarius by four and a half lengths, and British Champions Long Distance Cup, where the former champion was four lengths back in third. The Longchamp race on Arc weekend felt like a real changing-ofthe-guard contest, the old king usurped by the younger prince, with Ascot underlining the point. Eloquent spokesman for the owners of the Alan King-trained new staying star on the block is David Hill, founder of the successful Barbury Lions syndicates and whose background more or less made it inevitable that

78 THE OWNER BREEDER

horseracing would play a major part in his life. His grandfather was Willie Uprichard, who trained in Northern Ireland, while a couple of uncles were amateur jockeys. His own son James is Letters Editor at the Racing Post, and ROA member Hill is himself a longstanding owner and previous chairman of Warwick racecourse. “The first horse was Docklands Express with Kim Bailey, who I owned with Robert Baines, Compton Hellyer and friends, and he was a fabulous horse,” Hill states of the popular and prolific winner whose victories included the Whitbread, two Martell Cups and two Racing Post Chases. “Top Brass, who was also with Kim Bailey, was very nice too, but unfortunately he broke down when

winning at Cheltenham in December 1994. “Moving forward a few years, I was on the board at Warwick racecourse, and it was after that, and when I’d retired, that I took the concept of the Barbury Lions syndicate to Alan King. “Certainly at Warwick I’d noticed Alan’s horses were always produced to look a million dollars and they jumped soundly – the novices had obviously been well schooled. The Barbury Lions concept played its part in Alan returning to properly being a dualpurpose trainer, and he has certainly made his mark on the Flat. “We had a great first year with Master Blueyes, whose victory in the Adonis Hurdle, after a couple of decent handicap wins on the Flat, was pretty special for us all.

GEORGE SELWYN

David Hill has had a season to remember with star stayer Trueshan


“Year two was Coeur De Lion. He and Master Blueyes both ran in the Triumph Hurdle of 2017 and Coeur De Lion won the Ascot Stakes at the Royal Meeting last year. “Then we had Caspar The Cub, who won four times at Kempton, Tronada, who won three times on the Flat and is now in foal to Planteur, and then in year five we had Trueshan. So it has been very successful. “The concept is that each of our syndicates has three horses, two twoyear-olds and a three-year-old, horses who start on the Flat but are athletic enough to also go jumping.” Trueshan of course is by Planteur, but his connection with Hill and his partners actually dates to another son of the now Chapel Stud-based sire. Hill explains: “The reason we bought Trueshan goes back to the Craven Breeze-up Sale of the year before, 2017, when there was a son of Planteur who stood out as he looked like a three-mile chaser. He was selling there only as the vendor [Sherbourne Lodge Stud] had plenty for the Guineas breeze-up sale a few weeks later. “He was the very last lot on the first day of the sale and Anthony Bromley waited around to buy him for 20,000gns. Nebuchadnezzar, as we named him, is a magnificent-looking horse, moves well in his paces and has a tremendous attitude. “We liked him so much we went back to Newmarket to buy another Planteur at the breeze-ups the following year, and that was Trueshan, for 31,000gns.” He continues: “Alan had a share in Trueshan originally but sold his to Andrew Gemmell. Now there are four of us, although we leased him to the Barbury Lions for a couple of seasons, not as a two-year-old as Alan didn’t think he’d be precocious enough to run that often – he ran only once – so that wouldn’t have been fair. And he still carries the Barbury Lion colours.” Hollie Doyle and Trueshan have been part of each other’s success stories, and Hill is thankful for the jockey’s involvement. “Jockeys generally these days are

top-class,” he says. “We’ve had Hollie, James Doyle, William Buick, Tom Marquand, Martin Harley and others, and they are all excellent. We owe Hollie. She has been there since the early days of the Barbury Lions and there’s no doubt she has come on tremendously in terms of strength and jockeyship. She’s the finished article.” One could say the same about Trueshan, who has rather turned Hill’s head in a direction it did not used to go in. He says: “My grandfather being a National Hunt trainer, I grew up focusing on that, but I must say Trueshan has made the Flat very enjoyable! “He’d won at Wolverhampton and Ffos Las on his first two starts as a three-year-old, then at Newmarket, and

“It’s a major plus having [Trueshan’s sire] Planteur in the UK” he ran at Newbury where he was up against Hamish, who was odds-on. We thought we might be outclassed, and it looked like Hamish was going to win easily two out, and he took the lead a furlong out. However, Trueshan fought hard, outbattled him and got back up to win by a neck. “That was the first day we thought Trueshan could turn out to be something special, and it was also a day that made me realise that owning a Flat horse could be as exciting as one going over the sticks.” Year six of the Barbury Lions is under way and also includes Forever William, a three-year-old son of Sea The Moon who is a potentially nice hurdler, while Nebuchadnezzar is going chasing. There is also maiden hurdler Methusalar and, yes, there has also

been a Salmanazar, in case champagne bottle aficionados are wondering! “On our trip to Paris for Arc weekend, the champagne was free and flowing at Longchamp, and very pleasant,” relays Hill, who adds: “Trueshan’s breeder, Didier Blot, happened to join us on the winners’ podium, and he has the full-sister…” Planteur is closer to home now, having relocated from France to Chapel Stud in Worcestershire, and Hill is adamant it’s a big step in the right direction for British National Hunt breeding. “It’s a major plus having Planteur in the UK,” he says. “He throws really good bone to his stock, Trueshan being a fine example.” It’s “early days” as far as Hill the owner-breeder is concerned, though as well as Tronada potentially there is also Bourbon Beauty’s offspring to look forward to in the future, as he owns the Grade 2-winning mare with trainer Alex Hales and Alan Marsh, with the trio leasing her to the Old Stoics Racing Club. Marsh is a partner in Trueshan as well, with Ian Dodds-Smith the other member of the quartet that make up the Singula Partnership in whose name Trueshan runs. Indeed, it’s sharing the pleasures and pains of ownership with others which Hill cites as a key attraction in addition to the more obvious delights in having a winner. “It’s the camaraderie,” he confirms. “We’ve had many great days with the Barbury Lions, and you are sharing something with like-minded people who become friends as well as syndicate members. “I would also say we’re very well looked after and treated by racecourses. York are outstanding and Ascot too, while we recently had a really excellent weekend in Paris and at Longchamp for the Arc.” Being a gelding and only five, Trueshan, along with his Flat, hurdling and chasing compatriots, should continue to give Hill and his ownership pals plenty of thrills and good days out for a fair while yet.

