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Hoofbeat

January 2013

Charles D. Owen High School 99 Lake Eden Rd. Black Mountain, NC 28711

Listen. Learn. Speak. Vol. 113 Number 3

Owens wins first place for second year Again, senior Carly Owens has received a blue ribbon for her gingerbread house and had it taken to NYC to be shown on the Good Morning America TV show. By Yasemine Akduman Staff writer Oh snap! This year, senior Carly Owens won first place in the teen division of the Grove Park National Gingerbread House Competition for the second year in a row. Every year more that fifty teens submit one-of-a-kind gingerbread houses to the competition. It’s extremely competitive and hundreds of people from all across the United States enter the contest to try and win. “It’s a huge honor to win first place two years in a row,” Carly said. The main concern for Carly during the holiday season is getting her gingerbread house completed. Balancing school with a part-time job is no easy task especially if you’re applying to colleges. “I spent over 100 hours on my gingerbread house and lots of planning and organizing went into this project,” she said. This year, Carly chose a Muppets theme for her gingerbread house because “Everyone loves the Muppets. Its

new people every year. “I most enjoy meeting all the talented artists that compete each year. I especially enjoy meeting the elite panel of judges because they provide wonderful feedback and can present many opportunities,” Carly said. During this year’s competition she met a curator from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. “It’s not everyday when a famous chef tells you that he enjoyed your work so much that he had to save pictures of it to his phone,” Carly said. Carly’s culinary endeavors have influenced her education and career choices. photo by Linda Owens “I can remember tellCarly Owens adds finishing touches to her gingerbread house at the Grove Park Inn. Carly entered the ing a chef from Charteen division of the Grove Park National Gingerbread Competition and came in first place for the sec- lotte about my desire to ond year in a row. Her gingerbread house had a Muppets theme, a theme she said appeals to people of go to the Savannah Colall ages. She hopes to enter the adult division of the competition next year. lege of Art and Design, and he told me that he would arrange a meet“The thing that might surprise most something that appeals to all ages.” ing between me and a famous sugar people,” Carly said, “is that I only spent The hardest part of her house was artist based out of Savannah, Georgia, about $20 on my gingerbread house.” planning and creating 38 individual which was really cool.” This year was Carly’s fourth year comcharacters out of sugar. Carly chose Next year Carly will be able to peting at the Grove Park. She considers it a her theme just days after winning first compete in the adult division, which is great learning experience and meets many place in the teen division last year. much more competitive.

In this Issue... (Opinion 2-6)

Role of religion in school

(Features 7-15)

N.C .Poet Laureate Comes to Owen

(Sports 20-24)

Swim team doubles in size

Go to our online Web site


January 2013

Should the United States legalize marijuana? Controversey: The drug marijuana has been illegal in The United States since 1952. In the last election, Washington state and Colorado both legalized marijuana for recreational use, and 18 states have already passed laws to legalize medical marijuana. Arguments on both sides have come to national attention again. cancer patients. This could stop cancer from advancing in a patient and allow physicians to By Connor Ferry treat the patient’s priCo Editor-In-Chief mary cancer. In the Digital JourIs prohibition working? nalist, a study showed Statistics prove that more people are using that cancer patients usmarijuana in spite of its illegal status. According marijuana saw their FERRY ing to a survey done by The National Institute appetites returned and of Drug Abuse, drug abuse by people age 12 and were able to eat, keeping their chemotherapy up, has risen since 2002. treatments from being stopped because they These numbers declined in 2007 but have could now be safely treated. been steadily climbing since. If the government A survey by In The Know Zone found that 21 were to legalize marijuana, it could be used in percent of sophomores in high school are users medicine, regulated for recreation, and give the of marijuana. If marijuana was decriminalized, economy a boost. these sophomores would receive punishment as Marijuana was not always illegal in America. if they were drinking underaged and not be put There were laws passed as early as 1906 classify- in jail and given a serious criminal record. ing marijuana as a poison, but when marijuana Studies done by Patients for Medical Canbecame the target of Yellow Journalism, it was nabis show that marijuana is a non-habit formmade illegal with mandaing drug, unlike nicotine and tory sentencing in 1952. “21 percent of alcohol which both lead to seThe so called, “Devil’s vere physical withdrawals after sophomores in Weed” received its reputayears of use. Because marijuation for violence because of high school are us- na is non-habit forming it is a the work of one man. ers of marijuana.” better alternative than using William Randolph -In The Know Zone opiates for pain relief. Hearst, the owner of the Many pain patients use nation’s largest newspaper opiates for relief. These opiates can cause serious chain in 1905, targeted marijuana in his pub- damage to their kidneys and liver if mixed with lictions because its cousin plant, hemp, was alcohol. These opiates can also lead to depenan alternative to paper, and its use could have dency and addiction. The use of marijuana in devalued his forests.Hearst had his papers run these cases could help prevent kidney and liver stories that slandered marijuana. In his paper, damage as well as addiction. The San Francisco Examiner, it was written that, In Colorado, where marijuana has been le“Marihuana makes fiends of boys in thirty galized, it is speculated by the Colorado Center days—Hashish goads users to bloodlust.” on Law & Policy that the legalization and reguMany Americans still believe these blatant lation of marijuana can raise an average of 60 lies. While, according to the National Cannabis million dollars for Colorado’s budget. If other Prevention Centre, marijuana makes users less states could implement the same measures i prone to violence because it acts as a sedative. that Colorado has, they could expect a large inOne man along with Yellow Journalism was crease in savings and revenue. able to make marijuana illegal in the early twenIn 2005, Dr. Jeffery Miron, a guest professor tieth century. Now, science and research are at Harvard, found that by legalizing marijuana proving the marijuana should be legal. and taxing it, the United States could increase According to the Huffington Post, a chemical the the economy from 10 billion to 14 billion compound derived from marijuana could stop dollars per year. The paper was endorsed by 530 the spread of secondary malignant growths in economists and was signed by President Bush.

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Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana Web site said, “[Marijuana] is also known to cause respiratoBy Morgan Dale ry and reproductive probStaff writer lems, mental illness, birth defects and irreversible This year marked the first year that states in brain damage, especially America voted to make recreational marijuana for young people.” Also legal. according to C.A.L.M., it DALE Colorado and Washington passed laws has been proven that there that made marijuana legal November. In is four to five times more carcinogens in marithese states, citizens have to be 21 or older to juana than in cigarettes. have marijuana and can only have up to one These days more and more kids are trying ounce in their possession. Washington passed marijuana; some even start at the age of 12. This Initiative 502, which regulated the taxes on year also marks the first time that the use of marijuana. Colorado passed Amendment 64 marijuana by teenagers has surpassed the use of that made the taxation of marijuana similar to cigarettes by teenagers. tobacco and alcohol. It is estimated by the AsAccording to the Centers for Disease Control sociated Press that the taxation of marijuana and Prevention the numbers were 23 percent of could generate revenue of around $5 million to high school students smoking marijuana to 19 $22 million. percent of cigarettes smokers in A strong argument for “There is more high school. legalized marijuana use than five times the Contrary to the belief of advois tax revenue. However, cates for the use of marijuana, this tar and carcino- drug can be extremely addictive. compared to tobacco and alcohol revenue, the profit gens in marijuana This means that their dependence doesn’t even cover the cost on this drug will only get worse. of enforcing regulation. than in tobacco.” These are not ideas that have been -C.A.L.M CNBC says “Alcohol-rebrought about to have an effective lated costs total over $185 side in this drug war; it is science billion while federal and state collected an esti- that cannot be ignored. mated $14.5 billion in tax revenue.” The same Citizens cannot overlook the health probis true with tobacco. lems no matter what the revenue possibilities. The federal government still does not rec- Nobody’s well-being is worth that money. ognize marijuana as legal, and it still doesn’t Marijuana is also a “gateway drug” to harder, change even when states enact a law to make it more dangerous drugs. By making marijuana legal. In fact it will probably prompt a Constitu- legal, it will only increase the number of people tional showdown and its case will be brought to using the drug, not decrease it. the Supreme Court level. It will inevitably turn Also making it legal, will allow teens under into a war between the federal government and the age of 21 to obtain the drug easier, just as the states that passed the law. they do with alcohol and tobacco. Also Congress can punish states for makThe legalization of marijuana should not be ing marijuana legal by not giving them federal seen as a type of “liberation’ for people to be able highway funds. to use this drug but rather as a constraint on the On top of the issue of marijuana still being government being able to control the drug. If illegal, there is also the issue of how harmful the states chose to legalize drugs America will only drug is for people’s bodies. see an increase in the number of people using There is more than five times the tar and marijuana and also an increase in health probcarcinogens in marijuana than in tobacco. The lems in the United States.

COUNTERPOINT

Point/Counterpoint is a means of debating an issue. The opinions expressed are not necessarily the opinions of the students writing them.

January 2013

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Better mental health care, gun control needed STAFF EDITORIAL We’re tired of it. Will we ever feel safe again, to walk into a theater and enjoy a movie or go off to school to learn, without having to end up hiding for our lives inside our own classroom. According to The Nation, there have been sixteen mass shootings in America this year. Those killed were shot randomly and at random places from movie theaters to elementary schools. The death toll is now at 84. What will it take for Americans to do something about these horrible incidents? Experts say that risk factors for possible shooters include social isolation and rejection, which are found in many people across the United States. Even though they suffer from a mental illness, those types of people are most likely to be harmful. Massacres can happen at any time or place. While the risk factors are true of all people who commit these crimes, having those factors can’t predict that a specific person will do anything ever. That is the problem Fifteen minutes into the midnight premiere screening of Batman: The Dark Night Rises on July 20, 2012, a man in body armor and wearing a gas mask entered the Century Aurora 16 movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado, through an emergency exit. The gunman, James Holmes, 24, was equipped with a rifle, pump shotgun, two handguns, and over 6,000 rounds of ammunition which he had purchased at gun shops and over the Internet in the recent months. After entering, he tossed two canisters of tear gas into the theater and began firing on the audience. According to CCN, survivor Jennifer Seeger said she had seen the man and thought his get-

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up was part of the entertainment for the film’s debut. Holmes had colored his hair red and told the police he was the Joker. Twelve people were killed and 58 injured. “It was a scene straight out of a horror film,” Chris Ramos, also in the theater, said to CNN. But why do such dreadful tragedies occur? Do people just think about themselves these days? “There has to be something wrong with them to commit such crimes,” sophomore Sydney Raines said. The general consensus is that two elements of these massacres are access to guns and mental illness. Those two elements were present in Aurora, Colorado, and Newtown, Connecticut. Adam Lanza, killed his own mother at her home and then drove off to Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, and killed 20 students and six faculty members before turning a gun on himself at on December 14, ten days before Christmas. He had also attended this school when he was younger and has been described as quiet and socially awkward. Mental health issues were present, as was access to semi automatic guns. A major New York Times investigation, in 2000, examined 100 shooting rampages and found that at least half of the killers showed signs of serious health problems. According to Brownells, mental illness among the killers is no surprise. Half of all cases of mental illness begin by age 14, as stated in the National Institute of Mental Health. But it can take decades for those afflicted to get the treatment they need. The two beginning points to doing something about these massacres are obvious. Our legislators must do something about providing help for the mentally ill, and they must do something about access to semi automatic guns. Our lives depend on it.

