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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

Annual Report

2016

Keith E. Hiller / Chief of Police 204 East Pearl Street, Owatonna MN 55060 www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police


TABLE OF CONTENTS

C i t y o f O wa t o n n a . . … . . . . . . … . … … … … … … … … … …

M i s s i o n S t a t e me n t … . . . . . . … . … … … … … … … … … … …

P e r s o n n e l Ch a n g e s … … . . . … … … … … … … … … … … …

P r o f e s s i o n a l S t a n d a r d s , G e n e r a l O ve r vi e w, Tr a i n i n g … . . . … . . … . . . . . …

D i s t r i c t s , G e n e r a l O ve r vi e w, 2 0 1 6 H i g h l i g h t s , C h a p l a i n s , C a n i n e U n i t … . . . …

G e n e r a l O ve r vi e w, S t a t i s t i c s , 2 0 1 6 H i g h l i g h t s , S R O ’ s , S C DI U … … . . . . . . …

A l c o h o l & To b a c c o , P r e d a t o r y O ff e n d e r R e g i s t r y. . . … … … … . . . . … F o r f e i t u r e s , C r i m e S c e n e U n i t , P r o p e r t y & E vi d e n c e … … … … … … .

R e s e r ve s , C S O ’ s , P a r k i n g , A n i m a l C o n t r o l … . … … … . . . … . . . . . …

S a f e t y C a m p , P o l a r P l u n g e , C i t i z e n ’ s A c a d e m y , E x p l o r e r s … … …… . . . … COLA, TZD, Night to Unite


……..…….. …………..C hi e f ’ s M e s s a ge

…..…….. Or g a n i z a t i o n a l S t r u c t u r e

……………………. D e p a r t m e n t B u d g e t

……………. Ad m i n i s t r a t i ve D i vi s i o n

…..……………………... P a t r o l D i vi s i o n

………………………. De t e c t i ve B u r e a u

………………. Co m p l i a n c e I n i t i a t i ve s ……….. D e t e c t i ve B u r e a u S u p p o r t

………………………. S u p p o r t S e r vi c e s

……………..….. C o m m u n i t y P r o g r a m s

D a t a Tr e n d


ORGANIZED AS A MUNICIPALITY 1854

MAYOR: Thomas A. Kuntz ADMINISTRATOR: Kris M. Busse GOVERNMENT: Mayor—Council POPULATION: 25,660 LOCATION: Crossroads of I35 & U.S. Hwys 14 & 218 LAND AREA: 14.45 Square Miles CITY BUDGET: $26,002,416 ROADWAYS: 155 Lane Miles AIRPORT: Runway 1—5,500’ x 100’ Runway 2—3,000’ x 75’


FROM THE CHIEF

Citizens of Owatonna Mayor and City Council Members City Administration and Staff

The team at the Owatonna Police Department takes great pleasure in presenting the 2016 annual report. This year, the community was rewarded for its commitment to public safety. The staff at the Owatonna Police Department is pleased to report Part 1 crimes are down 12.48 percent, our Part 2 crimes are down 17.63 percent, and overall we have seen a 15.43 percent reduction. Crime rates can be influenced by a number of factors. It is our opinion some of the social forces influencing criminal behavior are:        

A holistic community methodology that focuses on engaging community members A strong engaging educational system A problem solving criminal justice system A vibrant business community Active and involved non-profits Available health care services A strong faith-based community Government services

When we interconnect these segments within our community, we tend to see positive results! And, one of them is the reduction of crime. A special THANK YOU to everyone that lives, works and visits our community for making a difference. While perusing this annual report, I trust you will witness the efforts our staff places on relationships. Our programming is designed to get to know each other on a personal level. It is human nature, the more we share life experiences, the more we care for one another. The more we care about one another, the less likely we are to hurt, offend or take advantage of another. I want our community to support our law enforcement professionals. They are dedicated to making a difference in our community. I would like to thank our community members for their outward support and appreciation. It is your watchful eyes and passion for a safe community that makes Owatonna one of the most desirable places to live in the State and Country.

My wish for all of you is a happy and healthy year. Warmest Regards,

Keith E. Hiller, Chief of Police City of Owatonna, Minnesota

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 3 & 4


ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

Chief (1)

Administrative Technician (1)

Records Management

Patrol Operations

Records Clerks (4)

Divisions:

Command Staff

Captain (1)

Administrative Technician (1)

EvidenceTechnician (1)

Sworn Staff Sergeants (6)

Chaplains (5) Reserve Officers (20)

Investigations

Explorer Post Civilian Staff

Shared Staff Patrol Officers (20)

Sergeant (.5)

Includes: Volunteers

K9 Unit (1)

Crime Scene Techs (3) SWAT (4)

Investigators(2)

Field Training (6) Gang (2) Firearms/Use of Force (4) School Resource Officers (2)

Pages 5 & 6—OPD 2016 Annual Report


Professional Standards

Support Services

Captain (1)

Community Service Officers (3) Includes Parking Control and Animal Control

MISSION The Owatonna Police Department is dedicated to

Drug Investigations

attaining the highest level of professionalism and accountability in its service to the citizens of Owatonna. Recognizing that our

SCDIU Commander(.5)

Community Service Officers (3) OHS & OJHS School Security

strength stems from our partnership with all sectors of the community, we envision an organization

OPD SCDIU Agent (1)

structured to meet the ever-changing needs of our citizens and our

SCDIU Agents (3)

professions.


2016 PERSONNEL CHANGES New Hires—Officers Michaela Smith—2/8/16 Dylan Ordorff—2/9/16 Katie Friesen—6/27/16 Ethan Meyer—9/8/16 Joshua Steinberg—10/25/16 Abby Dreher—11/28/16

Resignations—Officers Tommy Adams—2/24/16 Katie Friesen—7/7/16 Alex Mieritz—8/14/16 Adam Dupic—11/2/2016 Joshua Steinberg—11/7/16 Ethan Meyer—12/25/16

Resignations—CSOs

OWATONNA POLICE 2016 ACTUAL 2016 PROPOSED 2015 ACTUAL 2015 PROPOSED

2014 ACTUAL 2014 PROPOSED

Katie Friesen—3/24/16 Tommy Adams—7/19/16 Brandon Sell—4/14/16 Kyle Martin—8/9/16

Personnel

~

Fleet


FINANCIALS

The Owatonna City Council approved the 2016 annual base and capital improvement budgets after a series of presentations by:

Chief of Police, City Administrator and Finance Director Click on the City of Owatonna’s 2016 Adopted Budget to the left and scroll to page 136 to find program details for the Owatonna Police Department.