THE OWNER BREEDER 79


ROA Forum

Minimum ratings for Grade 2s over jumps

Point-to-point regulations

A number of changes have been made to the regulations for point-to-points for the 2021/22 season. These include reducing the time period for when a 5lb penalty is imposed for last-season wins, weigh-out deadline for riders, and method and fees relating to fixture applications.

Beck Edmunds: Employee of the Year in 2021 is on the judging panel

Runners must now achieve a minimum rating to compete in Grade 2 races over jumps

GEORGE SELWYN

The BHA board has approved the introduction of minimum ratings for horses running in Grade 2 jump Pattern races, a practice which was already in place for Grade 1s. This comes following a general proposal emanating from the PJA, which was subsequently discussed by the BHA Racing Group and considered in more detail by the Jump Pattern Committee. Following relevant analysis, the requirement will be for a horse to have a minimum rating or assessment of 120 (110 for mares’ races) to run in Grade 2 WFA jump Pattern races. A minimum rating will not apply to any Grade 2 races restricted to novices. This minimum rating is to be included within relevant race conditions. The rating restriction will be reviewed by the Pattern Committee at the end of the 2021/22 season to assess its impact.

Changes will also apply around horse eligibility, including deadlines for registering hunter certificates. Regulation 34 will prevent a horse that started the season running in a point-to-point and subsequently ran under Rules from returning to point-topoints in the same season. The trial of the 28-day rule for movement from Rules to pointing has been extended for another year.

Godolphin Stud & Stable Staff Awards 2022 Time is running out to make nominations for the 2022 Godolphin Stud & Stable Staff Awards. The awards, now in their 18th year, recognise and reward the outstanding skill, commitment and contribution of over 10,000 stud and stable staff in England, Scotland and Wales. Sponsored by Godolphin and run by the British Horseracing Authority in association with the Racing Post and Racing TV, the 2022 awards will carry prize-money totalling £128,500, with as much as £30,000 available to a single yard or stud. With judging and the ceremony having taken place virtually in 2021 due to the pandemic, 2022 will see a welcome return to the traditional format, with judging day for the finalists

80 THE OWNER BREEDER

The judge will be permitted to correct their raceday decision within five days of the race (subject to BHA confirmation) and enable the BHA to correct the decision within 14 days of the race, in line with the position under Rules. Further details on the point-to-point regulations can be found in the guides and downloads section at https://www. pointtopoint.co.uk/.

on February 21, 2022 before a London ceremony, at a venue to be announced. Nominations will close on November 9 and can be made online, simply by visiting the Godolphin Stud & Stable Staff Awards website at www. studandstablestaffawards.co.uk. Video submissions will be accepted in advance of the awards, ensuring that the nominations procedure is as fair as possible for all involved irrespective of their level of written communication and language skills. The 2022 judging panel will be chaired by broadcaster Nick Luck, who did so for the first time in 2021 having taken over from Brough Scott. As is traditional, the panel will feature the previous year’s Employee of the Year, Beck Edmunds.


ROA_PrintAds_Support_2.pdf

2

18/04/2020

10:17

At the ROA we work tirelessly to support, protect and promote the interests of racehorse owners everywhere. We collaborate across the industry to make sure that owners’ voices are heard within racing – making it a more open, enjoyable and rewarding sport for everyone. SUPPORTING YOUR OWNERSHIP JOURNEY AT EVERY STEP. DISCOVER HOW - ROA.CO.UK

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

SUPPORT AT EVERY STEP


ROA Forum

OWNERSHIP MATTERS K

with Khalid Almudhaf

halid Almudhaf has owned racehorses in Britain for 26 years. He was co-opted on to the ROA board in 2021. A businessman from Kuwait, he has been a member of the country’s main advisory body, the Supreme Council for Planning and Development. The best horses to run in the all-blue colours with a red star on the cap are Group 1 EP Taylor Stakes winner Lahaleeb and Group 2 Mill Reef Stakes winner Kessaar. What do you enjoy most about racing and owning racehorses? Racing is my abiding fascination – I hesitate to call something so allconsuming a hobby! Above all, I’m an owner because I love horses, and I’m an owner in Britain because I relish being able to compete at the highest level, in the best jurisdiction in the world. The spectacle and the history: British racing cannot be beaten! And, of course, the people in the racing community make it so enjoyable to be involved. It’s such a good-humoured sport, lively and such fun. What are the key matters that impact on your ownership experience? At the highest level, British racing has an unrivalled sense of occasion, and it’s wonderful to experience that as an owner. The competition here is so challenging that the sense of achievement when you find a diamond in the rough is unbeatable. Without wanting to harp on about it, it is undeniable that the level of prize-money falls well below other standards in the sport and simply doesn’t do racing justice. What does the racing industry do well for owners and which areas could be improved? The VAT Scheme is of great benefit in limiting costs and is essential to most owners. It’s great that the ROA has launched ROA VAT Solution to support owners with their VAT recovery. Racing here is also tremendous at showcasing its big events. Royal Ascot,

82 THE OWNER BREEDER

Khalid Almudhaf (right) with his Dee Stakes winner Azmeel

Goodwood, York – they are wonderful places to go as an owner, and you are made to feel special and valued. Not all racecourses have their resources, but I’ve not met many owners who are overly pleased to receive a ticket for one drink and a free sandwich. I would rather the racecourse spent their money on some small memento – I cherish owner’s fobs with my colours printed on, for instance. I particularly sympathise with syndicates and do feel racecourses should give them as many tickets as they need. I’ve been involved with syndicates and they are brimming with people who are completely passionate about the sport and the racehorse – the industry should do everything it can to nurture their enthusiasm. They are the bedrock of ownership and a great model for how the sport can widen the appeal of participation. What are your thoughts on welfare in relation to your horses in training and in terms of aftercare? This is where racing’s industry bodies must take the lead with enforcing rules and standards. What is an

unacceptable fate for a racehorse is, to my mind, unacceptable for any horse. Racing’s best protection is that Britain is an animal-loving nation with no tolerance of those who transgress the law. Police the rules stringently and protect horses by punishing wrongdoers who degrade these wonderful creatures. Which courses look after owners particularly well? The big ones at their festivals are hard to beat. I’ve been particularly lucky at Newbury. It’s a fine place to win a race and I have enjoyed having my party guided to a suite to review the race and start the celebrations. The key is understanding that owners are mostly motivated by sentiment and emotional attachment – the experience, and shared enjoyment of sport, is why so many of us find British racing irresistible. That said, I think it would be progress if there were accepted minimum standards of what an owner should expect, and a commitment that all racecourses should at the very least adhere to these standards.