Editorial Cartoon

Connor Ferry and Sarah Gilmour, Editors-in-Chief Adrienne Hollifield, Faculty Adviser Jessie Woodward, Assistant Editor Caitlyn Page, Photography Editor Lauren Nalley, Ad Manager Listen. Gisselle Villegas- Acosta and Yasemine Akduman, Business Managers

Learn. Speak. Staff writers: Max Alford, Mikayla Atwood, Logan Ballew, Hannah Box, Kristen Briscoe, Kailanne Burleson, Meara Cunningham, Morgan Dale, Rush Dittbrender, Laine Everly, Emma Farr, Jocelyn Franks, Makenzie Furman, Hannah King, Meaghan Mascitelli, Kevin McDaniel, Chris McHone, Julie Midkiff, Cassidy Moseley, Aubrey Meyers, Dalton Nickerson, Luke Rathbone, Allison Weber

By Laine Everly

The Hoofbeat is published by the staff at Charles D. Owen High School, 99 Lake Eden Road, Black Mountain, North Carolina 28711. (Telephone 828-669-3852) We welcome letters to the editor, free-lance articles, and suggestions. The paper is printed by The Star, Shelby, North Carolina. Views expressed are not necessarily those of the administration or the faculty. Signed columns, except for point/counterpoint, are solely the opinion of the writer. We reserve the right to edit letters to the editor for space and content considerations. The Hoofbeat is a public forum for students to express their opinions and is a member of JEA, NSPA, SIPA, and NCSMA. See our online newspaper at the following Web site: www.hoofbeatonline.net


Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

January 2013

REM sleep, dreams essential to well-being COMMENTARY By Cassidy Moseley Staff writer Sleep and dreaming have long been mysteries to many people, but scientists are uncovering much information in this area. MOSELEY Sleep can revive a tired body, build up resistance to infection and help people recover from too much stress. Often teens, however, do not get the sleep they need. “I get about four hours of sleep,” sophomore Kelsey Buchanan said. The kid’s health says teens need about nine hours or more of sleep a night. Recent studies have shown that teenager’s circadian rhythm, or biological clock, is temporarily reset telling teens to fall asleep later and wake up later. “[I would go to bed] from like 3 a.m. to 3 the next day,” Kelsey said. There are brain hormones that start getting produced later at night in teens, making it harder to fall asleep early. Starts to school

may be a factor in this. Many people have trouble remembering details of their dreams or they think they don’t dream at all. According to Psychology: Principles in Practice, people dream up to five times a night because people sometimes can not hold information from one state of consciousness to another (dreaming to awake). Dreams are typically the unconscious mind trying to bridge understanding with the conscious mind. Sometimes people dream in “real” time. If the dream felt like ten minutes, it probably was ten minutes. People go through the four stages of sleep about five times a night in a normal eight hours of sleep. Stages of sleep are defined by brain waves. The first stage of sleep is very light. Alpha rhythm brain waves slow to Thea waves. It lasts about 30 to 40 minutes and people who are awakened during stage one usually say they feel as if they haven’t slept at all. Next, people descend into stages two, three, and four while producing delta waves. Four is the deepest stage of sleep. After about 30 minutes of stage four sleep, sleepers quickly climb back up the stages to stage one. At this point, the person has been asleep for about 90 minutes. Then people start to breathe more irregular breathing, blood pressure rises, heartbeat

By Aubrey Meyers Staff Writer

photo illustration by Kevin McDaniel

becomes faster, and brain waves become similar to stage one sleep. This is called REM sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. The eyes move rapidly under closed lids. All the stages before REM sleep are known as NREM sleep, or non-rapid eye movement sleep, where the eyes don’t move much at all. As the night goes on periods of REM sleep get longer. In some studies animals and people have been deprived of only REM sleep. Some psychologists believe that we have a “REM rebound.” We catch up with REM sleep by getting more of it next time we sleep. REM sleep is important to psychological functions such as learning. People who don’t get enough REM sleep tend to learn slower and forget what they learn faster.

REM sleep may help the development in infants and “exercise” the brain cells in adults. When people dream in REM sleep they are more likely to be vivid clear images and plots that make sense even if some events aren’t realistic. The dreams in NERM sleep are often vaguer and the images more fleeting. NERM sleep is also where things like sleepwalking and night terrors happen. In an experiment 80 percent of deaf people reported dreams where they could hear, talk, and understand spoken words. Younger people tend to dream in color more often then older people. Most dreams, especially in REM sleep early in the night, are often extensions of the previous day.

COMMENTARY By Luke Rathbone Staff writer Chicken nuggets, sloppy joes, pepperoni pizza, and beans seasoned with ham. Vegetarians and vegans do not have many vegetarian RATHBONE options in the school cafeteria. Most non-carnivores bring their own lunch to school. “What vegetarian options?” junior Sage Churchill said. Students have a variety of reasons for being vegetarian. “I was born into it,” Sage said. “My en-

nutrition. “The food here that is actually vegetarian doesn’t really make a balanced/complete meal,” Sage said. Cafeteria manager Brooke Hudgins thinks otherwise. “We have plenty of options. It’s just the kids are too picky to chose them all,” Hudgins said. She said that the back line in the cafeteria has more options for vegetarians than the other two lines do. The reason there aren’t many vegetarian foods in the cafeteria is because the government requires only so many of certain food groups. If the school had a salad bar like it used to, vegetarians say they would have the options they want. However, according to Hudgins, even if the cafeteria had the salad bar, they couldn’t control the amount of nutrients the students obtained.

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

Stop and smell the roses. Though this cliche may be cheesy to some people, it is something every single person needs to do. MEYERS With school, work, relationships, and other events that effect them, students experience a lot of stress. With all the commotion, they forget the many things that they should be thankful for. Teenagers, especially, should take advantage of things some individuals would do anything to have. Material things have become more important than what truely matters, like nature’s scenery and, most importantly, life itself. The appre-

ciation of the simple things of life seems to be going gradually downhill. Most people don’t realize how much they value something until it’s gone. Life may throw up unexpected obstacles that cause anger to build up towards a family member or friend, but what if something was to happen to that person? Advantage is taken way too often of the people we claim to care about the most. Violent events that have taken place in this chaotic world have changed many people’s perspectives. Parents used to drop their children off to school routinely every morning. Now, parents have more of an appreciation in what they do every day. People feel more thankful for what they have once there is a heart-breaking wake-up call. Some individuals take for granted the beauty of nature that is all around us. They think it’ll always be around or it’s nothing new. The seasonal changes are new though, and everything about nature and how it takes it’s course, is beautiful. People in Western North Carolina are blessed with a spectacular environment that people travel from afar to see. Yet few students at

“I’m procrastinating on purchasing my mom’s birthday present.” Laura Long, sophomore

“I don’t procrastinate, I get it done.” Grace Drummond, freshman

photo by Luke Rathbone

Junior Sage Churchill’s vegetarian lunch includes fruit, crackers and a sandwich. The lack of entrée options is a stumbling block for students who don’t eat meat. “I mean, it’s cool that we have more [vegetarian foods] than we used to,” Sage said. “But if there aren’t that many [vegetarian] entrées, what’s the point?”

Opinion 5

Carpe diem: Do not take life for granted COMMENTARY

Cafeteria food lineup lacks vegetarian entree options tire family was vegetarian at one point, and that’s just how I’ve been.” Other students are vegetarian simply because they don’t like meat. “[Meat] just doesn’t taste good. I don’t like it,” sophomore Chiah Hartwiger said. Vegetarians have to be careful about what they eat, according to sophomore Michael McIntosh. “If you’re a vegetarian then you’re completely ruling out one whole food group, and even though you can still get the necessary nutrients, you have limited resources,” he said. Sage brings foods such as hummus, a PB&J sandwich, crackers, assorted fruit, and gummies. While the cafeteria does supply some of these options, for the most part, Sage doesn’t believe that the vegetarian options provide the needed

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“Right now I ’m procrastinating on getting my drivers permit.” Izaak Birtch, freshman

Owen participate in the hiking, rafting, rock climbing, canoeing, and the pure enjoyment of nature that others come to see. These things are available to us everyday, but rarely does anyone take the time to soak in all the beauty and appreciate all that we are blessed with. If more people realized how good we really have it, photo by Logan Ballew life would be more Rattle Snake Falls is one of many hiking trails in the WNC area. joyful and peaceful all around. The amount of complaining that occurs dai- have, and discontinued dwelling on some things ly should be replaced with graditude and appre- we don’t have, it would brighten up the world ciation. If we focused on the many things we do and would make the world a better place.

Question of the Month Compiled by Lauren Nalley Staff writer

What are you procrastinating on right this moment?

