__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

2014 ANNUAL REPORT

Owatonna Police Department

204 East Pearl Street, Owatonna, MN 55060 ci.owatonna.mn.us/police Keith E. Hiller / Chief of Police


2 0 1 4 A N N UA L R E P O RT

04

C i t y of O w a t o n n a / C h i e f ’ s M e s s a g e

06

M i s s i o n , Va l u e s , V i s i o n / O r g a n i z a t i o n a l C h a r t

08

Pe r s o n n e l C h a n g e s / D e pa r t m e n t B u d g e t

10

A d m i n i s t r a t i v e D i v i s i o n / P rof e s s i o n a l St a n d a rd s

12

Pa t ro l D i v i s i o n

14 16 18 20 24

2 0 1 4 Ye a r i n Re v i e w

Canine Officer

Po l i c e C h a p l a i n s / Re s e r v e U n i t

Tr a i n i n g

D e t e c t i v e B u re a u / C r i m i n a l I n v e s t i g a t i o n s

25

St a t i s t i c s

26

2 0 1 4 Ye a r i n Re v i e w

28

S c h o o l Re s o u r c e O f f i c e r s


TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S

South Central Drug Investigative Unit

29

Compliance Initiatives

30

P re d a t o r y O f f e n d e r Re g i s t r y

30

A l c o h o l & To b a c c o C o m p l i a n c e

31

D e t e c t i v e B u re a u S u p p o r t

30

P ro p e r t y & E v i d e n c e / C r i m e S c e n e U n i t

32

Ve h i c l e F o r f e i t u re s

33 34

Suppor t Ser vices—Community Ser vice Officers

A n i m a l & Pa r k i n g C o n t ro l , A d m i n i s t r a t i v e F i n e s

Community Programs—Safety Camp, TZD

C i t i z e n s A c a d e m y, CO L A , N i g h t t o U n i t e

34 38 39

D a t a Tre n d

42

Acknowledgements

46


C I T Y O F O WATO N N A M I N N E S OTA 1 8 5 4 ~ O R G A N I Z E D A S A M U N I C I PA L I T Y

POPULATION:

25,552

MAYOR:

Thomas A. Kuntz

ADMINISTRATOR:

Kris M. Busse

GOVERNMENT:

Mayor—Council

LOCATION:

Crossroads of I35 & U.S. Hwys 14 & 218

LAND AREA:

14.45 Square Miles

CITY BUDGET:

$25,029,627

ROADWAYS:

155 Lane Miles

AIRPORT:

Runway 1—5,500’ x

100’

Runway 2—3,000’ x

75’

Page 4 Owatonna Police Department


Citizens of Owatonna Mayor and City Council Members City Administration and Staff On behalf of the staff at the Owatonna Police Department, I am proud to present the 2014 Annual Report. Last year, we published the annual report in a new format. We are excited to report this new format has reached 4,106 views from around the world so far. It was viewed in the U.S., Canada, China, Italy, India, Greece, Thailand, United King-

dom, Ecuador, Malaysia, South Africa, Colombia, Russia Federation, and Australia. It has been viewed on desktops (69%), tablets (12%), and mobile devices (19%). As a result, we plan to continue using this format for distributing our annual reports. This final product and its creative layout is the result of many hours of hard work by Wendy Bentley of the OPD! The staff managed the budget with fiduciary watchfulness and managed expenditures at 1.379% below the proposed budget, an amount of $61,920. The Owatonna Police Department was fortunate to foster relationships this past year by participating in the Blandin Community Leadership Program, the Police Citizen’s Academy, Safety Camp, Shop with a Cop, Project Northland, the Safe and Drug Free Coalition, Owatonna Rotary, Steele County United Way, and Big Brothers Big Sisters activities. The patrol officers even distributed holiday gifts of cash to unsuspecting motorists as a gesture of kindness. These are just a snapshot of our involvements within the community and they make our jobs tremendously rewarding. I extend my sincere appreciation for allowing us to participate in all these wonderful events. We purchased a new in-car camera system this year. It replaced aging equipment that was towards the end of its useful life. The new WatchGuard system provides both high and standard definition video and digital audio of our interactions with the public. It serves as a constant reminder of our willingness to be transparent with the citizens, court, and other stakeholders within our community. It has proven to be a valuable capital asset and significantly enhances our work product. The annual report is full of highlights that may peek your interest or grab your attention. As you flip the pages, keep in mind the fine men and women of the Owatonna Police Department that are responsible for all the accomplishments. The staff at the Owatonna Police Department is always looking to improve upon the past year and with your assistance, we are blessed with a great opportunity. This past year has been interesting and challenging for police officers across the country. I trust the Owatonna Police Department has met your expectations and I look forward to the upcoming year and all encounters with our wonderful community members. Warmest Regards,

Chief Keith E. Hiller

Keith E. Hiller, Chief of Police City of Owatonna, Minnesota Page 5 2014 Annual Report


M I S S I O N , VA L U E S A N D V I S I O N The Owatonna Police Department is dedicated to attaining the highest level of professionalism and accountability in its ser vice to the citizens of Owatonna. Recognizing that our strength stems from our partnership with all sectors of the community, we envision an organization structured to meet the ever-changing needs of our citizens and our professions.

HONESTY, INTEGRITY, TRUST, RESPECT, ACCOUNTABILTY, COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE, POSITIVE ATTITUDE, TEAMWORK, EXCELLENCE

All Members of the Owatonna Police Department are dedicated to providing a safe and secure community through partnerships, leadership and an unwavering commitment to excellence. Policing excellence through our people, our work and our relationships.

Page 6 Owatonna Police Department


O RG A N I Z AT I O N A L C H A RT Chief (1)

Administrative Assistant (1)

Patrol

Captain (1)

Administrative Assistant (1)

Records

Professional Standards

Records Clerks (4)

Support Services

Administrative Assistant (1)

Captain (1) Community Service Officers (3)

Sergeants (6)

Chaplains (5)

Includes Parking Control & Animal Control Investigations

Drug Investigations

Reserve Officers (20) Explorer Post

Community Service Officers (3)

Patrol Officers (20) Includes:

Sergeant (.5)

K9 Unit (1)

SCDIU Commander(.5)

OHS & OJHS School Security

Traffic Unit (1) Crime Scene Techs (3) Investigators(2)

SWAT (4)

OPD SCDIU Agent (1)

Field Training (6) Gang (2)

School Resource Officers (2)

SCDIU Agents (3)

Divisions: Command Staff Sworn Staff Civilian Staff Shared Staff Volunteers

Page 7 2014 Annual Report


PERSONNEL CHANGES NEW HIRES Emily Ammentorp— Patrol Officer Steven Bowman—Patrol Officer

Travis Ardolf—Patrol Officer Jason Christensen—Patrol Officer

Adam Dupic—Patrol Officer

Alexandra Mieritz—Patrol Officer

Tommy Adams—Community Service Officer

Joshua Federly—Community Service Officer

Kyle Martin—Community Service Officer

Cody Mosher—Community Service Officer

Dave Schroeder—Community Service Officer

RETIREMENTS Mark Edel—Corporal Detective

Tim Hassing—Sergeant of Investigations

Deanne von Wald—Sergeant of Patrol

RESIGNATIONS Brady Fox—Patrol Officer/K9 Unit Anthony Heaser—Patrol Officer Tommy Adams—Community Service Officer Andrew Hobbs—Community Service Officer Chet Macht—Community Service Officer

Kyle Parr—Patrol Officer Josh Federly—Community Service Officer Chris Lee—Community Service Officer

Chad Schlueter—Community Service Officer

Authorized number of personnel / positions filled has maintained at a total of 35 for the past four years.

