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OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

2012 ANNUAL REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS Chief’s Message…………………………………………………………………………………………………….1 Mission ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..2 Organizational Chart………………………………………………………………………………………………3 Personnel Changes…………………………………………………………………………………………………4 Budget………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5 Administration Division……………………………………………………………………………………………6 Professional Standards……………………………………………………………………………………..7 Patrol Division……..……………………………………………………………………………………………….8 2012 Patrol Highlights….………………………………………………………………………………...9 Patrol Districts…....…………………………………………………………………………………......11 Canine Officer.………….……………………………………………………………………………….12 Police Chaplain Program………………………………………………………………………………...12 Training..………………………………………………………………………………………………...13 Field Training Officers………………………………………………………………………….13 Firearms Instructors… ..………………………….……………………………………………..14 Defensive Tactics Instructors…………………………………………………………………...15 Police Department Remodel…………………………………………………………………….16 Detective Bureau…..…………………………………………………………………………………………....17 Criminal Investigations…………………………………………………………………………………....18 School Resource Officers….………………………………………………...……………………………19 2012 Detective Bureau Highlights...…………………………………………………………………...…20 South Central Drug Investigation Unit…….……………………………………………………………..22 SCDIU Tactical Team……...………………….…………………………………………………………23 Compliance Initiatives……………………………………………………………………………………23 Predatory Offender Registry……………………………………………………………………24 Alcohol and Tobacco Compliance……………………………………………………………...25 Gang Officer…………………………………………………………………………………….25 Detective Bureau Support………………………………………………………………………………26 Crime Scene Technicians……………………………………………………………………….26 Property and Evidence………………………………………………………………………….26 Vehicle Forfeitures……..……………………………………………………………………….26 Property Room Remodel…..…………………………………………………………………….……27 Support Services…………………………………………………………………………………………………..28 Parking Control…………………………………………………………………………………………...28 Community Service Officers……………………………………………………………………………..29 Animal Control…………………………………………………………………………………………...30 Records/Pearl Street 911 Center…..……………………………………………………………………...31 Community Programs …...…………………………………………………………………………………….…32 Toward Zero Deaths Grant……………….……………………………………………………………………....36 Data Trend…...…….……………………………………………………………………………………………...37 Acknowledgements...……………………………………………………………………...………………………41


MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF

Citizens of Owatonna Mayor and City Council Members City Administration and Staff I find great pleasure in presenting the 2012 Annual report on behalf of the Owatonna Police Department. The highlights of 2012 are a direct result of the professional and hardworking staff at the police department. I want to thank all the staff at the police department for a great year! The Owatonna Police Department was in the process of researching, designing, and implementing a new Chaplain Program and Police Reserve Unit. These are two shining examples of citizen involvement that augment our police department. The chaplains provide a comforting presence to our community members during tragic and crisis events. These tragic days can forever shape a person’s life and their presence is another example of compassion lead service. Our upcoming Police Reserve Unit will be providing upwards of 2,000 volunteer hours of service a year. This past year was busy and I trust you will find interesting highlights throughout the report. The City of Owatonna experienced a 17.4% increase in Part I and Part II crimes this past year. The City witnessed a significant increase in thefts, vandalism, and narcotics crimes. The overall clearance rate for Part I and Part II crimes was 54% or a 3% improvement over the past year. My colleagues and I enjoyed serving our community this past year. A number of police encounters touched us all in ways that made our service enjoyable and satisfying. We wish our community a prosperous 2013 and hope this past year offered everyone health and happiness. I hope our service to the community exceeded our community’s expectations. Our motto of “Integrity Above All” remains our cornerstone in police service. Warmest regards,

Keith E. Hiller Chief of Police

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


VISION AND MISSION Vision The Owatonna Police Department is dedicated to attaining the highest level of professionalism and accountability in its service to the citizens of Owatonna. Recognizing that our strength stems from our partnership with all sectors of the community, we envision an organization structured to meet the ever-changing needs of our citizens and our professions.

Mission All Members of the Owatonna Police Department are dedicated to providing a safe and secure community through partnerships, leadership, and an unwavering commitment to excellence. Policing excellence through our People, our Work, and our Relationships.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PERSONNEL CHANGES New Hires Officer Kayla Perkins Officer Zackary Schumaker Officer Brianne Lesnau Officer Benjamin Johnson Officer Adam Hennen Officer Micaiah Becker Community Service Officer Joshua Federly Community Service Officer Andrew Van Osdale

Retirements Officer William Goodsell

Resignations Officer Mark Chambers Officer Micaiah Becker Officer Michael Schneider Officer Kayla Perkins Officer Chad Fierst Officer Kevin Fisher Community Service Officer Galen Thompson

AUTHORIZED STRENGTH YEAR

CHIEF

CAPTAIN

SERGEANT

CORPORAL

OFFICER

TOTAL

2004

1/1

2/2

5/5

4/4

**19/**18

31/30

2005

1/1

2/1

5/7

4/4

**19/**16

31/29

2006

1/1

1/1

7/7

4/5

***22/***19

35/33

2007

1/1

2/2

7/7

5/5

**20/*19

35/34

2008

1/1

2/2

7/7

4/3

21/22

35/35

2009

1/1

2/2

7/6

4/3

21/21

35/33

2010

1/1

1/1

8/8

4/3

***21/***21

36/34 3 part time

2011

1/1

2/2

7/7

2/2

23/23

35/35

2012

1/1

2/2

7/7

2/2

23/23

35/35

Literal 1/1 = Authorized Number of Personnel/Positions Filled *Total includes 1 part time officer **Total includes 2 part time officers

***Total includes 3 part time officers

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


BUDGET The annual base budget and capital budget for the police department is established by the Police Chief and staff within the department. The city administration and finance department are equally involved in the budget process. The adopted fiscal budget for 2012 was approved at $3,919,257. In 2011 and 2012, the police department had expenditures of $132,880 in other improvements within the Law Enforcement Center. According to the Steele County Assessor’s Office, the Law Enforcement Center has seen a market value increase of $558,100 over the last two years. This is largely due to the fact the City of Owatonna has an in-house construction department. The police department’s forfeiture budget significantly assisted with the purchase of technology, furniture, and equipment. Even in difficult financial times, the police department has consistently managed its budget with the future in mind.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE SUMMARY OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT