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

$923,005

$4,719,266

$3,796,261

$921,764

$4,724,717

$3,802,953

$940,371

$4,468,996

$3,528,625

$957,359

$4,563,827

$3,606,468

$908,098

$4,499,405

$3,591,307

$932,222

$4,490,655

$3,558,433

Capital

~

Supplies

~

Training

~

Equipment

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 7 & 8


ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION

Professional Standards Professional standards, also referred in some police agencies as Internal Affairs, is charged with the responsibility of monitoring and maintaining members compliance with federal, state and local laws, 2016 department tidbits from eachprocedures and policies. Every level in this city rules, and more narrowly the department operating organization is tasked with carrying section? picturethe ?? mission and philosophy of the department to their best professional ability. As community servants, police officers are accountable to the department and community of citizens they serve. Policing is complex and requires adaptability to work with a community of diversity and an array of expectations. We set a high standard of excellence for our staff and strive to be our best and do our best in every situation, but we also recognize that police officers are prone to making mistakes and we cannot be perfect all the time. Professional Standards serves as a transparent method of internal accountability by receiving, classifying, processing, and investigating complaints concerning police conduct. Conduct could include violations of a citizens’ rights, criminal law, department policy or officer performance. The Captain of Investigations is responsible for investigating complaints of police conduct from internal or external sources. Upon the conclusion of a complete and thorough investigation, the Captain of Investigations submits the investigation to the Chief of Police. In 2016, Professional Standards investigated 21 complaints, one of which was for another agency due to a conflict of interest. Of the 20 internal complaints involving Owatonna Police Department staff, 14 were sustained and discipline was issued that ranged from an oral reprimand to a one-day suspension. In six cases, the Chief of Police ruled in favor of the officer with a finding of exonerated, unfounded, or not sustained. The sustained discipline is most often the case of repeated policy violations of minor infractions. Over the course of the year, our officers and department received many compliments from the citizens that wished to recognize the work of our officers going “above and beyond”. Anyone, including citizens and police staff, can make a formal commendation request that will be reviewed by the Chief of Police. A formal commendation and awards ceremony is held as needed to recognize the outstanding performance of our officers and civilian staff.

Pages 9 & 10—OPD 2016 Annual Report


HONESTY:

General Overview

Being truthful and open in our interactions with each other and the citizens we serve.

INTEGRITY: If you visit the Administrative Division at the Law Enforcement Center you may be conversing with the chief of police, a divisional captain or an administrative technician. Our Administrative team is mindful of our commitment to excellence and serving the public with distinction. The team is responsible for the day-to-day operations that provide public safety services to people that live, work, and play in our community. Our team responds to a variety of social forces influencing many aspects of our community. The citizens provide us approx. $4.7 million and a staff of 64 full-time, part-time, and volunteers to serve.

We are very mindful of the high expectations our community and leaders place on our staff. Those expectations are what motivates us to serve with a daily pursuit of distinction. As you glance to the right of the page, you will notice the values we think are important in the delivery of public safety services. The focus on those values tends to ensure fair treatment to all those in need of services. We are mindful of our image, and the legitimate and referent power the position of a police officer has within our community, and do not take it for granted. The team reflects on our values with justice for all being the motivation behind all our actions.

Being above reproach, ethical and doing what is right.

TRUST:

Being honorable; maintaining a high level of trust with each other and the members of our community.

RESPECT:

Valuing each other and citizens by showing understanding and appreciation of our similarities and differences.

ACCOUNTABILITY:

Conscientious, professional, dependable, and accountable for our actions by the citizens we serve.

COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE:

Adhering to strict standards of conduct and performance in everything we do.

POSITIVE ATTITUDE:

We strive to bring positive constructive influences when dealing with each other & our community.

TEAMWORK:

We work in our department and with members of our community to achieve our goals; making use of diverse skills, abilities, roles and views.

EXCELLENCE:

We are compelled to be leaders and always do our best. We strive to be known for taking the extra step, going the extra mile, leaving no stone unturned in our work. This calls for people with an enduring commitment and dedication to the mission. It requires us to have a commitment to service before self.


2016 DEVELOPMENT Advanced Firearms, Active Shooter Advanced Narcotics Basic Financial Crimes, Interview Basic Pistol Instructor, SWAT School Bulletproof Mind / Warrior Certified Mobilyze Instructor CQB, High Threat & Vehicle CQB Crime Analysis School Crimefree Multi-housing Criminal Justice Info Systems Crisis Intervention Death Invest & Missing Persons Conf DMT-G Cert & Recertification Drug Unit Commander DWI & Traffic Safety, Arrest in Court DWI—ARIDE, SFST, OPUE Edge Weapon Defense Emergency Vehicle Operation Course Forensic Experimental Trauma Interview Forensic Science Interview FTO Basic Certification Gun Permit Background Check Handgun Instructors Course Hostage Rescue Internet Crimes Against Children Interview & Interrogation Lockup Basic Instructor, Police Combat Long Hot Summer MCPA Executive Training Institute MN CIT Mental Illness, MN Crime Analysis MN JOA & MSCIC Conferences Multidisciplinary Team Conference Narcotics Detect Dog, PD1, USPCA K9 Promoting Peace Search Warrants Shotgun Armorer’s Course Sovereign Citizens, Militia Extremists SPEAR Instructors Certification SWAT & Team Leader Tactical Leader, Training Conference Tactics in Traffic Taser Instructor TCORCA Conference Toward Zero Deaths Workshop

2016 Use of Force The Use of Force unit is comprised of three instructors; Sergeant Sorensen ADD CHART HEREand Officers Oeltjenbruns & Hennen. They have a combined training experience level in this field of 16 years. receiving specialized instructor training in SPEAR, L.O.C.K.U.P., TASER, and ASP. Our agency has outfitted each sworn officer with an X26 Taser. Officers Oeltjenbruns and Hennen instruct Taser and take care of the maintenance and downloading of data when these units are deployed in the field. The Use of Force unit works with each newly appointed employee for a minimum of 5 hours to review policy and procedures, state statutes, and our current training curriculum. In 2016, the unit also trained Reserves, and gave presentations to our Citizen’s Academy and Leadership Owatonna.

OWATONNA POLICE 2016 ACTUAL 2016 PROPOSED 2015 ACTUAL This past year,

2015 PROPOSED

the Use of Force instructors dedicated four full days of training to provide a minimum of 2014 ACTUAL eight hours of continuing education to all sworn Police Officers and Community Service Officers of the Owatonna Police Department. 2014 PROPOSED


ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION

2016 Firearms Sergeant Drenth — Coordinator / Certified Instructor Sergeant Matejcek — Coordinator / Certified Instructor Officer Ackerson — Certified Instructor Officer Johnson — Certified Instructor Sergeant Sorensen — Certified Instructor Officer Van Osdale — Certified Instructor

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

$940,371 $4,472,726 $3,532,355 In early 2016, the Owatonna Police Department’s Firearms Division had 4 certified Firearms instructors and 1 open instructor position. Officer Van Osdale was selected and appointed to be a firearms instructor to$921,764 fill the open position. Officer Van Osdale successfully completed a basic pistol firearms $4,658,757 $3,736,993 instructor course last year and is now a certified instructor. $940,371 $4,472,726 $3,532,355 The Owatonna Police Department’s Firearms Division conducted annual qualifications, Chief’s TopShot competition, Low-light/Inclement Weather and Vehicle CQB (close quarter battle). The department also hosted a rifle and shotgun armoring course, so now all of the instructors are certified ar$957,359 $4,563,827 $3,606,468 morers in both platforms. $908,098 $4,499,405 $3,591,307 In late 2016, Sergeant Drenth was assigned to take over as the Detective Bureau Sergeant and Commander of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit. Sergeant Matejcek took over Sergeant Drenth’s firearms coordinator duties. Sergeant Drenth is a key component to the Firearms Division $932,222 $4,490,655 $3,558,433 and will remain on as a fill-in certified firearms instructor.