Page 8 Owatonna Police Department


D E PA RT M E N T B U D G E T OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

2014 ACTUAL

$908,098

$4,428,735

$3,520,637

2014 PROPOSED

$932,222

$4,490,655

$3,558,433

2013 ACTUAL

$829,188

$4,240,893

$3,411,705

2013 PROPOSED

$803,947

$4,199,196

$3,395,249

2012 ACTUAL

$811,361

$4,104,614

$3,293,253

2012 PROPOSED

$640,945

$3,919,257

$3,278,312

2014 The Owatonna City Council approved the annual base budget and capital improvement budget after a series of presentations by the Chief of Police, Finance Director and City Administrator. ***

The police department had major expenditures of approximately $100,000 for the WatchGuard In-Vehicle Camera System and $60,504 for two Ford Utility Police Interceptors for the Patrol Unit as well as $30,546 for two Ford Fusions for the

Investigations Unit.. *** There were 12 retirements and resignations that impacted the actual budget. *** Fiduciary responsibility by managing expenditures at 1.379% below the proposed budget was at the center of our decision making process in the year 2014.

Page 9 2014 Annual Report


A D M I N I S T R AT I V E D I V I S I O N The Administrative Division is comprised of the chief of police, captain of the patrol division, captain of support services, and an executive administrative assistant. The captains are responsible for their respective divisions.

The bulk of their duties involve patrol and investigative tasks/

functions. The executive assistant is responsible for daily administrative operations and records management. The administrative team is responsible for the day-to-day operations that provide public safety services to the citizens of Owatonna and for a budget of approximately $4.5 million with staff of 73 full-time, part-time, and volunteers. We are fortunate to have 40 full-time, 4 fulltime shared positions, 4 part-time, 5 volunteer chaplains and up to 20 volunteer reserve officers. The following principles guide our organizations pride, attitude, conduct, and expected behavior: HONESTY:

Being truthful and open in our interactions with each other and the citizens we serve.

INTEGRITY: Being above reproach, ethical and doing what is right. TRUST:

Being honorable and maintaining a high level of trust with each other and the members of our community.

RESPECT: Valuing each other and citizens by showing understanding and appreciation of our similarities and differences. ACCOUNTABILITY: Conscientious, professional, dependable, and accountable for our actions by the citizens we serve. COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE: Adhering to strict standards of conduct and performance in everything we do. POSITIVE ATTITUDE: We strive to bring positive and constructive influences to our dealings with each other and our community.

TEAMWORK: We work within the department and with members of our community to achieve our goals; making use of diverse skills, abilities, roles, and view.

EXCELLENCE: We are compelled to be leaders and always do our best. We strive to be known for taking the extra step, going the extra mile, leaving no stone unturned in our work. This calls for people with an enduring commitment and dedication to the mission. It requires us to have a commitment to service before self.

The administrative team prides itself in its daily pursuit of distinction. We find value in seeking

constant improvement in all aspects of our operations. We are mindful of our image, and the legitimate and referent power the position of a police officer has within our community. We will engender the principles of equity and diversity as well as develop and shape our department in an effort to balance the needs of our community. The engaged and watchful citizens of our community significantly impact our direction, mission, and outcomes. The team values the aforementioned principles, with justice for all being the motivation behind all our actions.

Page 10 Owatonna Police Department


P R O F E S S I O N A L S TA N DA R D S The primary responsibility of Professional Standards is to ensure the integrity of the Owatonna Police Department and monitor the relationship between the community and the department, striving to create mutual trust. As an organization, we try very hard to provide quality customer service to all of our citizens. Policing is a very difficult and complex job in today's society; we realize that mistakes can be made and that the actions of our personnel may fall short of expectations. Professional Standards serves as a transparent method of internal accountability by receiving, processing and investigating complaints concerning police conduct. These complaints may allege violations of criminal law, department policy or officer performance and may originate from outside sources or from within the agency.

The Owatonna Police Department makes every effort to act with professionalism and integrity in everything we do; however, in the event a complaint against an officer is received, an internal affairs investigation is initiated in an attempt to determine whether the act of misconduct

occurred and disciplinary or corrective action is necessary or if the officer acted in a justified, lawful or proper manner. If criminal wrongdoing is alleged, the Owatonna Police Department often requests an outside law enforcement agency complete the criminal investigation.

In 2014, there were fourteen internal investigations conducted involving the same number of employees. These investigations resulted in eleven disciplinary actions—disciplinary actions can include oral and written reprimands, suspensions, demotions or terminations. The eleven discipli-

nary actions included seven oral reprimands, three written reprimands and one suspension; however, none of the actions were a result of a citizen complaint, but rather internal rule infractions. The final three investigations exonerated the officer(s), meaning that after a fair preponderance of the evidence, the act or acts complained of did not occur; the agency member named in the complaint was not involved in the alleged misconduct or the acts that provided for the complaint occurred, but the investigation revealed the act(s) were justified, lawful or proper.

Page 11 2014 Annual Report


PAT R O L D I V I S I O N GENERAL OVERVIEW The Patrol Division is the largest division of the Owatonna Police Department which is represented by a captain, six sergeants and 20 officers. Each patrol sergeant is assigned three police officers that work matching schedules. Within these groups are a variety of specialized assignments, such as a canine officer, field training officers, members of the emergency response unit, firearms and use of force instructors and crime scene technicians. In addition, the Patrol Division has support services that are not licensed police officers but serve as volunteers and play a vital role in the city and police department. Those services are police chaplains and police reserve officers. The Patrol Division has one administrative assistant to assist with a wide variety of tasks such as the administration of parking control and fine collection, forfeitures, City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA) and Night To Unite. The Patrol Division has a primary goal to carry out the mission of the police department through visual presence, enforcement, education, crime prevention and problem solving.

PATROL SERGEANTS The sergeants supervise the day-to-day activities of the patrol officers and coordinate efforts with the officers assigned to their watch. The primary responsibility of a police sergeant is to supervise, mentor and direct their police personnel and hold the officers accountable for their everyday functions. Additionally, the sergeants are responsible for performance evaluations and creating opportunities for the professional development of the officers. Upon the start of each patrol shift, the sergeants lead roll-call briefings. Each sergeant is appointed additional duties and oversees programs such as COLA, SCDIU Tactical Team, firearms and defensive tactics training, the field training program, reserve unit, squad car maintenance and fleet inventory.

PATROL OFFICERS Patrol officers provide 24-hour police services to the citizens of Owatonna. Each officer is assigned to one of three patrol districts (shown on the next page) established within the city. The duties of a police officer include responding to emergency and non-emergency calls for service, conducting preliminary investigations of criminal activity, identifying and enforcing criminal statutes, traffic laws and city ordinances, making arrests, citing offenders, investigating traffic crashes, preparing incident, investigative, and arrest reports, executing search and arrest warrants, implementing community policing strategies and directed patrols, and attending court where they offer testimony when required.

Page 12 Owatonna Police Department


Click here for the Steele County Emergency Notification System. This system enables Steele and Rice Counties the ability to provide pening in your neighborhood.

Powered by Everbridge

RAIDS Online Crime Mapping BAIR

Analytics

map—RAIDS

public

crime

online—connects

law enforcement with the com-

munity

to

reduce

crime

improve public safety.

and Crime

mapping helps the public get a better idea of the crime activity in their area so they can make more informed decisions about how to stay safe.

RAIDS Online goes

beyond crime mapping by automatically alerting the public about

recent crime activity and by improving communication between the public and law enforcement through anonymous tips. RAIDS Online empowers the public to make

better

decisions

about

crime by putting the same technology used by law enforcement to analyze and interpret crime activity into the hands of the pubCOMMUNITY POLICING DISTRICTS

lic. If you are interested in finding out more, click the icon below.

Police districts offer the patrol division of the police department an opportunity to develop relationship and partnerships with citizens and the business community of Owatonna.

