Page 1

City of Owatonna

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

2017 Annual Report Keith E. Hiller / Chief of Police 204 East Pearl Street, Owatonna MN 55060 www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Table of Contents

Owatonna, Minnesota

Chief’s Message

3

Mayor:

Organizational Structure

4-5

Administrator: Kris M. Busse

4

Government:

Mayor—Council

6

Population:

25,810

7

Location:

Crossroads of I35 &

Mission Department Budget Personnel Changes

Thomas A. Kuntz

U.S. Hwys 14 & 218

Administrative Division Professional Standards

8

Land Area:

14.45 Square Miles

General Overview

9

City Budget:

$26,002,416

Department Training

10-11

Roadways:

155 Lane Miles

Airport:

Runway 1—5,500’ x 100’

Patrol Division Districts, General Overview

12

2017 Highlights

12-13

Chaplains, Canine Unit

14

Detective Bureau General Overview

15

2017 Highlights

16

Statistics, SCDIU

17

SRO’s, Alcohol & Tobacco, POR

18-19

Runway 2—3,000’ x 75’

Owatonna Police Department Authorized Personnel

Detective Bureau Support Forfeitures

19

Crime Scene Unit

20

Property & Evidence

20

Support Services CSOs, Reserves

21

Parking, Animal Control

22

Community Programs Safety Camp, Polar Plunge

23

Explorers, Night to Unite

24

Data Trend

2—Table of Contents

25-27

Department Fleet


Citizens of Owatonna Mayor and City Council Members City Administration and Staff

Chief’s Message

The Owatonna Police Department is proud to present the 2017 Annual Report. This report is a snapshot of our accomplishments and outcomes. The staff is pleased to report our Part 1 crimes fell 23.9% and our Part 2 crimes declined 35.4% for an overall reduction of 30.1%! Over the last two years (2015-2017), our Part 1 and Part 2 crimes have declined by 40.8%! I want to thank our staff and community members for taking an active role in reducing our crime rate. The national landscape surrounding the recruitment and retention of police officers has influenced our police agency. We are exploring current practices, old ways of doing things and trying new things to shape our future. The pursuit of excellence and service to our community is at the forefront of all our hiring practices. This year we hired 5 police officers and 3 community service officers to serve us at the highest levels. When you meet someone with solid character who has a strong desire to serve their fellow men and women, please encourage them to join our ranks. And, for those currently serving as law enforcement professionals—THANK YOU! Our department values guide us daily in our pursuit of distinction.

They are: 

Honesty

Integrity

Trust

Positive Attitude

Excellence

Teamwork

Respect

Accountability

Commitment to Excellence

As you page through the annual report, you will see our values imprinted on all the pages. We are rewarded daily by our citizens. We appreciate your willingness to support our efforts in all we do! Warmest Regards,

Keith E. Hiller, Chief of Police City of Owatonna, Minnesota

Chief’s Message—3


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Administrative Technician (1)

Mission The Owatonna

Patrol Operations

Police Department is dedicated to providing a safe and secure community through

Captain (1)

Administrative Technician (1)

partnerships, leadership, and an unwavering

Sergeants (6)

Chaplains (3) Reserve Officers (13) Explorer Post

commitment to excellence. Policing excellence through our People, our Work

and our Relationships.

Patrol Officers (20)

Includes: K9 Unit (0) Crime Scene Techs (3) SWAT (4)

Command Staff Sworn Staff

Field Training (5)

Civilian Staff

DRE (0)

Shared Staff

EVOC(0) Firearms (6) Use of Force (3)

4—Mission

Divisions:

Volunteers


Chief of Police Keith E. Hiller

Organizational Structure

Records Management

Professional Standards

Records Clerks (4)

Support Services

Evidence Technician (1)

Captain (1)

Community Service Officers (3)

Includes Parking Control and Animal Control

Investigations

Sergeant (.5)

Drug Investigations

SCDIU Commander(.5)

Community Service Officers (3)

OHS & OMS School Security

Investigators(5) ICAC

OPD SCDIU Agent (1)

Child Protection SRO Gangs Crime Scene Techs

SCDIU Agents (3)

Organizational Structure—5


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Department Budget

OWATONNA POLICE

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

2017 ACTUAL

$875,606

$4,759,983

$3,884,377

2017 PROPOSED

$941,202

$4,891,027

$3,949,825

2016 ACTUAL

$923,005

$4,719,266

$3,796,261

2016 PROPOSED

$921,764

$4,724,717

$3,802,953

2015 ACTUAL

$940,371

$4,468,996

$3,528,625

2015 PROPOSED

$957,359

$4,563,827

$3,606,468

The Owatonna City Council approved the 2017 annual base and capital improvement budgets after a series of presentations by:

Chief of Police, City Administrator and Finance Director Click on the City of Owatonna’s 2017 Adopted Budget and scroll to page 136 to find program details for the Owatonna Police Department.