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 11 & 12


ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION

Probation Officer Smith with her FTO Hennen.

FTO Petterson with probationer Smith.

2016 Field Training Program The field training process of any police department is a critical component of any successful police department. New officers are put through an extensive five – phase field training and evaluation period in which they are critiqued on a daily basis in ten areas of core competency. The first four phases involve an intense sixteen week training period where the new officer is assigned to a field training officer. Newly hired officers spend time working at least one training phase during day, evening, and night shifts. Each phase involves direction and coaching from a different field training officer. During the fourth phase, the field training officer rides along in plain clothes and acts as an observer to the probationary officer. The team of dedicated field training officers are committed to the development and success of the new police officers as well as promoting the department’s mission as a whole. Upon successful completion of the field training program, the police officer candidates are certified for solo patrol duties. Sergeant DuChene coordinates and supervises the Owatonna Police Department’s Field Training Program. Field Training Officers Petterson, Johnson, Schumaker, Hennen, and Bowman are currently assigned to the field training unit. Newly hired Officers Smith and Ordorff have all successfully completed the first four phases of the field training program and have begun solo patrol. Officer Dreher was hired in late November and has started phase one of the field training program.

Pages 13 & 14—OPD 2016 Annual Report


The South Central Drug Investigation Unit’s Tactical Team (SWAT) was comprised of 23 team members from 11 different agencies within Steele, Freeborn, Waseca, and Faribault Counties. In 2016, the Owatonna Police Department provided four officers to serve: Officer Jesse Ackerson — Team Leader Detective Joel Hunt — Asst Team Leader Detective Matt Oeltjenbruns — Operator Officer Zack Schumaker — Operator

CALL OUTS 2007 — 1 2008 — 6

The primary goal of the tactical team is the safety and preservation of all human life. The team is a support group that aids the local police departments and sheriff’s offices through the use of their specialized trainings and equipment to resolve high-risk, critical incidents that are beyond the capabilities of the local authorities.

2009 — 5

All officers assigned to the tactical team maintain a high-level of proficiency through attendance of a monthly ten hour training day. Assigned OPD officers are allowed to conduct additional six hour monthly trainings in order to comply with the National Tactical Officers Association’s monthly training hour recommendations. Also, officers participate in the annual three day Special Operations Tactical Association Conference to compete against other tactical teams throughout Minnesota, and to learn the latest trends in tactical techniques.

2014 — 9

2010 — 3 2011 — 4 2012 — 21 2013 — 9 2015 — 5 2016 — 10


Patrol Division ADD CHART HERE Here at the Owatonna Police Department, the Patrol Division was staffed by a patrol captain, six patrol sergeants and an authorized twenty patrol officers in 2016. Our Patrol Division was broken down into three platoons, each of which has a primary patrol responsibility to a policing district within the city of Owatonna—the South, North or WestCentral District. The purpose of district policing is two-fold. The most obvious is that it attaches a name to a face and lets our community members become familiar with the officers assigned to their area. Secondly, it is a component OWATONNA POLICE of accountability—enabling our officers to familiarize themselves with a section of the2016 city andACTUAL to best recognize criminal behavior that may be afoot.

2016 PROPOSED

Specialized areas of training and assignments that fall within the footprint ACTUAL of the2015 Patrol Division are the Police Reserves, Chaplains, Toward Zero Death 2015 PROPOSED (TZD) Initiative, Canine Unit, Field Training Unit, Use of Force Unit, Firearms2014 TrainingACTUAL Unit, and Physical Evidence Officers.

2014 PROPOSED


PATROL DIVISION

REVENUES $940,371

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

$4,472,726

$3,532,355 General Overview $921,764 $4,658,757 $3,736,993 When you call 911 for emergency services or the non-emergency number to file a report, the responding officers will be the uniformed staff from the Patrol Division. Often referred to $4,472,726 as the $940,371 backbone of any police agency, the uniformed staff of the $3,532,355 Owatonna Police Department is the largest, most visible and recognizable component. They provide 24-hour coverage to $957,359 the city of Owatonna. The officers and supervisors of the Patrol Division are entrust$4,563,827 $3,606,468 ed by our community to provide excellence in public safety services such as responding to 911 emergency calls, investigating$4,499,405 citizen complaints, enforcement of state laws and local $908,098 $3,591,307 ordinances, traffic control and enforcement, and a myriad of other problem solving community concerns and community service outreach projects.

$932,222

$4,490,655

$3,558,433

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 15 & 16


PATROL DIVISION—2016 HIGHLIGHTS

January Patrol Officer Christian Berg fielded an initial complaint of a juvenile being solicited for sex from an City of set Owatonna & stats adult. Working with investigations, an undercover operation was up whichpicture identified the 37-year old male and led to his arrest.

February February marked some significant changes at the Owatonna Police Department. Michaela Smith and Dylan Ordorff begin their law enforcement careers as patrol officers, Officers Adam Hennen and Steve Bowman were appointed to the Field Training Unit, Officer Emily Ammentorp was appointed as a Liaison to the COLA Organization and Officer Brady Vaith was assigned to the Physical Evidence Unit.

April Officers Zack Schumaker and Michaela Smith responded to the report of a 15-year old missing female chocolate lab, Abby. The officers found the dog in distress, nearly freezing in a retention pond. The officers rescued the dog and returned her to her grateful owners. Abby made a full recovery.

May Officer Adam Hennen was named by the Moonlighters Exchange Club as the Owatonna Police Department Police Officer of the Year. Adam has been a member of the Owatonna Police Department since 2012, serving as a patrol officer during that time. He was awarded a Class D Commendation in 2013 and was assigned as the department Crime Free Multi-housing Officer. A banquet was held on May 12th to formally recognize him.

June Officers Michaela Smith and Dylan Ordorff successfully completed the Field Training and Evaluation Process and were assigned to protect our community as solo patrol officers. Officers Michaela Smith, John Petterson and Detective Tom Munns work collaboratively to arrest a forgery suspect— the arrest lead to the clearance of numerous other cases as a result of the arrest.

Pages 17 & 18—OPD 2016 Annual Report


July Canine Officer John Petterson, his canine partner Kash and training partner Officer Andrew Van Osdale successfully completed their United States Police Canine Association PD1 Certifications. To the right, Officer Steve Bowman was caught in the act, visiting a local lemonade stand. Officer Travis Ardolf arrested a female for drunk driving. Although not reported by the arrestee, Officer Ardolf suspected a small child was left unattended by the arrestee at her home. Ardolf followed-up by going to the home of the arrestee and found an unattended 2-year old; the child was placed with emergency child protective services. Officer Ardolf was later awarded with a Class D Commendation for his actions.

September—October Sergeant Tracy DuChene was recognized as top shooter in the 2 nd Annual “Chief’s Top Shot” marksmanship competition within the Owatonna Police Department. The Owatonna Police Department hosted a regional, 3-day Standardized Field Sobriety and Advanced Roadside Impairment Driving Enforcement course at the law enforcement center. To the left, Officer Adam Dupic served as the main instructor for the class. Off-duty Officer John Petterson helped the Mankato Department of Public Safety apprehend a fleeing felon in the City of Mankato and was later awarded a Class D Commendation for his actions. Sergeant Robbe Kniefel & Officer Emily Ammentorp worked with the Owatonna High School by serving as mentors to students who are considering a career in law enforcement.