The relationships

enhance accountability of staff and promote a problem solving and a community based policing approach to the citizens. Page 13 2014 Annual Report


PAT R O L — Y E A R I N R E V I E W In March, the patrol division

Also in March, officers

of the Owatonna Police De-

of the Owatonna Police

partment replaced their Digital

Department located a

Alley in-car video system and launched the

child

WatchGuard mobile video system. This deci-

Owatonna

sion was based on a three month long field

abducted out of Scott

testing and evaluation process, including prod-

County, MN. Thankfully

uct research and demonstration, feedback from

the child was unharmed

the field users, City of Owatonna information

and taken into our pro-

technology staff, vehicle maintenance staff and

tective custody.

the police department technology and squad

suspect—Nichole Marie

car committees. Pictured is Officer Ammentorp wearing her HIFI wireless

May—was arrested and

body microphone that works in conjunction with the in-car video system

released to Scott Coun-

located directly above the computer in her squad car.

ty Sheriff’s Office offiMar

in

the

city

that

of was

The

cials. (OW14-0653)

Jan

In January, the OPD was called to the El Progresso Market at 204 N. Oak Avenue for a theft complaint. The owner of the store alleged two female suspects stole approximately $17,000 in cash from the store. A witness recognized the suspects as previous customers and thought they were acting suspiciously. After the two left the store, the witness went to

May

move a cash bag from behind the counter and found it missing. A review of the surveillance tapes showed that one of the females appeared to be

May 31th marked the last working day of one

engaging an employee in conversation while the

of our Patrol Sergeants—Deanne von Wald.

other crawled on the floor behind the cash register

She served the department and the City of

several times. After the final time behind the cash

Owatonna for over 27 years in many valuable

register, the two suspects abruptly left the store.

capacities.

Both suspects were later identified in photo line-

wish her much happiness and success in her

ups. (OW14-000154)

retirement!

Page 14 Owatonna Police Department

Congratulations to Deanne, we


In May, the patrol division responded to and secured a

In November, Owatonna officers respond-

residence of a suspect who fired a handgun at family

ed to an adult female going into labor at a

members while they were fleeing the residence.

The

residence in the 500 block of Cherry Street.

South Central Drug Investigation Unit Tactical Team also

OPD Officers Berg and Ardolf were the first

responded and took custody of the suspect after exiting

on scene. In analyzing the situation, the

his home at the corner of Rice Street and Elm Avenue.

officers determined that the baby was

The suspect—Ricardo Kletschka— was charged with 2nd

coming and did their best to coach the

degree attempted murder, 2

nd

degree assault with a fire-

expectant mother while they radioed the

arm, illegal possession

ambulance service to quicken their re-

of a firearm and reckless

sponse.

use of a dangerous

proved correct and shortly thereafter, the

weapon.

Bullets pene-

expectant mother, with the assistance of

trated and lodged into a

Officers Berg and Ardolf, became a mother

nearby car and a neigh-

to a baby girl.

boring residence door.

Johnson arrived a short time later and

(OW14-1323)

The evaluation of the situation

Officers Schumaker and

helped with the mother and child.

May Nov Aug Dec

In August, officers of the patrol division teamed up with the

In

December,

the

local Salvation Army, the Steele County Sheriff’s Office and

Owatonna Police Department partici-

area children to ‘Shop with a Cop’. Sergeant Bata, Detective

pated in a Toward Zero Death’s en-

Hunt, Officer Schumaker and Community Services Officers

forcement wave that focused on im-

Johnson and Mosher headed out with kids to Target to make

paired drivers. In one weekend during

sure they were prepared to go back to school with everything

the enforcement wave, the OPD ar-

they need to grow and learn from school supplies to clothes

rested and removed four impaired

and shoes. The officers treated the event as a learning expe-

drivers from our roadways. Of those

rience for their little partners in understanding the im-

four arrests, three drivers followed the

portance of being responsible and how to get the best bang

law and provided breath samples with

for their buck. We think the officers may have

their average breath alcohol con-

learned a thing or two themselves. After their

tent being .16 or twice the legal lim-

shopping adventures, everyone went out to

it to drive. We are very proud of the

relax at Sparetime Lanes for some bowling

officer’s efforts in keeping our city

fun—a great time was had by all!

streets safe to travel on.

Page 15 2014 Annual Report


Officer Petterson and K-9 Kash Page 16 Owatonna Police Department


2014 CANINE UNIT In July of 2014, Officer John Petterson was selected to take over the Owatonna Police Department’s K9 Kash—a 3 1/2 year old German Shepard with police K9 blood lines from Czechoslovakia—when Kash’s previous handler left the department for other employment. Officer Petterson came to the K9 Unit with much experience. He was previously the department’s narcotics K9 handler of a German Shepard named "Kilo" from 1996 to 1999. This experience is what made the transition much easier on Kash and the K9 program as a whole. With the change in handler, the team needed to meet USPCA (United States Police Canine Association) standards and they started training right away in August. Recertification is necessary to meet proficiency standards in narcotics detection as well as for criminal apprehension. Officer Petterson and K9 Kash partnered with other local agencies and trained for narcotics detection of marijuana, meth, cocaine, heroine and ecstasy. In November of 2014, Officer Petterson and Kash obtained their USPCA Narcotics Recertification and became a squad ready team to perform narcotics searches for the Owatonna Police Department and other agencies at request. Officer Petterson also partnered with Sergeant Mike Drees of the Rochester Police Department where he worked with Kash on handler

control and protection, obedience, recall and tracking/article/building searches. Officer Petterson and Kash train together off duty in addition to when they are on duty to improve the general proficiencies of handling an "Apprehension Patrol Dog". In February of 2015, Officer Petterson and his K9 partner were certified for work and have been out patrolling the streets of Owatonna ever since. Kash has developed a bond and loyalty to his new partner since his transition of handlers to Officer Petterson. Together, they have been called out to assist on many traffic stops with the Owatonna Police Department and have assisted other agencies with the need for narcotics sniffs as well. The K9 team has contributed to the arrests and charges of suspects that have resulted in misdemeanors and felonies and the recovery of three handguns, one of which was stolen. You will find Officer Petterson and his K9 partner Kash out on the road working normal duty shifts this summer where they hope to have an impact on criminal activity over the many years to come. We sure appreciate all their hard work!

Page 17 2014 Annual Report


POLICE CHAPL AINS The Owatonna Police Department Chaplain Program was established in May of 2012 to enhance services in the community by providing non-denomination spiritual care and compassion to individuals in need; including first responders involved in critical incidents and / or during a time of crisis in one’s life. In the summer of 2014, Father Michael Cronin moved to a parish outside of Owatonna, which caused him to resign from the chaplaincy. The International Conference of Police Chaplains conference was held in Bloomington, MN. Although none of our members were able to attend, we hope it will be a future possibility. In 2014, a total of 158 hours were donated by the chaplains through ride-alongs with the officers from the patrol division, emergency call-outs, care of first responders as well as the attendance and leading of a blessing of the officers during a recent officer swearing -in and an officer / citizen recognition ceremony. We thank you Chaplains, for your devotion to our department and the residents of our City!

Pictured are Reverend Loren Olson, Parish Nurse Nancy Deetz, Reverend Ron Wilson (ret.), Reverend Brent Carlson and Reverend Mark Rosenau. Page 18 Owatonna Police Department


RESERVE UNIT The Owatonna Police Reserve Unit is a community-based, non-paid volunteer law enforcement unit. Since its inception in March of 2013, the Reserve Unit has supported the Owatonna Police Department in a variety of law enforcement operations. The Reserve Unit has an active roster of up to 20 members and is headed up by two Patrol Sergeants who are assigned as coordinators / advisors to the unit and four Reserve Sergeants who supervise and oversee the balance of the unit. The primary mission of the department’s Reserve Unit is to commit to serving the citizens of Owatonna to the best of their ability and to improve the quality of life for all within the community. The partnership between the Police Department and Reserve Unit is a fine example of our mission and vision. The unit as a whole has committed

Trust

2,354 hours of service to

the department.