“Right this moment I’m procrastinating on studying.” Travis Robinette, senior

“ I’m procrastinating on cleaning my room.” Shelby Decker, junior

“I’m procrastinating on buying a teddy bear for my valentine.” Dylan Mascitelli, sophomore


Opinion

January 2013

School system mandates community infomation fair COMMENTARY By Laine Everly Staff writer The line that separates church and state has become nothing more than a ghost of the past for public school systems. In a rapidly rising issue of controversy, the Buncombe County School System made it mandatory for all schools in the district to hold a “community information event” once every school year, where both religious and nonreligious organizations are permitted to pass out informational pamphlets or other materials. In a December board meeting of the Buncombe County School District, two minutes were allotted for members and attendees to discuss the matter on the table: the integration of religious and nonreligious materials in the school system. What many citizens were surprised to find was that the discussion was not even taken to a vote and, despite the fact that the majority of people present were

in disagreement with it, the new regulation was put into effect in all schools county-wide. While offering students access to religious materials, nonreligious organizations are also thrown in the mix in a form of a community event, and can give the students opportunities to expand their knowledge on topics that may otherwise be unattainable for them. Although this may be seen as positive, parents may not see it as the type of environment they would want their children experiencing. An additional issue was raised by board members at the meeting to clarify a concern that schools’ focus remains set on what they were originally designed for -- academics. This new regulation requires the principal of each school to organize a yearly event that allows for multiple religious and nonreligious organizations to set up and distribute religious materials. Unfortunately, this places all jurisdiction concerning the allowance and rejection of said organizations in the hands of the principal.

In the News

Compiled by Makenzie Furman Staff writer

DECA Club succeeds at competition

The DECA Club members competed in DECA-District 8 MCEC Competition on Wednesday, November 28. Amber Douglas was the Overall District 8 winner, winning out over 175 participants. Amber was also a first place winner in Sports and Entertainment Marketing. Kendra Wheeler, Sierra Gerringer, Jessie Kuykendall and James Hooper were medalists for high-test scores or role plays in Principles of Marketing. Taylor Buchanan and Jeremy Myers were proficiency winners in testing or role plays. These students are now eligible to continue their success at State Competition in Greensboro, NC, in March 2013.

New library assistant chosen

Former custodian Holly VanDonkelaar is now the new library assistant. She said although she is working a new job, she doesn’t feel new because everyone already knows her. She is also currently a student at Mars Hill, studying to be a teacher. This is VanDonkelaar’s third year working at Owen.

According to Asheville Citizen Times, Principal of the Year Meg Turner said, “With this policy we are left to decide who gets to bring what religious materials into our schools and to organize all these groups with very opposing viewpoints into a fair, cohesive event…It’s a mistake to leave this in our laps.” Groups wanting to participate in this event must either be admitted or rejected by the principal. However, according to the regulations, organizations are not required to heed the principal’s approval for literature intended for distribution. Although the event would be held after school hours, the groups would be organizing on school property and by the allowance of the principal. This breach of the boundary between church and state is only the beginning of mass controversy, which had,

photo courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

until recently, been kept relatively distanced from school systems. “Let the churches teach religion,” said author Fred Flaxman. “Let the schools teach our children reading, writing, arithmetic, science, music, languages, etc. Most of all, let them teach kids how to think critically.”

Early graduation ceremony on Saturday

The early graduate’s ceremony is on Saturday, January 26, starting at 2 p.m. at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. The snow makeup day is Sunday, January 27, at 3 p.m. There are unlimited tickets.

Not too late to apply for college

Senior guidance counselor Kitty Kelly said that it is not too late for seniors to apply for college. Also scholarships are available particularly during second semester. See a counselor at guidance for more information.

Financial Aid Day is Saturday, February 23

Financial Aid FAFSA Day is Saturday, February 23. Families can go to the Credit Union or UNCA to receive help completing FAFSA forms for college. Interested parties must pre-register at CFNC.org ABTech is coming on January 21 to enroll students for the fall 2013 and help students apply for scholarships.

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New classes available to students By Meaghan Mascitelli Staff writer

With registration in February this year, students need to acquaint themselves with the options available. More information about classes can be found on Career Cruising. Career Cruising is located on the school Web site, on the right side, under the links for the Moodle and the Hoofbeat Online. Students have access to assessment quizzes, like Career Matchmaker, which helps students assess what career might be right for them, and the Learning Styles Inventory that tells students what type of learner they are. In addition the portfolio, has other helpful tools like the resume builder, a course planner where students can plan out the classes they want to take next year, information about how to get scholarships, financial aid, and search for the schools that they might be interested in. There are many different ways that one can benefit from using Career Cruising.

New classes being offered or brought back for next semester and next year: Biomedical Technology: This course challenges students to investigate current medical and health care practices using technology and advances in health care research. Topics include ethics, forensic medicine, infectious diseases and organ transplants. No prerequisites required. Criminal Justice: There are two groups of courses offered, group one includes Criminology Relations, which introduces deviant behavior as it relates to criminal activity; Criminal Law, which covers the history, evolution, principles and contemporary applications of criminal law; and Investigative Photography, which covers the operation of various photographic equipment and its application to criminal justice. In group two, the courses offered are Ethics and Community Relations, Constitutional Law, and Interviews and Interrogations.

CTE Advanced Studies Sports Medicine and Fitness: This course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits in the Health Science cluster. This is an honors level course and is to prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation revolving around their experiences in Sports Medicine. Carpentry 1: This course covers basic carpentry terminology and develops technical aspects of carpentry with emphasis on development of introductory skills. The prerequisite required is the Core and Sustainable Construction course. Carpentry 2 and Carpentry 3 are also being offered.

Students watch the predicted growth of careers he said. Researchers say biomedical engineers, who are health care engineers, who help with the production of organs, In the present economy, getting a job is will be in demand so Jose is right. difficult. Senior Anna Stewart thinks, “ClothThe Bureau of Labor Statistics identified ing designer will be needed, because twenty jobs that are expected to grow rapthey are always coming out with new idly between now and 2018. These twenty clothes.” jobs are identified as most in demand in Each job has a reason for growing. the U.S. economy. For example, Students networking syshave differ“ ...a financial person will be tems companies ent ideas of in demand, because that is what will continue to what jobs upgrade techwill be in people will be doing..." nology and will demand in need to expand the future. their IT workSopho- Monica Valdez force. more MonPredicting ica Valdez what jobs will be still available in the fusaid that, “that a financial person will be in ture has become a game. Only the future demand, because that is what people will can tell if the statistics are true. be doing, or a farmer because people will The statistics chart gives informawant to eat food.” tion as to the projected growth in jobs Senior Jose Garcia has a different idea. “Producing organs from different items,” between 2008 and 2018. By Meara Cunningham Staff writer

Name of job:

Percent Change over 10 years 72

Number of new Jobs projected 11,600

Annual Median Salary $77,100

Network systems

53

155,800

$71,100

Home health aides

50

460,900

$20,460

Personal and home care aides

46

375,800

$19,180

Financial examiners

41

11,100

$70,930

Medical scientists

40

44,200

$72,590

Physician assistants

39

29,200

$81,230

Skin care specialist

38

14,700

$28,730

Biochemist and biophysicists

37

8,700

$82,840

Biomedical engineers


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Features 9 photo by Jessie Woodward

Committee plans for PBIS program next year By Laine Everly Staff writer The Buncombe County School System has decided to implement a new program, called Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, or PBIS, designed to improve disciplinary methods. Starting next year, PBIS will be changing how discipline is handled at Owen. New punishment and reward programs will be introduced and a new school behavioral policy will be put into effect. Principal Meg turner says the reason that Owen decided to adopt this program is because all Buncombe County elementary schools, and the Owen middle school are already using it, so discipline will be relatively uniform from K-12. Currently, a committee has been specifically assigned to ensure that the transition is as effective as possible. The program has been handled in different ways, at different schools.

The T.C. Roberson Rams have fashioned than before to make the program a success,” said Quick. a video depicting the correct behaviors The goal of PBIS is to create a supportive addressed in their PBIS plan, labeled and positive learning environment for all P.R.I.D.E: personal responsibility, respect, students. Depending on the acute needs integrity, determination, and excellence. of a particular Expectations differ school, different within those cat“ I hope it [PBIS] creates a tactics may be egories that extend utilized in creatto different areas of place where people develop ing that environschool, such as in ment. The PBIS the hallways, buses, positive behavior." program is not cafeteria, bathrooms, - Nathan Lyda strictly designed and classrooms. for a general Contrasting age school but for the broader spectrum. The groups also contribute to the more spedetails are left to be determined by commitcific details of PBIS. This past year, Black Mountain Primary began the integration of tees and individual members, such as social studies teacher and committee member, PBIS and the staff is currently working on Nathan Lyda. improving the program to fit their indi“I hope it creates a place where people vidual needs. develop positive behavior,” Lyda said. The Primary school is making progress According to Lyda, the program is still with PBIS, according to Committee Chair a work in progress. Acting as an extension Terry Quick. of the current ideas for a school rewards “Faculty and staff are participating more

program, there will be more events similar to the tardy party held on December 4. However, there are some things about PBIS that contrast with Principal Meg Turner’s recent incentives. “Instead of everyone, just people who meet the goals will be included,” Turner said. The program itself will be separated into three tentative categories: Minors, Midders, and Majors. Minors will be offenses that can be directly handled by teachers, and Midders and Majors will be handled by administrators. Specific circumstances to be grouped into these categories are yet to be determined. Teachers are not the only one who may have a say in how the school adopts the PBIS program. Students are welcomed and encouraged to become involved in the program and give feedback. Student representation would be beneficial and much appreciated in committee meetings specifically for the development of PBIS.

Teens worldwide pledge to stop texting, driving By Lauren Nalley Staff writer On average, 3092 teens are killed every year by distracted drivers. Types of distractions while driving fall into three main categories: visual -taking your eyes off the road, manual -taking your hands off the wheel, and cognitive -taking your mind off of driving. What is one simple task that creates all of these distractions? Texting. To prevent fatalities caused by this distraction, several businesses have initiated pledges that students can sign that promises they will not text and drive. The most popular is AT&T’s “It Can Wait” online pledge. An app is also available for AT&T customers called Drive Mode. Drive Mode is available on any Android or Blackberry phone. When activated, this app sends an automatic reply text to any one who texts the user while they are going above 25 mph. This text says that the user is driving

and will reply when they are no longer in motion. Another popular pledge is found at textinganddrivingsafety.com. Unlike the other driving pledges, this one allows people to print out a pledge and physically sign it. If the person does not want to maintain the pledge, he or she can send it to a nonprofit organization called Text No More. This nonprofit keeps track of all the signed pledges. Their goal is to get a million people to pledge that they won’t text and drive. A local pledge is run by WLOS News 13. Every day at least, 15 people are killed in the United States by drivers that are texting and 25 percent of Americans say that it’s easy to text and drive. WLOS wants texting while driving to stop. They have started a website called NO TXT ZONE, which is sponsored by

Left to right, mid year graduates are Kasie Harris, Richard Doe, Kendra Wheeler, Shaylie Kelly, Nikki Hudgins, Casi Watkins, Chad White, Melissa Lees, Emma Farr, Leighann Lake and Elizabeth Dunn. Not pictured are Zach Walsh, Daniel McMachon, Miranda Cole and Christian Rickard.