REVENUES

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

BUDGET 2012 ACTUAL

$811,361

$4,104,614

$3,293,253

BUDGET 2012

$640,945

$3,919,257

$3,278,312

BUDGET 2011 ACTUAL

$857,070

$4,129,716

$3,272,646

BUDGET 2011

$595,839

$3,965,147

$3,369,308

BUDGET 2010 ACTUAL

$651,671

$3,829,424

$3,177,753

BUDGET 2010

$561,104

$3,809,040

$3,247,936

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


ADMINISTRATION DIVSION The Administrative Division is responsible for the day-to-day operations of providing public safety services to the citizens of Owatonna. The Chief of Police is responsible for a budget of approximately $3.9 million and the department’s 41 employees. The police department also shares four (4) records staff with the Steele County’s Sheriff’s Office. In an effort to augment services, the six (6) Chaplains added this year provided a valuable service throughout the year. The Administrative Division is comprised of the chief of police, captain of the patrol division, captain of the investigative division, and an administrative assistant. Both captains are responsible for the respective divisions with sergeants providing direct supervision within their respective areas of responsibility. The administrative assistant is responsible for processing payroll, accounts receivable and payables, managing training and personnel files, and facilitating hiring processes and practices. The administrative team prides itself in shaping and guiding staff with solid principles and best practices that ultimately affects our methods of operation. We strive to be transformational with focus placed on being one of the best law enforcement agencies in the State of Minnesota and United States. “Integrity Above All” remains our cornerstone value and is a part of our entire decision making process! The engaged citizens in our community continue to assist the administrative team with direction and purpose. We will engender the principles of equity and diversity, and develop and shape our department to balance the needs of individuals. The administrative team provides leadership and supervision that stimulates open-mindedness and ingenuity within the department and community. The administrative team further clings to the principles of trust, compassion, respect, honesty, pride, and empathy in all we do, with justice for all motivating all our actions!

“You can’t hold a man down without staying down with him.” Booker T. Washington

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


ADMINISTRATION DIVISION PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS The primary responsibility of Professional Standards is to ensure the integrity of the Owatonna Police Department and monitor the relationship between the community and the department, striving to create mutual trust. Professional Standards serves as a method of internal accountability by receiving, processing and investigating complaints concerning police conduct. These complaints may allege violations of criminal law, department policy or officer performance and may originate from outside sources or from within the agency. The Owatonna Police Department makes every effort to act with professionalism and integrity in everything we do. However, in the event a complaint against an officer is received, an internal affairs investigation is initiated in an attempt to determine whether the act of misconduct occurred and disciplinary or corrective action is necessary or if the officer acted in a justified, lawful or proper manner. If criminal wrongdoing is alleged, the Owatonna Police Department often requests an outside law enforcement agency complete the criminal investigation. In 2012, there were 20 internal investigations conducted involving twenty-one employees. These investigations resulted in twelve disciplinary actions, including six oral reprimands, four written reprimands, one one-day suspension from duty and one three-day suspension from duty. Disciplinary actions can include oral and written reprimands, suspensions, demotions or terminations. Five of the investigations exonerated the officer(s), meaning that after a fair preponderance of the evidence, the act or acts complained of did not occur; or the agency member named in the complaint was not involved in the alleged misconduct; or the acts that provided for the complaint occurred; however, the investigation revealed the act(s) were justified, lawful or proper. One investigation was halted when the employee voluntarily withdrew from the department. And finally, in two of the investigations, the complainants voluntarily withdrew their formal complaints against the officers. In 2012, there was one allegation of criminal activity brought against an employee of the Owatonna Police Department; the investigation was conducted by the Mankato Department of Public Safety and in March of 2013 resulted in a conviction for disorderly conduct.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISON The Patrol Division is currently overseen by the patrol captain. Captain Jeff Mundale supervises six (6) patrol sergeants who in turn are responsible the twenty (20) patrol officers. The patrol division has many specialized units within the ranks, such as a canine officer, field training officers (FTO), members assigned to the multi-jurisdictional SCDIU Tactical Team, firearms and use of force instructors, crime scene technicians, police chaplains, police explorers, and an administrative assistant/parking control officer.

Patrol Sergeants The six (6) patrol sergeants are assigned police officers under their direct supervision. The sergeants supervise the day-to-day duties of the patrol officers and coordinate efforts with the officers assigned to each patrol district. Each sergeant is assigned to supervise a specialized unit that they have established a wealth of knowledge and training to supervise or participate in. The primary responsibility of a police sergeant is to supervise officers assigned to their specific shift and to hold the officer accountable for their day-to-day functions, activities, and duties. In addition, the sergeants are responsible to provide performance evaluations and create opportunities for the officer’s professional development. Upon the start of each patrol shift, the patrol sergeant will lead roll-call briefings, which is a summary of the previous shift activities, and to provide additional information for the safety and service to the community.