INTRODUCING A QUICK, SLICK AND SIMPLE APPROACH TO YOUR RACING VAT When you own a racehorse, paying VAT along the way is unavoidable. But reclaiming yours is now easier than ever with the ROA VAT Solution. Whether you are an ROA member or not, allow our team to deal with HMRC on your behalf and take the trouble out of reclaiming VAT – giving you more time to focus on the sport you love. CALL OUR TEAM ON 01183 385685 TODAY OR VISIT ROA.CO.UK/VAT YOU PUT SO MUCH INTO THE SPORT. START GETTING MORE BACK.

RACING WITH ADDED VALUE


ROA Forum

Countdown to Making Tax Digital transactions are easily accessible. Syndicate and partnership entities can use Xero’s reporting features to view racing income and expenditure as well as reporting for individual racehorses, partners, syndicate members and services.

BILL SELWYN

Why ROA VAT Solution?

Owners can use the bespoke ROA VAT Solution to handle all VAT-related matters

Making Tax Digital is part of HMRC’s strategy to make it easier for individuals and businesses to get their tax right and keep on top of their affairs, along with their ambition to become one of the most digitally advanced tax administrations in the world.

How will MTD affect me?

From April 1, 2022 all VAT registered businesses, regardless of whether they meet the minimum turnover threshold, will have to submit their VAT return via MTD compliant software and store all VAT-related documentation digitally.

What does this mean for racehorse owners?

We know that our owners are involved in the industry because of their love and passion for the sport. Although owners do not consider their racehorse activities as a business, HM Revenue & Customs treats all VAT registrations in this manner, which means that all VAT-registered owners must submit MTD compliant VAT returns from April 1, 2022 using compatible accounting

software. Another significant requirement of MTD is that all VAT return-related documentation must be accessible in a digital format. The ROA VAT Solution ensures owners are covered on both fronts. Powered by Xero accounting software and HubDoc, secure document storage, compilation and submission of your VAT returns has never been easier.

How is the ROA VAT Solution managing the transition?

ROA VAT Solution has been securely storing digital files as well as compiling and submitting owners’ VAT returns via MTD using Xero accounting software since the launch of our service. Each client has their own bespoke Xero and HubDoc organisations, ensuring security, confidentiality, and readily accessible cloud storage for each individual client. In addition, accounts are set up using multi factor authentication for enhanced security. Owners can choose their level of involvement in the VAT return; all the VAT return information and racing

Spearheaded by Louise Norman, who has over 20 years of expertise in the racehorse owners VAT scheme, ROA VAT Solution is aligned with HM Revenue & Customs MTD requirement and is innovating and modernising the administration of horseracing VAT. Both senior VAT executives, Davina Grewal and Glen Hillsmith, are Xero Adviser and Anti-Money Laundering certified in addition to their bookkeeping credentials. As your appointed VAT agent, ROA VAT Solution will handle all queries from HM Revenue & Customs on your behalf. Our office will be listed as your principal place of business. In the event of an audit our team will be responsible for providing HM Revenue & Customs with any information that they require for their records.

How do I instruct ROA VAT Solution as my agent?

Instructing us to become your VAT agent is straightforward. If you are applying for a new VAT registration, or would like to transfer your VAT agent authorisation, please let us know and ROA VAT Solution will complete the application process on your behalf and we will take care of the rest. Visit www.roa.co.uk/vat for further details. If you have any additional queries, please do not hesitate to contact Davina or Glen on vat@roa.co.uk or call 01183 385685.

Appearance Money Scheme changes for 2022 The British Horseracing Authority has confirmed the following changes for the Appearance Money Scheme from January 1:

Flat and hurdle races

• Payments will no longer be made to seventh- and eighth-placed horses. • Qualifying races will continue to have

84 THE OWNER BREEDER

prize-money topped up down to sixth place to £300 for Flat races and £350 for jump races. • The savings made will be recycled into an incremental prize-money (IPM) payment to be added into the race to take it above minimum value. This will be £400 per qualifying race.

Chases

• Payments to continue to be made to all starters (£350), barring: • No payments to be made to horses rated below 74 • No additional top up payment to be made to chases For further details see roa.co.uk.


The original auction website where you can

BUY

&

SELL

Each advert contains an exclusive expert commentary and an extended pedigree at no extra charge. Perfect for horses in training, unraced horses and breeding stock. Entry fee only £110+VAT. Book today!

RACEHORSETRADER.COM 01483 273377

michael@racehorsetrader.com

THE OWNER BREEDER 85


TBA Forum

The special section for TBA members

Brits winning big all over the world

BILL SELWYN

T

he spread of British-bred winners around the world at the top level extended to six countries and three continents in September. Godolphin had a strong start to the autumn with a total of six individual stakes winners. Their month was highlighted by the assault of Charlie Appleby-trained homebreds at Woodbine. Walton Street got the ball rolling with an authoritative win in the Group 1 Canadian International, while the following day two juveniles, Wild Beauty (Frankel) and Albahr (Dubawi) took the Group 1 Natalma Stakes and Summer Stakes respectively. Woodbine was also the venue for the Bartisan Racing-bred La Dragontea, who took the Grade 2 Canadian Stakes. Godolphin’s sextet of stakes scorers was completed by the Dubawi pair of Benbatl and Yibir in the Group 2 Joel Stakes and Jockey Club Derby Invitational Stakes respectively, and by the juvenile filly Fleur D’Iris in the Group 3 Prix d’Aumale. Kirsten Rausing’s magnificent season continued with Alpinista (Frankel) landing back-to-back Group 1 victories

Emaraaty Ana (right) defeats Starman in the Group 1 Sprint Cup at Haydock

in Germany. She followed up August’s maiden top-level score with a win in the Preis von Europa. On the other side of the world, Zaaki continued his domination down under. He followed up his Group 2 Tramway Stakes win with an easy success in the Group 1 Underwood at Sandown. Another breeder to experience success in both hemispheres was Shadwell. Its

Glorious Journey: win in the Group 2 Park Stakes took his career earnings to £562,000