Early graduates reveal their after high school plans By Jessie Woodward Staff writer

Question 1

What is your reason for graduating early? - “I wanted to get a head start on everything and enjoy my extra time.” -Melissa Lees - “I just wanna leave.” -Kendra Wheeler - “I want to get a head start for college, and honestly, I am ready to get out of high school.” -Shaylie Kelly - “I’m ready to move in and go to college.” -Daniel McMahon - “Just to be done with high school.” -Zach Walsh

Question 2

Are you nervous? - “Heck, yeah. Only because I am going out to the real world. I won’t have a comfort zone anymore, but it will be a big adventure.” -Emma Farr - “No, I am not. I am ready to get out of high school and continue with a greater education.” -Nikki Hudgins - “Get a part time job until I start college at AB tech next fall.” -Kasie Harris - “Not that bad, I guess.” -Christian Rickard - “No, not at all.” -Chad White

Question 3

What are your plans when you graduate? - “Transfer to a Pizza Hut in Florida and make sure I have everything set up for college. I want to go to [the] University of Central Florida.” -Elizabeth Dunn - “Go to college for cosmetology.” -Leighann Lake - “To go to school for Fish and Wildlife.” -Richard Doe - “To hopefully go to ECU.” -Miranda Cole - “Go to Montreat for four years and get my Med Doctoral.” -Casi Watkins

Calorie labeling helps some people eat healthier choices By Julie Midkiff Staff writer

photo courtesy of WLOS

Melrose, Seago & Lay PA, Ken Wilson Ford, Carolina Furniture Concepts, and others. When signing their pledge it makes the driver automatically eligible to win prizes for not texting and driving.

The number of available no texting and driving pledges is rising every day, which means that the number of people losing their lives to texting and driving is decreasing just as fast.

The number of calories for food has recently been added to several restaurant menus, especially fast food restaurants, as part of The Affordable Care Act coming into effect. California and cities like New York already have had their requirements for calories set to be clearly labeled on menus. A few of the fast-food restaurants having access to calorie counts are McDonald’s, Burger King, Subway, KFC, Dairy Queen, Baskin-Robbins, Five Guys, and Sonic Drive-in. “When labeling proposals were gaining stream several years ago, McDonald’s representatives publicly opposed them,” Reauter’s reporter, Lisa Baertlein wrote in an article. But now, Baertlein says, McDonald’s is one of the first to add calorie counts to educate customers.

According to the USDA, changing food choices is only one example to vary patterns of consumption and the nutrient intake. “Those moves matter because Americans get about one-third of their calories from eating out,” the director of nutrition policy for the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest, Margo Wooton, said. McDonald’s plans to add more fresh vegetables and fruits to its menu and has set a goal of decreasing calories, saturated fat and added sugars across its U.S. menu by the year 2020. Junior Maranda Mazur says that the calorie counts on menus help her choose healthier food choices. “I like to maintain a healthy attitude. Food fuels the body, and depending on what you use as that fuel will aid in determining how well your body functions,” she said. Calorie counts may also be added to vending machines beginning in 2013. Add-

ing calorie counts and more low-calorie drinks to vending machines will first appear in municipal buildings in Chicago and San Antonio early next year. “The cities are vying to see whose workers can make the greatest progress in improving their overall health, determined by a variety of factors, from weight loss to lowering blood pressure,” N.Y. Times reporter, Stephanie Strom, writes. According to the American Heart Association, one 12-ounce regular soda contains 130 calories and zero nutrition, or eight teaspoons of sugar. The publisher of Beverage Digest, John Sicher said he thought the new effort will possibly be a way to get consumers to drink more of their no-calorie and low-calorie drinks. Considering taxing sodas, numerous cities, including Chicago, while others such as Philadelphia and Seattle have instituted

major public education programs making people aware of how many of the calories they take in comes from sugary drinks and sodas. “This allows us to learn operationally how it works and ramp it up more quickly, but our intent is to take it nationwide,” said Susan K. Neely, chief executive of the American Beverage Association. The national calorie count rules target restaurants with 20 or more locations, as well as other retail food outlets. Not all students’ change their choices based on calories or nutrients. “I don’t care,” senior Nichole Michels said. Calorie and other nutrition information is already available on the McDonald’s Website. Calories are listed on menu boards, which allow customers to use that information source when they are deciding what to eat.


Features

January 2013

Local restaurants spice up options for vegetarians Compiled by MiKayla Atwood Staff writer

Avenue M

(828)350-8181 Price Range: $ Cuisines: Modern, American Vegetarian Good Seating: Outdoor Seating Open: Breakfrast, Brunch, Dinner, Late Night Ranked: 58 out of 367 Located: 791 Merrimon Avenue, Asheville Popular Dish: Merrimon Medallions

Laughing Seed Cafe (828)252-3445

Price Range: $$ Cuisines: American, Vegetarian Good Seating: Family with Children, Local Cuisine, Outdoor Seating, Special Occasions, Dining on Budget Open: Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch, Dinner, Dessert

Ranked: 22 out of 367 Located: 40Wall Street, Asheville Neighborhood: Near the Wall Street Coffee House Popular Dish: The Harmony Bowl

Plant

(828)258-7500 or 828-279-2139 Price Range: $$ Cuisines: Vegan, Vegetarian Good Seating: Outdoor Dining Open: Breakfast, Brunch, Reservation Ranked: 2 out of 367 Located: 165 Merrimon Avenue, Asheville Popular Dish: The Hazelnut Crusted Seitan

Rise N’ Shine Cafe (828)25404122

Price Range: $ Cuisines: American

Good Seating: Dine-In or Take-Out Open: Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch Ranked: 152 out of 367 Located: 640 Merrimmon Avenue, Asheville Neighborhood: Near Vinnie’s Neighborhood Italain Popular Dish: 3-Way Eggs Benedict

Roman’s

(828)232-0738

Price Range: $$ Cuisines:Vegetarian Good Seating: Bar Scene, Local Cuisine, and Outdoor Seating Serves: Dine-In and Delivery Ranked: 24 out of 367 Located: 75 Haywood, Asheville Neighboorhood: Near Modesto Trattoria Popular Dish: Red Curry Tofu

Key:

$ -Cheap $$ -ModeratePriced $$$ -High Priced

Students learn, provide service at Underground Cafe By Hannah Box Staff writer

A learning experience for students and a tasty lunch for teachers is the focus of the Foods 2 Café. The Foods 2 Café is a student run lunch Café for teachers, where the students in the class prepare all of the food completely from scratch. The Café is part of the Foods 2 class curriculum, and they serve food every Friday for five weeks. “The class centers mainly on business, but does include breads, cakes, and knives,” Foods 2 teacher Ashley Beauregard said. Part of the class includes learning about business, making a business plan and running a business, the Café. “The students in the class name their business and fill out applications for the different jobs,” Beauregard said. The jobs include marketing manager, kitchen manager and varying positions for people who want to be in charge of

Senior Cale Ogle, the marketcooking different foods. The students also pick the recipes and style of recipes that ing manager for the Foods 2 Café, says as marketing manager, he are used in the preparation of the food. “The foods café always has soup, a works with a group of four or five sandwich or wrap, a dessert and a wrapped other people to get orders from teachers, take the money, prepare peppermint,” Beauregard said. The cooking is done on Thursdays packaging for the food deliveries, deliver the and the “ The cafe has high quality food and adfood is vertise the delivered food and the options are well café. If they to the thought out and unique." are needed, teachers they somefor their times help to l u n c h -Richard James prepare the during food as well. third pe“I have learned a lot about busiriod on Fridays. “The café has high quality food and the ness from it [Foods 2]. It is a lot of options are well thought out and unique,” fun,” Cale said. Senior Jessie Reynolds is the biology teacher Richard James said. Beauregard says that the main benefit kitchen manager for the Foods 2 the students receive from the café is the Café. She helps cook the food and experience; however, the class also makes deliver the food to teachers. She said, “from the class I have money by charging $5 for the meal. The money is used to buy more food and may learned a lot about business. I love it [the class].” be used for a field trip in the future.

“Give me requests...anything,” was the first thing Joseph Bathanti said to a room full of high school students. Joseph Bathanti is the North Carolina Poet Laureate, who came to Asheville on December 6, to speak and read his poetry to the English AP classes and the Poetry Club. Bathanti came because he is a personal friend of English teacher Adrienne Hollifield and because she requested it. Bathanti is originally from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, but moved to North Carolina to work with the prison system, teaching creative writing. The North Carolina prison system is where he met his wife, who worked there as well, and he writes about his relationship with her frequently. Presently, Bathanti is a professor of creative writing at Appalachian State University in Boone, where he is also Director of Writing in the Field and Writer in Residence in the University’s Watauga Global Community.

photo by Connor Ferry

Bathanti said work on North Carolina’s that, being the Poet Visiting Artists Program. Laureate means Among those in attenmore than just readdance at this event were ing poetry. The Poet senior Dalton Nickerson, Laureate acts as an Poetry Club chair Connor ambassador of litFerry and junior Hannah erature, while shapBox. ing the job descrip“I liked him. He seemed tion to fit his or her like a cool guy,” Dalton particular ideas and said. mind set. Other students believed “To fail at somethat Bathanti may have thing new, I don’t helped their pursuits in worry about that at writing. all,” Bathanti said. “I thought it was interDuring Bathanesting how he used his exti’s visit he shared periences to write his posome of his poetry etry,” Hannah said. photo by Allen Westmoreland from his published Bathanti showed that book Land Of Amne- Joseph Bathanti was made North poetry comes from everysia and the personal Carolina Poet Laureate by former thing and anything. stories reflecting his Governor Beverly Perdue. “It was helpful for me to emotions. Bathanti see someone who made a has written two novels, a book of short sto- profession out of poetry. I think it was reries, four poetry books and a nonfiction inforcement for most poets there, seeing

Norquist’s pledge wields power in Congress By Sarah Gilmour Co-Editor-In-Chief

The Foods 2 Cafe is advertised in the English— Social Studies teacher work room.