6—Budget


Personnel Changes

Officer Alex Vogel

Officer Casey Martin

01/03/2017

03/20/2017

Officer Valerie Satre

Officer Luke Selvik

05/01/2017

10/04/2017

New Hires

Officer Travis Johnson

CSO Nathan Heeren

CSO Matthew Borash

CSO Brian Shaw

08/21/2017

11/02/2017

11/27/2017

10/29/2017

RESIGNATIONS Officer Terrence Flynn 03/09/2017

Officer Joseph Kelly 12/04/2017

Officer Abby Dreher 05/26/2017

CSO Shelia Appel 05/22/2017

Officer Emily Ammentorp 09/08/2017

CSO Mohamed Abdi 09/25/2017

Officer John Petterson 10/02/2017

Personnel Changes—7


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Professional Standards Professional standards, also referred in some police agencies as Internal Affairs, is charged with the responsibility of monitoring and maintaining members compliance with federal, state and local laws, city rules, and more narrowly, the department operating policies and procedures. Every level in this organization is tasked with carrying the mission and philosophy of the department to their best professional ability. As community servants, police officers are accountable to the department and community of citizens they serve. Policing is complex and requires adaptability to work with a community of diversity and an array of expectations. We set a high standard of excellence for our staff and strive to be our best and do our best in every situation, but we also recognize that police officers are prone to making mistakes and we cannot be perfect all the time.

Professional Standards serves as a transparent method of internal accountability by receiving, classifying, processing, and investigating complaints concerning conduct of any police department employee. Conduct could include violations of a citizens’ rights, criminal law, department policy or officer performance. Upon the conclusion of a complete and thorough investigation, the Captain of Investigations submits the investigation to the Chief of Police. In 2017, Professional Standards investigated 19 complaints, one of which was conducted for another agency. Of the 18 internal complaints involving Owatonna Police Department staff, 15 were sustained and discipline was issued that ranged from an oral reprimand to a 15 day suspension. In three cases, the Chief of Police ruled in favor of the officer with a finding of exonerated, unfounded, or not sustained. The sustained discipline is most often for minor policy infractions such as reporting late for duty or failure to report for a scheduled court appearance.

Professional Standards also receives many compliments from citizens that wish to recognize the outstanding work of our officers for going “above and beyond”. Anyone, including citizens and police staff, can make a formal commendation request that will be reviewed by the Chief of Police. Officer recognition is shared with all employees through a weekly bulletin. Actions conducted by an officer or officers that raise to a commendation will be presented by the Chief of Police at a formal awards ceremony.

8—Professional Standards


General Overview—Administration

Chief Hiller Turns 50!

The chief of police, support services captain, patrol captain and administrative technician serve in the Administrative Division at the Law Enforcement Center. The team manages a $4.9 million budget and a staff of 60 full-time, part-time, and volunteers. The team is responsible for the day-to-day operations that provide public safety services to people that live, work, and play in our community. Our team serves on many committees, non-profit boards, and they volunteer at many places. We seek engagement at the highest levels to discover shared meaning on a host of social issues influencing our way of life.

We are proud and mindful of our values. They serve as a framework to our decision making. They foster a caring and concerned approach in all levels of service. The values promote and encourage transparency and trust within our community. They create legitimacy in our police ranks. As noted on the page 8, we hold each other to the highest standards by holding ourselves accountable. We are very mindful of the high expectations that our community and leaders place on our staff. Those expectations are what motivates us to serve with a daily pursuit of distinction.

Cafeteria

Fitness Room

In 2017, the Owatonna Police Department, in partnership with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office, remodeled two rooms in the basement of the shared Law Enforcement Center into a fitness center and cafeteria for all employees use.

