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Owatonna Police Department


TABLE OF CONTENTS Chief’s Message…………………………………………………………………………………………………….1 Mission ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..2 Organizational Chart………………………………………………………………………………………………3 Personnel Changes…………………………………………………………………………………………………4 Budget………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5 Administrative Division……………………………………………………………………………………………7 Professional Standards……………………………………………………………………………………..8 Patrol Division…………………………………………………………………………………………………….10 Patrol……………………………………………………………………………………………………...10 Patrol Sergeants…………………………………………………………………………………10 Patrol Officers…………………………………………………………………………………..11 Canine Officer…………………………………………………………………………………..11 Patrol Districts…………………………………………………………………………………………....12 Traffic Summary………………………………………………………………………………………….13 Trainng…………………………………………………………………………………………………...14 Field Training Officers………………………………………………………………………….14 Firearms Instructors…………………………………………………………………………….15 Defensive Tactics Instructors…………………………………………………………………...17 Investigations Division…………………………………………………………………………………………....18 Criminal Investigations…………………………………………………………………………………...18 Crimes Against Persons………………………………………………………………………...19 Property Crimes…………………………………………………………………………...……19 School Resource Officers………………………………………………………………………19 South Central Drug Investigation Unit…………………………………………………………………..20 SCDIU Tactical Team……………………………………………………………………………………21 Compliance Initiatives……………………………………………………………………………………22 Predatory Offender Registry……………………………………………………………………22 Alcohol and Tobacco Compliance……………………………………………………………...23 Gang Officer…………………………………………………………………………………….23 Investigations Support……………………………………………………………………………………24 Property and Evidence………………………………………………………………………….24 Crime Scene Technicians……………………………………………………………………….24 Support Services…………………………………………………………………………………………………..25 Parking Control…………………………………………………………………………………………...25 Community Service Officers……………………………………………………………………………..26 Animal Control…………………………………………………………………………………………...27 Records/Pearl Street 911 Center…..……………………………………………………………………...28 Community Programs …...………………………………………………………………………………………29 Safe and Sober Grants…………………………………………………………………………………………....34 Data Trend………………………………………………………………………………………………………...35 Acknowledgements.....…….……………………………………………………………………………………...41


CHIEF’S MESSAGE Mayor, City Council Members, City Administration and Citizens of Owatonna: Progress and Performance: As Chief of Police, it is my privilege to present the 2009 Annual Report of the Owatonna Police Department. It has been a successful year in which we can tout both “Progress and Performance.” The accomplishments outlined throughout this report are consummate examples of leadership in public service. No successful organization will ever endure without the sustained effort of great people who are focused on achieving superior results, knowing and accepting the fact that the only thing constant is change. We know that we cannot approach the many challenges facing our community alone and need your support, participation and ideas to develop the unique level of service our citizens and visitors deserve. I hope that you will take some time to review this report and learn about the Owatonna Police Department and the services that we continue to provide. You will find that our officers and support staff are dedicated, enthusiastic, well-trained and well-equipped group of women and men who are committed to providing the best law enforcement services possible – making this community a great place to live, work and play. Our pursuit to model policing excellence requires strong core values, a sense of urgency, a commitment to Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving and an invitation to accountability and transparency. We are intensely focused on transition as we continue to address many organizational change initiatives for our future success. To accomplish our mission, we will continue to embrace community-based, problem-oriented, data driven policing strategies that emphasize area integrity, geographical accountability, the use of problem-solving techniques, and a reliance on data to identify threats, measure the results of our interventions, and to hold ourselves accountable; to each other and to our community. As an organization, the Owatonna Police Department commits to working continually to earn the confidence of the citizens of and visitors to Owatonna. A confidence that will not be taken for granted. The department fulfills this commitment by providing the best and most professional services possible; by striving to build a culture of trust and open and honest dialogue, with the community it serves and among the people it employs. The organization commits to creating and sustaining a positive working environment in which all employees have equal opportunity to fulfill their potential within the profession. As such, each employee commits to always putting the interest of the public and the department’s vision and mission before any personal and private interest and to demonstrate pride in his/her profession and the Owatonna Police Department through personal conduct that reflects a belief in the department’s values and ethics. By any measure, we as an organization have achieved many outstanding results. Every one of us strives to provide an unmatched level of service. It is our daily challenge to provide a level of service that consistently meets our community’s needs. The future ahead will bring many new challenges and I am confident that the Owatonna Police Department is ready, as we pursue excellence in this vital public service role. We are reminded daily that we live in challenging times. We are accepting the challenge – again! It has been a great pleasure to serve as your police chief and in doing so, present this report as a reflection of the past year’s positive impact on our growing community. I also invite you to visit our website at www. ci.owatonna.mn.us/owatonna-police for more information on crime and safety in our city. Shaun E. LaDue, Chief of Police


Owatonna Police Department Vision The Owatonna Police Department is dedicated to attaining the highest level of professionalism and accountability in its service to the citizens of Owatonna. Recognizing that our strength stems from our partnership with all sectors of the community, we envision an organization structured to meet the ever changing needs of our citizens and our professions.

EXCELLENCE

Mission All Members of the Owatonna Police Department are dedicated to providing a safe and secure community through partnerships, leadership, and an unwavering commitment to excellence. Policing excellence through our People, our Work, and our Relationships.

Core Values

INTEGRITY

The following principles guide our organizations pride, attitude, conduct, and expected behavior: HONESTY: Being truthful and open in our interactions with each other and the citizens we serve. INTEGRITY: Being above reproach, ethical and doing what is right. TRUST: Being honorable and maintaining a high level of trust with each other and the members of our community. RESPECT: Valuing each other and our citizens by showing understanding and appreciation of our similarities and differences. ACCOUNTABILITY: Being conscientious, professional, dependable, and accountable for our actions by the citizens we serve. COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE: Adhering to strict standards of conduct and performance in everything we do. POSITIVE ATTITUDE: We strive to bring positive and constructive influences to our dealings with each other and our community. TEAMWORK: We work within the Department and with members of our community to achieve our goals, making use of diverse skills, abilities, roles, and view. EXCELLENCE: We are compelled to be leaders and always do our best. WE strive to be known for taking the extra step, going the extra mile, leaving no stone unturned in our work. This calls for people with an enduring commitment and dedication to the mission. It requires us to have a commitment to service before self.