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

Features 11

N.C. Poet Laureate speaks of poetry, life By Allison Weber Staff writer

(828)505-1552

Rosetta’s Kitchen Price Range: $ Cuisines: Vegetarian, Vegan Friendly Good Seating: Indoor Seating, Outdoor Seating Open: Lunch, Dinner, late Night, and Sunday Brunches. Ranked: 132 out of 367 Located: 116 North Lexington, Asheville Popular Dish: Family Favorite and the Tempeh Rueben

January 2013

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Many pundits contribute political gridlock in Washington to the Taxpayer Protection Pledge and the creator of the pledge, Grover Norquist. But who is Grover Norquist? Grover Norquist is the founder and president of Americans for Tax Reform, an advocacy group devoted to minimizing the government’s power to tax. As part of this group, a pledge was released called the Taxpayer Protection Pledge, which obligates its signers to oppose all increases in income tax rates, as well as the elimination of deductions without matching reduced tax rates. However, Norquist’s real power comes when a politician does not sign the pledge. For those politicians, Norquist floods congressional and senate races with money for attack ads and other oppositional campaigns. The threat alone is enough to convince many Republicans to sign the pledge. Norquist’s attempts to oust those who do not sign on are usually successful, a fact evident by the 95

percent of Republicans in Congress who have signed the pledge. However, Norquist’s power is beginning to wane. Republicans and Democrats know that a compromise will have to be reached to avoid the fiscal cliff and the drastic spending cuts and tax hikes that will result from not finding a solution. For Republicans, this could mean having to backtrack on their vow to never raise taxes. Already, many Republicans have publicly distanced themselves from the pledge, including South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, Georgia Senator Saxby Chambliss, and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. “I care more about my country than I do about a 20-year-old pledge,” Chambliss told Georgia’s WMAZ. Other members of Congress have emphasized their responsibility to serve their constituents, not the pledge. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee said, “I’m not obligated on the pledge... The only thing I’m honoring is the oath I take...when I’m sworn in this January.” Though it seems as though Norquist has lost

his influence, he has achieved a long-lasting impact on American politics. Through this pledge and his lobbying group, he has succeeded in making the increase of taxes a detrimental stance in a campaign. Republicans will be able to compromise on less tax increases because any increase, no matter how small, will be seen as a huge concession. According to Ezra Klein of the Washington Post, reducing tax increases, not eliminating them completely, may have been Norquist’s goal all along. Klein calls the pledge, from a budgetary standpoint, “an obscenity.” He says Norquist realized this from the beginning but understood the long-term effect of the pledge. “Norquist and his pledge changed...American politics. The question isn’t how we’ll increase taxes and by how much. It’s whether we’ll increase taxes.” Klein wrote in the Washington Post. Norquist is still confident about his power despite losing support for the pledge, saying to the New York Times, “This is not my first rodeo.”

someone do what they love and not end up broke,” Connor said. Being from the same state as Bathanti enhanced the experience for Connor. “I also thought it was cool to have another person from Pittsburg. I feel like that helped me picture the poems in a way he may have been intending because I knew the area he was talking about,” Connor said. Bathanti spoke about writing inbetween reading poems. “Don’t just sit around and wait for your inspiration,” Bathanti said. He encouraged the students to write every day. Connor enjoyed the advice from the artist. “I think it’s really cool that he talked about inspiration and cannibalizing your own experiences. It’s guidelines to stay away from while writing poetry, or just writing in general, and it’s coming from someone who has been doing what I want to do for longer than I have been alive,” Connor said. Bathanti regularly goes to different schools and gives talks on creative writing and poetry but rarely visits high schools.


.........A World In Conflict......... Conflicts around the globe may seem far away from the lives of high schoolers. However, these conflicts play a direct role in the lives of people from the United States. Conflicts can raise the price of commodities produced by the country, an effect that will reach across the world. It is important to understand these conflicts in order to understand how they can impact everyone. Even beyond the ecomomic impact, these conflicts can play a role in the lives of military families. Even if the United States is not directly involved in the conflict, there is a military presence of United States troops around the world.

By Sarah Gilmour Co-Editor-In-Chief Kevin McDaniel Staff writer

Smoke rises after an Israeli airstrike Monday, November 19, 2012, in Rafah in southern Gaza Strip. (Eyad Al Baba/APA Images/Zuma Press/MCT)

Rebels walk along the frontline in Mayadeen, Syria. November 19, 2012. (David Enders/MCT)

Syria: Since March 2011, Syria has been in an ever growing conflict between its government and its residents. Syrians protested for more political and civil freedoms, and President al-Assad sent police to break up the protests violently. Over 17,000 people were killed by July, according to the United Nations. Al-Assad has given his army free reign to deal with the situation. Al-Assad has been president of Syria since 2000 and is a strong Russian ally. For this reason, Russia has told other world powers to back down and not help the rebels. The rebels call themselves the Free Syrian Army. Currently, Syrian officials are readying themselves to use chemical weapons.

Israel: The Israeli-Palestinian conflict dates back to World War II. Following the war, the United Nations divided the country of Palestine to form the nation of Israel as a haven for people of the Jewish faith. However, the Islamic people of Palestine also consider the region their Holy Land and opposed the UN’s move. The conflict has continued violently ever since. Conflicts between Hamas, a Palistinian terrorist organization, and Israel have resulted in wars and ceasefires, but no permanent solution has been reached.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad gives a speech at the 67th meeting of the General Assembly at the United Nations in New York, New York on Wednesday, September 26, 2012. (Sven Hoppe/DPA via Zuma Press/MCT)

Iran: Iran has recently made some significant steps in their nuclear program. It is also in one of the most unstable regions in the world, a dangerous combination. Iran has increased their production in highgrade uranium by installing almost 2,800 centrifuges that enrich the material, which is the primary resource for nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. Iran’s government reports that these are for peaceful purposes, which is questioned by many U.N. nations. As of November 2012 Iran has acquired enough uranium to make at least one nuclear weapon, if not more.

Mexico: Mexico is the gateway from drug rich South America into the United States. Approximately 75 percent of Colombian cocaine enters the U.S. from Mexico. A reported 60,000 drug-related deaths have been reported in the past six years while former president of Mexico, Felipe Calderón, was in office. According to CNN, the recently elected president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has pledged to focus more on reducing violence and less on catching cartel leaders and blocking drugs from reaching the United States. As many as 230 American cities have connections to Mexican drug organizations through criminal gangs, according to law enforcement. The Sinaloa Cartel and the Ultra-violet Zetas have given the Mexican government particular trouble. Federal agents unload bales of marijuana found at the exit of an elaborate crossborder drug smuggling tunnel discovered inside a warehouse in the Otay Mesa industrial park near San Diego, California, November 29, 2011. (Ron Rogers/ICE/ MCT)

Mali: In January 2012, a conflict broke out in Mali beginning with a Tuareg rebellion. The Tuaregs are an ethnicity in Africa that is predominantly Islamic. The Tuareg rebels deposed the president in March and seized control of the northern region, declaring independence. The Tuareg rebel group, the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA), merged with Islamist Ansar Dine rebel groups to institute Islamic law in the North. This move was supported by AlQaeda, a radical Islamic terrorist group. The Islamic militants who took control have committed war crimes, including rape, use of child soldiers, and the destruction of hospitals and schools. In accordance with Islamic law, a couple was also stoned to death for committing adultery.

Mutinous soldiers gather in front of the State Television Station in Bamako, capital of Mali, Thursday, March 22, 2012. Mali’s National Committee for Redressment of Democracy and Restoration of the State (CNRDR) announced on Thursday morning on Mali’s state-owned television that it had overthrown President Amadou Toumani Toure from power. (Xinhua/Zuma Press/MCT)

Egypt: An uprising in Egypt against President Hosni Mubarak sparked the so-called “Arab Spring.” In January 2011, mass protests erupted around the country against Mubarak’s 30 year autocratic and corrupt reign, until Mubarak resigned. In 2012, democratic elections were held and Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood candidate, won the election. However, since that time, Morsi has taken tremendous power and has acted in an autocratic manner. Though his decrees to expand presidential power and sideline judiciary power have been reversed, people are again taking to the streets to protest Morsi, saying he is no better than Mubarak. In December, citizens of Egypt voted to approve Morsi’s proposed constitution.

Egyptians turn out to vote Saturday, December 15, 2012, in Cairo, Egypt, on the controversial, Islamist-backed constitution. (Cliff Cheney/ Zuma Press/MCT)


Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

January 2013

Speaking Out: LGBT students share stories The Hoofbeat held a panel of LGBT students at Owen to hear about their experiences with bullying, acceptance, and coming out. LGBT stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender, and the majority of these people face challenges surrounding their sexual orientation every day. Five students, who will remain anonymous, participated in the panel and will be referred to as A1, A2, and so on. A1, A4, and A5 are bisexual females; A3 is a homosexual male; A2 is bisexual and identified as gender fluid. By Lucy O’Brien Staff writer

They begin by discussing when they knew their orientation and the coming out process. A3: I was probably 12 years old, and I came out to my mom as bisexual. And then I finally realized I was actually gay at about 16. Growing up bisexual was pretty hard, but being gay is even worse. A4: I realized that I had my first real crush beginning my freshman year. I was kind of confused about it, but then by the end of my freshman year I realized I was bisexual…I emailed …the man who helped raise me and he’s very gay, and he…helped me tell my mom about it. I still haven’t told many people about it. A1: I was always the different girl when I was a little kid, because in fourth grade I decided I was going to kiss all my friends. So, I guess all my friends knew except for me, which is really weird, I know. But in eighth grade, I was finally like “Hey guys, I think I like girls” and they were all like “Oh, really?” A2: I sort of first realized it in middle school, like seventh or eighth grade, and I told my folks, and my dad was like “Okay, that’s cool, I’ll support you no matter what,” and my mom, who happens to be lesbian, said that I was just curious and it was just a stage or something. I don’t know if she believes that bisexuality is real or not, but, obviously, we’re here. A5: I was probably in about sixth grade when I realized, oh, I like girls too. I wasn’t really sure what was going on…My mom’s okay with it, and everyone seemed to really support me. A1: I tried telling my mom, and she wouldn’t talk to me for two weeks. So I was like halfdisowned for a while, and then it was like one night, she was sitting at her computer, and she was like “So, are you over your phase?” I was like, “Yeah,” because I didn’t want her bothering about me. But she sometimes still asks me if I’m gay…and I’m just like “no.” A3: Well at least you were disowned for a little

while; I was disowned until I turned 16. It was pretty bad; my family life sucked. I had verbal abuse thrown at me every day. I would literally fear going home because my mom would not only call me a fag and all that…but it was a lot of abuse in the family life. My dad was never in the picture, but now my mom and I can actually sit down and talk about dudes and fashion and makeup and that cool stuff that gay guys and women talk about.

sions, actually.

ity for the past three years…he would not stop.