Employee Kitchen

Administration Overview—9


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Department Training The Use of Force Unit is comprised of four instructors; Sergeant Josh Sorensen, Detective Matt Oeltjenbruns and Officers Travis Ardolf and Adam Hennen. The instructors have received specialized instructor training in SPEAR, L.O.C.K.U.P., TASER, Less Lethal, Defense against Edged Weapon Attacks and ASP curriculums. The Owatonna Police Department has outfitted each sworn officer with an X2 Taser. Officers Ardolf and Hennen instruct on the use the tasers and take care of the maintenance and downloading of data when these units are deployed in the field.

of

This year, the instructors dedicated four full days of mandated training to provide a minimum of eight (8) hours of continuing education to all sworn police officers and community service officers of the Owatonna Police Department. Along with the mandated training, the Use of Force Unit works with each newly appointed employee for a minimum of five hours to review policy/procedures, state statutes, and our current training curriculum. During the year, our instructors also train the Reserve Unit, as well as give presentations to include our department’s Citizen’s Academy and the Owatonna Leadership Academy groups. Defensive Tactics

Looking forward to 2018, our agency plans to add another instructor at the end of the year to replace Detective Oeltjenbruns and Officer Hennen. We also plan to incorporate an online training website called Patrol Online into our use of force curriculum to expand on our current training program with micro trainings throughout the year.

10—Department Training


Department Training Firearms Sergeant Jason Matejcek—Coordinator Sergeants Andy Drenth & Josh Sorensen—Certified Instructors Officers Ben Johnson, Jesse Ackerson, and Andrew Van Osdale— Certified Instructors

The Owatonna Police Department’s Firearms Unit had one coordinator and five certified firearms instructors. In April of 2017, Officers Ben Johnson and Andrew Van Osdale attended and successfully completed a weeklong HTCQB (high-threat close quarters battle) instructor’s course in Albert Lea, MN. Also, the Owatonna Police Department’s Firearms Unit conducted the following: annual qualifications, chief’s Top-Shot competition, low-light/inclement weather and vehicle CQB (close quarter battle) trainings for the officers of the department. The trainings consisted of a mix of live-fire and simunition rounds.

SWAT Tactical Team

SWAT Tactical Team In 2017, the South Central Drug Investigation Unit’s Tactical Team (SWAT) was comprised of about 23 team members from 11 different agencies within Steele, Freeborn, Waseca, and Faribault Counties. The primary goal of the tactical team is the safety and preservation of all human life. It is a support group that aids the local police departments and sheriffs offices through the use of their specialized trainings and equipment to resolve high-risk, critical incidents that are beyond the capabilities of the local authorities. All officers assigned to the tactical team maintain a high-level of proficiency through attendance of monthly ten hour training days. Assigned OPD Officers Jesse Ackerson, Zack Schumaker as well as Detectives Joel Hunt and Matt Oeltjenbruns were allowed to conduct additional six hour monthly trainings in order to comply with the National Tactical Officers Association’s training hour recommendations. Detective Oeltjenbruns was selected and appointed as a sniper for the team and in April 2017, he successfully completed the basic sniper rifle course held in Waterloo, IA. Officers participated in the annual three day Special Operations Tactical Association conference to compete against other tactical teams throughout Minnesota, and learned the latest trends in tactical techniques. The SWAT team was called out to respond to 3 incidents in 2017.

Department Training—11


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

General Overview—Patrol Often referred to as the backbone to a police department, the uniformed Patrol Division is the largest and most visible division of the Owatonna Police Department. Tasked with patrolling and answering calls for service within the city of Owatonna—an area encompassing approximately 14.45 square miles—the Patrol Division was staffed by (1) captain, (6) patrol sergeants and was authorized for (20) patrol officers. The sergeants and patrol officers are assigned to one of three policing districts—the North, South or West Central District. Patrol Districts were designed in 2007 with a focus on building relationships with businesses and residents to make a positive impact on the quality of life in our neighborhoods. This is accomplished through partnerships, collaboration, problem solving and community engagement opportunities. The officers meet regularly with our citizens, businesses and community leaders and engage other agencies and organizations to identify issues and seek positive resolutions. Specialty units that are within the Patrol Division include the Field Training Unit, Use of Force Unit, Firearms Unit, Canine Unit, Chaplains, and Physical Evidence Officers.