86 THE OWNER BREEDER

progressive three-year-old Baaeed brought up his fifth win from as many starts in the Group 1 Prix du Moulin at Longchamp. The following week at Flemington, Turaath (Oasis Dream) scooped the Group 2 Let’s Elope Stakes. September 11 was a notable day in the diary for Philippa Cooper’s Normandie Stud. The evergreen six-year-old Glorious Journey (Dubawi) took the Group 2 Park Stakes at Town Moor and 35 minutes later, Hurricane Lane – already the winner of the Irish Derby and Grand Prix de Paris this year – was an impressive winner of the Group 1 St Leger. In Ireland, Juddmonte’s Straight Answer won the Listed Blenheim Stakes, while across the Atlantic, Pocket Square renewed the stakes-winning thread in the Grade 3 Athenia Stakes at Belmont Park. A useful juvenile, Emaraaty Ana had regained form this season and the gelding’s consistency was rewarded with a maiden top-level win in the Sprint Cup at Haydock Park, where he held off the final flourish of fellow British-bred Starman. The final weekend of the Grosse Woche was a big one for Spanish-based trainer Guillermo Arizkoretta, scoring a Group-race double. Firstly, the Iffraaj mare Kitty Marion, who was bred by Glebe Stud Co Ltd, James Dean and Lady Trenchard, won the Group 3 Goldene Peitsche on the Saturday. The day after and it was the turn


of stablemate Rodaballo, bred by Aston House Stud, to win the Group 2 Oettingen Rennen. Amongst the juveniles to strike in Pattern company was Oasis Dream’s son Native Trail, winner of the Group 1 National Stakes at the Curragh. A few days before and the Cheveley Park Stud homebred Frankel filly Inspiral took the Group 2 May Hill Stakes impressively. The National Stud’s first-season sire Time Test really hit his stride in late August and September. The son of Dubawi was represented by a pair of Group 3 winners within the space of 24 hours. First up was Rocchigiani in the Zukunftsrennen at Baden-Baden. The second winner came courtesy of Romantic Time in the Dick Poole Fillies’ Stakes at Salisbury. She is a homebred of Elizabeth Haynes’ Wretham Stud. Another British-based first-season sire on fire is Overbury Stud’s Ardad and his daughter Eve Lodge gained that all important bold black-type when taking the Group 3 Sirenia Stakes against the boys at the beginning of the month. The same day and the Brian Haggas homebred Hamish caused a mild upset when winning the Group 3 September Stakes. The following day, but across the English Channel at Longchamp, Acer Alley and Bubble Smart were victorious in Group 3 company. The former, a homebred of Craig Bennett’s Merry Fox Stud Limited, defeated the boys in the Prix la Rochette, while the latter, another filly, won the Prix Gladiateur. In the US, Public Sector, a son of Kingman bred by The Kathryn Stud, maintained his position as one of the leading three-year-old colts with victory in the Grade 3 Saranac Stakes at Saratoga. A winner in Group 3 company at Doncaster’s St Leger meeting was Just Beautiful. The Essafinaat UK-bred filly took the Sceptre Stakes. Yarmouth’s feature contest of the year, the Listed John Musker Fillies’ Stakes, was won in good style by the Hunscote Stud and Chris Humber homebred Ville De Grace. In the Garrowby Stakes at York, the Littleton Stud-bred Great Ambassador gained a first stakes win. In France there was a Listed win for the Stanley House Stud-bred Quenelle D’Or, a daughter of Golden Horn, in the Prix des Tourelles, while in Italy, Cantocorale took the Listed Premio Marchese Ippolito Fassati and the Minster Stud-bred Calithea took the Listed Repubbliche Marinare. In the US there was further stakes success for the Meon Valley Studbred Value Proposition (Dansili).

Rossdales to provide Equine Infectious Disease service The Horserace Betting Levy Board (HBLB) has announced the implementation of key steps towards re-establishing on a long-term basis the essential equine infectious disease surveillance provision that had been performed by the Animal Health Trust (AHT) until its closure in July 2020. Acting on the recommendations of an industry-wide committee set up to assess options for the future, HBLB has concluded an agreement from August 2021 with Rossdales Ltd to provide the diagnostic microbiology testing capacity, arrangements that will work in conjunction with the epidemiological surveillance and monitoring unit that will now be based at the University of Cambridge Veterinary School. Alan Delmonte, Chief Executive of HBLB, said: “This is an important milestone in putting in place successor arrangements to the services that had been carried out by the Animal Health Trust for a long time. A full evaluation of the current situation and the equine sector’s requirements took place, including through a tender process that was announced by the BHA in 2020. Substantial work has been done by Stephen Atkin, who was retained to act as project manager of this complex area that has taken many months to consider. “As well as now engaging the widely recognised expertise of Rossdales, it will be welcomed that it has been possible to retain the previous AHT team headed by Dr Richard Newton. All in the equine sector are grateful to them for continuing to provide disease monitoring coverage and reaction to outbreaks given the challenging circumstances of the past year.” Since the closure of the AHT, the surveillance services have been provided by the former AHT team headed by Dr Richard Newton on a temporary basis under contract to the BHA. This team will be employed by Cambridge University under the new agreement and will continue to respond to disease outbreak incidents and to produce daily updates on infectious disease reports worldwide for the benefit of the health of all horses, thoroughbred and non-thoroughbred. Over the past year, diagnostics have

Richard Newton: heads monitoring team

been available to Dr Newton’s team on an ad hoc basis from Rossdales Ltd, funded by HBLB. Full coverage has therefore been maintained, meaning that the team was able to respond promptly and effectively to any incidents of disease. The new arrangements will span an interim period of at least two years while options for the longer term are considered and developed. Funding will be provided, as previously, by HBLB, racehorse owners and the TBA. Discussions are also being held with the sport and leisure horse interests regarding potential contributions in the future. In addition, HBLB has formed a representative oversight committee, with HBLB government-appointed member Anne Lambert as its chair. The membership will include representatives from HBLB’s Veterinary Advisory Committee, the TBA, the Racehorse Owners Association, the BHA and the non-thoroughbred sport and leisure sectors. This committee will have responsibility for monitoring the service in its initial phase and for designing plans for the future, with the paramount objective of safeguarding the national herd. Full engagement between the thoroughbred and non-thoroughbred sectors in respect of infectious disease management will underpin the work which includes the development of an epidemic risk management plan.

THE OWNER BREEDER 87


TBA Forum

Regional day proves a big hit with TBA members

Members enjoyed the visit to Kim Bailey's Thorndale Farm (left) and Overbury Stud, home of prolific first-season sire Ardad

Following the enforced hiatus, TBA members are once again able to enjoy regional days together. The sole day to be offered this year took place on September 21, where the morning was spent with Kim Bailey, before lunch, followed by an afternoon at Overbury Stud. Around 40 members converged at Bailey’s Thorndale Farm where the trainer, who is one of only a handful to have trained winners of the Champion Hurdle, Gold Cup and Grand National, gave a rundown of his horses for the season,

including last season’s Grade 1 Clarence House Chase winner First Flow. Others included National hopeful El Presente, Sandown Park Listed bumper scorer Flirtatious Girl and last season’s Graded-winning chaser Imperial Aura. Following the tour, members were able to view fourth lot, which included many of the potential stars of the season ahead, from the gallops, which are surrounded by beautiful countryside. Following a lunch at the thoroughly recommendable Fox and Hounds in Bredon, members found themselves at

Simon Sweeting’s Overbury Stud. A parade of stallions, including exciting first-season sire Ardad and the retired former king of the National Hunt stallion ranks Kayf Tara, preceeded Simon and his team showing off a raft of youngstock, including both Flat- and National Hunt-orientated foals. Members had a thoroughly enjoyable day and the TBA would like to thank the hosts for their hospitality. Each region will host its own day next year and members are advised to keep an eye out for details in the spring.