Patrol Officers Patrol officers provide 24-hour police services to the citizens and community of Owatonna. Each officer and sergeant is assigned to one of three patrol districts established within the city. The patrol officer’s primary duty is to provide public safety through visual presence, enforcement, education, crime prevention, and problem solving throughout the city and in their respective districts. Each district patrol officer is tasked with becoming familiar with crime issues and trends, and to work in partnerships with the citizens and residents to improve the quality of life in each neighborhood or business district. A patrol officer’s daily activities also include: responding to emergency and non-emergency calls for service, conducting preliminary investigations of criminal activity, investigating traffic crashes, preparing incident, investigative, arrest reports, performing necessary follow-up investigations, making arrests and searches as required, identifying and attending to problem and directed patrol areas, identifying and enforcing criminal and traffic laws including city ordinances, preparing and providing courtroom testimony, and providing general security to business establishments, residential neighborhoods, school property, and the parks system. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISION 2012 Patrol Highlights January 2012: On January 11th, Owatonna patrol officers, city and county investigators, and agents from the South Central Drug Investigations Unit (SCDIU), apprehended Jason P. Krieg, age 44, who was wanted for the shooting outside the Medford McDonald’s restaurant. Krieg was arrested without incident on the 500 block of Adams Avenue following a short foot chase that ended behind the Owatonna Ready-mix plant. An OPD Agent for the task force received a commendation for his efforts in this apprehension. February 2012: On February 20th at 9:24 p.m., an officer on patrol came across a vehicle that went off the road at the intersection of Mineral Springs Rd. and St. Paul Rd. The vehicle struck a stop sign, a fence, and then a fire hydrant. The officer located and spoke to the driver, who was shaken from the crash but uninjured. The officer noticed that driver was showing signs of impairment and had the driver perform road-side field sobriety tests. The driver was subsequently placed under arrest for suspicion of drunk driving and transported to the Steele County Detention Center for further DWI processing. March 2012: In a cooperative effort with the Owatonna Park & Recreation Department and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the Owatonna Police Department concluded a three month deer management hunt in city parks. 11 deer were taken during a series of four separate hunts to cull the deer population. The DNR conducted a study that authorized 15 deer to be taken from the deer herd living in the City of Owatonna. April 2012: Unseasonably warm weather spikes vandalism to city parks which prompted an undercover operation by the Patrol Division. On separate dates and at different parks, undercover officers made a total of six arrests for subjects possessing marijuana and juveniles in possession of alcohol and tobacco products. May 2012: On May 2nd at approximately 11:15 p.m., an officer was attempting to locate a suspect in a theft investigation at 215 22nd St. NW. While he was there, he heard an alarm signaling from within the building and detected a smoke haze in the street lights. The officer investigated further and found a window on the third floor that had smoke coming from it. Shortly thereafter, a female and young child appeared on the apartment balcony. The female appeared distressed and the child was crying. The officer gained access to apartment complex. The officer reached the affected apartment and found thick smoke covering the entire apartment. He entered the kitchen area and observed open flames above the stove on the wall. A fire extinguisher was used to control the flame while other responding officers began evacuating the building. It was determined the fire was caused by a burner being left on “high”. The female was found in an intoxicated state and was placed under arrest for child endangerment. June 2012: Officer Berg stopped a vehicle traveling on I-35 whose occupants are wanted out of Downey, California for murder that occurred a few days prior. The suspects were arrested and held for extradition. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISION 2012 Patrol Highlights July 2012: Officer Heaser attended a 50 hour course certifying him as a EVOC course instructor. The Owatonna Police Department also participated in a Mock Crash event on Wednesday, July 11th. Participating agencies included the Owatonna Hospital, Gold Cross, and Owatonna Fire Department. August 2012: The first Tuesday of August is dedicated to the Minnesota Crime Prevention Association (MCPA) Night to Unite block party celebration. Owatonna PD has been participating in this annual event for many years. In all, our officers visited 40 local block parties that were attended by an estimated 1600 people. September 2012: Owatonna officers participated in a multi-agency traffic enforcement saturation on September 6th and 7th for the Shangri-La party in rural Freeborn County. Shangri-La is an event held in Harmony Park and known for illegal drug usage. As a partnering agency to the South Central Drug Investigative Unit, the Owatonna Police Department dedicated several officers to this operation and made over 80 of the 200 total traffic related contacts for all agencies. October 2012: Sergeants DuChene and Sorensen attended a two-week Supervision of Police Personnel (SPP) course in Bloomington, MN. The SPP course is sponsored by the Northwestern University, Evanston, IL Center for Public Safety. The course is designed to prepare first line personnel for a successful transition from officer to supervisor. Officer Heaser attended a one-week Crime Scene Investigation School sponsored by the Burnsville Police Department Crime Scene Unit. Topics covered in this course were crime scene photography, evidence collection, evidence processing, new techniques used in evidence collection, court preparation, homicide and death investigation, fingerprinting, casting, blood stain pattern recognition, and fluid collection. November 2012: The Patrol Division assisted the Predatory Offender Coordinator assigned to the Detective Bureau by completing the second half of our biannual predatory compliance checks. Our checks found that eight offenders have moved out of Owatonna and eight other offenders are currently incarcerated for other offenses. Three offenders were found to be non-complaint and have been arrested for their non-compliance. December 2012: On December 8th, officers investigated a juvenile party on East Rice Lake Street. As part of a zero-tolerance approach to juvenile offenders and contributing to the delinquency of a minor, Owatonna officers issued five citations for underage consumption of alcohol. The host was charged with the Social Host ordinance violaOWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISION PATROL DISTRICTS The Owatonna Police Department divides the city into three patrol districts: the north district, the south district and the west-central district; each with their unique set of issues, concerns, and traffic patterns. Officers, under the direction of their Team Leaders, are assigned to a specific district for not only patrol duties and calls for service, but to also establish partnerships with members of the community.

All officers assigned to the individual districts are responsible for “Action Requests� from citizens who call in specific concerns, crime issues, or traffic problems in their neighborhoods. This affords the community the opportunity to acquaint themselves with the officers as well as a vehicle for information sharing between the community and law enforcement. Specific to traffic initiatives based on citizen concerns from each district, is the use of the speed trailer which monitors and records speeds of passing motorists. This important data is then passed on to citizens as a follow-up to their concerns. It is important for the officers to maintain district integrity as they respond to emergency calls and concerns from citizens.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISION Canine Officer 2012 was a long year for the canine unit. Bullet has begun to show his age. Bullet still participated in the yearly Patrol Dog 1 certification trial, however he was held out of the agility portion on the trial. Bullet still tallied a few felony arrests to his credit. One in particular was a suspected gang member with a serious felony warrant that was hiding in a friend’s duplex. Officers had surrounded the house. The suspect had climbed out a second floor window and was going to jump off the roof and flee. As he got to the edge of the roof, he realized that there was a K9 on scene and retreated back into the house. The subject refused to come to the door. Officer Fandel gave the subject several warnings to surrender or the dog would be sent in to apprehend him. The subject finally complied after threat of Bullet being released into the house. Bullet also had several assists outside of Owatonna. Bullet assisted Freeborn County with a track of a fleeing felon. Bullet tracked him to the shoulder of I-35 where the track was subsequently lost. Bullet also assisted Albert Lea PD with a sniff of their Alternative Learning Center as well as several narcotics sniffs at Owatonna High School and Owatonna Junior High School. 2012 marked a transition period for the canine unit as we began seeking donations from the public in anticipation of Bullet’s retirement, which will occur in early 2013. Preparations are being made to replace Officer Fandel and K9 Bullet. Officer Fox was selected as the department’s new K9 handler. Officer Fox will receive a new German Shepherd dog and both are slated to attend K9 school in St. Paul, MN in early 2013.

Police Chaplain Program The Police Chaplain program was established in May to enhance police services in the community by providing non-denomination spiritual care and compassion to individuals in need; including, first responders involved in a critical incident and/or during a time of crisis in one’s life. Pictured are the chaplains following their first orientation and training session with Captain Mundale to help prepare them for field service call-outs. The training also provided the chaplains with knowledge and an understanding of a police officer’s role during a critical incident response and how the two services will work together. On October 15-17, Chaplains Olson, Carlson and Koeberl attended the International Conference of Police Chaplain’s in Duluth, MN. The chaplains donated 218 volunteer hours to the program this year. The Chaplains achieve these hours by participating in ride-alongs with the patrol division and for emergency call-outs. Your police department chaplains are Reverend Loren Olson, Reverend Mark Rosenau, Reverend Brent Carlson, Reverend Ron Wilson, Pastor Gena Koeberl and Parish Nurse Nancy Deetz. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISION TRAINING Field Training Officers The field training and evaluation process of any police department is a critical component of any successful police department. Unfortunately, every candidate that wishes to become a police officer is not always the right fit for their chosen career or the department and population they wish to serve. The field training process ensures that the employer has sufficient opportunity to directly observe and certify that a newly hired officer has the essential job-related knowledge and skills to be an effective solo police officer for the department and community in which they will serve. Sergeant Kniefel and Sergeant DuChene coordinate and supervise the Field Training Unit of the department. New officers are put through an extensive five-phase field training and evaluation period, in which they are evaluated on a daily basis in ten areas of core competency. The first four phases of training for a new officer involves an intense sixteen week minimum training period in which the new officer is assigned to a field training officer. Each newly hired officer spends time working at least one training phase during a day, evening and night shift. Each phase involves direction and coaching from a different field training officer. Included during this period is the fourth phase of training in which the field training officer rides along in plain clothes and acts as an observer to the probationary officer. Upon successful completion of the fourth phase of field training, new officers are certified for solo patrol duties and placed into the fifth phase of training as probationary officers through their first year of employment. In 2012, the FTO program was met with significant challenges due to an unprecedented number of officers that chose to end their employment with the Owatonna Police Department for other employment opportunities. This significantly challenged the Field Training Unit with up to five new officers in the field training program at the same time. Sergeant DuChene was assigned as the new Field Training Coordinator in October of 2012. Officers John Bata and Anthony Heaser both became certified Field Training Officers and part of the Owatonna Police Departments Field Training Unit in October of 2012. Eight police officer candidates were placed in field training this year. The teams of dedicated Field Training Officers are committed to the training, development and success of the new police officer candidates, as well as promoting the department’s mission as a whole. Upon successful completion of the field training program, the police officer candidates are certified for solo patrol duties. Owatonna Police Department’s FTOs are Jason Matejcek, Joe Swenson, Kyle Parr, John Bata, and Anthony Heaser. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISION TRAINING