2017 Patrol Division

Police Districts

Swearing-in Ceremony

Highlights On May 2, the Owatonna Police Department held a recognition ceremony during the regular City Council Meeting. Officers John Petterson and Travis Ardolf were presented Class D Commendations for outstanding police service. Sergeant Jason Matejcek was formally recognized for his promotion to sergeant. Officers Alan Callahan, Abby Dreher, Casey Martin, Dylan Ordorff, Derrik Quinlan, Michaela Smith and Valerie Satre were ceremonially sworn in as Owatonna police officers. Lastly, retired Owatonna Sergeant John Kristofferson was recognized for his service as an Owatonna officer from 1953 to 1979.

12—Districts, Patrol Overview, Highlights


2017 Patrol Division Highlights On March 18th, 30 local celebrities, including Police Chief Keith Hiller, played in the Suits & Sneakers charitable basketball game. The basketball game raised more than $2,200 for the Homestead Hospice House in Owatonna. The Homestead Hospice House is a residential hospice located in Owatonna and provides personalized care in a welcoming home environment 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

On April 11th, the Owatonna Leadership Academy visited the Owatonna PD as part of their criminal justice day. The group received several presentations on differing aspects of local policing that include patrol, criminal and drug investigations, use of force considerations, SWAT operations and our canine program. Detective Joel Hunt was formally recognized on May 11, as the Moonlighter’s Exchange Club Owatonna Police Officer of the Year. Detective Hunt has served the Owatonna community since 2003—as a community service officer, patrol officer, school resource officer and detective. Detective Hunt also volunteers in our community serving on the Owatonna Human Rights Commission, Vice-president of the Owatonna Eagles Club and on the Owatonna Forward Organization. This was the 3rd annual ceremony; previous winners of this award were Officers Zack Schumaker (2015) and Adam Hennen (2016).

OPD Watermelon Seed Spitters @ Steele County Free Fair

Annual Shop with a Cop

Police Officer of the Year

CSO Travis Johnson defended his title at the Steele County Free Fair in the annual watermelon seed spitting contest that pits the best the Owatonna Police Department has to offer against our law enforcement partners at the Steele County Sheriff’s Office. Despite adverse weather conditions, CSO Johnson won the competition with a mighty heave of 34’-11”. We look forward to what he has in store for 2018. CSO Johnson was joined by fellow OPD spitters, Sergeant Tracy DuChene, Detectives Matt Oeltjenbruns and Christian Berg and Officer Valerie Satre. On August 23rd, Owatonna officers partnered with other Steele County law enforcement agencies at the annual Shop with a Cop event sponsored by the Salvation Army. Striving to develop positive relationships with our youth, shopping with a cop aims to develop a connection between law enforcement and kids so that our youth are more likely to seek help from the police when they need it rather than getting into trouble.

Patrol Highlights—13


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Chaplains Back Row Reverend Ron Wilson (Retired) Reverend Brent Carlson Reverend Mark Rosenau (Retired)

Front Row Reverend Loren Olson Parish Nurse Nancy Deetz

Canine Unit Kash & Handler Petterson

14—Chaplains, Canine Unit


General Overview—Detective Bureau The Detective Bureau falls under the support services branch of the Owatonna Police Department. This division consists of seven members; a captain, detective sergeant, a corporal, five detectives and an evidence technician. The division commander is the captain who oversees the general operations of the Detective Bureau. The captain is also responsible for department professional standards, internal affairs investigations, and the property and evidence room. The sergeant serves a dual role as a detective sergeant and the commander of the South Central Drug Investigative Unit (SCDIU). The detective sergeant is involved in the day-to-day operations and has direct supervision of all team members, including SCDIU agents. The SCDIU commander also manages the Violent Crimes Enforcement Team (VCET) grant that provides financial support for violent crime and drug investigations in the task force area. Two detectives serve as school resource officers (SRO’s) for the Owatonna Public School District. Three detectives, including a corporal, are stationed at the Law Enforcement Center and specialize in areas to include child protection, property, financial and person crimes, predatory offenders, and internet crimes against children. All detectives, including SRO’s, investigate criminal cases referred from the Patrol Division. The detectives are a liaison to other local, county, state and federal agencies. All members of the bureau are cross-trained in REID interview and interrogation technique, CornerHouse—child forensic interviews, death investigations, search warrants, and are trained crime scene technicians. The Owatonna Police Department is also committed to drug enforcement and violent crime investigations. One detective is assigned to work solely with the SCDIU task force and surrounding task force regions to include state and federal agencies. The evidence technician serves as a civilian in a support role to all members of the Detective Bureau and manages the SCDIU task force financial accounts. The evidence technician also prepares in-custody files for the Steele County Attorney’s Office. The evidence technician is the sole custodian of the property and evidence room for the police department and task force. In addition, the Evidence Technician prepares monthly crime data reports and is a certified computer forensics operator [Cellebrite].