November A fugitive from Cerro Gordo County in Iowa was captured in Owatonna after Sergeant Andy DeVinny observed a vehicle identified in a regional attempt to locate teletype from Iowa at the Kwik Trip store on 26th Street NE. Sergeant DeVinny was assisted by Officers Jesse Ackerson and John Petterson and the capture also lead to the discovery of controlled substances.


ADD CHART HERE

CHAPLAINS PICTURED Back Row Reverend Ron Wilson Reverend Brent Carlson (retired) Reverend Mark Rosenau

Front Row Reverend Loren Olson Parish Nurse Nancy Deetz

Police Chaplains 2016 marked the fifth anniversary of our volunteer Chaplain Unit. Originated as a nondenominational faith-based resource, the chaplains serve far beyond their individual churches, reaching out into all areas of the community at times of need. They provide OWATONNA POLICE support, shelter and a strength of faith to every citizen of the City of Owatonna. In addi2016 ACTUAL tion, our community chaplains serve as a faith resource to our officers who are often exposed2016 to critical and traumatic incidents PROPOSED throughout their careers that often go unseen by the public we serve. Our chaplains can 2015 assist our officersACTUAL in dealing with the emotional and physical challenges they face in law enforcement, in the simplest form by 2015often PROPOSED just riding along with a patrol officer or being present during a significant event. Your police 2014 ACTUAL department chaplains in 2016 volunteered many, many hours—we thank you all as you 2014 our PROPOSED walk alongside officers in serving our community!


PATROL DIVISION

Canine Unit Officer John Petterson and his partner K9 Kash, now a 5.5 year old German Shepard, had a busy 2016 with training, demos and many arrests. As always, the primary responsibility of the K9 Unit is to maintain certifications standards with the United States Police Canine Association—Patrol Dog 1 and Narcotics. We are excited to report that Kash excelled in both trials showing his abilities in ALL categories with higher scores than in previous years. During 2016, Officer Petterson partnered with local hotel management and has been adding in community policing with Kash to increase police presence. During these contacts, Kash demonstrated the ability to identify rooms with narcotics inside which will open up investigations leading to arrests and ensure safer environments. We look forward to many seizures and arrests from this proactive detail. Officer Petterson and Kash responded to over 70 deployments. A few examples were—tracks for fleeing suspects, an apprehension of a wanted felon and many warrant arrest attempts. The team assisted other agencies that include annual school narcotics searches in Steele, Freeborn, Rice and Waseca Counties as well as searches with the SCDIU and the BCA. The K9 team also directed over 20 demonstrations for many civic groups.

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

In October, the K9 team was called to respond to a felony warrant arrest. The suspect was observed fleeing from officers out a rear door where Kash was waiting (with his toy Kong in his mouth) and continued to run after two warnings to STOP. Kash was “focused and fast” and apprehended the male at his right buttocks forcing him to the ground. When Kash was called to release, he did; his Kong toy dropped from his mouth, along with the suspect’s pants and shirt. No injuries were noted to the suspect.

$940,371

$4,472,726

$3,532,355

$921,764

$4,658,757

$3,736,993

In June, Officer Petterson received a call from a BCA narcotics agent regarding a suspect vehicle involved in the transporting of methamphetamine. Officer Petterson stopped the vehicle for speeding and determined reasonable suspicion for a narcotics sniff. Kash sniffed the exterior of the vehicle and gave a positive alert. A search of the vehicle followed and 4.44 pounds of methamphetamines were located in the trunk. The driver was charged and convicted in Federal Court. It has been a good year!

$940,371

$4,472,726

$3,532,355

$957,359

$4,563,827

$3,606,468

$908,098

$4,499,405

$3,591,307

$932,222

$4,490,655

$3,558,433

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 19 & 20


DETECTIVE BUREAU

General Overview At the beginning of 2016, the two division (Patrol and Detective Bureau) captains flipped roles for a two year stint for their professional development.

2016 department tidbits from each

The Detective Bureau is comprised of a captain, a detective sergeant, one corsection? picture ?? detectives and an evidence technician. The capporal detective, as well as five tain oversees the overall operation of the bureau, while the detective sergeant is responsible for the day–to–day operations and supervision of each detective. The detective sergeant also serves as the commander of the South Central Drug Investigations Unit (SCDIU) and the Violent Crimes Enforcement Team (VCET), and is a representative to the Steele / Waseca Drug Court Committee. Two detectives serve as School Resource Officers (SRO) for the Owatonna Public Schools; one located at the Owatonna High School and the other at the Owatonna Junior High School. An additional detective is assigned as a full-time agent on the SCDIU. Each detective is assigned an area of discipline to include the Predatory Offender Registration (POR) database and bi-annual compliance checks, Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAP), Child Protection under the Governor’s Task Force for the Protection of Children, and alcohol and tobacco compliance checks. The detectives receive specialized training in interview and interrogation, crime scene investigations, death and homicide investigations, CornerHouse forensic interviews, background investigations, and search warrants. All detectives work person and property crimes that are referred from the Patrol Division. An evidence technician [formerly known as the administrative assistant] supports many administrative duties of the Detective Bureau and the SCDIU. The duties include custodian of the property and evidence room, crime statistics and analysis, case preparation for the prosecuting attorney, and serves as a crime scene technician.

Pages 21 & 22—OPD 2016 Annual Report


Cases Assigned—368

2016 Cleared by Formal Complaint—87 Cases sent to the County Attorney’s Office for prosecution.

Child / Adult Protection—511 46%

Cleared by Citation—21 Cases when the suspect has been personally issued a citation.

Cleared Civil—1

Property Crimes—401 36%

Indication that the matter is civil and not criminal, no further investigation will be done.

Exceptionally Cleared—8 Both victim and suspect have been identified and a crime has occurred, but for whatever reason the crime will not be charged, i.e. victim stops cooperating with investigation.

Unfounded—92 Cases found to be non-criminal in nature, meaning no crime was committed or no offense occurred by statute.

Inactive—26 Cases that are stalled; there is no lead or suspect information to proceed with the investigation. These cases could be reopened as leads come forth.