Firearms Training The Owatonna Police Department’s firearms training unit is authorized to have four firearms instructors. These instructors are a portion of the agency’s Use of Force Training Unit. The four certified firearms instructors each have specialized duties within the unit and all serve as armorers for the departments’ weapons. For a portion of 2012, the firearms unit operated with only three instructors. Mid-year, Officer Bata was appointed as the department’s fourth firearms instructor. He attended a firearms instructor course that certified him as an instructor of handgun, shotgun and patrol rifle. Instructors also attended certified armorers courses for Glock and the AR15/M16 weapons platforms. As it stands, Sgt. Sorensen and Officer Fandel are primary instructors for handgun and shotgun. Sgt. Petterson and Officer Bata focus their instruction to the patrol rifle and handgun. Together, the instructors of the Firearms Training Unit work together to train, test and evaluate the licensed peace officers of this agency under the mandated training requirements set forth by the Peace Officer Standards & Training (P.O.S.T.) Board. In 2012, the firearms instructors conducted three mandatory training events. The firearms courses this year consisted of a Winter Cold Weather Training, a Spring Annual Qualification and Evaluation Course, and the Fall Low Light/Night Training Course. Each event is outlined by specific guidelines, training goals and objectives. The agency conducted its Cold Weather Training and Annual Qualification and Evaluation with the use of live ammunition fire. Scenario based training (force on force) was the focus of the Low Light/Night Training Course. This type of training utilizes simunition rounds and actors in predetermined scenarios. All of the trainings were held at the 20 Rifle and Pistol Club, with a paid membership. Generally, each officer received about 8.5 hours of firearms training throughout 2012. This does not include the officer’s personal time training off-duty. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVISION TRAINING Defensive Tactics Instructors Sergeant Sorensen, Officer Seifert, and Officer Oeltjenbruns are the defensive tactics instructors for the Owatonna Police Department. Sergeant Sorensen has been instructing use of force for seven years, Officer Seifert for three years, and Officer Oeltjenbruns was added this past year. These instructors have received specialized training in defensive tactics and follow the Pressure Point Control Techniques (PPCT) training curriculum. The S.P.E.A.R. (Spontaneous Protection Enabling Accelerated Response) system was taught for a second year in a row that focuses on the principle of startle response. This year, the instructors dedicated three full days of training to provide a minimum of eight (8) hours of continuing education to all sworn officers of the Owatonna Police Department. Training was conducted at the Community Center and the National Guard Armory. The instructors not only teach the tactics but help officers understand the physiological effects of the body and how that can affect an officer’s reaction or physical response. Defensive tactics instructors also utilized scenario based training strategies to assist with training officers using Redman suits. This form of stress inoculation training allows the officers to practice delivery and placement of strikes, kicks, stuns, and take down techniques that normally cannot be practiced in firearm scenario based training due to the greater probability of injury. In addition, the participants can experience the human factors associated with use of force engagements, such as: increased heart rate, fatigue, exhaustion and how their body performs at different levels of deterioration. Because the TASER is recognized as a valuable tool to obtain subject compliance, to effect the arrest and/or to control non-compliant, potentially dangerous, aggressive, or assaultive subject(s) while minimizing injury to the officer/subject, the agency has outfitted each sworn officer an X26 TASER. Officer Seifert and Oeltjenbruns are both TASER instructors and take care of the maintenance and downloading of data when these units are deployed.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


PATROL DIVSION REMODEL In 2012, forfeiture funds and in-kind services from city employees were used to remodel the main floor of the Law Enforcement Center creating a new work area for patrol sergeants and patrol officers. The construction portion of the project was primarily funded by in-kind city services and we extend a big “Thank You� out to our fellow city workers, who without, would have made this project impossible. Those involved in making this project happen include: the city administrator and finance director, the facility and grounds superintendent, city carpenters, city electrician, city plumber and the street department employees who assisted with the demolition.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU Criminal Investigations The Detective Bureau serves in a support capacity of the Owatonna Police Department by concentrating on the investigation of criminal matters that have previously been reported to the Patrol Division. A detective will take a proactive approach when the need arises, by gathering intelligence, conducting human and electronic surveillance, and installing portable alarms. The major components of investigations are case screening, follow-up investigations, and gathering criminal intelligence. In 2012, the Detective Bureau was comprised of a captain, a detective sergeant, two corporal detectives, three detectives, and an administrative assistant. The captain oversees the overall operation of the bureau while the detective sergeant oversees the bureau’s daily operations and workflow. The detective sergeant assigned to the bureau also currently serves as the commander of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU). In addition to these responsibilities, the detective sergeant oversees the Predatory Offender Program and acts as a liaison to the Steele County Attorney’s Office and Steele County Human Services. Two detectives are assigned to the Owatonna Public Schools during the school year, serving as school resource officers. Detectives receive specialized training in the areas of interview and interrogation, crime and death scene investigations, and writing search warrants. The Detective Bureau administrative assistant serves as the property and evidence technician for the department and also serves as the administrative coordinator for the SCDIU. The types of cases referred to the Detective Bureau are broken into two separate classifications, crimes against persons and property crimes. Crimes against persons involve criminal sexual assault, child/adult protection, assaults, arson, robbery, and homicide. Property crimes include: theft, burglary, fraud/forgery, financial, and computer crime. In addition, detectives conduct alcohol and tobacco compliance checks twice a year on Owatonna retailers that sell alcohol and/or tobacco products, twice yearly coordinate predatory offender verifications, conduct pre-employment background investigations, oversee the Retailer’s Protection Agency (RPA) program, and gather gang and criminal intelligence. The Detective Bureau is currently staffed by Captain Rethemeier, Detective Sergeant Hassing, Detective Corporals Munns and Edel and Detectives Drenth, Hunt and Flynn. During the school year, Detective Hunt and Detective Flynn are assigned to Owatonna Junior High School and the Owatonna High School.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU

*CAC refers to a formal complaint sent to the county attorney’s office.