Detective Bureau Overview—15


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

2017 Detective Bureau Highlights An undetected two month crime spree came to an end during the summer of 2017 after a 17 year old juvenile offender, Charles Lee Ramsey Adams, entered residences and victimized two women in their sleep and entered a handful of residences potentially seeking other victims. The first case of a sexual assault was reported mid-July and was inactive due to no suspect leads. A second case occurred and was reported one month later, also inactive due to the lack of investigative leads. A day following the second incident, a concerned parent found two sets of car key fobs in her son’s backpack. These keys were linked back to property from the second burglary and sexual assault case. Our detectives immediately began working with this lead and arrested the juvenile who was in possession of the key fobs. This suspect then pointed detectives to Charles Adams. Adams was located shortly thereafter and a search warrant of his cellular phone revealed supporting evidence in the form of still pictures of him in many homes and videos of him sexually assaulting female victims in their sleep. A detective tied Adams to the first sexual assault incident after recognizing and matching still images from Adams’ phone of a unique pattern of woman’s undergarments to the crime scene evidence from the first case. More pictures in Adams’ possession tied him to other theft and burglary victims of credit card fraud. Charles Adams was certified as an adult and was formally charged with six counts of Burglary and two cases of Criminal Sexual Conduct. Adams pled guilty to the most serious sexual assault cases and was sentenced to 172 months and 108 months, serving concurrently. In June, patrol officers and detectives responded to a stabbing at Skyline Gardens. The victim, a 36 year old female was located outside the residence sitting in a chair, being treated by a neighbor. The victim’s clothing was soiled in her blood from knife lacerations to her cheek, abdomen and back. The victim was stabbed a total of 10 times with a folding knife. The victim was losing consciousness, although uttered to officers that her boyfriend, Ron Jaeger, stabbed her, took her phone and fled in her vehicle. A KOPS alert was issued and a deputy from the Dodge County Sheriff’s Office heard the call and began monitoring Highway 14 East. Shortly thereafter, the deputy spotted the suspect vehicle traveling east, toward Rochester. The deputy made a high risk traffic stop with the help from the Minnesota State Patrol and arrested the driver and only occupant—Jaeger. Jaeger had blood on his hands, clothing and inside the vehicle. A weapon was found on the passenger side floor with blood on it. OPD detectives immediately responded to the call and secured two crimes scenes, the residence and vehicle. They collected evidence, took photographs, conducted interviews, took the victim’s statement, and filed search warrants. The victim was airlifted to a Rochester hospital and survived the assault. Ron Jaeger, 34 of Owatonna, was charged and remains in custody for Attempted Second Degree Murder and First Degree Assault. On June 19, 2018, Jaeger was found to be competent to stand trial which will begin during the fall of 2018.

Ron Jaeger

16—Detective Bureau Highlights


Other 7%

Crimes against Persons 18%

Detective Bureau Statistics

Property Crimes 28%

298

383

341

102

24

1

23

74

Inactive

Cases Unfounded

Exceptionally

Cleared

Cleared Cita-

Cleared CAC (Formal Com-

Cases Assigned

Criminal Cases Referred

Child/Adult Protection Cases Referred

Child / Adult Protection 47%

34

South Central Drug Investigation Unit The mission of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit is to investigate and apprehend mid to upper level drug dealers and violent offenders. The Owatonna Police Department is the fiscal agent of a four county multi -jurisdictional Violent Crime Enforcement Team (VCET) including Steele, Freeborn, Waseca, and Faribault Counties serving 2,500 square miles and approximately 100,000 people. The unit consists of a commander, evidence technician, and four full-time agents. There are 13 law enforcement agencies within the four counties who contribute funds to the unit, along with state and federal grants. SCDUI’s focus is to investigate the sale, possession, and manufacturing of illegal drugs including methamphetamine, opioids, prescription pills, cocaine, and marijuana. The agents work closely with other agencies to identify drug dealers who are selling in several jurisdictions or states. By locating the main sources of the drugs, they can reduce the supply in our communities. Agents also conduct public presentations for civic groups, schools, churches, workplaces, and professional groups in order to educate and increase awareness.