TBA Stud Farming Course returns The TBA’s ever popular Stud Farming Course is set to return this year and bookings for the three-day course are being accepted. The cost of the course is £395 for TBA members and their employees, and £495 for non-members. There are discounts for members sending four or more delegates. Ideal for breeders and stud employees who wish to update their knowledge ahead of the busy breeding season, the course will take place at the British Racing School, Newmarket, between Tuesday, December 7 and Thursday, December 9. The course will be delivered by industry experts and cover an extensive range of stud management topics, including mare reproductive

88 THE OWNER BREEDER

The 2019 delegates pictured with Frankel at Banstead Manor Stud

management, bio-security and infectious diseases, rearing of youngstock, grassland management, nutrition, sales preparation and stallion management. External visits to a stud and veterinary practice are also included and delegates have the opportunity to attend a dinner on the first evening of the course, which will provide an

opportunity to talk to fellow delegates, speakers and industry professionals. Bookings for the Stud Farming Course can be made through the events page of the TBA website. For more information or to register an interest, please contact Heather Ewence on heather.ewence@thetba.co.uk or call 01638 661321.


ADAM SMYTH

Ron Lott (left) of Shadwell Stud receives the Charlie Langton Bronze from Peter Stanley

TBA Stud Staff Employee Award winner: Ron Lott The TBA Stud Employee Award, kindly sponsored by Peter Stanley’s New England Stud, aims to recognise the significant contribution that stud employees make to the breeding industry and reward those who have shown dedication and excellence in their role. This can be through recognising notable performance over a long period of time, or exceptional performance in a specific situation. Stanley believes that those who run studs will appreciate that they could not do so without such magnificent people and the award is small in comparison to the hard work undertaken by employees. Open to anyone currently employed on a stud farm in Britain, nominations can be made by an employer, line manager, colleague, or client. Ron Lott, nominated by Shadwell Stud Manager Paul Holdsworth, was this year’s winner of the Stud Employee Award, presented at the TBA’s Flat Breeders’ Awards Evening in September. Ron, who was chosen from six shortlisted nominees, received a £2,000 cash prize and was presented with an engraved perpetual trophy in the form of a Charlie Langton Bronze. The remaining five shortlisted nominees, Bev

Woodley, Greg Hooley, John Rice, David Gardner and Antonia Neal, each received £250 and a certificate to recognise their achievement. “Ron commenced his career in the industry as a stallion handler at the age of 26 in 1981, working for Sir John Musker and joined the Shadwell team upon its purchase of the estate in 1984,” said Holdsworth. “Initially working at Melton Paddocks, the first stallion he looked after was the great Green Desert – the pair of them moved to Nunnery upon its completion at the end of 1988. “An outstanding horseman, Ron has proved this time and time again with colts starting their stud careers, having the unique blend of skills and understanding that is vital in the safe and successful management of the transition from racehorse to stallion. “His devotion to the health and welfare of the horses in his care knows no bounds and this was no more evident when Unfuwain, his favourite stallion, was nearing the end of his days. Dedicating his time to this great horse, he sat up and nursed him through radiation treatment, colic surgeries, even sitting up in the early hours of some cold February nights to be at his side until the end.

“One of Ron’s main attributes would be that despite fulfilling his role for over 40 years, he has never grown tired or lost any interest for his job and his enthusiasm has a positive impact on all those that he meets. Ron is keen to nurture and pass on his knowledge to the scores of students that have worked at Shadwell and is very much a father figure, who retains a delightful mix of traditional values with the ability to get the very best out of those around him." At the awards ceremony in early September, which was held at Chippenham Park, Ron said: “I couldn’t have had a better job in my life, it has been a great job and I would like to thank Shadwell for nominating me. There are a load of people in the industry who deserve this award, anyone who works in the industry does. "I’d like to thank the late Sheikh Hamdan for standing such good stallions and the staff at Shadwell, they have been brilliant – it is a big family environment.” When asked by host Gina Bryce what had bought him the most pride over the years, Ron replied: “Just handling these good horses – when they finish racing you are very lucky to get a good stallion, to handle them, to see them come along. "Also, at my age, to see the young lads coming through, working with such enthusiasm with the stallions. We always have a good bit of banter and it’s made it a special job.”

THE OWNER BREEDER 89


TBA Forum

TBA associate subscription – the perfect festive gift

Access to regional days are one of the benefits of becoming a TBA associate member

With the festive period just around the corner, the TBA's associate subscription is the perfect gift for friends and family. Priced at just £60, the subscription is ideal for those who are interested in the breeding industry, want to get involved and learn more. Offering access to race badge offers and discounted access to TBA events,

seminars and courses, subscription also gives access to webinars and resources on TB-Ed, as well as regular e-bulletins on industry news to keep you in the know. The TBA has also partnered up with the National Horseracing Museum in Newmarket to provide exclusive offers to TBA associates. See thetba.co.uk for more information.

Video series promoting optimum equine health and wellbeing launched Showcasing thoroughbred breeding, the TBA and Sandown Park racecourse joined together to host a Breeders’ Day event on Wednesday, September 15, which coincided with National Racehorse Week. The day, which saw all seven races sponsored by studs, featured activities for racegoers, including a QR trail in and around the parade and pre-parade rings, competitions, interviews with breeders, give-aways and a TBA trade stand. Members were entitled to two complimentary admission tickets, while there was also a paid luncheon. Breeders’ Day also witnessed the launch of a series of videos promoting optimum equine health and wellbeing

90 THE OWNER BREEDER

standards. The series, which consisted of five episodes, covers a range of topics including transportation of the mare and foal, vital signs of health and wellbeing in horses on stud farms, daily checks for horses at grass, management of older horses on stud farms and body condition scoring. Each episode, produced in collaboration with leading industry and veterinary professionals, provides an overview of the key principles within the respective topics and demonstrates techniques and benchmarks that optimise equine health and wellbeing. The videos are free to view and can be accessed by visiting TB-Ed at www.tb-ed.co.uk.