A3: I mean, I get called a woman, but I don’t really care.

A3: And what I think is funny with people who bully other people, especially who bully the homosexual community…is that what I don’t understand is we’re human. I’ve had people come up to me and say, “You’re a demon, and you need to be exorcised,” and I’m like “Actually, I’m not a demon, Sweetie.”

A1: I feel bad because I was dating one of my exboyfriends, and this girl comes up to him and goes “You’re dating a man.” I felt bad for him!… it was the fact that he was being picked on and it was because of me. A1: I’ve lived in Asheville my entire life…and it was only when I came here that I realized that people were starting to tell other people to go to hell because of it… I feel like the more urbanized you get, the more accepted it gets.

A3: I am literally out to everybody, I mean I blatantly say that I’m gay and I’m proud of who I am. Mostly everybody in the school knows who I am because of my sexuality, and some of them make fun of me for it, but I don’t really care. I’m out within the family, my “It’s important that we friends, my social these words so they can’t networks. I’m just proud of who I am. in a derogatory manner.”

A3: And they’re, reclaim like, quick to mispeople too, be used judge just by their appearance. Like for instance someA4: I told what I body could be - Anonymous 2 thought was my wearing a bright best friend and she pink jacket, and reacted very badly towards it. She told me I was he’s a dude, and people would be like “Faggot! going to go to hell and that I better ask forgive- You’re going to hell!” and it turns out he’s actuness, and to never ever hit on her. I can’t be who ally straight. I am around her at all because it makes her so uncomfortable…My family, for the most part, A4: Just as people around here are quick to doesn’t know, and I want to keep it that way. call someone wearing camo or someone with Southern accent who likes to hunt and fish a A1: I think everyone knows except for my fam- redneck, the same people who are being called ily, which I think is funny. rednecks are quick to call us faggots, queers, stuff like that. A2: I’m out to pretty much anyone who asks. I don’t see a reason to hide it…most of my fami- Finally the question of bullying was raised ly…I don’t know if they do or they don’t know. specifically to the group. There are some of them that I just wouldn’t tell on principle. A3: [This girl came up ]and said “You’re going to hell for being a faggot because God hates A5: I’m kind of with A2. My mom knows, my queers…Here, I get called a fag probably five dad’s side of the family doesn’t really know and I times a day…My grandfather, he’s [a religion], don’t particularly want them to know. Basically, and what’s really interesting is that when I first everyone who asks, I tell them. came out to him, he was like.…“I will not have a grandson who’s a faggot,” but now he’s actually Bullying and discrimination came up often chill with it.

during the panel.

A2: I went through my entire eighth grade year being called a dyke, and I didn’t care. A1: Yeah, I was called a man. On many occa-

A4: We recently went to Mr. Chaplain about something that was happening with [A3] in one of his classes, because this one student …has been really messing with him about his sexual-

January 2013

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

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Prevention, support reduce LGBT bullying By Dalton Nickerson Staff writer

bal harassment involved 84.9 percent of LGBT students hearing “gay” used in negative contexts such as “That’s so gay”; uses of homophobic remarks were nearly as prevalent with 71.3 percent of LGBT students hearing disparaging insults like “fag,” “queer,” and “homo.” These conditions have left approximately six out of ten LGBT students feeling unsafe at schools because of their gender, along with four out of ten feeling unsafe at school because of their gender expression, causing many LGBT students to skip classes for fear of further harassment. Most of these LGBT students reported feeling unsafe in specific school places such as locker rooms, bathrooms, and physical education and gym classes. Fortunately, schools nationwide have begun to adopt more supportive practices and non-discriminatory policies that have improved conditions for many LGBT students in school. Some of the most common forms of positive intervention and support for

LGBT students in high schools include LGBT-inclusive curriculums, anti-bullying policies with LGBT provisions, and Gay-Straight Alliances (GSA). Schools implementing these measures have been directly attributed to significantly fewer cases of homophobic remarks and victimization based on sexual orientation or gender expression; other effects for LGBT students include a greater sense of safety and belonging in their school community, promoting better attendance and performance in school for previously troubled LGBT students. Currently, Owen High School has been working to promote a safe, non-discriminatory learning environment through counseling and support from the school staff; however, principal Meg Turner and guidance counselor Jennifer Abshire among other members of the Diversity Committee have held discussions focusing on further improvements for LGBT students. Numerous ideas have been proposed

before the panel, including the formation of a GSA and promoting ideas from other LGBT supportive associations, including Lady Gaga’s Born Brave Foundation and Roberson High’s STRIDE group. The panel members have expressed interest groups for LGBT that would be open to all students, whether LGBT, straight, or otherwise undefined in sexual orientation or gender expression. In addition to the possibility of more community support groups, there has been discussion of holding an Ally Week, meant to empower and support LGBT youth, as well an informative poster exhibit of LGBT families that the Center for Diversity Education is planning to display in Owen Halls this February. While harassment still remains a frequent occurrence for many LGBT students nationwide, more modern, non-discriminatory policies and availability of support groups have signaled a steady decreases in the frequency of LGBT related harassment in school environments.

A2: I think it’s important that we reclaim these words so they can’t be used in a derogatory manner, and turn the meanings around either in the correct way that they were originally defined as or in a new, more positive manner.

Derogatory terms such as “dyke” or “faggot” make up only a small portion of the various harassments lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students experience day to day, but recent studies suggest progress in safer school climates for LGBT students. The Gay, Lesbian, & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) released its 2011 National School Climate Survey, which demonstrated continued declines in harassment and victimization of LGBT students. The survey’s findings have shown that on average, for every ten LGBT students, eight will have encountered some form of verbal harassment, four will have experienced physical harassment, and two will have been physically assaulted at school for their sexual orientation or gender expression. The most common instances of ver-

A3: Or just completely do away with them. It would be a whole lot better if they were completely done away with.

Theories regarding homosexuality show variety of views

A4: Just because someone may love me in a different way, different gender than you, that’s your problem…It’s not a disease…The term queer, the original meaning of it was odd or curious… A fag is a cigarette in Britain. A faggot is a bundle of sticks.

A4: And gay originally means happy, joyful, bright. A3: And then the homosexuals adopted it to describe themselves. And it works. A5: I would just like to say that the school [has] …done a great job taking a step towards [dealing with ]racism. They’re very severe and they say this is not acceptable and their boundaries are clear. But I’d just like to see that more with name calling of the LGBT. When that happens, they’re usually wary if they should step in or not. They don’t know if it’s a joke, they don’t know if it’s hurting someone, and they don’t know if the person being accused is actually of that sexual orientation. I think they should take more steps forward to protect students. More of this panel discussion is available in the online newspaper hoofbeatonline.net. Information about a pending LGBT support group is available at the counseling office. If you or someone you know is being bullied because of sexual orientation, report it to a guidance counselor right away.

By Gisselle Villegas Staff writer The issue of homosexuality is controversial as to its cause, whether it is a disease or a choice, and on religious grounds. Some people think homosexuality is a disease or social deviance that can be cured or rehabilitated. “Ben Newman” (his name is a pseudonym) believes that homosexuality can be cured. He is an ex-gay who argues that sexual orientation can be changed through psychotherapy. Ben began therapy for homosexual sex addiction with a therapist who was, himself, an ex-gay man. The therapist, Matt, had dealt with his own homosexual longings but had resolved them. In an article in Gale Viewpoints, Ben tells Matt’s story as a form of hope for himself. According to Matt, he had been a happy father and husband on the outside and a “rabid homosexual sex addict on the inside.” Matt wanted to make the two parts of himself come together. The process of rehabilitation included signing a consent form for treatment. Then he had

to make a full confession to the high priests of Other people think that homosexuality is his church, who excommunicated him, with not a disease. They also think that they and the opportunity to be rebaptized a year later, others should accept and embrace their way of after Matt had done what he needed to change being. In his article in Gale Viewpoints, Casey his sexual orientation. Sanchez relates the damage done to homoThe process included attending meeting of sexuals, particularly gay men, by a group called Sexaholics Anonymous and acquiring a spiriLove in Action (LIA). He says that LIA damtual mentor to help him with the process. After ages gay people by retraining them, sometimes 27 months, Matt felt that he was cured. forcefully, into what the organization thinks is “I was a different man, stronger, happier, a more acceptable lifestyle. more grounded, A former client of LIA whole. I had claims that he was told “It “My differences shouldn’t would be better if I were to been ‘sexually commit suicide than to go sober’ and faith- define who I am. " ful to my wife for back into the world and become a homosexual again.” two years,” Matt - Andrew Fink LIA started aiming to said. turn gays straight, to bring them to God, but Ben’s article admits that reparative therapy, now it battles with the gay rights movement, which is the therapy described above, is not trying to prove that sexuality is a characteran accepted therapy of the American Psychoistic that can be changed or cured. The LIA logical Association (APA). In fact, they have discouraged this treatment, saying that it is im- staff also teach that sexual orientation is due to childhood trauma and parents who fail possible to change sexual orientation, and that to make their sons masculine enough. They attempting to do so can possibly cause harm. attempt to “teach” their clients how to act However, Ben decided that his double life straight-how to move, sit, and act with mascuwas more harmful to him than the therapy.

linity. According to Box Turtle Bulletin, a Web site that keeps track of the ex-gay movement, gays are considered “sexually broken” by organizations like LIA. They are broken and must be fixed. Lastly, some people believe that homosexuals want to be seen as people first, not gay or lesbian people. Andrew Fink says that it doesn’t matter what people think of the cause of homosexuality, or whether they agree with it or not. Any attempt to try to find a cause is an attempt to put him and other gay people into a box and make them conform. Fink’s article title, “The Causes of Homosexuality Are Irrelevant,” says it all. Trying to find a cause or gene or childhood trauma that causes sexuality, in itself, belittles the homosexual and labels that person as wrong and bad. “My differences shouldn’t define who I am,” Fink said. “I am not a gay student; I am a student who happens to be gay.” Fink wants people to respect the differences between them and go on. He said, “I’m a human being. Just like you.... I just have a different approach to life.”