Detective Bureau Statistics, SCDIU—17


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

School Resource Officers The Owatonna Police Department has two school resource officers (SRO) in the Owatonna Public School System. Detective Matt Oeltjenbruns is stationed at the newly remodeled middle school and also covers the elementary schools. Detective Brady Vaith is at the high school along with managing the alternative learning center. The SRO’s act as a liaison and on a day-to-day basis you will see them interacting with the students and dealing with criminal issues that may arise (i.e. tobacco violations, assaults). The new Owatonna Middle School now houses 68 grades. It has been a great transition for the staff and students. Security at the building is also a lot different. The school district has implemented a new checkin protocol when you arrive at the school. With the new system, an I.D. must be presented, a name tag is generated and then staff will let you into the building. This has helped immensely when it comes to monitoring who is in the building. Another reason for implementation was in the need of an evacuation or lockdown, we know who is in the building and are able to account for everyone. The school district also contracts with the Owatonna Police Department to provide additional uniformed security presence with two full-time and one part-time community service officer.

Alcohol and Tobacco Compliance The Owatonna Police Department, with the assistance of underage operatives, conducts alcohol and tobacco compliance checks amongst local retailers. Compliance checks provide a proactive approach to keep alcohol and tobacco out of the hands of our youngest community members. These checks have been completed twice per year by the department since 1999. The operatives are trained, photographed and equipped with electronic listening devices so officers can monitor the conversations. The OPD conducts the checks with the anticipation that all businesses are complying with state and local laws. The sale of tobacco and alcohol to someone under the legal age is a criminal matter and may result in criminal charges to the employee who sold the product. The business may also face a possible suspension or revocation of their tobacco or alcohol license by the city council. Twenty-nine establishments were checked for tobacco compliance in 2017. Twenty-eight establishments were found to be compliant for a 97% compliance rate. A letter was sent to each business that passed congratulating them on their diligence and professionalism. A citation was issued to the employee that failed the check, and a letter was sent to the business reviewing their licensing requirements. Forty-seven establishments were checked for alcohol compliance. Forty-three establishments were found to be compliant for a 91% compliance rate. Formal complaints were issued to the employees that failed the checks. A letter was sent to each business that passed congratulating them on their diligence and professionalism when asking and checking for the underage buyer’s identification and birthdate.

Predatory Offender Registry

Minnesota’s Predatory Offender Registry was established in 1991 in an effort to assist law enforcement with identifying and tracking sexual offenders. Since its inception, the registry has grown to include individuals who have demonstrated predatory behavior, to include: kidnapping, false imprisonment, solicitation of a minor and criminal abuse. All registrants are required to register for a minimum period of 10 years or the duration of their probation (whichever is longer). No two cases are the same and due to the nature of the crime and venue, some registrants are required to register for life. The registry requires offenders to provide up to date information on their primary addresses, vehicles, places of employment, phone numbers and changes in appearance. A conviction of failing to register information may result in additional jail /prison time as well as adding an additional five years to the offender’s registration requirement.

18—SRO’s, Alcohol & Tobacco, POR Compliance


Forfeitures

Predatory Offender Registry

78 registered offenders within Owatonna 2 noncompliant – charged criminally / arrested

Officers and detectives with the Owatonna Police Department conduct biannual checks on offenders to make sure all registration information is up to date and valid. Additional photographs are taken of offenders and their vehicles, once per year. The Owatonna Police Department works closely with the Minnesota Department of Corrections and area probation agents to ensure compliance of offenders and educate the community through public notification meetings. Recently, the Owatonna Police Department has partnered with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension’s Human Trafficking Investigator’s Task Force where we are working proactively with other agencies to combat sex trafficking in our community.

Forfeitures, POR Compliance—19


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Crime Scene Unit The Crime Scene Unit assists the Patrol and Investigative Divisions for the purpose of evidence identification, collection, and preservation. Crime scene technicians are trained in areas of crime scene photography, latent print development and recovery, biological and trace evidence recovery, and tool mark and footwear impression recovery. Members strive to obtain the most up to date training and equipment in crime scene processing. In 2017, crime scene technicians provided training to the Owatonna Middle School Forensics Class.