Change of ownership TBA members are reminded that it is a legal requirement that all horse owners register their ownership within 30 days of purchase with their passport issuing organisation. Weatherbys is the body that issues all passports for thoroughbreds registered with the General Stud Book. This legislation applies to all equines and so TBA members are reminded to ensure that any other horses in their ownership are also up to date with the requirements. Since becoming a legal requirement in 2018 and enforceable by Trading Standards, legislation also requires a horse’s passport is returned to Weatherbys to be updated with the new ownership details. Racing ownerships have been granted an exemption; however, when a horse comes out of training this exemption no longer exists. An owner of a horse in training should have previously registered their ownership with Weatherbys before the horse went into training unless they are the breeder, in which case the ownership is already correct. When a horse comes out of training and the racing ownership is terminated, the Weatherbys ownership (i.e. the ownership registered with Weatherbys before the horse entered training and was registered in the BHA database for racing purposes) becomes the valid ownership recognised by DEFRA and the Central Equine Database. Even if a racing owner retains ownership of a horse after it finishes racing, they will be required to register their continued ownership with Weatherbys – if they had not already done so prior to the horse going into training (unless they bred the horse).

Ownership changes must be registered with Weatherbys


£3.7m and counting... GBB — flying the flag for British-bred fillies and mares Our top three high-flyers: Dragon Bones

Blackberry

Anythingforlove

(Passing Glance ex Sainte Kadette)

(Brazen Beau ex She’s A Worldie)

(Black Sam Bellamy ex La Perrotine)

Breeder: All Things Rural Owner: Ian Williams GBB earnings: £70,000 Bonuses won: Four

Breeder: Simon Chappell Owners: Simon Chappell and partner GBB earnings: £60,000 Bonuses won: Three

Breeder: Dr B Mayoh Owner: Foxtrot Racing GBB earnings: £60,000 Bonuses won: Three

Meet GBB’s leading Flat broodmare: KISSABLE (Danehill Dancer ex Kitty O’Shea) Owned by Lordship Stud Dam to two bonus winners: Multiple-bonus winner FIVE STARS (Sea The Stars) Group 1 winner LOVING DREAM (Gleneagles)

Two of Kissable’s offspring have been GBB registered, which no doubt was a positive incentive in the purchase of the Sea The Stars filly (Five Stars), who has won two bonuses so far. Loving Dream has graduated out of the scheme, as it were, but that initial boost to her income certainly helped finance her progress. As far as we are aware, Kissable is the only broodmare to have had progeny win three GBB bonuses. GBB has been a lifeline to the fillies programme and to British breeders like us Trevor and Libby Harris, owners at Lordship Stud

GBB — working for everyone! Make sure you don’t miss out. Now for the Jumps season...Will your girl be next? For more information on eligibility, visit greatbritishbonus.co.uk

Information correct at time of going to press


Breeder of the Month Words Howard Wright

Sponsored by

Manufacturers of

BREEDER OF THE MONTH (September 2021)

As well as being a celebration of the victories of Glorious Journey and Hurricane Lane within 35 minutes of each other at Doncaster’s September meeting, the nomination of Philippa Cooper as the TBA’s Breeder of the Month has an unusual appropriateness. While much of the world turned to indirect communication during the Covid-19 pandemic, Cooper was already operating her Normandie Stud as a virtual entity. Having bought the West Sussex property in 1997 and built up an impressive catalogue of success over two decades, her decision to sell in 2017 was taken on the grounds of welfare, explaining: “I have more retirees than runners.” To accommodate the change, Cooper considerably downsized her broodmare band and distributed the remainder between Coolmore and Newsells Park Stud. Running a virtual stud “is working very well,” she says. “Environment is as important as genetics.” The downside, though, is the inevitable lack of hands-on involvement. “The problems during the lockdown meant I couldn’t go over to Ireland to see my mares and foals,” she explains. “I was sent lots of videos and was pleased they were there, because I simply want the best for my horses. But it meant I could only see them every two months or even longer, instead of three or four times a week when Normandie was a physical entity.” Cooper adds: “I missed the horses terribly, and when I did see the mares, I was very sad, thinking I wouldn’t see them again for some time. After the season I’ve had, I should be feeling positive, but in fact I’m quite despondent, for the stud

PHILIPPA COOPER

PHILIPPA COOPER

Philippa Cooper pictured with Classic hero Hurricane Lane, bred out of Gale Force

situation and for the industry in general.” Her mood lightens considerably when she looks back to that Saturday in September and recalls other recent breeding successes, including with Mohaafeth, winner of the Group 3 Hampton Court Stakes at Royal Ascot and subsequently fourth in the Juddmonte International, and Serve The King, winner of a Listed race at Saratoga and since runner-up in Grade 1 company. “Looking back, I’ve bred some wonderful horses,” she says. Yet, it seems, time is again catching up with her. “I’m up to 12 broodmares for next year,” she explains. “As quickly as I downsized, I seem to be back up again. I’m not selling yearlings, but I will sell two or three mares at next year’s December sales. I’ve kept too many two-year-olds, which I will probably sell at the horses in training sale. “Also, I’ve got my retired horses to look after. There are seven old girls, with another coming this year, and seven old boys. But you have to make your choices, and I decided to keep the three core families with whom I started out.” Her foundation mare, the unraced In

The Wings filly Agnus, is represented through her daughter Dolores, dam of Samuel, Duncan and Gretchen, with the other families emanating from Foodbroker Fancy, granddam of Mohaafeth, and nowretired Fallen Star, dam of Coronation Stakes heroine Fallen For You. Hurricane Lane, Cooper’s first British Classic winner as a breeder, and Glorious Journey, whose eighth win, in the Group 2 Park Stakes, took his earnings to £560,000, illustrate the balancing act she maintains. Glorious Journey is out of Fallen For You and represents Cooper’s most lucrative sale, when he fetched 2.6 million guineas to John Ferguson on behalf of Sheikh Mohammed at the Tattersalls Book 1 October Sale in 2016. “He’s a wonderful horse,” she says proudly, “So sound and genuine. Mr Reliable, in fact. It was a huge thing to top the sale with him; it meant so much, after years of rejection and horses not making as much as I valued them.” By contrast, Hurricane Lane’s dam Gale Force, bought for 270,000gns at the Tattersalls December Sale in 2015, returned there four years later as part of Normandie’s part-dispersal and made 300,000gns to Watership Down Stud. Earlier in 2019 at Tattersalls, Cooper sold four colts from a crop of six, including Mohaafeth for 350,000gns and Hurricane Lane for his reserve of 200,000gns. “I was thankful I was down as the breeder of Hurricane Lane,” Cooper says. “Whatever else happens, you can’t take that away. “I’ve generally bred the kind of horse that I would want to send my mares to, and Hurricane Lane combines stamina with speed and constitution. He wears his heart and soul on his sleeve.” Just like his breeder.