INNOVATION


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART


PERSONNEL CHANGES Promotions Sergeant Jason Petterson Sergeant Andy DeVinny

New Hires Officer Joe Swenson Officer Scott Kirchner Officer J. Laddie Bata Officer Michael Schneider Community Service Officer Ryan Pankratz

Resignations Captain Charles Walerius Officer Jason Weber Officer Stephanie Fogel Community Service Officer Allen Rose AUTHORIZED STRENGTH YEAR

CHIEF

CAPTAIN

SERGEANT

CORPORAL

OFFICER

TOTAL

2004

1/1

2/2

5/5

4/4

**19/**18

31/30

2005

1/1

2/1

5/7

4/4

**19/**16

31/29

2006

1/1

1/1

7/7

4/5

***22/***19

35/33

2007

1/1

2/2

7/7

5/5

**20/*19

35/34

2008

1/1

2/2

7/7

4/3

21/22

35/35

2009

1/1

2/2

7/6

4/3

21/21

35/33

2010

1/1

1/1

8/8

4/3

***21/***21

36/36 3 part time

Literal: 1/1 = Authorized Number of Personnel/Positions Filled *Total includes one part time officer **Total includes 2 part time officers ***Total includes 3 part time officers


BUDGET The annual base budget and capital budget for the police department is established by the Police Chief and staff within the department. The adopted fiscal year budget for 2009 was approved at $4,078,825.00 of which $3,320,281.00 or 81% of total budget was allocated to personnel costs. In addition, $634,544.00 or 16% was allocated to supplies and services and $124,000.00 or 3% was allocated to capital items consisting of replacement squad cars, patrol, canine and investigative equipment and technology updates such as computer upgrades and replacements as well as public safety radio upgrades and replacements. In essence, the department has consistently exceeded all budgetary demands and has in all instances proven fiscally responsible.

2009 Expenditures Personnel $3,320,281.00

Supplies & Other Services $634,544.00

Capital Outlay $124,000.00


BUDGET FIVE YEAR REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE SUMMARY BUDGET 2005

BUDGET 2006

BUDGET 2007

BUDGET 2008

BUDGET 2009

REVENUES INTERGOVERNMENTAL

266,452

291,620

284,457

289,504

367,729

FINES & FORFEITURES

198,500

215,000

215,000

253,267

253,800

11,500

92,000

12,000

0

0

476,452

598,620

511,457

542,771

621,529

2,429,527

2,873,633

3,202,702

3,286,901

3,320,281

363,625

500,498

564,570

626,306

634,544

27,000

209,000

147,500

88,000

124,000

2,820,152

3,583,131

3,914,772

4,001,207

4,078,825

OTHER

TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES PERSONNEL SUPPLIES & OTHER SERVICES CAPITAL OUTLAY

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Dividing Up Your 2009 Tax Dollar (Based on $150,000.00 home)


ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION The Administration Division is responsible for the day-to-day administration of providing law enforcement services to the citizens of Owatonna. The Chief of Police is responsible for a budget of approximately $4.0 million and the department’s 41 employees. The Chief of Police reports directly to the City Administrator. The Administrative Division is comprised of the Chief of Police, the Operations Commander, and an Administrative Assistant. Each of the division commanders oversees their respective areas of responsibility. The administrative assistant is charged with processing payroll, accounts receivables and payables, coordinating and managing all training records, facilitating hiring processes and practices, and coordinates all department policy review and updates housed on the Departments intranet through the Policy Committee. Under the leadership of Police Chief Shaun E. LaDue, the Owatonna Police Department continues to guide the delivery of efficient and effective service to the community through high standards of service delivery and professionalism. This guidance ensures victims of crime and those experiencing personal emergencies are treated with compassion. It also seeks the cooperation with the community through the development and implementation of local partnerships in solving local problems, through efficient and effective utilization of resources, environmental scanning and an intelligence-led problem-solving approach. The Department will continue to work towards achieving best practices and embrace management principles that ensure staff have the appropriate authority, accountability, tools, education, training and development to deliver professional services. In addition, The Owatonna Police Department promotes a safe and healthy working environment, engenders the principles of equity and diversity, and develops progressive career path opportunities that balance the needs of individuals and the organization. The Administration provides leadership, supervision and review, and updates and evaluates departmental practices and procedures utilizing change-management strategies.


ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS The primary responsibility of the Professional Standards is to ensure the integrity of the Owatonna Police Department. Professional Standards also monitors the relationship between the community and the Department and strives to create mutual trust. It serves as a method of internal accountability by receiving, processing and investigating complaints concerning police conduct. These complaints may allege violations of criminal law, department policy or officer performance and may originate from outside sources or from within the department. The goal of Professional Standards is to ensure the integrity of the Owatonna Police Department is maintained through an internal system in which objectivity, fairness and justice is guaranteed by an impartial investigation and review of complaints made against any of our employees, policies or procedures. Professional Standards have been established to ensure police always act with professionalism and integrity in everything they do. In the circumstance a complaint against officers is received, an internal affairs investigation is initiated to determine whether act of misconduct occurred and whether disciplinary action is necessary. If criminal wrongdoing is alleged, the Owatonna Police Department often requests an outside agency complete the criminal investigation. In 2009, there were no allegations of criminal activity brought against an officer with the Owatonna Police Department. In 2009, there were 32 internal investigatory actions taken which resulted in six disciplinary actions. Of the 32 internal investigations, 12 of the investigations were the result of an external complaint from outside of the organization. The remaining investigations were the result of an internal complaint from within the organization. Discipline actions can include verbal and written warnings, suspensions, demotions and terminations. Of the remaining investigatory actions, one matter was unfounded and in five instances, the police officers actions or conduct was exonerated. An exonerated finding reveals the alleged act did occur, but was justified, legal and proper. The 20 remaining actions were classified as Performance Matters. Performance Matters are not classified as discipline as they generally result from a minor policy infraction and are likely to be resolved by training and counseling if there is no known pattern of similar conduct with the employee and there is no evidence of bad faith or intent to do wrong.


ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS


PATROL DIVISION The Patrol Division of the Owatonna Police Department is comprised of 28 people, and is currently overseen by the Operations Commander. The Operations Commander supervises seven Patrol Sergeants who in turn supervise 21 Patrol Officers. The Patrol Division is supported by anywhere from one to five Community Service Officers (CSO’s) who supplement the police officers, supervisors and administrative staff by providing a variety of services that provides support in community policing efforts. The division also has canine program that aids in detecting illegal narcotics, evidence recovery and tracking and searching for individuals. The Patrol Division is comprised of three separate policing districts, the north district, the south district and the west-central district, in which specific officers are assigned to each. Of the officers assigned to a policing district, one officer is designated as the “Team Leader”. The team leader coordinates all Action Requests from citizens who have special requests such as extras patrol and other enforcement efforts aimed at increasing individual involvement by the officers. In many instances, the team leader also serves as the liaison to the complainant of policing concern that directly affects their particular of the city. The purpose of the policing districts is to increase the role of each officer in the community policing, strategic enforcement and community partnerships. New technology was added to the department in 2009 to further increase the department’s efficiency and effectiveness. Those advances include a field based reporting system that not only speeds up the writing of police reports, but also improves communication with judicial system. The field based reporting system, referred to as CJIIN (Criminal Justice Information Integration Network), was implemented to the department through a unique partnership with Dakota County. The department also added eTicketing to the squad cars this past year. eTicketing simplifies and shortens a traffic stops duration by creating a citation with the swipe of a driver’s license. eTicketing also allows the citation to be exported into the court system electronically rather than manually as has been done in the past: yet another means to allow the officers and the criminal justice system to work more efficiently. In addition, in-car digital video recorders have been added to the marked patrol fleet. The in-car digital video recorders can help officers by creating a digital recording of an event to help with the prosecution of case. The system can also aid the officers in the event any allegations may be made regarding their conduct.

Patrol Sergeants The Owatonna Police Department has six (7) patrol sergeants, who along with day to day supervisory duties of patrol officers also coordinate efforts of the Team Leaders in each district as well. Each sergeant is also assigned an area of specialization that they not only coordinate, but also are responsible for duties as assigned. These assignments include, City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA),


PATROL DIVISION Firearms and Defensive Tactics training, Field Training Program, Safe & Sober Traffic Initiatives, state grant programs, crime prevention, department wide traffic initiatives, scheduling, first aid/AED and medical supplies, equipment and supplies, canine program, and other initiatives as directed by the Chief or the Operations Commander. However, the primary responsibility of a police sergeant is to supervise officers assigned to their specific shift and to hold the officer accountable for their day to day functions, activities, and duties as well as provide evaluations and opportunities for professional development. They are also tasked with conducting the roll-call briefings on a daily basis. The sergeants all report directly to the Operations Commander.

Patrol Officers Patrol officers provide basic 24-hour police services to the community, and are assigned to one of the three patrol districts within the city. Each officer works to maintain public safety through directed enforcement, education, and prevention initiatives to each of their respective districts. Within their assigned district, each officer is tasked with becoming familiar with crime issues and trends, and to work side by side with area residents to improve the quality of life in each neighborhood. The officers, on a rotating basis, also each serve a term as the “Team Leader” for each district. It is the duty of each Team Leader to keep a pulse on the activities within their assigned district. They also perform various duties including: responding to emergency and non-emergency calls for service, conducting preliminary investigations of criminal activity, handling traffic crashes, preparing both initial and supplemental case reports, performing necessary follow-up investigations, making arrests and searches as required, identifying and attending to problem and directed patrol areas, enforcing criminal and traffic laws including city ordinances, providing courtroom testimony, and providing general security to business establishments, residential neighborhoods, school property, and the parks system. The patrol officers are under the direct supervision of the patrol sergeants.

Canine Officer The City of Owatonna’s canine goes by the call-name “Bullet” and is handled by Officer Brandon Fandel. Bullet is a five year old German Shepherd Dog imported to the United States from Slovakia for the sole purpose of being a service dog. In modern day policing, a police canine is a valuable and very important tool. A police canine’s main purpose is to be a locating tool. Police canines can be trained to locate people, narcotics, bombs, cadavers, wild game and illegal food brought into the country. Bullet is a dual purpose canine trained to locate people and narcotics. Bullet is also trained to apprehend dangerous or fleeing criminals or persons who threaten or attack his handler.


PATROL DIVISION PATROL DISTRICTS The Owatonna Police Department divides the city into three patrol districts, the north district, the south district and the west-central district, each with their unique set of issues, concerns, and traffic patterns. Officers, under the direction of their Team Leaders, are assigned to a specific district for not only patrol duties and calls for service, but to also establish partnerships with members of the community.

All officers assigned to the individual districts are responsible for “Action Requests� from citizens who call in specific concerns, crime issues, or traffic problems in their neighborhoods. This affords the community the opportunity to acquaint themselves with the officers as well as a vehicle for information sharing between the community and law enforcement. Specific to traffic initiatives based on citizen concerns from each district, is the use of the speed trailer which monitors and records speeds of passing motorists. This important data is then passed on to citizens as a follow-up to their concerns. It is important for the officers to maintain district integrity as they respond to emergency calls and concerns from citizens.