Property and Evidence The property and evidence technician is tasked with maintaining the chain of custody for all evidentiary items submitted to the property room. Documenting the intake, storage, security, release and disposal of all items is the primary focus of property room personnel. The Owatonna Police Department continues to utilize a program called Evidence Tracker to electronically track all items in the property room.

20—Crime Scene Unit, Property & Evidence

6031 items as of 12/31/2017

1,859 items released or destroyed in 2017

1,430 items entered in 2017


Community Service Officers Typical CSO essential duties:  Performs patrol to secure assigned areas during the school day;  Performs parking control and ordinance enforcement duties;

 Performs animal control duties by coordinating, responding to,

and investigating related matters; and  Performs other duties of a similar nature or level.

Knowledge (Position requirements at entry): 

Modern police practices and methods;

Departmental procedures, rules, and regulations;

Applicable state & federal laws, city ordinances, and laws of arrest;

Street layout and geography of the city;

Principles and practices of patrol and crime prevention;

Report preparation techniques;

Customer service principles; and

Computer operation and related software applications.

Reserve Unit

CSOs, Reserves—21


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Parking Control Division Strategy To maximize the use of all existing parking spaces for downtown customers, businesses, and residents. To accomplish this strategy, parking restrictions are enforced to encourage employees, business owners, and residents to use long-term parking spaces located on the fringe of the downtown area, while making available short-term parking spaces located in the center of downtown for shoppers and customers.

A happy tail for you—the dog to the right was brought to our Owatonna Police Department’s shelter in the beginning of August 2017. He had been running for a while when he was caught. He was adopted out a short time later from Rescue 55021 by a family that wanted a running partner and Bentley fit the bill!

Here is a kitten born to one of the pregnant cats the OPD animal control adopted out a while back. The shelter that adopted her, wanted us to know that what we do does matter. Shelter staff said saving this one cat did not change the world, but for her and the kittens—their world changed forever.

22—Parking, Animal Control

Animal Control


Safety Camp

Polar Plunge In 2017, with the help of the Owatonna Scuba and Diving Club, the Steele County Sheriff’s Office and the Owatonna Parks and Recreation Department, OPD’s Chief Keith Hiller, Administrative Technician Pamela Roberts and Officer Andrew van Osdale took to the frigid cold water of Lake Kohlmier along with 175 supporters and fellow jumpers to promote awareness for Special Olympics Minnesota. $30,798,225 was raised and will go toward programming and other events for more than 8,000 athletes statewide. Way to go Owatonna PD team!