Crimes Against Persons—141 12%

Other Part II Crimes—67

6%

Total—1,120


DETECTIVE BUREAU—2016 HIGHLIGHTS

January On January 2, an employee of the Law Enforcement Center Records Division reported her handgun stolen over the weekend. After multiple interviews and search warrants, it was City of Owatonna picture & stats revealed the reporting party had filed a false police report after purchasing and giving the handgun to a known felon. Investigators were able to locate surveillance video of the reporting party purchasing the handgun while the convicted felon waited in the store. Frank Lucellerson Tubbs was charged with prohibited person in possession of a firearm and domestic assault, Kia Lee was charged with prohibited person in possession of a hand gun, and Sarah Mae Dillon was charged with transfer to ineligible person, purchase of firearm on behalf of ineligible person, and falsely reporting a crime. (OW16-000012)

April

On April 2nd, officers and fire personnel responded to a shed fire at 2747 26th Street NW. When they arrived, the shed was engulfed in flames and heavy smoke was present. Officers went to evacuate the residence on the property and located a person hiding in a bedroom. The subject gave the officers a false name because he had several outstanding warrants for his arrest. The subject was identified by officers as Joshua Michael Sommers, age 28, of Wanamingo. The cause of the fire remains under investigation by Owatonna PD and the State Fire Marshall. (OW16-000875)

On July 24th, city officers were called to 422 North Cedar “The Downtowner Apartments” for a shooting. Two suspects gained access through a secured gate and proceeded to an apartment and accused a tenant of stealing money. One suspect, identified as Ray Cabrera, disguised in a hooded sweatshirt and a bandana mask, pulled a firearm and began shooting at the tenant. The detectives collected three spent rounds from a 9 mm semi-automatic pistol. One projectile penetrated the door where the victim took concealment and another was lodged in the couch framework. The victim sustained a gunshot wound to the fatty tissue of the hand. Cabrera fled and was arrested the following morning at a Mankato apartment by our VCET (Violent Crimes Task Force) and the assistance of River Valley Drug Task Force/Mankato PD. Cabrera confessed to the shooting. The firearm was also recovered where Cabrera was arrested. The firearm matched the description used in the shooting and a robbery 12 hours before. It was later discovered that the firearm was stolen during a burglary in South St. Paul, MN in February. Ray Cabrera, age 18, was charged for 2nd degree attempted murder. Cabrera pled guilty to 2nd degree murder with intent but not premeditated, Possession of a Firearm, and 1st Degree Assault. Cabrera will serve 80 mos. in a MN Dept. of Corrections Institution.

July

Pages 23 & 24—OPD 2016 Annual Report


August Precious Metals—On Wednesday, August 24, the Steele County Attorney’s Office formally charged Matthew Ray Hager with felony theft following a two month theft investigation involving silver that was taken from Viracon. The silver was traced back to a pawn shop and some of which had already been sold. A total weight of 4.88 pounds or 71.2 Troy ounces was pawned, a value of $1,471.03. Hager was also responsible for stealing an additional $22,134.74 of silver weighing 73.5 pounds or 1,071.9 Troy ounces by stashing it outside a Viracon building during his work hours. Hager was interviewed by detectives at his home in New Richland and he confessed to the thefts and was transported to the Steele County Detention Center. (OW16-002093)

November Detectives from the Owatonna Police Department, the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA), the SCDIU Violent Crimes Enforcement Team (VCET) and local partners from Waseca and Blooming Prairie PD—all members of the Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force— developed an undercover sting to identify individuals using on-line forums that were targeting 14 year old children for sex and then made arrangements to meet the alleged children (male or female). The two-day investigation netted alarming results. Four of five suspects were arrested for intent to commit attempted 3rd Degree Criminal Sexual Assault and Solicit a Child or Believe to be a Child in Person or Internet Sexual Conduct—both felonies. (OW16-003152)

December Owatonna Police Department detectives were busy investigating several residential burglaries/attempted burglaries that were reported in the city of Owatonna. Since December 24, 2016, a total of four (4) burglaries or attempted residential burglaries had occurred—the four were in a line from Oakwood Lane NE, to Crestview Lane NE to Creekside Drive NE. In all of the instances, entry was gained by forcing a door. The burglaries/attempted burglaries occurred to unoccupied residences over the long holiday weekend. The unknown suspect(s) appeared to be targeting jewelry. (OW16-004243)


2016 SCHOOL YEAR CALLS

Alternative Learning Center: 5 Wilson: 18 Washington: 23 Lincoln: 29 McKinley: 29 Willow Creek: 36

School Resource Officers The Owatonna Police Department has two school ADD CHART HERE resource officers (SRO) in the Owatonna Public School System. Detective Matt Oeltjenbruns is at the Owatonna Junior High School and also covers all the elementary schools. Detective Vaith is at the high school along with managing the Alterative Learning Center. The SRO’s act as a liaison to the school district. On a day-to-day basis you will see the officers interacting with the students and dealing with criminal issues that may arise (i.e. tobacco violations, assaults). In the picture below, a community service officer is stationed at the newly remodeled front entrance of the Owatonna Junior High checking in visitors. The entrance is secure during the school day and people are only allowed into the building by checking in at the security desk. The Owatonna School District contracts with POLICE the Owatonna PoOWATONNA lice Department to provide additional uniformed security presence with two full-time and one part2016 ACTUAL time community service officers.

2016 PROPOSED 2015 ACTUAL 2015 PROPOSED 2014 ACTUAL

OJHS: 67 OHS: 121

2014 PROPOSED


DETECTIVE BUREAU

South Central Drug Investigative Unit

Total Investigations

New Investigations

REVENUES

Drug Arrests

Non-Drug Arrests

Consent Searches

EXPENDITURES

Search Warrants

Meth Labs

Marijuana Growth

TOTAL

The Owatonna Police Department is the fiscal agent of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) which consists of a commander, administrative assistant, and four full-time investigative $940,371 $4,472,726 $3,532,355 agents. The SCDIU is a state and federally funded multi-jurisdictional Violent Crime Enforcement Team (VCET) formed in cooperation with member agencies within the four counties of Freeborn, $921,764 $4,658,757 $3,736,993 Steele, Faribault, and Waseca. The coverage area encompasses approximately 2,500 square miles and serves approximately 100,000 people.

$3,532,355 The focus is$940,371 to identify and apprehend $4,472,726 violent offenders and investigate controlled substance sales and possession crimes. Illegal drugs commonly investigated are methamphetamine, cocaine, heroin, $4,563,827 $3,606,468 prescription$957,359 pills, and marijuana.

The SCDIU has developed strong partnerships with adjoining VCET’s, the MN Bureau of Criminal $908,098 $4,499,405 $3,591,307 Apprehension (BCA), along with other federal agencies such as the DEA, ATF, FBI, IRS, DOC, and Homeland Security. Together, we are able to investigate cases that stretch outside of our local jurisdiction and have a direct impact on the flow of illegal drugs coming into our community. We also $932,222 $4,490,655 $3,558,433 conduct public presentations for civic groups, schools, churches, workplaces, and professional groups in an effort for education and prevention.

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 25 & 26


COMPLIANCE INITIATIVES

It is unlawful for any person(s) to—

Social Host Violations 2016

0

2015

4

2016 department tidbits from each 2014 section? picture ??  When the person knows or reasonably should

4

know that an underage person will or does consume any alcohol or alcoholic beverage;

2013

4

Or possess any alcohol with intent to consume it;

2012

7

And the person fails to take reasonable steps to prevent possession or consumption by the underage person(s).