Some

field

activities

include traffic control at parades and community

run

/

walk

events, overnight security at OHS and Festival of Arts, security at special events like street dances, Steele County Kids Safety

Commitment to Excellence

Camp, Polar Plunge, Night to Unite, park patrols, house checks, emergency callouts for securing fire and crime scenes as well as any other various duties assigned to them. The Reserves hold monthly meetings where such things as reviewing policy / procedures or training on vehicle, equipment and radio usage takes place. Additional certification is also provided to them for OC Spray, CPR,

AED’s and First Responder. The unit is made up of persons who are interested in the welfare of people and in the protection of property in their community. The Reserve Unit is a large part of what community policing is all about. They provide reliable staffing to the Owatonna Police Department by helping with routine tasks such as emergencies, natural disasters and special assignments at a very minimal cost. Coordinators of this program are Patrol Sergeants DeVinny and Kniefel. If you are interested in volunteer opportunities, please contact Administrative Assistant Roberts at 507-774-7200 or visit us at: www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police Page 19 2014 Annual Report


2 0 1 4 D E PA RT M E N T T R A I N I N G DEFENSIVE TACTICS Sergeant

Sorensen

and

Officers

Seifert

and

Oeltjenbruns were the defensive tactics instructors for the Owatonna Police Department in 2014. They have a combined training experience level in this field of 17 years. These instructors received specialized training

in defensive tactics and follow the Pressure Point Control Techniques (PPCT) training curriculum. Other training regimens infused in their training program include SPEAR, GAGE, L.O.C.K.U.P., TASER and ASP. Because the TASER is recognized as a valuable tool to obtain subject compliance, the agency has outfitted each sworn officer with an X26 TASER. Officers Seifert and Oeltjenbruns were the TASER instructors and took care of the maintenance and downloading of data

when these units were deployed in the field. In 2014, the instructors dedicated two full days of training which provided a minimum of eight (8) hours of continuing education to all sworn officers of the Owatonna Police Department.

EMERGENCY VEHICLE OPERATIONS/PURSUIT TRAINING COURSE (EVOC) In the State of Minnesota, the Minnesota Peace Officers Standards and Training Board (POST) requires that all police agencies must have a written policy to govern the conduct of peace officers during police pursuits. The POST Board also requires that every five years, licensed officers must complete an 8-hour course in emergency vehicle operations and in police pursuits. The Owatonna Police Department met the 8-hour course requirement this year when we teamed up with the Rochester Community and Technical College and sent our officers over to Rochester to train on the road and on a pursuit driving course.

Page 20 Owatonna Police Department


FIELD TRAINING PROGRAM The field training / evaluation process of any police department is a critical component of any successful police department. Unfortunately, every candidate that wishes to become a police officer is not always the right fit for their chosen career or the department and population they wish to serve. The field training process ensures that the employer has sufficient opportunity to directly observe and certify that a newly hired officer has the essential jobrelated knowledge and skills to be an effective solo police officer for the community in which they will serve. Sergeant DuChene coordinates and supervises this unit of the Owatonna Police Department. New officers are put through an extensive five-phase field training and evaluation period in which they are critiqued on a daily basis in ten areas of core competency. The first four phases involve an intense sixteen week minimum training period where the new officer is assigned to a field training officer. Each newly hired officer spends time working at least one training phase during a day, evening and night shift. Each phase involves direction and coaching from a different field training officer. During the fourth phase, the field training officer rides along in plain clothes and acts as an observer to the probationary officer. The team of dedicated Field Training Officers are committed to the development and success of the new police offic-

ers as well as promoting the department’s mission as a whole. Upon successful completion of the field training program, the police officer candidates are certified for solo patrol duties. In the fifth phase of the program, the officers start their probationary period that goes through the first year of employment. In 2014, the FTO program was met with significant challenges due to an unprecedented number of officers that either retired or chose to end their employment with the OPD for other

opportunities. The Field Training Unit was tasked with six new officers in the program around the same time—Ardolf,

Dupic,

Ammentorp,

Officer Mieritz with her FTO Petterson

Christensen,

Bowman and Mieritz—all who have begun phase five solo patrol. Field Training Officers assigned to the unit were Matejcek, John Petterson, Oeltjenbruns and Cooper. Officers Petterson and Oeltjenbruns both became certified Field Training Officers in April of 2014 and Officer Cooper certified in August of 2014. We are very proud of their efforts and welcome them to our team of professionals!

Page 21 2014 Annual Report


SOUTH CENTRAL DRUG INVESTIGATION UNIT TACTICAL TEAM Sergeant Jason Petterson (Supervisor/Team Leader), Sergeant Bata Detective Hunt, Officer Oeltjenbruns, Officer Ackerson

The South Central Drug Investigation Unit’s Tactical Team (SWAT) is comprised of 18 operators, two negotiators and two medics from seven different law enforcement agencies within Steele, Freeborn, Waseca and Faribault Counties. The Owatonna Police Department currently provides five officers to serve on this team. During 2014, Officer Fandel left the Tactical Team in order to take an assignment as an agent with the SCDIU. Fandel has been a great asset to the team, his experience and knowledge will certainly be missed. Tryouts were conducted in the summer of 2014 in order to fill the vacancy that generated three highly qualified candidates in the selection process. After a very tight competition, Officer Ackerson was selected as the newest member of the Tactical Team. In May of 2014, the team was afforded the chance to complete onsite Advanced SWAT training in the city of Albert Lea.

During the course, the members received marksmanship, entry tactics, breaching, team movements and scenario based training. The opportunity to have outside evaluator’s critic the team’s abilities was an invaluable opportunity and feedback rated the team’s proficiency among the best in the state. The officers assigned to the Tactical Team maintain proficiency through attendance of monthly ten hour training days. In addition, officers from the Owatonna Police Department are allowed to conduct additional six hour monthly training sessions in order to maintain the National Tactical Officers Association’s training recommendations. Page 22 Owatonna Police Department


2 0 1 4 D E PA RT M E N T T R A I N I N G FIREARMS The Owatonna Police Department Firearms Training Unit consists of five members: Sergeant Drenth (Firearms Training Coordinator), Sergeants Sorensen and Bata, and Officers Johnson and Ackerson. Each are certified firearms instructors and have specialized duties within the unit. The instructors are tasked with training, testing and evaluating the officers under the mandated training requirements set forth by the Minnesota Peace Officer Standards and Training Board (POST). Each licensed officer qualified in the use of their department issued handgun, shotgun and patrol rifle. In 2014, the Firearms Training Unit conducted four trainings that included annual qualification, active shooter training, basic / fundamental training and a low light / cold weather shoot. The instructors strive to replicate realistic situations and scenarios through a variety of ways in order to induce stress in the officers. This method of training, known as stress inoculation, teaches officers to overcome the negative physiological and psychological aspects of a deadly force situation. One way instructors train the officers to have a winning mindset is by utilizing scenario based training where instructors and officers use simunition non-lethal rounds and role players.

Pictured: Captain Rethemeier and Officers Ackerson, Berg, Cooper, Hennen, Hunt, Johnson and Van Osdale

In June of 2014, the City of Owatonna received grant funding from the DNR to purchase the home at 215 South Walnut Avenue (shown above) and remove it due to it being located in a floodplain. This becomes a great opportunity for the officers of the Owatonna Police Department to use the vacated property for training scenarios that take place in a real life setting with minimal cost associations. Page 23 2014 Annual Report


DETECTIVE BUREAU GENERAL OVERVIEW In 2014, the bureau was comprised of a captain, a detective sergeant, one corporal detective, four detectives and an administrative assistant. Captain Rethemeier oversees the overall operation of the bureau while Detective Sergeant Jason Petterson oversees the bureau’s daily operations and workflow and is also assigned to serve as the commander of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU). In addition, he oversees the investigation and management of the registered sex offender database, acts as a liaison to the Steele County Attorney’s Office and Steele County Human

Services and serves as a police representative on the Steele/Waseca Drug Court Committee. Detectives Hunt & Flynn have been assigned to the Owatonna Public Schools during the school year, serving as School Resource Officers. The detectives, who also include Corporal Munns, and Detectives Fandel and Lesnau all receive specialized training in the areas of interview and interrogation, crime and death scene investigations and writing search warrants. 2014 brought about movement and staffing changes in the The types of cases referred to the detective bureau are broken into two separate classifications—crimes against persons and property crimes. Crimes against persons involve criminal sexual assault, child / adult protection, assaults, arson, robbery, and homicide. Property crimes include: theft, burglary, fraud / forgery, financial, and computer crime. In addition, detectives conduct liquor and tobacco licensing investigations and compliance enforcement activities, twice yearly coordinate predatory offender compliance verifications, conduct pre-employment background investigations, oversee the Retailer’s Protection Agency (RPA) program, and gather gang and criminal intelligence.

bureau. On May 26th, Detective Sergeant Hassing retired after more than 31 years with the department. As a result of his retirement, Detective Drenth was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and transferred to the Patrol Division and Patrol Officer Fandel was assigned to the position of Detective to take over Drenth’s position. On December 1st, Corporal Detective Edel retired from the department after more than 27 years of service. To replace him, Detective Hunt was reassigned from the Owatonna Junior High School (OJHS) as Resource Officer to a General Investigator. To replace Hunt at the OJHS, Patrol Officer Lesnau was assigned as Detective and assigned to the OJHS. Detective Bureau Administrative Assistant Dub serves in a support role to investigations and the SCDIU. The administrative assistant serves as the department’s property and evidence technician, compiles monthly statistical analysis, prepares completed prosecutorial case files and is also a certified physical evidence officer. For the SCDIU, the administrative assistance serves as the fiscal agent, property and evidence officer and prepares statistical analysis.