Safety Camp, Polar Plunge—23


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Owatonna Police Explorers

Night to Unite

24—Explorers, Night to Unite


Data Trend

Past Years Comparison Part I & Part II Crimes—# of Offenses 2016

2015

2014

2013

Homicide

0

0

0

0

31

Rape

1

9

3

5

50

23

Robbery

9

14

6

6

15

83

70

Aggravated Assault

28

37

27

25

64

8

12

248

Burglary

81

142

79

114

372

169

45

1,441

Larceny

495

513

510

538

27

10

37

105

36

27

30

28

1

1

100

4

Arson

2

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

Human Trafficking

0

1

0

0

496

213

43

1,922

Total Part I

652

745

655

716

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

Crime Rate per 100,00

Other Assaults

75

60

80

291

Other Assaults

134

156

157

143

Forgery/Counterfeiting

16

9

56

62

Forgery/Counterfeiting

25

16

17

40

Fraud

41

19

46

159

Fraud

72

68

74

72

Embezzlement

1

0

0

4

Embezzlement

0

0

2

0

Stolen Property

4

3

75

15

Stolen Property

11

3

5

6

Vandalism

93

23

25

360

Vandalism

173

207

167

183

Weapons

8

5

62

31

Weapons

12

8

10

7

Prostitution

0

0

0

0

Prostitution

1

9

0

0

Other Sex Offenses

14

8

57

54

Other Sex Offenses

19

16

31

46

Drug Abuse

83

73

88

322

Drug Abuse

92

115

105

104

Gambling

0

0

0

0

Gambling

1

0

0

0

Family/Children

1

1

100

4

Family/Children

6

6

15

14

DUI

46

45

98

178

DUI

62

112

108

100

Liquor Laws

11

10

91

43

Liquor Laws

11

24

20

30

Disorderly Conduct

26

22

85

101

Disorderly Conduct

38

28

40

43

Vagrancy

0

0

0

0

0

41

n/a

n/a

Other Offenses

76

64

84

294

Other Offenses

109

121

124

115

Total Part II

495

342

69

1,918

Total Part II

766

930

875

903

GRAND TOTAL

991

555

56

3,840

Grand Total

1,418

1,675

1,530

1,619

2017 Part I Crimes Homicide Rape Robbery

Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Human Trafficking Total Part I

2017 Part II Crimes

Crime Rate per 100,000

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

0

0

0

0

8

7

88

6

3

18

Motor Vehicle Theft

Vagrancy

Data Trend—25


OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT—2017 Annual Report

Data Trend Part I & II

Narcotics

MOWER CO SHERIFF—683

MOWER CO SHERIFF—38

AUSTIN PD—1,634

AUSTIN PD—107

FARIBAULT CO SHERIFF—139

FARIBAULT CO SHERIFF—20 FREEBORN CO SHERIFF—36

FREEBORN CO SHERIFF—177

ALBERT LEA PD—87

ALBERT LEA PD—604 WASECA CO SHERIFF—8

WASECA CO SHERIFF—176 WASECA PD—265

WASECA PD—30 RICE CO SHERIFF—43

RICE CO SHERIFF—219

Offenses Cleared by Agency

NORTHFIELD PD—234

NORTHFIELD PD—61 FARIBAULT PD—147

FARIBAULT PD—638

STEELE CO SHERIFF—23

STEELE CO SHERIFF—155 OWATONNA PD—555

OWATONNA PD—79

Part I & II Crimes—Offenses Cleared

Local Drug Abuse –Offenses Cleared

78.2%

77.5%

21.8 %

22.5%

Owatonna PD

26—Data Trend

Steele Co Sheriff


Data Trend DRUG ABUSE CASES CLEARED—Drug Task Force Regions

Rice County Drug Task Force Population = 67,303 Total Narcotic Arrests = 212 Narcotic Arrests per Capita=.0031

SE MN Narcotics and Gang Task Force Olmsted, Winona, Goodhue, Dodge, Mower Fillmore, Houston, Wabasha Population = 374,734 Total Narcotic Arrests = 1,128 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0030

So Central Drug Task Force Steele, Waseca, Faribault, Freeborn Population = 100,264 Total Narcotic Arrests = 282 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0028

MN River Valley Drug Task Force Martin, Watonwan, Nicollet, Blue Earth Population = 131,558 Total Narcotic Arrests = 587 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0045

Regional

25,000—49,999 Population 49,355 ST LOUIS PARK—5,053

OWATONNA PD —3,840

42,999 MOORHEAD—6,510

FARIBAULT PD—6,283 42,047 MANKATO—10,313

AUSTIN PD—9,732 ALBERT LEA PD—6,003

40,689 MAPLEWOOD—9,012 41,176 SHAKOPEE—5,996 36,253 COTTAGE GROVE—6,174

WASECA PD—4,945

36,196 ROSEVILLE—9,275

NORTHFIELD PD

—2,705

35,254 INVER GROVE HEIGHTS—5,175 31,491 SAVAGE—5,633 28,181 OAKDALE—7,342

STEELE CO —2,849

Crime Rates

RICE CO —2,505

27,071 WINONA—6,664

MOWER COUNTY—5,632 FREEBORN CO

27,516 FRIDLEY—9,195

—2,339

26,643 RAMSEY—3,997 25,374 PRIOR LAKE—7,553 25,810 OWATONNA—3,840

WASECA COUNTY—5,548 26,065 WHITE BEAR LAKE—8,567

FARIBAULT COUNTY—4,193

26,383 CHASKA—2,994

Data Trend—27


2017 Annual Report This document and all of its contents are the property of:

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

Reproductions or distributions of this document in whole or in part are permitted subject to appropriate source citation and the express prior written consent of the Chief of Police of the Owatonna Police Department. Please visit us and learn more about our organization at:

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Owatonna Police Department 2017 Annual Report  

Owatonna Police Department 2017 Annual Report