Crimes Against Persons Detectives work cases classified as Crimes Against Persons. These investigations include Criminal Sexual Conduct, Predatory Offenders, Children in need of Protective Services (CHIPS), Adult Protection, Arson, Robberies, and Homicides. Within this subdivision, detectives work collaboratively with numerous resources throughout the state.

Property Crimes Detectives are also trained to investigate Property Crimes. These investigations include crimes such as burglaries, t heft s, fra ud , forgeries, computer crimes, the Worthless Check Diversion Program, as well as alcohol and tobacco compliance checks.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU School Resource Officers With over 5000 students enrolled in the Owatonna Public School District, the school resource officers are assigned to help maintain a safe, secure, and uninterrupted learning environment for the students, staff, and parents in the district. The officers, one assigned to the senior high school and the other assigned to the junior high and elementary schools, serve as a resource to prevent crime in the school as well as investigate incidents that occur on school property. The officers also serve as an education resource by bringing their experience and expertise as guest instructors in certain facets of educational curriculum. During the school year, Detective Joel Hunt is assigned to the Owatonna Junior High School/elementary schools and Detective Terrence Flynn is assigned to the Owatonna High School.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU 2012 Detective Bureau Highlights January 2012: Owatonna detectives followed up on a case involving the discharge of a firearm within city limits. Upon interviewing witnesses and the suspect, detectives learned that the two squirrels had been killed with the firearm. Detectives requested charges of discharging a firearm within city limits, wanton waste, and taking small game without a license. (OW12-000073) February 2012: An Owatonna woman was charged with theft after admitting to stealing food from her employer. Cash Wise notified the OPD of an employee theft and provided surveillance video as well as written reports detailing the incidents. The employee admitted to the theft and was terminated from employment. A detective interviewed the suspect and requested theft charges through the Steele County Attorney’s Office. (OW12-000471) March 2012: A nine month long investigation culminated in the execution of five search warrants in Owatonna and the arrests of thirty-two individuals involved in the sale of illegal drugs. OPD detectives worked with South Central Drug Iinvestigation Unit (SCDIU) Agents and the SCDIU Tactical Team to execute the warrants and make the arrests. (OW12-000569) April 2012: A fifteen year old girl reported being sexually assaulted at a party she attended approximately one month earlier. Detectives learned the victim was with several friends who were drinking and smoking marijuana when she was lured into a bedroom and sexually assaulted. The victim was scared to report the incident, but eventually told her mother, who brought her to the police department to file a report. The case was sent to the Steele County Attorney’s Office for review of criminal sexual conduct charges. (OW12-000833) May 2012: A string of burglaries led detectives to a trio of suspects. After several interviews and viewing of surveillance video, detectives were unable to find enough evidence to request charges on the suspects. The businesses involved sustained minor damage. (OW12001138, OW12-001139, OW12-001140) June 2012: An officer with the Minneapolis PD notified OPD detectives that a Level II Predatory Offender Registrant living in Owatonna was distributing what was believed to be child pornography. Detectives assisted the Minneapolis PD officer with the execution of a search warrant at the suspect’s home. Formal complaint charges were requested through the Steele County Attorney’s office for possession of child pornography. (OW12001371) OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU 2012 Detective Bureau Highlights July 2012: Four juveniles were charged with theft, tampering with a motor vehicle, aid and abet, and curfew violations after detectives discovered they were responsible for a string of thefts that had been occurring over the past several weeks. The Patrol Division and Detective Bureau worked closely on these cases and were able to apprehend the suspects and locate several items of stolen property. (OW12-001564) August 2012: Patrol officers responded to a call for assistance from Target loss prevention employees. When officers arrived, the suspect had fled, but the Target employees recognized her from other thefts and were able to provide her name and the type of vehicle she was driving. Detectives followed up on information provided by Target loss prevention and found that the suspect had stolen over $2,900.00 worth the merchandise. She was formally charged with felony theft. (0W12-002099) September 2012: After responding to two separate fire calls near Morehouse Park, the fire department advised OPD that the fires were arson. Detectives were able to pull up surveillance video of the skate park and identify the individuals responsible for starting one of the fires. A juvenile was cited for fifth degree arson. (OW12-002424) October 2012: Working with officers from the Financial Crimes Task Force, detectives were able to locate two suspects involved in credit card fraud at Cabelas and Kohls. The suspects were part of a larger ring of criminals committing financial card fraud across the country. Two suspects were charged locally through the Steele County Attorney’s Office. It was determined their fraud resulted in the loss of over $14,000.00 to local stores. (OW12-002568) November 2012: A night of drinking and partying led to obscene photos being placed on Facebook. When the victim called police, she stated she had asked for the photo to be removed, but the suspect refused to remove the photo. When detectives spoke with the suspect, he stated he had been drinking and partying when he posted the photo and thought it would be funny, but removed the photo once he was sober and realized how inappropriate it was. (OW12-003054) December 2012: Detectives followed up with the victims of an assault and a domestic assault and learned that the suspect and victims had been drinking and playing truth or dare before the assault. Upon further interviews, detectives discovered that the suspect was not provoked but attacked the victims when they tried to leave. The suspect was charged with gross misdemeanor domestic assault, OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU SCDIU

The Owatonna Police Department continued the leadership role as Fiscal Agents of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) in 2012. This leadership role includes the assignment of a police sergeant as commander as well as an administrative assistant. We also continued to co-fund a field agent position in conjunction with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office. The SCDIU is a federally funded narcotics task force formed in cooperation with member agencies of four counties, encompassing a jurisdictional area of approximately 2,500 square miles. Staffed by four specially trained field agents, the task force concentrates their efforts on narcotics distribution and narcotics related investigations. Agents also assist member agencies with criminal investigations that have a correlation with illegal drugs.

The SCDIU has developed strong partnerships with adjoining task forces, the Minnesota BCA (Bureau of Criminal Apprehension), FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation), DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency), and ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), investigating cases that stretch beyond our boundaries that have a direct impact on the flow of illegal drugs into our area. The agents also focus on public education, especially the young people of our communities, by conducting presentations at schools, churches, civic organizations, and in the work place. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU SCDIU TACTICAL TEAM The primary goal of the tactical team is safety and preservation of all human life. The tactical team is a law enforcement support unit, which is specifically trained and equipped to resolve critical high-risk situations. Containment of suspects and negotiation procedures are the team’s first responsibilities. The team members are selected from law enforcement agencies within Faribault, Freeborn, Steele, and Waseca counties. Each agency is responsible for equipping the assigned officer. In 2012, the Owatonna Police Department had four officers and one sergeant assigned to the tactical team.