PATROL DIVISION DWI SUMMARY

2009 DWI Arrests Per Month: December November October September August July June May April March February January

21 17 9 16 14

8 21 8 12

9 9 0

5

10

15

2009 DWI Arrests By Time of Day:

20

25

Additional Charges Resulting From DWI 25

42

2021

20

15

21

20 7 5 5

2

3

1 1 2

2 2 3 4

8 7

10 11

10

5

17

15 11

9 6

1

14

1312

1

4453

8 55

0

00:00-00:59 01:00-01:59 02:00-02:59 03:00-03:59 04:00-0459 05:00-05:59 06:00-06:59 07:00-07:59 08:00-08:59 09:00-09:59 10:00-10:59 11:00-11:59 12:00-12:59 13:00-13:59 14:00-14:59 15:00-15:59 16:00-16:59 17:00-17:59 18:00-18:59 19:00-19:59 20:00-20:59 21:00-21:59 22:00-22:59 23:00-23:59

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

DWI Arrests Per Month

12

*Based on citations/charges, does not include warnings issued.

3


PATROL DIVISION TRAINING Field Training Officers The field training and evaluation process of any police department is a critical component of any successful police department. Unfortunately, every candidate that wishes to become a police officer is not always the right fit for their chosen career or the department and population they wish to serve. The field training process ensures that the employer has sufficient opportunity to directly observe and certify that a newly hired officer has the essential job-related knowledge and skills to be an effective solo police officer for the department and community in which they will serve. In 2008, Sergeant Rob Kniefel became the coordinator of the field officer training program. New officers are put through an extensive five-phase field training and evaluation period, in which they are evaluated on a daily basis in ten areas of core competency. The first four phases of training for a new officer involves an intense sixteen week minimum training period in which the new officer is assigned to a field training officer. Each newly hired officer spends time working at least one training phase during a day, evening and night shift. Each phase involves direction and coaching from a different field training officer. Included during this period is the fourth phase of training in which the field training officer rides along in plain clothes and acts as an observer to the probationary officer. Upon successful completion of the fourth phase of field training, new officers are certified for solo patrol duties and placed in to the fifth phase of training as probationary officers through their first year of employment. In 2009, the department expanded its field training program by adding additional certified officers to the training unit. This accomplished a three-fold mission designed to meet the demands of an ever changing workforce, to keep pace with ever changing departmental needs, and to help further guide future new hires succeed in their chosen career path.


PATROL DIVISION TRAINING Firearms Instructors The firearms and defense tactics instructors comprise the agencies Use of Force Training Unit. There are four certified Firearms Instructors that have specialized duties within the unit. Sergeant Mundale supervises the Use of Force training program and is also an active firearms instructor with a primary emphasis on handgun training. Sergeant Petterson, is also a handgun instructor with specific duties to develop and implement the patrol rifle program. Sergeant Petterson is the department’s certified Patrol Rifle Instructor and AR-15 Armorer. Officer Drenth and Officer Sorensen joined the program together and have been instructors for last two years. They are certified handgun instructor’s with emphasis on the tactical shotgun. Together, these four instructors work together to train, test and evaluate the license peace officers of this agency under the mandated training requirements set forth by the Peace Officer Standards & Training (P.O.S.T.) Board. In 2009, the firearms instructors conducted three mandatory training events, in addition to the initial patrol rifle operator’s course. The firearms courses this year consisted of a Winter / Cold Weather training, the Spring / Annual Qualification and Evaluation Course, and the Fall / Low Light- Night training course. Each event has a set of training goals and objectives which is specific to the training or environmental conditions, such as cold weather or night training. In August, Sergeant Petterson conducted the initial basic patrol rifle operator’s course after receiving patrol rifles through budget requisitions and capital improvement planning in 2008. There was an eight month delay introducing the rifles into the patrol division due to supply and demand of rifle ammunition as a result of the war effort. Sergeant Petterson’s basic patrol rifle course consisted of 9 hours, including classroom and range live fire drills.


PATROL DIVISION TRAINING The agency conducts most of the In-service firearms training and qualification courses with a paid membership at the 20 Rifle and Pistol Club. There was a total nine range days totaling 478 hours of firearms training that was received by the entire force in 2009, which included the basic patrol rifle operator’s course. Generally, each officer receives about 6.5 – 8 hours of firearms training each year. This does not include the officer’s personal time training off-duty. In the years ahead, those hours are expected to increase due to the implementation of the patrol rifle. Below is a breakdown of the total training hours in 2009 received by the department per event. Cold Weather Training (1.5 hours) – 50 hours Annual Evaluation and All Weapon Qualification Course (3 hours)– 99 hours Low Light/Night Training (2 hours) – 68 hours Initial Patrol Rifle Operator’s Course (9 hours) – 261 hours

In the years ahead as municipalities continue to see budget constraints and the cost of training ammunition continue to increase, the training unit will need to develop strategies and creative ways to continue to offer the level of training that is necessary and critical to maintain tactical shooting skills for officer safety and survival. An example of cost effective training for police officers that has been offered in the previous years is scenario based also known as reality based training which allows officer’s the opportunity to train in pairs and in the environment they work with specialized and safe training weapons and safety equipment. This level of training allows officers to use all force options available to them; beginning with officer presence, verbal skills, chemical, Taser, control techniques and ending with deadly force using simunition or airsoft training ammunition. The Use of Force Unit recognizes the benefits and rewards that scenario based training offers and will stay committed to this program each year. Furthermore, the Use of Force Unit has built a repertoire of training aides over the last few years such as portable & remote training targets, training weapons; such as airsoft and simunition, and protective training gear that will give this unit more options without experiencing the impact of high ammunition costs.