Page 24 Owatonna Police Department


S TAT I S T I C S

The Detective Bureau serves in a support capacity of the Owatonna Police Department by concentrating on the investigation of criminal matters that have previously been reported to the Patrol Division. The responsibilities of the Detective Bureau are to provide support to members of the Patrol Division through follow-up investigations and to initiate proactive investigations into general criminal, narcotics and gang-related activity. In addition, the Detective Bureau is commonly the liaison with other local, state and federal law enforcement agencies.

*CAC refers to a formal complaint sent to the county attorney’s office. Page 25 2014 Annual Report


The South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) culminated an in-

The Detective Bureau said goodbye to

vestigation on a male subject residing in Owatonna and selling hero-

Sergeant Tim Hassing, who retired after

in. The events started when agents, with the assistance of an inform-

32 years of service with the Owatonna

ant, were able to purchase $1,000 worth of heroin from a subject.

Police Department in May. Jason Pet-

Once the deal was completed, agents had purchased 12 baggies of

terson was assigned to replace Hassing

presumptive positive heroin weighing a total of 5.1 grams. Subse-

as Sergeant and Commander of the

quent to the heroin purchase, a search warrant was obtained for the

South Central Drug Investigation Unit.

subject’s residence. The SCDIU tactical team made forcible entry into

Congrats to Tim, all your hard work

the suspect’s residence where he was taken into custody without inci-

does not go unnoticed. We hope you

dent. The suspect, Thomas R. Gibson, was placed under arrest and

enjoy your retirement!

transported to the Steele County Detention Center. A search of Gib-

May

son’s residence produced further evidence of his alleged crimes, including a digital scale, $3,840 dollars in cash—which included the $1,000 buy funds the agents used to purchase the heroin. Also, nine additional baggies of heroin were found concealed in a popcorn salt container. Thomas Gibson was formally charged with 3rd Degree Possession of a Controlled Sub-stance and 2nd Degree Sale of a Controlled Substance.

(OW14-00675, OW14-000681) Mar

Feb

Apr

Owatonna detectives assisted officers attempting to arrest a male fugitive Detectives followed up on

believed to reside on Pearl Street. Officers made contact with the suspect,

a reported sexual assault where a

but he refused to open the door. Shortly thereafter, a bomb threat was

13 year old female was given alco-

called in for Federated Insurance. Some officers responded to the threat,

hol and cigarettes at the home of

but others remained at the Pearl Street residence thinking the threat was

an 18 year old male. The victim’s

called in as a ruse to divert resources—the hunch was correct as an officer

mother reported she was called to

was able to contact an accomplice and learned that the fugitive asked the

pick up her daughter after she

bomb threat to be called in to divert officers and allow him the opportuni-

passed out in the kitchen and was

ty to escape. An officer, feigning to be a friend to the accomplice, was

unresponsive.

The mother trans-

able to lure the accomplice to Owatonna where she and two other ac-

ported the daughter to the hospital

complices were arrested in the Cash Wise parking lot. A search warrant

after the daughter disclosed she

was obtained for the Pearl Street address and the fugitive was taken into

had been touched inappropriately

custody. Fugitive Joshua D. Watkins, age 27, was arrested for outstanding

and was not coherent. After inter-

warrants and later charged with Aiding and Abetting Terroristic Threats—

views, Keith Allen Lindl was arrested

the bomb threat. Emily A. Nelson, age 29, was arrested and formally

and charged with 3rd degree crimi-

charged with Terroristic Threats. William J. Wieseler, age 26, and Miguel A.

nal

Carreon Balderas, age 20, were also arrested and formally charged with

sexual

conduct.

(OW14-

000423) Page 26 Owatonna Police Department

Aiding and Abetting Terroristic Threats. (OW14-000846, OW14-000847)


I N V E S T I G AT I O N S — Y E A R I N R E V I E W Detectives assisted the Patrol Division with the execution of search warrants following a robbery at Casey’s General Store on State Ave. Owatonna officers were called to the Casey’s General Store on State Avenue in response to a panic alarm. When officers arrived, they learned the store had just been robbed and the suspect fled on foot. Officers broadcast a description of the suspect and a short time later, an Owatonna sergeant spotted a male subject matching the suspect description sitting in the entryway to the Kernel Restaurant. While identifying the suspect, Sep

the sergeant learned the suspect was wanted for failing to return to the Steele County Detention Center while on work release. The sergeant also found the

suspect had $277 in cash in his shorts pockets; the cash was all bundled together in a similar fashion as reported taken from Casey’s and the same amount. In addition, two small baggies were found in the suspects pockets which contained a white residue which tested presumptive positive for methamphetamines. Shayne D. Bowers, age 24, was formally charged with Simple Robbery, 5th Degree Possession of a Controlled Substance—felonies and Theft—a misdemeanor. (OW14-002478) Oct

Dec

In conjunction with a multi-jurisdiction investigaNov

tion, on October 1st, agents with the South Central Drug

Corporal

Investigation Unit (SCDIU) and the MN BCA, DEA and IRS

Detective

executed various search warrants and federal arrest

During the month of

Mark

warrants in the Owatonna area. During this investigation,

November, the de-

from the Owatonna

agents learned of a shipment of methamphetamine be-

partment conducted

Police

ing delivered to Outlaw Kustoms at 1090 Brady Boule-

compliance

on

vard in Owatonna. Using information collected during

with registered pred-

after

the investigation, agents were able to intercept and stop

atory offenders living

community for over

the vehicle and driver alleged to be making the delivery.

in the community. In

27 years. Congratu-

A federal search warrant was obtained for the vehicle

all, 69 checks were

lations to Mark, a job

and inside the vehicle behind a trim panel, agents recov-

c o m p l e t e d —

well done! We wish

ered six one-gallon zip lock bags that contained

although some moni-

him nothing but our

presumptive methamphetamine—each bag weighed

toring

information

best as he starts this

approximately one pound. Agents arrested the driver of

was updated, we are

new chapter in his

the vehicle, Ricardo A. Alarcon, age 32. Alarcon was for-

happy to report that

life.

mally charged in MN District Court with a 1st Degree

all were found to be

Possession of a Controlled Substance. (OW14-002650)

in compliance.

checks

Edel

retired

Department

December

1st,

serving

the

Page 27 2014 Annual Report


SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS Two Owatonna Police Department School Resource Officers are assigned to work within the local schools of Owatonna. They serve as an avenue to improve safety and prevent crime and violence within our schools. School resource officers collaborate with administration and staff to investigate crime on school property and improve reporting of criminal activity as well as serve as an educational resource by bringing their expertise as guest instructors into certain facets of the education curriculum. Currently, Detective and Resource Officer Flynn and Community Service Officers Johnson and Martin are assigned to the Owatonna High School. Detective and Resource Officer Hunt served the first 1/2 of the school year at the Owatonna Junior High School and Detective and Resource Officer Lesnau is serving the second 1/2 of the year along with Community Service Officer Schroeder; however, together they all serve the elementary schools and the Alternative Learning Center. The community service students, staff and visitors were complimentary of the improvements to access control of the school. Combined, the Owatonna Public Schools have an approximate enrollment of 5,000 students.