The SCDIU Tactical Team is overseen by the SCDIU board. This board consists of chief law enforcement officers from each of the represented agencies. The commander and assistant team commander report to the board monthly. Team members train 16 hours per month. Training topics include hostage rescue, warrant service, firearms qualifications, tactical first aid, physical fitness, defensive tactics, and various other topics. In addition, the SCDIU Tactical Team has also trained jointly with the Bloomington Bomb Squad, the Federal Correctional Institution in Waseca, the Minnesota Correctional Facility in Faribault, the Minnesota State Patrol Tactical Team, Austin PD/ Mower County Tactical Team, Rice County Tactical Team. Each year, team members also attend the Special Operations Tactical Association Conference. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU POR COMPLIANCE The Owatonna Police Department recognizes that predatory offenders pose a significant risk to a community. Keeping the public safe is our priority and it is our belief that a collaborative approach, including taking precautionary measures and encouraging community reporting practices, will ensure that predatory offender registration continues to be largely successful. It has been well documented that roughly 80% of predatory offenders are known by their victims; therefore, it is imperative that law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and human services work together in keeping our community informed and educated. Registering as a predatory offender is a collateral consequence of criminal behavior and it acts as one of the many deterrent factors as to whether someone will re-offend. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) maintains a registry of predatory offenders residing within the state. Those registered have been convicted of a violent felony or sexually related crime and classified in the registry based on their likelihood to reoffend. A risk assessment is conducted on each person registered prior to release from confinement. An offender’s risk assessment dictates the level of community notification that is required of law enforcement.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS The Owatonna Police Department, with the assistance of underage operatives, conducts alcohol and tobacco compliance checks with local retailers. Compliance checks provide a proactive effort to keep alcohol and tobacco out of the hands of our youngest community members. The operatives are trained, photographed and equipped with electronic listening devices so officers can monitor the conversations. The department continues to utilize city funds for alcohol and tobacco compliance checks. Tobacco checks were not conducted in 2012. The department conducted one alcohol compliance check in 2012. Forty-one licensed establishments were checked and all were found to be compliant.

Gang Officers The Owatonna Police Department Gang Task Force's (GTF) mission is to reduce the recruitment/ expansion of gangs within Steele County and reduce the amount of gang and drug crime. The task force works with other agencies in the area and attends monthly meetings focusing on gang activity. In addition to their normal patrol duties, Gang Task Force Officers (GTFO's) are responsible for intelligence gathering on any potential gang activity. Intelligence that is gathered by GTFO's is analyzed and disseminated to the appropriate agency. Because gang members often travel from one city to the next, GTFO's work closely and provide information to appropriate local, state, federal, and out of state agencies, to assist in any open-ended investigations. Currently the Owatonna Police Department has 2 officers assigned to the GTF. Officer Cooper has been assigned to the GTF since 2008. Officer Berg was assigned to the unit in 2012. Both officers have an extensive background in criminal gang identification and interdiction. The task force developed and implemented the gang field interview cards for the Owatonna patrol officers. The officers are given the field cards to carry with them while on patrol. The field cards have ten gang qualifiers along with physical descriptions of possible gang members. Officers fill out the gang cards and the gang officers place the information into the department’s database. The gang officers use the department’s database and a national database to track and store current information on gang members which assists in investigations. The gang task force officers also put on presentations to area clubs and associations regarding local gang issues. The presentation included a power point along with numerous articles of gang related items that had been confiscated from students that attend the local high school. With the implementation of cameras and the Quick $50 Program (2007), the city of Owatonna has seen a reduction in vandalism and graffiti. Gang officers attempt to get graffiti cleaned up within twenty-fours after it has been reported. Officers, along with community volunteers, will paint over fresh graffiti with the property owner’s permission.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU DETECTIVE BUREAU SUPPORT

Crime Scene Technicians The Crime Scene Unit is called upon to assist the Patrol and Investigative Divisions for the purpose of evidence identification, collection, and preservation. The unit is comprised Officers Swenson, Bata and Heaser from the Patrol Division along with Detectives Flynn, Hunt, Munns, and Evidence Specialist Kimberly Dub from the Detective Bureau. Crime Scene Technicians are trained in areas of crime scene photography, latent print development and recovery, biological and trace evidence recovery, and tool mark and footwear impression recovery. The newest piece of technology being utilized by the Crime Scene Unit is a Cyanoacylate Fuming Chamber. The fuming chamber assists the technicians in the development and preservation of latent impressions left by, fingers and hands. Members strive to obtain the most up to date training and equipment in crime scene processing.

Property and Evidence The Property and Evidence Technician is tasked with maintaining the chain of custody for all evidentiary items submitted to the Property Room. Documenting the intake, storage, security, release and disposal of all items is the primary focus of property room personnel. The Owatonna Police Department continues to utilize a program called Evidence Tracker to electronically track all items in the property room.

Vehicle Forfeitures Minnesota statutes contain a provision where an offender’s vehicle may be forfeited when the offender has used the vehicle in a driving while intoxicated incident if certain conditions related to offender’s prior drinking and driving record exist. Along with DWI vehicle forfeitures the Owatonna Police Department has seized vehicles associated with criminal crimes and arrests. The intention of vehicle forfeitures is that public safety is served by forfeiting vehicles used in a commission of a crime and to reduce recidivism. In 2012, a total of twenty-five (25) vehicles were subject to forfeiture. Of these vehicles seven(7) were sold at auction, five (5) were returned to the owner or lien holder, while thirteen (13) vehicles are still in the forfeiture process. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DETECTIVE BUREAU PROPERTY ROOM REMODEL In 2012, forfeiture funds and in-kind services from city employees were used to remodel the 2nd floor of the Law Enforcement Center creating a new property room.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


SUPPORT SERVICES PARKING CONTROL The mission of the Owatonna Police Department Parking Control Division is to create a fair use of available parking within the city by enforcing parking laws. The parking strategy for the City of Owatonna is to maximize the use of all existing parking spaces for downtown customers, businesses, and residents. To accomplish this strategy, parking restrictions are enforced to encourage employees, business owners and residents to use long-term parking spaces located on the fringe of the downtown area, while making available short-term parking spaces located in the center of downtown for shoppers and customers. The objective of the graduated parking fine system is to provide a warning for first time offenders, but penalize the chronic offender for multiple parking violations. It is a continued goal for the Parking Control Division to maintain a vibrant downtown with parking that is user friendly and convenient to customers, business owners, employees and residents. Administrative offenses are intended to provide the public and the city with an informal, cost effective, and expeditious alternative to traditional criminal charges for violations of certain ordinance provisions. The administrative citation procedure is intended to be voluntary by those individuals who have been cited. Any time prior to payment of the administrative penalty, an individual may withdraw from participating in the procedure, in which event, the City may bring criminal charges in accordance with the law. Likewise, prior to the payment of the administrative citation, the City, at it’s discretion, may choose to dismiss the administrative offense and may bring criminal charges in the first instance.