PATROL DIVISION TRAINING Defensive Tactics Instructors Officer Sorensen and Officer Drenth are the Defensive Tactics Instructors. These officers have received specialized training in defensive tactics and follow the Pressure Point Control Techniques (PPCT) training curriculum. The officers not only teach the tactics but help officers understand the physiological effects of the body and how that can affect an officer’s reaction or physical response. Each year, Officer Drenth and Sorensen dedicate two full days of training to provide a minimum of 8 hours of continuing education to all sworn officers of the Owatonna Police Department. Defense Tactics Instructors also utilize scenario based training strategies to assist with training officers using a padded Redman suits. This form of stress inoculation training allows the officers to practice delivery and placement of strikes, kicks, stuns, and take down techniques that normally cannot be practiced in firearms scenario based training due to the greater probability of injury to occur. In addition, the participants can experience the human factors associated with use of force engagements; such as, increased heart rate, fatigue, exhaustion and how their body performs at different levels of deterioration. In 2009, Officer Drenth and Sorensen certified each licensed peace officer with eight hours of defensive tactics training and an additional two hours of Taser training. Every two years these instructors need to attend a three day PPCT Instructor refresher course to maintain their instructor credentials. Officer Drenth is the department’s in-house certified Taser instructor. Probationary Officer Joe Swenson is a new member of the ranks and is also a certified Taser Instructor from his previous agency. Swenson shadowed and assisted Officer Drenth in this years Taser re-certification course. Once every other year the Taser Instructor’s need to attend an instructor refresher course to stay current with safety, legal, warranty and equipment updates. Because the Taser is recognized as a valuable tool to obtain subject compliance, to effect the arrest and/or to control non-compliant, potentially dangerous, aggressive, or assaultive subject(s) while minimizing injury to the officer/subject; the agency purchased additional X-26 Tasers so that each uniformed police officer/sergeant has an assigned Taser to carry on duty.


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION Criminal Investigations The Investigation Division serves in a support capacity of the police department by concentrating on the investigation of criminal matters that have previously been reported to the Patrol Division. An investigator will take a proactive approach when the need arises, by gathering intelligence, conducting human and electronic surveillance, and installing portable alarms. The major components of investigations are case screening, follow-up investigations, and gathering criminal intelligence. In 2009, the unit was comprised of (1) Operations Commander, (1) Sergeant, (3) Corporal Investigators, (1) Investigator trainee, and (1) Administrative Assistant. The Operations Commander oversees the operation of the division. The Sergeant assigned to the Investigations Division currently serves as the Commander of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit. In addition to these responsibilities, the sergeant oversees the Predatory Offender Program, screens cases for assignment, and acts as a liaison to the Steele County Attorney’s Office. One of the Corporal Investigators and the Investigative Trainee are assigned to the Owatonna Public Schools during the school year, serving as School Resource Officers. In addition to their responsibilities as School Resource Officers, one serves as the primary financial crimes investigator and the other serves as a firearms and defensive tactics instructor. The second Corporal Investigator serves as the primary property crimes investigator and the Gang Intelligence Coordinator. The third Corporal Investigator serves as the primary investigator for crimes against the person relating to sexual assaults, and adult/child protection matters. The investigator trainee is assigned to general investigations, which include crimes against persons and property. Investigator trainees are appointed to the investigative division as a means of staff development and are in this assignment for at least one year. Trainees in this role receive specialized training in the areas of interview and interrogation, writing, crime and death scene investigations, and writing search warrants. The Investigations Division Administrative Assistant serves as the property and evidence technician for the department and also serves as the Fiscal Agent for the South Central Drug Investigation Unit. The types of cases referred to the Investigations Division are broken into two separate classifications, crimes against persons and property crimes. Crimes against persons involve criminal sexual assault, child/adult protection, assaults, arson, robbery, and homicide. Property crimes include: theft, burglary, fraud/forgery, financial, and computer crime. In addition, investigators conduct alcohol and tobacco compliance checks, coordinate predatory offender verifications, conduct pre-employment background investigations, oversee the Retailer’s Protection Agency (RPA) program, and gather gang and criminal intelligence.


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION Crimes Against Persons Investigators spent hours working cases involving crimes against persons in 2009. Many cases were worked jointly with other agencies such as other local police departments, human services agencies, and federal agencies.

Property Crimes A significant amount of time was spent on several high profile investigations in 2009.

School Resource Officers With over 5000 students enrolled in the Owatonna Public School district, the School Resource Officers are assigned to help maintain a safe, secure, and uninterrupted learning environment for the students, staff, and parents in the district. The liaison officers, one assigned the senior high school and the other assigned to the junior high and elementary schools, serve as a resource to prevent crime in the school as well as investigate incidents that occur on school property. The liaisons also serve as an education resource by bringing their experience and expertise as guest instructors in certain facets of educational curriculum.


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION SOUTH CENTRAL DRUG INVESTIGATION UNIT The Owatonna Police Department continued the leadership role as Fiscal Agents of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit in 2009. This included the assignment of a police sergeant as Commander of the task force as well as an administrative assistant. We also continued to co-fund a field agent position in conjunction with the Steele County Sheriff’s Department. The SCDIU is a federally funded narcotics task force formed in cooperation with member agencies of four counties, encompassing a jurisdictional area of approximately 2,500 square miles. Staffed by four specially trained field agents, the task force concentrates their efforts on narcotics distribution and narcotics related investigations. Agents also assist member agencies with criminal investigations that have a correlation with illegal drugs. The SCDIU has developed strong partnerships with adjoining task forces, the Minnesota BCA, FBI, DEA, and ICE, investigating cases that stretch beyond our boundaries that have a direct impact on the flow of illegal drugs into our area. The agents also focus on public education, especially the young people of our communities, by conducting presentations at schools, churches, civic organizations, and in the work place. Over 20 presentations were held throughout the south-central region of Minnesota, covering a wide range of topics such as teen drug use, methamphetamine labs, marijuana grows and club drugs. Task force agents directly touched the lives of over 1,200 people, educating them on recent illegal narcotics trends and the dangers that illegal drugs pose to our communities. In 2009, SCDIU agents conducted 85 narcotics investigations which resulted in 27 search warrants, the arrests of 56 people and 63 people charged. Additionally, the task force assisted in federal narcotics investigations and 2 methamphetamine labs were dismantled. Confiscated or purchased illegal narcotics included 567 grams of cocaine, 1,487 grams of methamphetamine, 3.5 pounds of marijuana, 35 marijuana plants, 112 grams of mushrooms, 38 dosage units of prescription medication, and smaller quantities of crack cocaine and ecstasy. Agents also seized cash, several vehicles, and jewelry, which was directly linked as proceeds from the distribution of illegal drugs. The task force continued to see the rise in the availability of all forms of cocaine and its decrease in price as well as the importation of glass methamphetamine from Mexico and a significant increase in its street value, to almost twice that of cocaine.