January- February Event Calendar

SUNDAY

MONDAY

All Dates Are Subject to Change Always Check Online for: *Cancellations *Ticket Prices *Age Limits and Times 13

Yacht Rock Revue @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

20

14

TUESDAY

The Helio Sequence @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

3

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

The Orange Peel @ 101 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville 28801 www.theorangepeel.net The Grey Eagle @ 180 Clingman Avenue, Asheville 28801 www.thegreyeagle.com

Martin Luther King Day

28

Morrissey @ The Orange Peel 7 p.m. All Ages

22

23

24

25

26

30

31

1

2

ZOSO @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

Margaret Cho @ The Orange Peel 6 p.m. or 9:30 p.m.

29

Graveyard @ The Orange Peel 7 p.m.

The XX @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

Yonder Mountain String Band @ The Ornage Peel 7:30 p.m.

4

5

6

7

11

12

13

14

18

19 Presidents’ Day

Menomena @ The Grey Eagle 9 p.m

20

Fishbone @ The Grey Eagle 9 p.m.

Toubab Krewe @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

Yonder Mountain String Band @ The Ornage Peel 7:30 p.m.

Big Head Todd & The Monsters @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

The Used @ The Orange Peel 6 p.m. All Ages

21

Matisyahu @ The Orange Peel 7 p.m.

15

16

22

Report Cards

Toubab Krewe @ The Orange Peel 9 p.m.

Purity Ring @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

Groundhog Day

9

Cotton Jones Album Release Show @ The Grey Eagle 9 p.m.

Steep Canyon Rangers @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

19

8

Dark Star Orchestra @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

No School

17

18

12

17

Super Bowl Sunday

10

Steep Canyon Rangers @ The Orange Peel 8 p.m.

SATURDAY

16

No School

21

FRIDAY

11

January 2013

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

Arts

17

Compiled by Jessie Woodward Staff writer

15

No School

27

January 2013

The

The

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

16 Arts

23

Railroad Earth @ The Orange Peel 7:30 p.m.

Compiled by Kirsten Briscoe Illustrations by Max Alford


Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

January 2013

MOST NOTABLE OF 2012

January 2013

“U Mad Bro?” “Cool story Bro.” “Swagg” “Scuuuuurt.” “YOLO”

Arts

19

COMIC By Rush Dittbrender

Compiled by Emma Farr Staff writer

Comedy: 21 Jump Street Magic Mike Romance: The Lucky One The Vow Animation/ Family: Brave Paranorman Horror: Paranormal Activity 4 Sinister Action: The Avengers The Hunger games Batman-Dark Knight Rises

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

The

Arts

The

18

Sandy Hook Colorado shooting Steve Jobs died Olympics ‘12

Pintrest Twitter Stumbleupon

2 Chainz Bassnectar Justin Bieber Nicki Minaj Chris Brown Rihanna Alicia Keys Psy Taylor Swift One Direction

The Walking Dead Duck Dynasty Adventure Time Catfish The Voice The X Factor Vampire Diaries Pretty Little Liars Illustrations by Dylan Bougis

Draw something Snapchat Instagram Temple Run Flow Song pop Spotify

Movies often based on lives of real people By Caitlyn Page Staff writer Many movies are of fictional characters or biographies of celebrities like Alfred Hitchcock, but some movies arebased on lesser known real life people. The 2002 movie Catch Me If You Can was based upon the true life story of Frank Abagnale Jr. In the movie Leonardo DiCaprio plays Frank Abagnale Jr., a man who impersonated an airline pilot, a lawyer and doctor, as well as scammed people out of 2.8 million dollars, all before the age of 19. The movie begins with Abagnale at the age of 16 living in New Rochelle, New York, with his father Frank Abagnale Sr. (Christopher Walken), and French mother Paula (Natalie Baye). The family is forced out of their home due to a series of IRS tax frauds by Frank Jr., and into a small apartment. Frank soon finds out that his parents filed for divorce, and he runs away. Frank runs out of money and begins to rely on confidence scams to get by. Meanwhile, an FBI bank fraud agent begins to track him down. Carl soon finds out that Frank is just a teenager. To

find out what happens next you need to watch the movie. Abagnale is known as one of the most famous imposters ever, as a confidence trickster, check forger, imposter and escape artist. Before he was 21 years old he had escaped police custody two times and served less than five years in prison before going to work for the government in 1974. The United States federal government released him on the condition that he would help the federal authorities catch fraud and scam artists. He now works for the American Security consultant agency and lecturer at the academy and field offices for the FBIand runs his own financial fraud consultancy company called Abagnale and Associates. He is happily married with children. The movie The Fighter is based upon the real life of junior welterweight Mike Ward and his half-brother Richard. Richards career in the ring was almost thrown away due to drugs and crime. Mike rebounded from a series of losses to make his way back and become the WBU Intercontinental Lightweight title, and the WBU Light Welterweight title thanks to hard work and dedication. Today Mike Ward lives in Lowell,

Massachusetts. He is part owner of a boxing gym as well as an outdoor hockey rink. Ward married Charlene Fleming, who is also a former athlete. They live with Ward’s daughter, Kasie. Ward manages the boxing gym he owns and his half-brother and former trainer, Dicky Eklund, trains new boxers entering its academy. The Austin Powers series is jam packed with three action filled comedies. The franchise parodies numerous James Bond, Derek Flint, Jason King and Matt Helm films, characters, and video games. The theme of the films is that Dr. Evil, the arch-villian, plots to elicit money from governments. Austin Power’s personality is said to be based upon the real life Peter Asher. Asher is an English guitarist, singer, manager and record producer. He was a member of the pop music vocal duo Peter and Gordon, in the 1960s, before

photo courtesy of New Line Cinema

becoming a record producer. Mike Myers has said he had patterned his Austin Powers character after Asher.


January 2013

Lack of height hinders girls, make up with speed By Chris McHone Staff writer Varsity girls basketball has started off the season with a 5-7 record, and a 1-1 record in conference. “We are depending on our speed and athleticism to help us win games since we aren’t very tall this year,” senior guard Ciara Holloman said. The team is using their speedy guards, Ciara and sophomore Tre’Onna Salters, to push the tempo and to try and score baskets in transition. With most of their points coming off of fast breaks, Coach Tim Raines really tries to encourage the girls to push the ball up the court as much as possible. “We aren’t big at all this year, so we can’t get inside and beat and bang with all these teams we play. We really have to try and get some points by getting steals and turning good defense into offense,” Raines said. Senior Jordan Devan plans on getting

ting as many turnovers and play to their strengths, they have a good chance of winning the conference tournament and making a deep run into the playoffs. The JV girls team is off to a slow start, sporting a two and five record. However, the team has high hopes, because they are undefeated in conference. “I am really enjoying basketball this year, but we always seem to come out to a slow start, although, we do pick it up in the second half,” sophomore Tiffany James said. JV basketball is mostly about photo by Lauren Nalley working on the basics and preparing the girls for when they Players Tiffany James and Katie Craig run to get the ball from a Mountain Heritage Player on get to varsity. Friday, January 4 at a home game. “JV is working hard at developing our fundamental skills. playoffs,” she said. a chance to play in the postseason. We are starting to work well The girls all believe that if they can as a team, and knowing each other’s “We plan on doing well in the conference tournament and making it to the start playing as a team, and stop commit- strengths,” coach Hannah Linquist said.

Boys aim for playoffs By Lauren Nalley and Hannah King Staff writer So far this season, the varsity boys basketball team has a 3-6 record and is tied for first in their conference while the boys JV basketball team has a 7-1 record. “We work well together as a team because we’ve all been friends for a really long time,” sophomore Tate Brown said. “Whether it’s encouraging each other during drills or just showing someone that what they’re doing is wrong and then teaching them how do it right.” The players are working on improving their teamwork and are looking forward to potentially making it into the play-offs. JV is coached by Nathan Lyda, and varsity is coached by Chuck Robinson. “I really enjoy coaching. I think the best way to get involved in young people’s lives is by being a coach,” Lyda said. Most basketball games are held on Tuesdays and Fridays starting at 4:00 p.m., alternating between home and away. The lead scorer on JV is sophomore

Tyson Sellers who averages 21 points per game. “Considering we’re 7-1 (2-0 in conference), I’d say our chemistry as a team is great. When it’s game time, we all put our differences aside and become a family,” freshmen Austin Metcalf said. Varsity is currently tied for first in their conference. “The team is good enough to make it to the second round of play-offs. We are doing okay for right now; it’s still early in the season, but we have a good team,” Coach Robinson said. Their lead scorer is junior Micheal Pomeroy. While Ryan Raines is back from an injury, Tyler James is still recovering from a ligament tear that happened during tryouts. Senior Dante Brown said, “We’re going to make it to play-offs, and I believe we could also make it far into play-offs, as long as we play as a team, and play how we know how to play.”