2011

6

2010

0

Host or allow an event or gathering;

At any residence, premise, or any other private or public property;

Where alcohol or alcoholic beverages are present;

Alcohol and Tobacco The Owatonna Police Department, with the assistance of underage operatives, conducts alcohol and tobacco compliance checks with local retailers. Compliance checks provide a proactive approach to keep alcohol and tobacco out of the hands of our youngest community members. These checks have been completed twice a year by the department since 1999. The operatives are trained, photographed and equipped with electronic listening devices so officers can monitor the conversations. We conduct the checks with the anticipation that all businesses are complying with state and local laws. The sale of tobacco and alcohol to someone under the legal age is a criminal matter and may result in criminal charges to the employee who sold the product. The business may also face the possibility of a suspension or revocation of their tobacco or alcohol license by the City Council. Twenty-eight establishments were checked for tobacco compliance in 2016. Twenty-Seven establishments were found to be compliant for a 93% compliance rate. A letter was sent to each business that passed congratulating them on their diligence and professionalism. A citation was issued to the employee that failed the check, and a letter was sent to the business reviewing their licensing requirements.

Pages 27 & 28—OPD 2016 Annual Report


Predatory Offender Registry We have approximately 81 predatory offenders residing within the City of Owatonna. The Owatonna Police Department conducts two compliance checks per year on offenders to verify all information including but not limited to their primary address, place of employment and schooling. Photographs of their vehicles and any distinguishing markings or tattoos are taken and monitored regularly.

During compliance checks in 2016, three noncompliant offenders were identified, which is roughly 3% of our local offenders.

POR MONITORING

# of Offenders

2015

2016

107

107

128

114

47

28

35

18

2

3

23

34

Charge Forms Completed Moved into

We take pride in the relationships that we have with the Minnesota Department of Corrections as well as the citizens within the community and provide community notification meetings regarding level three predatory offenders. Note—offenders may have moved in, moved out, submitted change forms or were incarcerated more than once throughout the year. Homeless weekly check-ins were not recorded separate from change forms in 2014 and 2015.

Town Moved out of Town

Registration Period Completed Incarcerated Homeless Weekly Check Ins

9


DETECTIVE BUREAU SUPPORT

2016 Highlights Forfeitures On January 1, 2016, there was $17,191.17 in the Owatonna Department Forfeiture Account. CityPolice of Owatonna picture & stats Through the course of the year, the following receipts and expenses were made to this fund. This account sees receipts and expenditures resulting from vehicle and cash forfeitures due to DWI, Controlled Substance, Fleeing, Theft and Prostitution cases. Receipts Total Funds Received

$31,089.88

Total Assets for 2016

$48,281.05

Expenditures Tow Expenses

$ 3,515.00

Vehicle Titles

$

289.50

Certified Mail

$

69.34

County Attorney

$ 4,194.13

State Treasurer

$

Vehicle Supplies / Auction Expenses

$ 3,592.41

Event Expenses

$ 1,525.59

Office Supplies / Equipment

$ 2,030.02

Safe/Drug Free Coalition Donation

$ 5,000.00

Total Expenditures in 2016

$21,028.37

Fund Balance :

$27,252.68

As of 12/31/16

812.38

Crime Scene Unit The Crime Scene Unit is called upon to assist the Patrol and Investigative Divisions for the purpose of evidence identification, collection, and preservation. Crime scene technicians are trained in areas of crime scene photography, latent print development and recovery, biological and trace evidence recovery, and tool mark & footwear impression recovery. The Crime Scene Unit uses technology such as a Cyanoacylate Fuming Chamber. The fuming chamber assists the technicians in the development and preservation of latent impressions left by fingers and hands. The Crime Scene Unit also utilizes an Evidence Drying Cabinet to protect and dry wet evidence such as bedding and clothing.

Pages 29 & 30—OPD 2016 Annual Report


Property & Evidence The property and evidence technician is tasked with maintaining the chain of custody for all evidentiary items submitted to the Property Room. Documenting the intake, storage, security, release and disposal of all items is the primary focus of property room personnel. The Owatonna Police Department continues to utilize a program called Evidence Tracker to electronically track all items in the property room.

2016

2015

2014

ITEMS ENTERED

2016

2015

2014

ITEMS RETURNED

2016

2015

2014

TOTAL ITEMS


RESERVE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES To cooperate with and assist the Owatonna Police Department in the enforcement of law and order under the direction of the Chief of Police during any and all emergencies declared by the Chief to exist within the City of Owatonna; To render services under mutual aid as ordered by the Chief; To render volunteer police service upon occasions when, in the opinion of the Chief, such augmentations to the regular department is essential to the public welfare and safety; To function in any community service event or program in which the Chief requests volunteer involvement; To maintain an on-going training program; To preserve and upgrade skills necessary to perform as Reserve Officers. http://ci.owatonna.mn.us/police/ reserve-officer-program

Reserves This past year marked the fourth year the Owatonna Police Department was able to utilize ADD CHART it’s Reserve Officer ProgramHERE and we can’t emphasize enough how important the volunteers in this program are to us. The troops were managed by Patrol Sergeants Andy DeVinny and Robbe Kniefel with 11 reserve members who worked a total of 1,064 volunteer hours in 2016. The reserves were committed to quite a few assignments that included the following:     

Monthly Meetings & Training Requirements Helping Oversee Traffic Control for Various Events Throughout our Community Emergency Call Backs for Fire and Crime Scene Assistance Security at Street Dances and Park Control Assisting Detectives by Sitting with Suspects / Witnesses while Detectives Conduct Interviews and Search Warrants

OWATONNA POLICE 2016 ACTUAL 2016 PROPOSED 2015 ACTUAL 2015 PROPOSED

Other specific detail includes helping with Steele County Safety Camp, Night to Unite, Shop with a Cop, Four2014 SeasonsACTUAL events, and community walks & runs. If you or someone you know is interested in becoming a member of the Reserve Program 2014 PROPOSED at the OPD, Please visit our website at the link to the left to learn how to file an application.


SUPPORT SERVICES

Community Service Officers Community service officers serve under the Support Services Division. The Owatonna Police Department employees six community service officers. There are one part-time and two full-time CSOs that are stationed under contract with the Owatonna School District that provide a uniform presence to maintain safety and security of staff and students. Three CSO’s work directly with the uniformed Patrol Division and have the two main responsibilities of animal control (including maintenance at the animal shelter) and parking control and ordinance enforcement. The community service officers also do many other non-emergency police duties and administrative tasks that serve as a support function to the entire department which allows license officers and administrative staff to remain engaged in higher priority tasks.      

Funeral Escorts, Traffic Control, Parade Details House Watch, Park Patrol, Crime Scene Security Deliver Evidence to BCA Crime Lab Work directly with pet adoption agencies Care for domesticated animals

Maintain cleanliness of the animal control facility

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

$940,371

$4,472,726

$3,532,355

$921,764

$4,658,757

$3,736,993

$940,371

$4,472,726

$3,532,355

$957,359

$4,563,827

$3,606,468

$908,098

$4,499,405

$3,591,307

 Pick up supplies from local merchants  Inspect Vehicle – Equipment Warning Notices  Assist with nuisance ordinance/parking violations  Release Impounded Vehicle $932,222 $4,490,655 $3,558,433  Investigate crashes on private property – if license  Community Policing and Outreach – station tours, officer is not available

squad car tours, safety presentations

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 31 & 32


SUPPORT SERVICES

Parking Control Parking Control Division Mission: To create a fair use of available parking within the City of Owatonna by enforcing parking laws. Parking Control Division Strategy: To maximize the use of all existing parking spaces for downtown customers, businesses, and residents. To accomplish this strategy, parking restrictions are enforced to encourage employees, business 2016 department tidbits from owners, each and residents to use long-term parking spaces located on section? the fringe picture of the downtown area, while making available short-term parking spac?? es located in the center of downtown for shoppers and customers. Parking violations are issued by the Patrol Division along with community services officers. Enforced parking violations range from parking in the yellow zone to the City of Owatonna ordinance for odd and even restriction. The following link is to: CHAPTER 72: PARKING RULES http://amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Minnesota/owatonna_mn/titleviitrafficcode/chapter72parkingrulesgenerally? f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:owatonna_mn$anc=JD_Chapter72