2013—2014 School Year Calls 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR CALLS 700

638

600

500

425

400

300

133

200

77 100

1

75

56

44

0 TOTAL CALLS ALC

TOTAL CALLS ROOSEVELT

ALC

ROOSEVELT

TOTAL CALLS WILSON

WILSON

TOTAL CALLS OHS

TOTAL CALLS WASHINGTON

OHS

WASHINGTON

TOTAL CALLS TOTAL CALLS MCKINLEY OJHS

MCKINLEY

OJHS

TOTAL CALLS LINCOLN

LINCOLN

Pictured above right: CSO Johnson with an OHS student at the front entrance Pictured right: CSO Martin with students in the commons area of the OHS

Page 28 Owatonna Police Department


SCDIU The Owatonna Police Department continued the leadership role as fiscal agents of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) in 2014. This leadership role includes the assignment of a police sergeant as commander as well as an administrative assistant. The Owatonna Police Department also continues to co-fund a field agent position in conjunction with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office. The SCDIU is a federally funded violent crimes enforcement team formed in cooperation with member agencies of four counties, encompassing a jurisdictional area of approximately 2,500 square miles. Staffed by four specially trained field agents, a commander, and an administrative coordinator, the team concentrates their efforts on narcotics distribution and investigations as well as violent crime investigations. Agents also assist member agencies with criminal investigations that have a correlation with illegal drugs.

The SCDIU has developed strong partnerships with adjoining task forces, the Minnesota BCA (Bureau of Criminal Apprehension), FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation), DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) and ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), investigating cases that stretch beyond our boundaries and have a direct impact on the flow of illegal drugs into the area. The agents also focus on public ed-

ucation, especially the young people of our communities, by conducting presentations at schools, churches, civic organizations and in the workplace. In October of 2014, the SCDIU Board approved a project to co-locate the agents. The Owatonna Police Department and Steele County Sheriff’s Department designated / repurposed space in the lower level of the Law Enforcement Center for the construction of an SCDIU office. This total project cost was authorized for $33,000 with in-kind labor supplied by the City of Owatonna. At the end of 2014, the project was just underway with a forecasted completion date in early 2015. Page 29 2014 Annual Report


DETECTIVE BUREAU The Owatonna Police Department recognizes that predatory offenders pose a significant risk to the citizens who reside in our community and keeping the public safe is our priority. It is our belief that a collaborative approach that includes taking precautionary measures and encouraging community reporting practices, will ensure that the predatory offender registration will continue to be largely successful. It has been well documented that roughly 80% of

their

are known by

P R E DATO RY O F F E N D E R R E G I S T R AT I O N

victims; there-

2 0 1 4 St a t i s t i c s

fore, it is imperative that law enforcement agencies systems, correction agencies and human

services

departments

work

Registered offenders

100

Change forms filed with OPD

185

Incarcerated (some multiple times)

15

No longer required to register

04

Offenders that moved in to Owatonna

14

Offenders that moved out of Owatonna

18

together to keep our

community educated. Registering as a predatory offender is a col-

5 reports were forwarded requesting charges that the predatory offenderknowingly violates registration requirements or intentionally provides false information, MSS 243.166 subd. 5(a)

lateral consequence of June, 2014—Compliance Checks

criminal behavior and

73 checks completed and 31 change of information forms completed

it acts as one of the

1 non-compliance report forwarded to Steele County Attorneys Office

many deterrent factors

October, 2014—Compliance Checks:

as to whether someone will reoffend. The

69 checks completed and 32 change of information forms completed

Minnesota Bureau of Criminal

0 Non-compliance reports forwarded to Steele County Attorneys Office

Apprehen-

sion maintains a registry of predatory offenders residing within the state. Those offenders that are registered have been convicted of a violent felony or sexually related crime and are classified in the registry based on their likelihood to reoffend. A risk assessment is conducted on each person registered prior to their release from confinement. An offender’s risk assessment will dictate the level of community notification that is required of local law enforcement. Page 30 Owatonna Police Department


CO M P L I A N C E I N I T I AT I V E S The Owatonna Police Department Detective Bureau conducts tobacco and alcohol compliance checks with licensed tobacco and on/off sale liquor retailers operating within the city. Compliance checks are a mechanism to help ensure tobacco and alcohol retailers are complying with regulations that are designed to keep these products out of the hands of our youth. Using trained, underage operatives, our detectives conduct these checks at least twice annually at random times.

When conducting the

checks, the underage operatives are wired with an electronic listening device that allows our detectives to monitor the conversation between the operative and retailer. When conducting the checks, our

hope is that retailers are doing what they are supposed to do and we get 100% compliance. Unfortunately, sometimes an illegal sale is made and requires enforcement action. A sale of tobacco or alcohol to someone underage is a criminal matter and may result in a criminal charge. The sale of tobacco to someone underage is a misdemeanor offense, or if it is a second violation within five years, a gross misdemeanor offense. The sale of alcohol to a minor is gross misdemeanor. In addition to criminal charges, a retailer who commits an underage alcohol sale offense may have their liquor license suspended or revoked by the city council. In the case of a tobacco sale offense (to include e-cigarettes), the retailer may face an administrative fine of up to $500 and/or a license suspension, depending upon the number of times the retailer has committed an offense.

Alcohol Compliance

2014

16 September Checks 1 Fail—Firehouse Liquor

26 November Checks 0 Fails

To b a c c o C o m p l i a n c e

29 November Checks 2 Fails— Owatonna Fuel & Food Owatonna Pump & Grocery

8 December Checks 1 Fail—Reggie’s Brew House

96% compliance rate

93% compliance rate

Page 31 2014 Annual Report


P R O P E RT Y A N D E V I D E N C E OPD Property & Evidence 7587

1735 743

Items Entered

Items Released 2008

2009

2010

2011

Total Items 2012

2013

2014

The Property and Evidence Technicians are tasked with maintaining the chain of custody for all evidentiary items submitted to the property room. Documenting the intake, storage, security, release and disposal of all items is the primary focus of property room personnel. The Owatonna Police Department continues to utilize a program called Evidence Tracker to electronically track all items in the property room. The Crime Scene Unit identifies, collects and preserves evidence and is comprised of trained specialists in the areas of crime scene photography, latent print development and recovery, biological and trace evidence recovery and tool mark and footwear impression recovery.

Page 32 Owatonna Police Department


VEHICLE FORFEITURES

FORFEITURE - for·fei·ture -ˈfôrfəCHər/ * noun: forfeiture; * plural noun: forfeitures ~ The loss or giving up of something as a penalty for wrongdoing.

Minnesota law allows property associated with certain crimes to be forfeited. This can be done

judicially or administratively. Under Minnesota law, property associated with designated criminal offenses may be forfeited. The most common criminal activities leading to seizure, forfeiture and final disposition of property in 2014 were DWI-related incidents and controlled substance. Vehicle forfeiture is often one of the most startling and penalizing consequences of a DWI incident. The intention of a vehicle forfeiture is that public safety is served by forfeiting the vehicle used in a commission of a crime and to reduce recidivism. Pursuant to Minn. Stat. § 169A.63, police agencies have authority to seize permanently any vehicle used in the commission of First Degree DWI, Second Degree DWI or any DWI occurring when the driver's privileges are Canceled IPS (inimical to public safety) or when the driver has a B Card license (prohibiting the use of alcohol or drugs). Vehicle forfeiture occurs regardless of how valuable the vehicle is or whether there is a loan on the vehicle. In 2014, a total of thirty (30) vehicles were subject to forfeiture. Of these vehicles, nine (9) were returned to the owner or lien holder, five (5) were sold on a state auction site and the remaining sixteen (16) are still in the forfeiture process. The vehicles seized were due to the following: (21) DWI, (5) Controlled Substance, (2) Theft, and (2) Fleeing.

Page 33 2014 Annual Report


S U P P O RT S E R V I C E S The Owatonna Police Department currently employs six community services officers (CSOs)—four part-time and two full-time. Three of our part-time CSOs serve in a traditional role by supporting the Patrol Division, Detective Bureau and Administrative Division. The other part-time CSO and the two full-time CSOs are primarily assigned to the Owatonna Public School District to enhance security in the Owatonna High School and Owatonna Junior High School. These CSOs work in conjunction with the OHS & OJHS School Resource Officers (SROs) and administration. Their primary duties include staffing a single point of entry during school hours, monitoring student activity in the

hallways and during lunch periods, school property parking and being a visible deterrent in the school. In addition, they provide security at special school functions, such as sporting events or dances. When school is not in session, these three CSOs are assigned back to the department to perform traditional CSO duties and focus on being a uniformed presence at summer school sessions, summer lunch programs or any other community event that may draw youth from the community.