Boys Basketball Schedule Jan. 11 Jan. 15 Jan. 18 Jan. 22 Jan. 25 Jan. 29 Feb. 1 Feb. 5 Feb. 8 Feb. 12

Hendersonville Polk Thomas Jefferson Avery Mitchell Mtn. Heritage Madison Hendersonville Polk Thomas Jefferson

Home Away Away Home Home Away Away Away Home Home (Sr.Night)

January 2013

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

The

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

The

20 Sports

Sports

21

Swimmers strive for spots at State

By Morgan Dale Staff writer

This year’s swim season brings new team members and new possibilities for this program. The swim team has over 30 people total and 15 of them are newcomers. Out of the 15 recent additions only six of them are freshmen. This means that students of all grade levels are trying their hand at swimming this season too. “I did swimming to have a new experience,” sophomore Savva Martyshev said. Freshman Savannah Marett wanted to be on the team because she loves the sport and has been swimming since she was young. The return swimmers also feel that the recent additions to the team have potential. “They bring some new talent to the team,” junior Sam Collins said. Even though the new swimmers are one of the highlights to this year’s season they are not yet the stars. Swim coach Kate Dost said, “[The new members] are just now getting to the point to do the same workouts as the rest of the team.”

photo by Morgan Dale

Nathan Oliver practices the butterfly during swim practice. Nathan has already made consideration time for regionals in the 100 butterfly. To her, though, this is encouraging news because she sees that her swimmers are improving each practice and meet. This season the boys record consists of ten wins and four losses. The girls team has six wins and eight losses. Those wins include a

Newcomers add needed strength to wrestling team By Kailanne Burleson Staff writer Sweaty boys, cauliflower ear, and ringworm are signs of the wrestling season. “It takes dedication, hard work, heart, blood, and sacrifice [to be a wrestler],” senior Jose Garcia said. Although the team is struggling with injuries and football players not meeting weight at the beginning, the wrestling team has been solid with a record of 6-3 overall. They have added many new assets to the team this year, such as seniors Luke Hall and Johnathon Roland, sophomores Josh Hernandez and Anthony Justus, and freshmen Letson Hernandez, Javin Whiteside, Garret Welsh, Coleby Maloney, and Landon Hollar. “You’ll never know the feeling of being out in front of everyone alone for a one on

one match up until you do it,” Luke said. Coming out on top for the Christmas Tournament, the team has shown to be a big competition. They are aiming to have wrestlers qualify for State and to win another Conference Championship for the second year in a row. The weight classes who have placed high so far are 106, 113, 145, 160, 170, 152, and heavyweight. “Wrestling is a great sport; no matter size or build, there’s always room for anyone to compete at any level,” said coach Jeff Foster. Foster plans to continue to help the team grow and show good sportsmanship this year to have a successful team. The boys are a very close team and support each other at every match. “Being with a team who shows they care is amazing,” said junior Denis Avila, “and I’m glad to be a wrestler.”

win against rivals Hendersonville for both the boys and girls team. Their goal this year is to make regionals in automatic times rather than in consideration times. Automatic times are when a swimmer automatically goes to regionals if they achieve

a certain time, where as with consideration times a swimmer has a chance of going to regionals if he or she reaches a set time. The possibility of going to regionals with consideration times all depends on how the other swimmers in the region do. The automatic times are faster than the consideration times so it is harder to obtain the automatic opportunity to compete at regionals. For example the 100 yd. butterfly for women in the 1A/2A division has an automatic time of 1.13.99 but a consideration time of 1.30.99. Swimmers who have made consideration times so far this season are Stephanie Reese in the 50 yd. and 100 yd., Savannah Marett in 100 yd. butterfly, Sarah Gilmour in the 100 yd. breaststroke, Nathan Oliver in the 100 yd. butterfly, Matt Brouwer in the 100 yd. free, Sam Collins in the 100 yd. backstroke, and Noah Fortson in the 100 yd. breaststroke. All the girls and boys relay teams have also made consideration times. On top of that, almost everybody on the team has made personal bests this year.


January 2013

Winter hikes provide uncluttered view of nature By Logan Ballew Staff writer Hiking in the winter is far different from hiking in other seasons. Increased visibility makes winter hiking a good activity for anyone who wants to see the mountains that surround their homes from a view rarely seen. One hike near Black Mountain is the Rattlesnake Trail, which starts at the Tennis courts at the Ridgecrest Conference Center and ends at the top of Rattlesnake Mountain. The hike is around 2.5 miles long with a view of Montreat at the very top of the summit. The trail is a fairly moderate hike with mostly uphill slopes. True to its name, many people see rattlesnakes in the summer while hiking the trails, so going during the winter is the best idea. Another hiking trail is the Mountains to Sea Trail, which goes from Clingman’s Dome in the Great Smokey Mountains all the way to Jockeys Ridge in the Outer Banks. To hike this portion of the trail, start at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway, at milepost 382.0, and end at Balsam Gap, at milepost 359.8.

photo courtesy of ncwaterfalls.com

One of the waterfalls seen on the Catawba Falls hike. Many of the other hikes feature waterfalls such as this. On the way up, sites include Craven Gap, Rattlesnake Lodge, and Craggy Gardens. This hike is 21.7 miles long and is

an easy to moderate hike. One of the most popular hikes around the Black Mountain area is the Catawba

Falls. This hike starts in the Pisgah National Forest in Old Fort, and is 2.5 miles round trip with over 100 feet of waterfalls to see. These falls are the best to see during the winter because the water freezes the falls. The falls have a trail going up the side, which leads to different layers of the falls, and, eventually, to the top. It is not advised to go up this trail because it can prove fatal due to the sketchy robes used to climb the trail, steep slopes and sharp rocks on the trail, but getting to the falls itself is fairly easy. A new parking lot and restroom facility was built recently. An unusual hike with an outstanding view is Looking Glass Rock. It starts in the Brevard area, south of Mount Pisgah and near Graveyard Fields. This Hike is a 3.2-mile hike to the top of Looking Glass Rock. This hike is a long and moderately difficult hike The Looking Glass Trails involves tunnels of rhododendron and mountain laurel. After about two miles of hiking there is a flat rock that is used as a helicopter pad to rescue injured rock climbers. After the helicopter pad the trail leads up to the summit, but the best views can be seen past this point.

Sports Column: Kobe Bryant considered greatest player By Chris McHone Staff writer In December, NBA superstar Kobe Bryant, a member of the Los Angeles Lakers, made history by becoming the fifth player in history to score 30,000 points in his career. Does being in an elite class consisting of Karl Malone, Michael Jordan, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Wilt Chamberlain, make Bryant the greatest player in Los Angeles Laker’s history? Maybe so. In an interview with USA Today, former Laker’s general manager Jerry West, who brought Bryant to L.A. in the 1996 draft in a trade with the Charlotte Hornets, said Bryant is “the best Laker of all time even if he quits tomorrow.” Many players could be considered the greatest Laker of all time, including Shaquille O’Neal, Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem

Abdul-Jabbar, and Magic Johnson. Howev- one game against the Toronto Raptors on er, many people argue that Bryant takes the January 22, 2005. This was, and still is, the cake in that debate. Despite being one of the second most points scored in one game by five to score 30,000 career points, Bryant an NBA player, behind Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-point game also has averaged 25.5 “It’s very arguable that Kobe is in 1962. “It’s very points per game, 5.3 re- the best Laker of all time, but it’s arguable that bounds, 4.7 also a matter of opinion. He is one Kobe is the Laker of assists and of the greatest all time scorers, but best all time, but 1.5 steals throughout if you talk about all-around play- it’s also a matter of opinion. his 16 sea- ers, it’s very arguable.” He is one of sons in the the greatest NBA. all time scorBryant - David Fiest ers, but if you also has talk about allfive NBA championship rings, which is tied for 14 all around players, it’s very arguable,” soccer time for a single player, and all have come and basketball coach David Fiest said. If Bryant can get another NBA title, he with the Lakers. In addition to all these other statistics, Bryant scored 81 points in will be tied with arguably the greatest play-

er of all time, Michael Jordan. Jordan won six NBA championships from 1991 to 1998 and won the Finals Most Valuable Player each time. Bryant has been the most comparable to Jordan, with him being the same height, and only ten pounds lighter. Bryant’s scoring numbers are slightly below Jordan’s, but they both have been selected to the NBA All-Defensive Team nine times. However, Jordan has made the All-NBA Team 10 times, while Bryant has made it eight times. “I think he is the best Laker of all time because he’s scored 30,000 points with just the Lakers, and he has five NBA championships,” world history teacher Nathan Lyda said. Someone may not think Bryant’s the best, but he’s definitely in the discussion, and by the stats alone, no one can say he’s not.

January 2013

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

The

Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

The

22 Sports

Sports

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Hoofbeat Listen. Learn. Speak.

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24 Sports

Students of the Issue

Dylan Bougis

January 2013

Noelle Buske

By Jocelyn Franks Staff writer

By Jocelyn Franks Staff writer

Junior Dylan Bougis is a cat person whose favorite hobbies are singing, acting and playing video games. He is a part of the Theater Club and avidly participates in the school plays and productions. Along with dreams of traveling to Japan, New York and England, Dylan plans to work on Broadway. He is active in theater class, which is his favorite subject. “You just meet some really weird people… You get to experience different emotions on stage that you might not feel in real life,” Dylan said. Dylan’s friends describe him as crazy, outgoing and fun. “He’s always all over the place. He’s never still. You can never predict what he’s going to do next,” junior Samantha Lone said. Outside school, Dylan enjoys playing tennis and online video games. His ideal career is to be an actor, but if all else fails, his other options are to become a computer programmer or Calvin Klein model. Dylan said, “My goal in life is to be the best person I can be and love what I do.”

Sophomore Noelle Buske is an aspiring photographer who is involved in Key Club and plays soccer during the spring. Her favorite subject in school is English, because she enjoys writing. At home, she likes to spend time with her family and take photographs of herself, friends and nature. “When I get home, I take pictures, edit pictures and look at other people’s pictures,” Noelle said. With dreams of becoming a full-time professional photographer, Noelle also wants to travel to Europe and other exotic places. After high school, she plans on attending Savannah College of Art and Design, an arts school in Georgia. Her friends describe her as someone who is imaginative, kind, creative, and fun. “She’s always drawing and taking pictures of things. She’s very fun,” sophomore Eden Binkley said. If Noelle could have one super power, she would want to fly so that she could take photographs from above.

photo by Jocelyn Franks

Students of the Issue are Dylan Bougis, left, and Noelle Buske, right.

The Hoofbeat for January, 2013  

C. D. Owen High's student-run, January 2013 edition.

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