Year

Fines Collected

Administrative Fines Collected

Green Tickets Issued

Odd/Even Tickets Issued

Red Tickets Issued

Administrative Tickets Issued

2012

$46,605

$2,425

959

630

2,149

68

2011

$50,843

$3,475

1,393

894

2,257

69

$48,004

$1,920

1,232

873

2,271

60

$63,844

$1,955

1,195

1,159

2,136

43

2010

2009

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


SUPPORT SERVICES COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS There are currently three part-time Community Service Officers (CSO) working for the Owatonna Police Department. The CSOs support the efforts of the department by providing services to the community while also supporting other divisions within the police department. The CSOs are knowledgeable and flexible in their assignments as they are asked to perform duties from every division within the Owatonna Police Department.

The current climate within police agencies is that they are becoming increasingly constrained because of budgetary concerns and the need to serve a larger or growing community. In this environment, the position of the CSO is considered a blessing for both the departments and communities they serve in. CSOs typically are paid significantly less than a sworn police officer, allowing departments to field more people for the same amount of money. This has the effect of providing quicker response times to citizen requests for police services that are not considered emergencies or a matter of immediate public safety. Further, CSOs usually handle lower priority calls which do not require a licensed police officer with arrest powers thus freeing sworn officers to concentrate on those incidents requiring their specific skill set. Even a few CSOs can have a significant impact on the efficiency and effectiveness of police services that departments provide. CSOs are tasked with multiple duties such as—traffic control at vehicle collisions, public events, traffic signal outages, patrol the city parks and schools, issue parking tickets, community relations including crime prevention and responding to requests for tours and presentations. CSOs may respond to minor calls such as minor accidents, thefts and vandalism. CSOs work closely with the Owatonna Park and Recreation Department by reporting and documenting damage in the city parks and trails as well as assisting with locking park buildings at park closing times. The CSOs also work closely with our department’s fleet vehicles by monitoring mileage, scheduling routine maintenance and vehicle repairs with the public works mechanics. CSOs also patrol the city to enforce ordinance violations, junk vehicle complaints and perform house checks. The community service officer also plays a vital role in the community by providing funeral escorts, assisting with Safety Camp each summer, parade assistance, security for community events, and providing the opportunity for citizens to view squad cars and other police equipment at various community organizations and events. Our CSOs act as the primary animal control officers in the city. As a result, they are typically the responding officers to all animal related calls for service, such as a barking dog, a dog/cat biting incident or a dog/cat at large. The CSOs are responsible for the care of impounded animals being held at the Animal Control Facility and the maintenance of the Animal Control Facility. Lastly, the CSOs will investigate and follow-up with all dog/cat bite complaints to make certain the animal owner is in compliance with the state statutes related to potentially dangerous dogs and dangerous dogs.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


SUPPORT SERVICES ANIMAL CONTROL Animal Control helps to maintain the health and safety of pets and protects city residents from problem domesticated animals.

The Owatonna

Police Department Community Service Officers respond to domestic animal complaints within the

city including barking dogs, animals at large, amongst others.

They also enforce the city

ordinances regarding animals, educate the public on important issues concerning animals, and look after the safety and welfare of pets and their owners. The following services are performed: provide live traps for catching cats, picking up animals captured by citizens, impounding loose dogs and cats, vaccination tag enforcement, investigate cruelty

and barking complaints, and enforce the potentially dangerous and dangerous dog ordinances. In 2012, a total of $2,720.00 in funds was collected from animals claimed at the animal control shelter.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


SUPPORT SERVICES RECORDS AND 911 CENTER Records Division The Records Department is staffed with four full time Steele County employees; Owatonna Police Department contributes 50% of their salary. The Records Department updates all names, locations, arrests, and property-loss reports as well as handles non-emergency calls, background checks, transcription, and other general requests from the public.

Pearl Street 911 Center The 911 Center answers all requests for law enforcement assistance via 9-1-1 and the local police number. The center serves nine law enforcement agencies, ten fire and rescue departments, and five ambulance services within Rice and Steele County.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Safety Camp Steele County Safety Camp occurs for two days each year in June. Children from Steele County who have completed the third grade are invited to spend a few days learning about safety. The camp is held at the Lake Kohlmier boat landing and the Fairgrounds and runs from 7:30 AM to 4:30 PM each day. Along with fun and games, the kids learn about fishing safety, boat/canoe safety, camping/hiking, bike safety, firearms safety, first aid, electrical safety, fire safety, outdoor equipment safety, and much more. Each child receives a camp T-shirt, a certificate of completion and a team picture. The Owatonna Police Department volunteers five officers, a coordinator, and community service officers to help at Safety Camp. Safety Camp is a joint effort with various organizations contributing time, money and talents to ensure our youth learn the skills they need to stay safe.

Guns Versus Hoses As a kick off to Corky’s Early Bird Softball Tournament, the Owatonna Police Department competed in the 2nd annual charitable Guns vs. Hoses softball game against members of the Owatonna Fire Department. The Owatonna Fire Department won the 2011 inaugural game by a score of 16-2. In 2012, led by team captain Brandon Fandel, the police department vowed revenge and began a regimented training program. The training paid off as the department avenged last year’s loss by defeating the fire department comfortably 18-4. OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS COLA

The City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA) was formed to network small and large landlords with the police department and other property managers. We are now in our sixth year as an organization. Sergeant vonWald was the department liaison with the landlords in 2012. She attends monthly COLA board meetings and well as many general membership meetings. In 2012, there were over 50 COLA members. The Owatonna Police Department and COLA continue to participate in the Crime Free MultiHousing Program. Disorderly use violations and the enforcement of the ordinance continued to be a focus in 2012 while addressing issues which were taking place in rental units throughout Owatonna. In 2012, there were a total of 205 disorderly use violations and 42 nuisance violations which were addressed and resolved. The communication and involvement between landlords in addressing these issues helped make the housing units safe for members of the community.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS NIGHT TO UNITE The Owatonna Police Department is proud to participate in the Night to Unite program. Night to Unite 2012 was held across Owatonna on Tuesday, August 7, 2012. Officers from the Owatonna Police Department, along with City Council President Les Abraham and City Administrator Kris Busse teamed up to visit over 40 block parties. In addition, the Owatonna Fire Department, Gold Cross Ambulance, Steele County Sheriff’s Office, and Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) also visited various block parties. This was the 29th annual Minnesota Night to Unite celebration, formerly recognized as National Night Out. Night to Unite, a program of the Minnesota Crime Prevention Association (MCPA), replaced National Night Out, an event sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch. Despite the name change, the first Tuesday of every August will nevertheless continue as an enjoyable night of activities and fun identical to past years, maintaining focus on crime prevention and building a strong, safe community. Minnesota Night to Unite is designed to: (1) heighten crime and drug prevention awareness; (2) generate support for, and participation in, local anticrime efforts; (3) strengthen neighborhood spirit and policecommunity partnerships; and (4) send a message to criminals letting them know neighborhoods are organized and fighting back. The Owatonna Police Department encourages residents to participate in this great celebration of community, crime prevention, and strong police/community partnerships. A strong community makes for a safe community. Everything we do to strengthen the ties among neighbors of all ages, backgrounds and lifestyles makes our present and future that much brighter. Celebrating MINNESOTA NIGHT TO UNITE with the Owatonna Police Department and your neighbors is a positive way to build and nurture our community by starting quite literally, in your own front yard!