What are some responsibilities of a traditional Community Service Officer? 

Traffic control at vehicle collisions, public events and signal outages

Community relations with crime prevention, tours and presentations

Respond to minor accidents, thefts & vandalism and provide house checks

Monitor damage in city parks and assist with locking park buildings at closing

Monitor mileage and schedule routine maintenance of department fleet

Enforce ordinance violations, junk vehicle compliance and issue parking tickets

Provide funeral escorts & parade assistance and be advisors at kids safety camp

The current climate within police agencies is that they are becoming increasingly constrained because of budgetary concerns and the need to serve a larger or growing community. In this environment, the position of the CSO is considered a blessing for both the departments and communities they serve in. CSOs typically are paid significantly less than a sworn police officer, allowing departments to field more people for the same amount of money. This has the effect of providing quicker response times to citizen requests for police services that are not considered emergencies or a matter of immediate public safety. Further, CSOs usually handle lower priority calls which do not require a licensed police officer with arrest powers thus freeing sworn officers to concentrate on incidents that require their specific skill set. Even a few CSOs can have a significant impact on the efficiency and effectiveness of police services that are provided. The CSOs at the Owatonna Police Department are knowledgeable and flexible in their assignments as they are asked to perform duties from every division within the Owatonna Police Department. Page 34 Owatonna Police Department


CO M M U N I T Y S E R V I C E O F F I C E R S CALLS

2014

2014

1,959

Impounds

249

2013

1,921

Releases

102

2012

1,911

Adoptions

131

2011

1,455

Euthanasia

12

Escapes

4

ANIMAL CONTROL Animal Control helps to maintain the health and safety of pets and protects city residents from problem domesticated animals. The Owatonna Police Department Community Service Officers as well as the Patrol Officers respond to domestic animal complaints within the city including barking dogs and animals at large, amongst other requests. They also enforce the city ordinances regarding animals, educate the public on important issues concerning animals as well as look after the safety and welfare of pets and their owners. The CSOs manning the animal control shelter regularly work in cooperation with animal advocating partners to provide safe homes for abandoned or lost pets that cannot be reunited with their owners—we strive to find homes for every adoptable animal taken into the shelter. The Owatonna Animal Shelter Facebook page is designed to serve as an avenue to help reunite impounded animals with their owners or showcase what we currently have up for adoption. The Administrative Assistant of the Patrol Division is tasked with posting pictures, descriptors and pick-up locations of animals housed in the shelter.

Animal services include:

In 2014—$2,548 was collected from animals claimed at the animal control shelter.

Provide live traps for catching cats

Pick up animals captured by citizens

At large dog / cat impounds

Vaccination tag enforcement

Cruelty / barking complaint investigation

Potential dangerous / dangerous dog enforcement

Page 35 2014 Annual Report


CO M M U N I T Y S E R V I C E O F F I C E R S Mission:

PA R K I N G C O N T R O L

To create a fair use of available park-

Parking Violations are issued by the patrol division along

ing within the city of Owatonna by

with community services officers. Enforced parking vio-

enforcing parking laws.

lations range from parking in the yellow zone to the City of Owatonna ordinance for odd and even restriction.

Strategy: To maximize the use of all existing parking spaces for downtown customers, businesses and residents. Parking restrictions are enforced to encourage employees, business owners and residents to use longterm parking spaces located on the fringe of the downtown area, while making available short-term parking spaces located in the center of downtown for shoppers

CSO Ryg and his Parking Control GO-4

and customers.

Fines Collected 2-4 Hour Tickets Issued Odd/Even Parking Tickets Issued Parking Violations

2014

2013

2012

2011

$47,895

$41,395

$41,395

$50,843

1,172

1,190

2,149

2,257

956

825

630

894

1,307

1,190

959

1,393

Reference the link below for Chapter 72 of the City of Owatonna Ordinance Code—Parking Rules. http://amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Minnesota/owatonna_mn/titleviitrafficcode/chapter72parkingrulesgenerally? f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:owatonna_mn$anc=JD_Chapter72

Page 36 Owatonna Police Department


S U P P O RT S E R V I C E S A D M I N I S T R AT I V E F I N E S TICKETS

FINES

ISSUED

COLLECTED

2012

68

$2,425

2013

53

$1,995

2014

30

$ 720

OFFENSE DESCRIPTION

CITY ORDINANCE CODE PENALTY

Animal at Large

1025:25

$60.00

Barking Dog

1025:35

$60.00

Noise Violation

1082:35

$60.00

Burning

1010:05

$60.00

Tumultuous Conduct

900:00

$60.00

Junk Vehicles

1035:00

$60.00

Littering

910:00

$60.00

Vagrancy

900:05

$60.00

Snowmobiling

725:30

$60.00

Transient Merchants

488:00; 1045:05

$100.00

Parks-Prohibited Acts

250:45

$60.00

Skateboarding

735:00

$25.00

Administrative offenses are intended to provide the public and the city with an informal, cost effective and expeditious alternative to traditional criminal charges for violations of certain ordinance provisions. The administrative citation procedure is intended to be voluntary by those individuals who have been cited. Any time prior to payment of the administrative penalty, an individual may withdraw from participating in the procedure, in which event the City may bring criminal charges in accordance with the law. Likewise, prior to the payment of the administrative citation, the City, at it’s discretion, may choose to dismiss the administrative offense and may bring criminal charges in the first instance.

Page 37 2014 Annual Report


The 2014

SAFETY CAMP

was held on July 16th and 17th with a large contingent of patrol, com-

munity service and reserve officers who participated. Officers Vaith, Berg, Johnson and Van Osdale were lead advisors for each team of kids. Community Service Officers Steinberg and Federly also helped as advisors on the first day and taught the Bike Safety class on the second day. Community Service Officers Johnson and Adams and Reserve Officer Ryg also served as advisors of the 213 graduating third graders who took part in the two-day event. Safety Camp is an annual event filled with fun activities, but its focus is mainly on safety of the following: Boating and swimming, fishing and camping/ hiking, first aid, bicycle, and fire and electrical. At the end, Chief Hiller was amongst the dignitaries at the graduation ceremony who congratulated all of the participants and awarded the campers their “Safety Camp Certificate of Completion”. The Board of Directors who plan events for Safety Camp have

representatives from the Owatonna Police and Fire Departments, Owatonna Park and Rec., Steele County Sheriff’s Office, Gold Cross Ambulance, Steele County Attorney’s Office, Cybex and Daikin.

Detective Hunt is the

Owatonna Police Department’s representative and serves as the boards chair.

September 30th concluded a three year grant cycle

TO WA R D Z E R O D E AT H S

administered by the Owatonna Police Department that involves all law enforcement agencies in Owatonna, Steele County. The agencies were awarded federal dollars to fund extra enforcement efforts to increase high-visibility patrols and enforcement during established periods determined by the Minnesota Office of Traffic Safety. Each enforcement wave is established through statistical analysis collected by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Each traffic safety wave is dedicated to target specific violations, such as speed enforcement, seatbelt safety and child restraints, distracted / impaired drivers and the Trooper Ted Foss Move-Over Law. The Owatonna Police Department is the grant coordinator for the 2015 enforcement period, which began on October 1, 2014 and ends on September 30, 2015. During this enforcement period, the grant agencies were awarded a total of $21,006.24 to cover officer overtime costs. The partnering agencies include the Owatonna Police Department, the Blooming Prairie Police Department and the Steele County Sheriff’s Office.