CALPHORMIN For Optimum SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT & CONFORMATION

INVEST IN THE FUTURE WITH... Photo Credit: TRM clients Sledmere Stud

www.farmstable.com

92 THE OWNER BREEDER

TM


IS YO U R CURREN T EG US T R E ATM EN T PERFO RMING?

EQ U I N E GAST R I C U LC E R SY N D R O M E ( EG U S ) A F F ECT S OVER 80% OF THOROUGHBRED HORSES IN TRAINING1 With nearly 20 years of robust studies, you can trust GastroGard® to help keep performance horses at the top of their game

370 mg/g oral paste for horses

N OT A L L T R E AT M E N T S A R E E Q U A L

Speak to your vet about using GastroGard® to treat and prevent EGUS. References: 1. Sykes BW, et al. ECEIM Consensus Statement – EGUS in Adult Horses. J Vet Intern Med 2015; 29: 1288-1299. GastroGard® 370 mg/g oral paste contains omeprazole. UK: POM-V IE: POM. Advice should be sought from the prescriber. Further information available in the SPC or from Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health UK Ltd., RG12 8YS, UK. Tel: 01344 746957. Email:vetenquiries@boehringeringelheim.com. GastroGard® is a registered the Boehringer Ingelheim Group. ©2020 Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health UK Ltd. All rights reserved. Date of preparation: Oct 2020. EQU-0200-2020. Use Medicines Responsibly.

GastroGard_racing_a4_TRAINER version.indd 1

26/10/2020 20:35


Vet Forum: The Expert View

Neonatal maladjustment syndrome in foals N

eonatal maladjustment syndrome (NMS) is one of the most common diseases of newborn foals. In this article we will discuss the underlying causes and how the syndrome can be recognised and treated. The syndrome has many names including ‘dummy foals’, ‘wanderers’ and ‘barkers’.

Cause of the syndrome

Historically, the syndrome has been attributed to oxygen deprivation at the time of foaling. This occurs in foals that experience a prolonged or difficult delivery. In these circumstances the supply of blood and oxygen via the umbilical cord and placenta is reduced, which leads to a decrease in the supply of oxygen and energy to the foal’s tissues. This can lead to severe organ damage. The organs most commonly affected include the brain, kidneys and intestinal tract. Foals that have experienced significant oxygen deprivation tend to show severe clinical signs and generally have a poorer outlook for survival. However, the condition also commonly occurs in foals without a history of dystocia or oxygen deprivation and should be considered a syndrome with multiple possible causes. A large subset of foals with NMS experience abnormalities in the birth transition process. In these foals, abnormal levels of steroid hormones are produced by the foetal brain and adrenal gland. These high levels of steroid hormones (progestagens) suppress the function of many organ systems including the brain and gastrointestinal tract. The cause of this abnormal hormone balance is not known but factors that are likely to play a role include placental disease or infection. In some foals that develop NMS it has been observed that foaling is unusually rapid and this has raised the possibility that the physical pressure of the birth canal may be an important stimulus for normal birth transition.

Clinical signs

Clinical signs occur from birth to three days of age. Neurologic signs are the

94 THE OWNER BREEDER

a

b

Figure 1 Neurologic clinical signs are common in foals with NMS. These foals are both demonstrating common signs – a: abnormal tongue position and poor suck reflex; b: pronounced head tilt

most common (Figure 1). These can range from a foal that appears slightly ‘slow’ to a foal that is completely unresponsive. Common signs include loss of suck reflex, lack of bonding to the mare, depression, head tilt and loss of tongue function. Some foals show signs of hyper-responsiveness

to stimulation with muscle rigidity and seizures. Other body systems are also commonly involved. Gastrointestinal problems are very common and foals can show signs of colic or diarrhoea. Many foals also have abnormalities in the control of respiration. This can cause

Figure 2 Foals with advanced disease or secondary complications such as sepsis often require a high level of intensive care


By Emily Floyd MRCVS abnormalities in breathing patterns. Renal dysfunction is also common.

Diagnosis

There is no specific test to diagnose the condition. Diagnosis relies heavily on clinical signs and the exclusion (or inclusion) of other problems. Careful veterinary examination and an accurate history usually gives a good indication as to the likelihood of the disease. Blood tests are often useful to assess how severely the foal’s body systems are affected.

Treatment

The majority of foals with NMS will survive if given early and appropriate supportive care. Many foals with mild NMS can be managed successfully on the farm. Early supportive care is the key to treatment. Secondary problems such as sepsis (infection) are very common and can rapidly be life threatening. Foals that have experienced a significant oxygen deprivation are much more difficult to treat and can require the highest level of intensive care (Figure 2). Treatment is aimed at supporting the foal’s body systems to allow time for the tissues to recover and the normal transitional processes to recover. Diligent nursing care and observation is critical. In the most mildly affected foals, treatment may be as simple as assisting the foal to stand and nurse from the mare every one-two hours. Careful attention should also be paid to the health of the mare and she should also receive a thorough veterinary examination. Placental infection, box rest and abnormal nursing behaviour from the foal can all have a negative impact on the mare’s uterine recovery,

Figure 3 The ‘squeeze’ procedure can improve clinical signs in some foals

which can lead to uterine infection and secondary problems such as laminitis. More severely affected foals will need a greater level of supportive care. Hospitalisation is recommended for these foals. Veterinary treatment usually involves careful fluid therapy and nutrition and antimicrobials to prevent infection. Drugs may be required to prevent seizures and to support the circulation. Anti-oxidant medication is usually given to foals that have experienced oxygen deprivation. There is a great deal of interest in ways to reduce progestagen concentrations to try to speed up the recovery of foals with high levels of these compounds. However, it is still not known whether this is an appropriate way to try and accelerate recovery in these foals or whether there may be a protective benefit from the high levels of these compounds. Medications have been tried but have unknown efficacy.

A technique called ‘squeeze-induced somnolence’ or the ‘foal squeeze’ has been developed over the last few years to try to recreate the physical pressure of the birth process (Figure 4). The idea behind this technique is that the physical pressure of foaling is an important trigger in the normal birth transition process. In some foals this leads to a dramatic and rapid improvement in their clinical signs. This procedure can be easily carried out using a soft cotton rope. Further instructions can be found at http://www.equineneonatalmanual. com/foalsqueezing

Prognosis

The outlook for foals with NMS is usually very good with appropriate supportive care. Reported survival rates range widely but can be as high as 80-90%. Foals which have experienced severe oxygen deprivation at birth are less likely to survive.

THE

Treehouse sporting colours

Want to advertise in the next issue?