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION SCDIU TACTICAL TEAM The primary goal of the Tactical Team is safety and preservation of all human life. The Tactical Team is a law enforcement support unit, which is specifically trained and equipped to resolve critical high-risk situations. Containment of suspects and negotiation procedures are the team’s first responsibilities. The 25 team members are selected from law enforcement agencies within Faribault, Freeborn, Steele, and Waseca counties. Each agency is responsible for equipping the assigned officer. The SCDIU Tactical Team is overseen by the SCDIU Board. This board consists of chief law enforcement officers from each of the represented agencies. The SCDIU Tactical Team Commander and Assistant Team Commander report to the board monthly. Team members train ten hours per month. Training topics include hostage rescue, warrant service, firearms qualifications, tactical first aid, physical fitness, and various other topics. In addition, the SCDIU Tactical Team has also trained jointly with the Bloomington Bomb Squad, the Federal Correctional Institution in Waseca, the Minnesota Correctional Facility in Faribault, and the Minnesota State Patrol Tactical Team. Each year, team members also attend the Special Operations Tactical Association Conference.

2009 SCDIU Tactical Team Call-Outs


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION PREDATORY OFFENDER REGISTRATION The Owatonna Police Department recognizes that predatory offenders pose a significant risk to a community. Keeping the public safe is our priority and it is our belief that a collaborative approach, including taking precautionary measures and encouraging community reporting practices, will ensure that predatory offender registration continues to be largely successful. It has been well documented that roughly 80% of predatory offenders are known by their victims; therefore, it is imperative that law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and human services work together in keeping our community informed and educated. Registering as a predatory offender is a collateral consequence of criminal behavior and it acts as one of the many deterrent factors as to whether someone will re-offend. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) maintains a registry of predatory offenders residing within the state. Those registered have been convicted of a violent felony or sexually related crime and classified in the registry based on their likelihood to re-offend. A risk assessment is conducted on each person registered prior to release from confinement. An offender’s risk assessment dictates the level of community notification that is required of law enforcement.

In 2009, the Owatonna Police Department monitored and tracked 68 individuals living in our community who are registered as predatory offenders. This included semi-annual unannounced visits to their residences as well as voluntary compliance checks by the offenders. The Patrol and Investigation Divisions work in concert to ensure that predatory offenders are in statutory compliance with their registration requirements. Any offenders who, through investigation, are found to be non-complaint at any time are aggressively prosecuted with the assistance of the Steele County Attorney’s Office.


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION COMPLIANCE INITIATIVES The Owatonna Police Department, with the assistance of underage operatives, conducts alcohol and tobacco compliance checks with local retailers. Compliance checks provide a proactive effort to keep alcohol and tobacco out of the hands of our youngest community members. These checks are completed twice a year by the department. The operatives are trained, photographed and equipped with electronic listening devices so officers can monitor the conversations. In 2009, the department was unable to secure a grant for tobacco and alcohol compliance checks. This was the first time in many years that the Owatonna Police Department did not receive a grant. This was largely due to tight budgets and a large number or agencies applying for grant money. The department conducted one tobacco compliance check for 2009. Of the twenty-nine licensed tobacco establishments checked, one was found to be non-compliant for a 97% compliance rate. In 2009 the department conducted one alcohol compliance check. Forty-three licensed establishments were checked. Of the forty-three establishments checked, one was found to be non-compliant for a 98% compliance rate.

Gang Officers Owatonna Patrol Officer Cooper, was assigned to the department’s gang investigation unit in 2008. Officer Cooper works closely with the Corporal Investigator Mark Edel, who is also assigned to the unit. The unit works with other agencies in the area and attends monthly meetings focusing on gang activity. The unit developed and implemented the gang field interview cards for the Owatonna patrol officers. The officers are given the field cards to carry with them while on patrol. The field cards have ten gang qualifiers along with physical descriptions of possible gang members. Officers fill out the gang cards and the gang officers place the information into the department’s database. The gang officers use the department’s database and a national database to track and store current information on gang member which assists in investigations. In 2009, the gang unit officers also put on presentations to area clubs and associations regarding local gang issues. The presentation included a power point along with numerous articles of gang related items that had been confiscated from students that attend the local high school. The officers also presented at the department’s in-service training in September. With the implement of cameras and the Quick $50 Program (2007) the City of Owatonna has seen a reduction in vandalism and graffiti for 2009. Gang officers attempt to get graffiti cleaned up within twenty-fours after it has been reported. Officers, along with community volunteers will paint over fresh graffiti with the property owner’s permission.


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION INVESTIGATIONS SUPPORT Property and Evidence The Property and Evidence Technician is tasked with maintaining the chain of custody for all evidentiary items submitted to the Property Room. Documenting the intake, storage, security, release and disposal of all items is the primary focus of property room personnel. In 2009, a total of 1104 items were entered into the property room. This is an increase of over 20% from the items entered in 2008. With the assistance of an online software program, the property room personnel are able to dispose and release property promptly to ease overcrowding issues that could arise as a result of the increase in evidentiary items. For instance, in 2008, only 58 items were released or destroyed, but in 2009, 915 items were released or destroyed. As of December 31, 2009, there were a total of 3,933 items being held in the Owatonna Police Department property room.