Page 38 Owatonna Police Department

http://www.minnesotatzd.org/


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS The Citizen’s Police Academy marked its second annual class in 2014. The academy is an eight week session, offered once per year and intended to educate citizens on how the Owatonna Police Department serves the community. The class started on September 29, 2014 and went through November 17, 2014. They met on Monday evenings between 6-8 p.m. with a total of 20 community members who attended. Qualifications require the students to be at least 18 years of age, work or reside in the community and submit to a criminal history screening. During the academy, a different subject matter and presenter leads the session. Most presenters

were representatives from the police department that have special knowledge, training or skills in the law enforcement field or were invited as a guest speaker from the criminal justice field. This year’s guest speakers were Tim Boyer, Administrator of the Pearl Street 911 Communications Center, Judge Joseph Bueltel from the Steele County District Court and Attorney Dan McIntosh, from the Steele County Attorney’s Office. Lecture, video, demonstrations, and practical exercises filled the evenings. During one session, a use of force and practical field experience was offered in a safe and controlled setting. The participants found this experience as an eye opener. At the end of each session, the participants were given the opportunity to evaluate and critique each presentation. A couple participant comments were “Come – Listen and Learn” and “Every Owatonna citizen should attend the academy”.

2014 CITIZEN’S POLICE ACADEMY

If you are interested in joining, click here for a brochure and application: http://ci.owatonna.mn.us/police/citizens-academy

Page 39 2014 Annual Report


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 2014

Nuisance 2013

Disorderly

2012 2011 2010

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

In June of 2005, The City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA) was formed as a network of landlords who work with the police department to help rental property owners accomplish the following:

Participate in an exchange of information and experience with fellow property owners and local law enforcement

Disseminate useful information to all members and inspire them to further educate themselves in the practical features of their rental operations

Advance the general welfare of the local rental property industry

Advocate a Code of Ethics to maintain high professional standards and sound business methods among its members for the best interest of the industry and the public

Educate landlords/managers/owners as to their rights and responsibilities under the Minnesota Landlord /Tenant Act and Federal State Fair Housing Laws

Promote the enactment and enforcement of local laws and regulations beneficial to rental property owners

Enhance your rental property ownership

The communication and involvement between landlords and the Owatonna Police Department help make our housing units safe for individuals in the community. As part of law enforcement involvement, we continue to work diligently with landlords and managers by following the Disorderly Use and Nuisance Ordinance in our city in order to make properties and neighborhoods secure and safe for all.

Page 40 Owatonna Police Department


The Owatonna Police Department is proud to participate in the Night to Unite Program. Each year thousands of citizens across Minnesota get together on the first Tuesday in August to participate with the local law enforcement officials to build stronger neighborhoods through police and community partnerships. Night to Unite was held across Owatonna on Tuesday, August 5, 2014. Officers from the Owatonna Police Department, City Officials, Council Members, Owatonna Fire Department, Reserves and Chaplains visited over 40 different neighborhood groups and an estimated 1,500 community members.

N I G H T TO U N I T E

Night to Unite is one of the most important community outreach programs we participate in during the year. Night to Unite offers the opportunity for our department to reach out to many citizens in an informal setting so that we can work together in collaborative efforts to strengthen our neighborhoods community

and

partnerships.

It also gives the department an opportunity to see how we are doing in the eyes of the community and find out what we can do better so we can continue to strive toward delivering outstanding police services that the citizens of Owatonna deserve. Minnesota Night to Unite is designed to: (1) heighten crime and drug prevention awareness; (2) generate support for and participation in local anticrime efforts; (3) strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships; and (4) send a message to criminals letting them know neighborhoods are organized and ready to fight back. The Owatonna Police Department encourages residents to participate in this great celebration of community, crime prevention and strong police/community partnerships. A strong community makes for a safe community. Everything we do to strengthen the ties among neighbors of all ages, backgrounds and lifestyles makes our present and future that much brighter. Celebrating Minnesota Night to Unite with the Owatonna Police Department and your neighbors is a positive way to build and nurture our community—JOIN US! Night to Unite is sponsored by the Minnesota Crime Prevention Association, AAA of Minnesota / Iowa and local law enforcement communities.

Page 41 2014 Annual Report


DATA T R E N D OWATONNA P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T Five year comparison CRIME

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

Homicide

0

0

0

0

0

Rape

3

5

7

9

4

Robbery

6

6

1

12

4

Aggravated Assault

27

25

22

18

28

Burglary

79

114

82

119

76

Larceny

510

538

509

352

386

Motor Vehicle Theft

30

28

21

20

20

Arson

0

0

4

0

1

Total Part I

655

716

646

530

519

Total Part II

875

903

916

801

864

Total Part I & II

1,530

1,619

1,562

1,331

1,383

Statistics furnished from the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report Page 42 Owatonna Police Department


DATA T R E N D Crime Rate per # of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

100,000

Homicide

0

0

0

0

Rape

3

0

0

11

Robbery

6

2

33

23

Aggravated Assault

27

21

78

106

Burglary

79

16

20

311

Larceny

510

281

55

2,009

Motor Vehicle Theft

30

14

47

118

Arson

0

0

0

0

655

334

51

2,581

2014 Part I Crimes

Total Part I

Crime Rate per 2014 Part II Crimes

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

100,000

Other Assaults

157

122

78

618

Forgery/Counterfeiting

17

4

24

66

Fraud

74

19

26

291

Embezzlement

2

1

50

7

Stolen Property

5

4

80

19

Vandalism

167

54

32

658

Weapons

10

7

70

39

Prostitution

0

0

0

0

Other Sex Offenses

31

16

52

122

Narcotics

105

93

89

413

Gambling

0

0

0

0

Family/Children

15

5

33

59

DUI

108

99

92

425

Liquor Laws

20

18

90

78

Disorderly Conduct

40

36

90

157

Other Offenses

124

89

72

488

Total Part II

875

567

65

3,440

1,530

901

59

6,021

GRAND TOTAL

Statistics furnished from the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report Page 43 2014 Annual Report


DATA T R E N D AGENCY COMPARISON 2014 Part I and Part II Arrests

2014 Local Narcotics Arrests

85.3%

83.3%

14.7%

16.7%

Owatonna Police Department

2014 Arrests by Agency

Mower Co. Sheriff’s Office

Steele County Sheriff’s Office

Part I & II

Narcotics

527

51

1,615

197

Faribault Co. Sheriff’s Office

109

9

Freeborn Co. Sheriff’s Office

291

70

Albert Lea Police Dept.

908

108

61

8

Rice Co. Sheriff’s Office

243

36

Northfield Police Dept.

283

44

Faribault Police Dept.

707

98

Steele Co. Sheriff’s Office

101

17

Owatonna Police Dept.

585

85

Austin Police Dept.

Waseca Co. Sheriff’s Office

Page 44 Owatonna Police Department


DATA T R E N D South Central Drug Investigative Unit Steele, Waseca, Faribault, and Freeborn Counties Population = 101,057

NARCOTICS ARRESTS BY AGENCY DRUG TASK FORCE REGIONS 2014 per Capita

Total Narcotic Arrests = 355 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0035 MN River Valley Drug Task Force Martin, Watonwan, Nicollet, and Blue Earth Counties Population = 130,393

.0027%

Total Narcotic Arrests = 661 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0051

.0035%

.0032%

SE MN Narcotics and Gang Task Force Olmsted, Winona, Goodhue, Dodge, Mower, Fillmore, Houston, and Wabasha Counties

.0051%

Population = 367,969 Total Narcotic Arrests = 1,179 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0032 Rice County Drug Task Force Rice County Population = 66,458 Total Narcotic Arrests = 178 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0027

2014 Crime Rate Regional Comparison

Owatonna Police Department

6,029

Faribault Police Department

6,652

Austin Police Department

9,967

Albert Lea Police Department

6,196

Waseca Police Department

4,956

Steele County Sheriff’s Office

3,728

Rice County Sheriff’s Office

2,266

Mower County Sheriff’s Office

5,380

Freeborn County Sheriff’s Office

2,553

Waseca County Sheriff’s Office

5,825

Faribault County Sheriff’s Office

3,483

Page 45 2014 Annual Report


This document and all its contents are the property of: Owatonna Police Department Reproductions or distributions of this document in whole or in part are permitted subject to appropriate source citation and the express prior written consent of the Chief of Police of the Owatonna Police Department. Please visit us and learn more about our organization at: www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police

Owatonna Police Department 2014 Annual Report

Profile for Owatonna Police Department

Owatonna Police Department 2014 Annual Report  

Owatonna Police Department 2014 Annual Report