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS EXPLORERS The Owatonna Police Department Explorer Post #204 was founded in 1998. In 2012, the program had three active Explorer Advisors: Officer Oeltjenbruns, Officer Schumaker and Community Service Officer Malepsy. The Explorer program is a young adult career education program for young men and women who are 14 and graduates of eighth grade or are 15 through 20 years of age. There were 4 youth participants in 2012. Law Enforcement Exploring is a youth development program centered on law enforcement careers and is a cooperative effort between the Owatonna Police Department and the Boys Scouts of America. The purpose of this program is to provide experiences to help young people mature, and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Explorers are ready to investigate the meaning of interdependence in their personal relationships and communities. The end result of a program of this nature is that the various program activities help youth pursue their special interests, grow and develop. Explorer programs are based on five areas of emphasis: career opportunities, life skills, service learning, character education, and leadership experience. The programs are based on the Learning for Life Mission Statement: “The mission for Learning for Life is to serve others by helping instill core values in young people and in other ways prepare them to make ethical choices throughout their lives so they can achieve their full potential.� Members of the Owatonna Police Department Explorer Post #204 participate in training meetings, which expose them to a wide variety of situations that law enforcement officers experience, and in community events where their assistance is valuable to the police department, all while giving them insight into the many varied duties of the department. Several previous explorer members are now sworn officers, and several more are currently majoring in college law enforcement programs.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


TOWARD ZERO DEATHS The Owatonna Police Department has been involved with the Safe and Sober program since 1998. In 1998, the Owatonna Police Department has joined in a partnership with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office and Blooming Prairie Police Department in applying for Safe and Sober overtime grant monies that allow officers to work specific hours during each of the designated traffic enforcement campaigns. The Towards Zero Deaths (TZD) grant is a partnership of four E’s (Education, Engineering, EMS and Enforcement) groups coming together to lower the number of deaths on Minnesota roads. The TZD goal in 2012 was to have less than 2011’s number of deaths of 375 on Minnesota roads. Unfortunately we did not lower the number of deaths but 2012 ended with a total of 380 traffic deaths. TZD works when the four “Es” continue to work together. How you might ask? The highway engineers work to re-create safer new and old roads. Education works by media campaigns to educate the public and also teaching new and older drivers through driver’s education and defensive driving courses. EMS works to get patients to trauma centers after a crash and law enforcement does their part by enforcing the traffic laws. It also takes drivers to do their part and drive responsibly. The TZD grant period begins October 1 and goes through September 30th the following year. During a grant period, the particular violation focus of traffic enforcement is designated by the Office of Traffic Safety. These campaigns or waves, as they are called, are for alcohol and/or drug impairment, underage consumption, speeding, distracted driving, motorcycles, Move Over Law and seatbelt/child restraint violations. Even though there is a specific focus for enforcement, officers working these overtime shifts still enforce all traffic infractions. The wave’s focus is determined through statistical analysis done by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. During the holiday seasons of Christmas, New Year’s, and Labor Day, the focus is mainly on alcohol and/or drug impairment and underage consumption. Throughout the year, month long initiatives are dedicated to special campaigns that focus on specific types of traffic enforcement. For instance, in May and October, the focus of traffic enforcement is seatbelts and child restraints. The “Buckle Up, Click it or Ticket” campaign is to battle unsecured motorists. Statistical information shows that 75 percent of all fatality crashes occur on two lane state aid highways in greater Minnesota. Unfortunately, seat belt surveys found that drivers in greater Minnesota are less likely to wear their seat belts. Protect yourself and others in your vehicle by everyone buckling up. Officers look for traffic violations and write traffic citations throughout the year. Just remember “Click it or Ticket,” and “You Drink, You Drive, You Lose.” If you break the law you are subject to a ticket and/ or can be arrested.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DATA TREND Owatonna Police Department CRIME

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Homicide

0

0

0

0

0

Rape

7

9

4

10

5

Robbery

1

12

4

3

1

Aggravated Assault

22

18

28

22

19

Burglary

82

119

76

83

74

Theft

509

352

386

402

357

Auto Theft

21

20

20

18

15

Arson

4

0

1

1

4

Total Part I

646

530

519

539

475

Total Part II

916

801

864

904

962

Total

1562

1331

1383

1443

1437

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DATA TREND Part I Crimes

Murder Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Total Part I Part II Crimes Other Assaults Forgery/Counterfeiting Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property Vandalism Weapons Prostitution Other Sex Offenses Narcotics Gambling Family/Children DUI Liquor Laws Disorderly Conduct Other Offenses Total Part II

GRAND TOTAL

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

Crime Rate per 100,000

0 7 1 22 82 509 21 4 646

0 4 1 20 7 209 6 2 249

0 57 100 90 8 41 28 50 38

0 27 3 87 325 2019 83 15 2562

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

Crime Rate per 100,000

139 19 52 1 2 206 6 1 30 132 0 11 158 29 35 95 916

119 8 15 1 2 39 6 1 13 116 0 7 129 29 32 75 592

85 42 28 100 100 18 100 100 43 87 0 63 81 100 91 78 64

551 75 206 3 7 817 23 3 119 523 0 43 626 115 138 376 3633

1562

841

54

6195

*Statistics furnished from the 2012 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DATA TREND OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ARREST DATA

Total Part I Arrests

241

Total Part II Arrests

654

Total Arrests

895

*Statistics furnished from the 2012 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


DATA TREND

*Statistics furnished from the 2012 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This document and all its contents are the property of the Owatonna Police Department. Reproduction or distribution of this document in whole or in part is permitted subject to appropriate source citation and the express prior written consent of the Chief of Police of the Owatonna Police Department. This document is also available in PDF format on our website at www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police. Please visit our site for additional information about our organization.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2012 ANNUAL REPORT

Profile for Owatonna Police Department

Owatonna Police Department 2012 Annual Report  

Owatonna Police Department 2012 Annual Report