Crime Scene Technicians The Crime Scene Technician program includes 4 officers. Officer Joel Hunt, Officer Terrence Flynn, Officer Willie Goodsell, and Corporal Tom Munns make up this group of both Patrol Officers and Investigators. When on patrol, the Officers drive a Chevy Tahoe that is fully equipped to hold all of the equipment needed to properly process any form of crime scene. Crime Scene Technicians attend regular training and keep up to date on their skills. Crime Scene Technicians are trained in crime scene photography, latent print development and recovery, footwear evidence, biological and trace evidence recovery and crime scene reconstruction. Their expertise and training is an invaluable resource for the investigations division as well as the prosecuting attorney.


SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION PARKING CONTROL The Owatonna Police Department has transitioned to a new downtown parking system. The graduated parking fine system for downtown parking violations has been in effect since January 1, 2009. The successful work of both internal and external partners to implement and administer this system has proved to be effective. Since the implementation of the graduated system we have seen a decrease of 47% in the amount of 2-4 hour tickets issued in the downtown area. In 2009 a total of 2,136 tickets were issued for 2-4 hour parking of this total 1,061 were warning tickets only. We feel we are accomplishing the goal of maintaining a vibrant downtown with parking that is user friendly to customers, businesses, and residents.


SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS

The Community Service Officer supports the efforts of the Owatonna Police Department by providing services to the community while also supporting other divisions within the police department. There are currently three part-time Community Service Officers working for the police department. The Community Service Officers are knowledgeable and flexible in their assignments as they are asked to perform duties from every division within the Owatonna Police Department. The Community Service Officer (CSO) is responsible for a variety of functions within the department which do not necessarily require the response of a sworn officer. CSOs patrol the city parks and schools. Working closely with the Owatonna Park and Recreation Department, they look for signs of vandalism to city parks and trails as well as assist with locking park buildings at park closing times. CSOs also respond to minor calls such as minor accidents, thefts and vandalism. In addition, they assist Parking Control and Animal Control when necessary. Ordinance violations, junk vehicle complaints, and house checks are also the responsibility of the CSO. CSOs are tasked with administrative duties such as crime mapping, maintaining the warrant list on the department’s web page, and updating the organizational chart. The CSO responds to tow releases and warning tags at the Law Enforcement Center. Furthermore, CSOs transport evidence to the BCA crime lab, deliver paperwork to other government entities, and complete other deliveries as needed. Squad Maintenance is assigned to the CSOs. The CSOs track monthly vehicle mileage for all police vehicles, track problems with squad cars and arrange for maintenance and repair with the city shop. They also assist with portable radio repair and maintain the LIDAR equipment. The Community Service Officer also plays a vital role in the community by providing funeral escorts, assisting with Safety Camp each summer, parade assistance, security for community events, and providing the opportunity to view squad cars and other police equipment to various community organizations and events. Besides providing critical support to the Owatonna Police Department on a daily basis, our CSO Program continues to turn out top-quality police officer candidates. This is a direct result of the high standards each CSO must meet in order to be hired, the ongoing training they receive, and the job responsibilities they are given. Like all department personnel, Community Service Officers display a positive image for the Owatonna Police Department while contributing to maintain a more efficient and professional organization.


SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION ANIMAL CONTROL Animal Control is a contracted position within the City of Owatonna that is supervised by the police department.

Animal Control primarily responds to concerns about domestic animals within the City of

Owatonna. Animal Control Officer Mike Bartsch, who responds to calls, coordinates Animal Control and helps resolve issues through negotiation or having the police department cite offenders, when necessary. ACO Bartsch also maintains and cares for animals at the animal control shelter. Wild animal control calls should be directed to Critter Busters Nuisance Wildlife Control by contacting Todd at 507456-1148 or Tami at 507-456-1771. Additionally you may contact Falls Creek Animal Control at 651235-0829 or 1-866-838-2868. When ACO Bartsch is not available the police department or community service officers respond to calls for service.


SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION RECORDS AND 911 DISPATCH Records Division The Records Department is staffed with five full time and one part time Steele County employees. The Owatonna Police Department contributes 50% of their salary. The Records department updates all names, locations, arrests, and property-loss reports as well as handles non-emergency calls, background checks, transcription, and other general requests from the public.

Pearl Street 911 Center The 911 Center answers all requests for law enforcement assistance via 9-1-1 and the local police number. The center serves 9 law enforcement agencies, 10 fire and rescue departments, and 5 ambulances services within Rice and Steele County.


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS AED PROGRAM In 1999, the Owatonna Police Department implemented the AED Program. At the start of the program, funding was obtained from the Department of Public Safety and two AED’s were purchased with this grant. Later with help of several local charities (Eagles, Elks, Golden Kiwanis, Knights of Columbus, and VFW) in 2005, there were a total of eight AEDs in Owatonna Police Department squad cars. In 2007 Owatonna Hospital donated two AED’s through the Owatonna Hospital’s Heart Safe Communities project. At the same time the Owatonna Women’s Club and Federated donated AEDs and the Owatonna Police Department purchased a unit. This brings the total number of AEDs to 13. Early in 2008 the Owatonna Hospital Heart Safe Communities heard we had one squad without an AED and purchased the AED for this squad. This bringing the Owatonna Police Department to a total of 14 AED’s in 2009. The Owatonna Police Department entered into an agreement with Gold Cross Ambulance Service and Dr. Ralph Wertwijn, who agreed to be the local Medical Director for the use of AEDs by officers. Officer training is completed annually; consisting of four hours of lecture and hands on experience. Since the inception of the program, the AED has become an important link in the Chain of Survival in the Owatonna Community. 13 lives have been saved as a result of having AED placement in squad cars!