FINES COLLECTED: 2016: $49,626

2016

2015: $50,178

2015

2-4 Hr Tickets Issued

Pages 33 & 34—OPD 2016 Annual Report

2014: $47,895

2014 Parking Violations

2013: $41,395

2013

2012: $46,605

2012

Odd / Even Violations


Animal Control The Owatonna Police Department Community Service Officers oversee the daily operations of the animal shelter, providing care and custody for lost, abandoned and stray animals, as well as conducting animal related field investigations and enforcement actions. In 2016, animal services responded to 1,402 animal related calls for service and processed 128 cats and 97 dogs into the shelter’s care. The animal shelter released 83 dogs and 9 cats to owners. Also, 84 cats and 5 dogs were adopted into homes and rescue programs with the tremendous effort of volunteers such as Cathy Lindekugel and Steele County Humane Society as well as many adopted in our local community. At the rescues, the animals are tested for illness and treated, vaccinated, microchipped, spayed or neutered and then adopted out to loving families. In 2016, the animal shelter also saw an upgrade in the facilities and equipment. A new wash station was installed to accommodate ergonomics, comfort and operating efficiency. In addition, the product Wysiwash was implemented in order to disinfect dog and cat cages and kennels. Wysiwash deodorizes by killing the bacteria that causes an odor. By killing the disease causing pathogens in pet waste, Wysiwash also prevents the spread of disease among the animal population.

Cats adopted into Feline Rescue, SMART, Angel of Hope and Warm Fuzzies.

Adopted into foster home Wags and Whiskers. By the looks of his picture below, he is happy and settled in well!


Safety Camp The 2016 Steele County Kid’s Safety Camp took place Thursday, JuneHERE 9th and Friday, ADD CHART June 10th at Lake Kohlmier and at the Steele County Fairgrounds. This is a two-day camp that is held annually for students that just completed the third grade in schools across Steele County. There were 227 kids attending this year who enjoyed learning about the safety of some of their favorite activities—fishing, boating, camping and biking. They also gained some very important knowledge in first aid, electrical & equipment safety and weather safety. Other classes and presentations were from our police K9 team, a state patrol helicopter, Sparky’s Fire House, NetSmartz internet safety, the South Central MN EMS Systems Roll-Over Simulator, and a vehicle extraction by the Owatonna Fire Department. The kids were excited to receive a backpack OWATONNA POLICE full of fun stuff to take home, including a t-shirt and water bottle. A graduation and ice cream 2016 ACTUAL social was held at the conclusion of the camp for the kids and their families to wrap up a 2016 successful event.PROPOSED

2015 ACTUAL 2015 PROPOSED 2014 ACTUAL 2014 PROPOSED


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

REVENUES $940,371

EXPENDITURES $4,472,726

TOTAL $3,532,355

If you’ve never jumped into frigid MN waters in the middle of the winter, we can help change that—for a great cause! $921,764 $4,658,757 $3,736,993 Plunges are a part of the year-round fundraising program called the Law Enforcement Torch Run, $940,371 $4,472,726 $3,532,355 through which law enforcement personnel from across the state raise funds and awareness for Special Olympics Minnesota. Throughout the year, men and women in law enforcement volunteer their time and energy to host events to support Special Olympics and the Polar Plunge is just one of $957,359 $4,563,827 $3,606,468 them. Law enforcement folks sit on the planning committee at all Plunge locations, volunteer on Plunge days, recruit the dive teams to ensure safety at all events, help with set up and tear down of $908,098 $4,499,405 $3,591,307 the Plunge sites, and work all year round to make these events a huge success. In 2016, with the help of the Owatonna$4,490,655 Scuba and Diving Club, Steele County Sheriff’s Office, City $932,222 $3,558,433 of Owatonna Police Department and the Parks and Recreation Department, we had 144 participants who raised $23,225 for Special Olympics Minnesota.

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 35 & 36


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Police Explorers

2016 department tidbits from each section? picture ??

The Police Explorers is a career exploration program for students ages 15-20 years old who have an interest in law enforcement. The explorers learn skills in emergency medical care, traffic stops, search and arrest, domestic assaults, crime scene investigation, building searches, shoot don’t shoot scenarios, hostage negotiation and more. At the end of every year, the explorers put their skills to the test against other Explorer posts from around Minnesota at the Police Explorers Conference in Rochester. In 2016, we doubled in size and our explorers helped out with Toys for Tots, assisted in training exercises for Gold Cross and the Owatonna Fire Department, volunteered at safety camp and community events at the four seasons.

Citizen’s Academy

On Monday, November 21, 2016 ,our fellow community members graduated from the Citizen’s Academy! The culmination of the academy ended with a brief overview of City Administration, Community Development, Human Resources, Finance, Engineering/ Streets, Parks and Recreation, Information Technology, and the Library. A special THANK YOU to all the City department heads for sharing how they serve our community. Citizen’s Academy is held annually at the Owatonna PD, typically in the fall.

Pages 37 & 38—OPD 2016 Annual Report


The City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA) was established to help rental property owners accomplish the following:

DISORDERLY CALLS

COLA 

Participate in an exchange of information and experience with fellow property owners and local law enforcement; Disseminate useful information to all members and inspire them to further educate themselves in the practical features of their rental operations;

Advance the general welfare of the local rental property industry;

Advocate a Code of Ethics to maintain high professional standards and sound business methods among its members for the best interest of the industry and the public;

Educate landlords, managers and owners as to their rights and responsibilities under the MN Landlord / Tenant Act and the Federal State Fair Housing Laws;

Promote the enactment and enforcement of local laws and regulations beneficial to rental property owners and to free enterprise.

As part of law enforcement involvement, we at the Owatonna Police Department continue to work diligently with landlords and managers in regards to the Disorderly Use and Nuisance Ordinance in order to make properties and neighborhoods secure and safe for all. The OPD also has two officers who are certified in Crime Free Multi-Housing and provide a three-phase program to landlords to certify their property.

2016 — 64 2015 — 100 2014 — 144 2013 — 193 2012 — 205 2011 — 249

NUISANCE CALLS 2016 — 14 2015 — 7 2014 — 33 2013 — 37 2012 — 42 2011 — 109


NIGHT TO UNITE PARTICIPATION

# of

Est # of

Parties

Attendees

2006 — 34

700

2007 — 47

1,500

2008 — 56 2009 — 54

1,980

2010 — 64

2,680

2011 — 44

2,030

2012 — 43

1,693

2013 — 33

1,232

2014 — 40

1,495

2015 — 28

1,265

2016 — 33

1,351

2016 Night to Unite The Owatonna PD is proud to participate in the Night to Unite Program. Each year thousands of ADD CHART HERE citizens across Minnesota get together on the first Tuesday in August to participate with the local law enforcement officials to build stronger neighborhoods through police and community partnerships.