Silks, Paddock Equipment and Safety Wear

Deadline for the DECEMBER issue is: Wednesday 17th November ads@anderson-co.com • 01380 816777 (UK) 041 971 2000 (IRE) • 1 888 659 2935 (USA)

www.treehouseonline.co.uk Tel: 01299 851625

THE OWNER BREEDER 95


Terry Warner has been a familiar face on the racecourse for more than half a century – this year is his 50th as an ROA member – and at the age of 89 he remains as passionate about our sport as ever. Relic’s Son, bought for just £1,000 with two friends, got him going as an owner by winning eight races in little more than a year and he calculates he’s now been involved in more than 370 winners. Some of them have been in small partnerships, like Kibreet, who gave Sir Anthony McCoy his first Festival winner in the 1996 Grand Annual, while others have been in sole ownership, like Rooster Booster, Detroit City, Oiseau De Nuit and Elixir De Nutz. Though jumping is his first love he has also had plenty of winners on the Flat, including two strikes in the Cesarewitch.

Interview: Graham Dench

Every year I have seven or eight horses, probably half on my own and half in partnership. If I’m in a partnership, it’s seldom one of more than three people and I prefer it that way. Partnerships work well socially and of course they share the expense. Currently we’ve got four of our own and four in half shares. We used to have them nearly all with Philip Hobbs, who won a lot of races for us, but I spread them around now and I have one with Philip, two with Fergal O’Brien, one with Olly Murphy, one with Tom George and three with the Tizzards. That way if a stable is having a bad run you’ve got a chance of a winner with one of the others. I saw Rooster Booster run third in a novice hurdle at Chepstow for Richard Mitchell and his daughter Sophie and said to a farmer next to me that I wouldn’t mind buying him. So, I tapped the trainer on the shoulder and we did a deal. It was quite a lot of money at the time; I tried a Gumball: one of Terry Warner’s talented dualpurpose performers

96 THE OWNER BREEDER

bit of bargaining, but I ended up paying the asking price and I’m very glad I did. He never stopped improving, winning nine races including a County Hurdle, a Greatwood, a Bula and a Champion Hurdle. He liked to be dropped out last, as he loved to overtake horses, and coming down the hill in the Champion Hurdle he was going so easily that Richard Johnson had to take a pull on him! Not long after Rooster Booster I had Detroit City. He would have been one of the best I’ve ever had but sadly he had a fatal heart attack at Ascot. He was still only five, but I think he won eight races on the trot after we first bought him from Jeremy Noseda, including the Triumph and the four-year-old hurdle at Aintree, and then the Cesarewitch, the Greatwood and the International Hurdle the following autumn. Both he and Rooster Booster were greys, and they’ve been lucky for me. I now get offered them all of the time. Trainers hate it, as they think it reflects on their ability, but I like to move my horses around from time to time as I think they can do well for a change. If horses go up the same bit of track two or three times every day they can get bored, as we would. I have no doubt that a change of routine can freshen them up, and I never fall out with a trainer over it. After I moved Gumball from Philip Hobbs to Fergal O’Brien he won first time out at York, and Philip was the first on the phone to say well done. Gumball had won on the Flat before but he’d been mainly chasing recently and going back on the Flat at York was Fergal’s idea.

Jumping has always come first but I can enjoy a day on the Flat. We were in the Royal Ascot Racing Club for quite a while so we went to Epsom when Motivator won the Derby. I’ve been lucky enough to have quite a few dual-purpose horses and both Detroit City and Big Easy were established as hurdlers by the time they won the Cesarewitch. Gumball, who we’ve already spoken about, is another, and we made a weekend of it when he won up at York, getting our son-in-law to drive us up there and staying the night before and the night after. At 89 that’s how I like to do it now if they are running far away. Prize-money is very disappointing nowadays and I can understand why people complain so much about it. We know what the situation is when we go into ownership, so it’s no surprise, but it needs to improve if we are to keep bringing more new owners in. Racing is my pleasure, and I can indulge myself, but despite averaging seven or eight winners a year, I’ve probably covered my costs only about three times in 50-odd years. I love the Cheltenham Festival and I’ve been lucky enough to have had nine winners there. I went for many years when it was just a three-day Festival and I liked it like that. I wasn’t in favour of a fourth day but it’s actually worked out fine. We like to go every day and, while we are only 15 miles away, I think five days would be too much. It’s bound to come, though. It’s all about money, isn’t it? I’ve had good winners at Aintree too and we go to the Grand National most years. I had a share in Ultragold who jumped round those fences six times, winning the Topham twice, but when we ran him in the National he didn’t get the trip. A Grand National horse would be lovely, but winners at Cheltenham are always special. I’d love another one there.

BILL SELWYN

I

’m a farmer’s son, but farming wasn’t for me. My business was in sports shops; I started with one in Gloucester and ended up with 22, before selling up after I had a heart attack at Uttoxeter about 25 years ago. Heart attacks were a bit more serious then than they are now, but mine wasn’t that bad luckily, as I was only in hospital for a week or so, and I’ve had no after effects. We met some lovely people as we were building up the business, and we did a lot of travelling too as buyers, so it was a great life. Then when we sold up we did very well out of it.

GEORGE SELWYN

The Finish Line with Terry Warner


All eyes on his first European crop of 128 2yo runners in 2022 Buyers of his phenomenal first European yearlings include: Avenue Bloodstock (x4), Peter & Ross Doyle (x3), Longways Stables (x2), Church Farm & Horse Park (x2), Amanda Skiffington, Bryan Smart, Charlie Gordon-Watson, Federico Barberini, Hugo Palmer, Kevin Ross, Margaret O’Toole, Stephen Hillen, etc.

“He’s a beautiful first foal, a big athletic strong horse with a great walk – one of the nicest horses we’ve seen at Book 1”. Mick Kinane Hong Kong Jockey Club

Colt ex Rue Cambon Purchased for 110,000Gns as a foal and sold for 310,000Gns as a yearling

Filly ex Permission Sold for 280,000Gns to Amanda Skiffington

Colt ex Herecomesthesun Sold for 200,000Gns to Mick Kinane, on behalf of the Hong Kong Jockey Club

Filly ex Felissa Purchased for 50,000Gns as a foal and sold for 185,000Gns as a yearling

Contact Hannah Wall or Alice Thurtle at Tweenhills E: hannah@tweenhills.com E: alice@tweenhills.com T: +44 (0) 1452 700177


A Derby hero, a Champion juvenile and a Champion sprinter. Now with first foals heading for the sales ring – and the winners’ enclosures of tomorrow. Masar, Too Darn Hot and Blue Point. They’re breeding the future.