OWATONNA Night to Unite was held across POLICE Owatonna on Tuesday, August 2nd. Officers from the Owatonna Police Department, Officials, Council Members, 2016CityACTUAL Owatonna Fire Department, Reserves and Chaplains visited over 33 different neighborhood groups 2016 PROPOSED and an estimated 1300 community members. Night to Unite is one of the most important commu2015 ACTUAL nity outreach programs we participate in during the year. It offers the opportunity for our officers to PROPOSED reach out to2015 many citizens in an informal setting so that we can work together in collaborative efforts to strengthen 2014 our neighborhoods. It also gives the deACTUAL partment an opportunity to see how we are doing in the eyes of2014 the community and what we can do PROPOSED better in an effort to continue to deliver outstanding police services to the citizens of Owatonna.


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Toward Zero Death Owatonna is a Toward Zero Death membership agency that focuses on the following four E’s to reduce traffic injuries and fatalities: EDUCATION

~

~

ENFORCEMENT

~

ENGINEERING

EMERGENCY MEDICAL & TRAUMA SERVICES

~

The Owatonna Police Department is one of 300 law enforcement agencies that participates through a grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The OPD is part of the Steele County TZD Coalition that includes the Steele County Sheriff’s Office, MN Department of Transportation, Owatonna Public Schools, Allina Hospital, Gold Cross and Steele County Public Health. They meet bi-monthly to discuss traffic related issues. In April, the OPD along with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office had extra officers on the streets strictly for Distracted Driving Enforcement. DISTRACTED DRIVING IN MINNESOTA Between 2011—2015: 86,000 Crashes 65 deaths on average

REVENUES215 life-changing EXPENDITURES injuries / year In 2015 alone:

$940,371

7,666 injuries, 74 deaths

$4,472,726

TOTAL $3,532,355

Since 2008, $921,764 Minnesota has had a no texting law. It is illegal to read $3,736,993 or send texts while driving, $4,658,757 email or browse the web, or such things as check social media while your vehicle is in motion or in traffic. This means it is just as illegal to sit at a stop light as it is driving down the highway.

$940,371

$4,472,726

1ST OFFENSE: $50 fine + court costs

$957,359

$3,532,355

2ND OFFENSE: $275 fine + court costs

$4,563,827

$3,606,468

Before heading out, eliminate distractions. Texting is not the only distraction; eating, changing the radio station,$908,098 reading the paper, putting $4,499,405 on make-up, shaving and even$3,591,307 day dreaming are also distractions. Using a cell phone while driving delays a driver’s reaction time as much as having a .08 alcohol concentration which is the same as being legally drunk and $3,558,433 driving. If you injure or kill $932,222 $4,490,655 someone because of texting and driving, you could face criminal vehicular operation charges—a felony that carries at least 1 year in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 39 & 40


Crime Rate 2016 Part I Crimes

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

per 100,000

Homicide

0

Rape

0 0 0 City of Owatonna picture & stats

1

0

0

4

Robbery

9

5

56

35

Aggravated Assault

28

24

86

109

Burglary

81

12

15

314

Larceny

495

256

52

1,922

Motor Vehicle Theft

36

11

31

140

Arson

2

0

0

8

Human Trafficking

0

0

0

0

652

308

47

2,532

Total Part I

Crime Rate # of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

per 100,000

Other Assaults

134

110

82

520

Forgery/Counterfeiting

25

11

44

97

Fraud

72

17

24

280

Embezzlement

0

0

0

0

Stolen Property

11

7

64

43

Vandalism

173

38

22

672

Weapons

12

9

75

47

Prostitution

1

1

100

4

Other Sex Offenses

19

14

74

74

Drug Abuse

92

85

92

357

Gambling

1

1

100

4

Family/Children

6

3

50

23

DUI

62

57

92

241

Liquor Laws

11

11

100

43

Disorderly Conduct

38

35

92

148

Vagrancy

0

0

0

0

Other Offenses

109

79

72

423

Total Part II

766

478

62

2,974

1,418

786

55

5,506

2016 Part II Crimes

GRAND TOTAL


DATA TREND

Five Year Comparison Owatonna Police Department 2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

Homicide

0

0

0

0

0

Rape

1

9

3

5

7

Robbery

9

14

6

6

1

Aggravated Assault

28

37

27

25

22

Burglary

81

142

79

114

82

Larceny

495

513

510

538

509

36

27

30

28

21

Arson

2

2

0

0

4

Human Trafficking

0

1

0

0

0

Total Part I

652

745

655

716

646

Total Part II

766

930

875

903

916

Grand Total

1,418

1,675

1,530

1,619

1,562

CRIME

Motor Vehicle Theft

OPD 2016 Annual Report—Pages 41 & 42


DATA TREND

2016 Offenses Cleared by Agency Mower Co Sheriff

706

31

Austin PD

1,668

Faribault Co Sheriff

2016 department tidbits from each 93 Part I & II section? picture ??

Freeborn Co Sheriff

Northfield PD

Narcotics 44

642

76

191

37 53

265

Faribault PD

Steele Co Sheriff

12

216

Albert Lea PD Rice Co Sheriff

101

740

135

193

25 812

Owatonna PD

2016 Part I & II Crimes Offenses Cleared

85

2016 Local Drug Abuse Offenses Cleared

74%

80% 20% 26%

Owatonna PD

Pages 43 & 44—OPD 2016 Annual Report

Steele County


.0030 Rice Co

.0027 SCDIU

.0033 SE MN

.0043 MN River

DRUG ABUSE CASES CLEARED Drug Task Force Regions 2016 per Capita South Central Drug Investigative Unit

2016 Regional Crime Rate 5,644—Owatonna PD

6,648—Faribault PD 9,727—Austin PD

Steele, Waseca, Faribault, and Freeborn Counties Population = 100,352 Total Narcotic Arrests = 271 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0027

MN River Valley Drug Task Force Martin, Watonwan, Nicollet, and Blue Earth Counties Population = 129,889 Total Narcotic Arrests = 564 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0043

5,544—Albert Lea PD 4,888—Waseca PD

3,630—Steele Co Sheriff 2,667—Rice Co Sheriff

5,962—Mower Co Sheriff 2,303—Freeborn Co Sheriff 4,959—Waseca Co Sheriff 3,370—Faribault Co Sheriff

SE MN Narcotics and Gang Task Force

Olmsted, Winona, Goodhue, Dodge, Mower, Fillmore, Houston, and Wabasha Counties Population = 369,291 Total Narcotic Arrests = 1215 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0033

Rice County Drug Task Force

Rice County Population = 94,094 Total Narcotic Arrests = 281 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0030


2016 Annual Report This document and all of its contents are the property of:

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT Reproductions or distributions of this document in whole or in part are permitted subject to appropriate source citation and the express prior written consent of the Chief of Police of the Owatonna Police Department. Please visit us and learn more about our organization at: www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police

Profile for Owatonna Police Department

Owatonna Police Department 2016 Annual Report  

Owatonna Police Department 2016 Annual Report