5 4.5 4

Shock/Save

3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0

Shock/Deceaste d @ Scene

Shock/Deceased @ Hospital No Shock/Deceased @ Scene


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS COLA The City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA) was formed to network small and large landlords with the police department and other property managers. We are now in our fourth year as an organization. While membership decreased in 2009, this was due to some landlord’s selling there properties as well as deceased members. We currently have 91 members. In 2009, we have put together booklets providing information from applications to leases. This guide provides information on what to do for a person applying through the lease signing. We had Crime Free Housing training Feb. and March. Guest speakers for this program were Attorney Mark Carver, Investigator (Gang) Mark Edel, Captain Chuck Walerius, Steele County Deputy (Civil) Tony David, (Housing Authority) Nancy Bokelmann, and (Fire Department) Bruce Thomas. We had 42 landlords either become certified or renewed their certification. All of these included the major management companies and property owners in Owatonna. COLA also had a number of member meetings throughout the year. Among the speakers were Chief LaDue who spoke on what the police are doing and the issues in the City of Owatonna. The Drug and Gang task force gave provided updates on their issues. We provided computer training at Senior Place on our website and through Riverland College. In the fall of the year, we held a member picnic. Again, Chief LaDue spoke at this picnic and gave us updates and encouragement as landlords. In 2009, COLA had a booth at the Community Coordination team open house at which time we let people know about the program and what we had to offer to the community. Round table discussion on abandonment issues and marketing were some of the concerns addressed. COLA had 100% police participation and support which continued to make the organization a success. Chief LaDue has spoken at numerous events. Sergeant Hassing is the department liaison with the landlords and attends all monthly COLA board meetings and well as many general membership meetings. Updates on police issues are provided in person and on the city website which has been set up specifically for landlord use. In 2009, the city officers again had landlords sign and update their property information to assist with trespassing issues which continue to be a problem in numerous housing units. Disorderly Use Violations and the enforcement of the ordinance continued to be a focus in 2009 while addressing issues which were taking place in rental units throughout Owatonna. In 2009, there were a total of 319 Disorderly Use Violations and 155 Nuisance violations which were addressed and resolved. The communication and involvement between landlords in addressing these issues helped make the housing units safe for members of the community. In 2009, COLA developed an additional website, separate from the City of Owatonna site but one which works in conjunctions with the police. Our goal in 2010 is for the merger of the two sites to better utilize


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS COLA the information provided and make the system more user friendly. All the members are listed on COLA site with their properties. The joint websites have disorderly use, evictions, leases, rental agreements, and other pertinent information posted. COLA’s new website is owatonnacola.com. COLA members can also make their own web page for their own use, on this site. COLA members have free advertisement and free vacancy listings on this web page.

This has been the fourth year of existence for COLA and while we have met many sustainable objectives, we continue to look forward to many successful ventures and additions in 2010. While attempting to make this a model program in our area, we are looking at areas of further development including training, equipment and communication. Our goal in 2010 is to continue to add complexes and managers/owners to Phase II and III of the crime free multi housing program In 2010, our goal is to develop a more effective means of licensing properties , leading the way to possible tenant registration and working with the Fire Department to complete this project. Also identifying and addressing the data base by which updated information can be identified immediately. The merger of the city and COLA site for landlords is also a goal for 2010. As always, our goal is to increase membership and involvement in COLA and the many issues landlords and law enforcement face while working together to reduce crime. Our next meeting in 2010 will include the use of security cameras on properties and technology which can assist them in reducing crime. Also, Police Chief LaDue and Fire Chief Johnson will be addressing their areas of concern and involvement to the COLA members.


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS NIGHT TO UNITE The Owatonna Police Department is proud to participate in the Night to Unite program. Night to Unite 2009 was held across Owatonna on Tuesday, August 4, 2009. This was the 26th annual Minnesota Night to Unite celebration, formally recognized as National Night Out. Night to Unite, a program of the Minnesota Crime Prevention Association (MCPA), will replace National Night Out, an event sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch. Despite the name change, the first Tuesday of every August will nevertheless continue as an enjoyable night of activities and fun identical to years past, maintaining focus on crime prevention and building a strong, safe community. Minnesota Night to Unite is designed to: (1) Heighten crime and drug prevention awareness; (2) Generate support for, and participation in, local anticrime efforts; (3) Strengthen neighborhood spirit and policecommunity partnerships; and (4) Send a message to criminals letting them know neighborhoods are organized and fighting back. The Owatonna Police Department encourages residents to participate in this great celebration of community, crime prevention, and strong police/ community partnerships. A strong community makes for a safe community. Everything we do to strengthen the ties among neighbors of all ages, backgrounds and lifestyles makes our present and future that much brighter. Celebrating MINNESOTA NIGHT TO UNITE with the Owatonna Police Department and your neighbors is a positive way to build and nurture our community by starting quite literally, in your own front yard! In 2009, Owatonna residents held over 50 block parties with a turn out of over 2000 residents. Members of the Owatonna Police Department adjusted their schedules and volunteered their time to visit each block party, answer questions, and hear concerns of residents.


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS EXPLORERS The Owatonna Police Department Explorer Post #204 was founded in 1998. In 2009, the program had four active Explorer Advisors; Officer Terrence Flynn, Officer Joel Hunt, Officer Kyle Parr, Officer Andrew Seifert. The Explorer program is a young adult career education program for young men and women who are 14 and graduates of eighth grade or are 15 through 20 years of age. There are six youth participants in 2009. Law Enforcement Exploring is a youth development program centered around law enforcement careers and is a cooperative effort between the Owatonna Police Department and the Boys Scouts of America. The purpose of this program is to provide experiences to help young people mature, and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Explorers are ready to investigate the meaning of interdependence in their personal relationships and communities. The end result of a program of this nature is that the various program activities help youth pursue their special interests, grow and develop. Explorer programs are based on five areas of emphasis: career opportunities, life skills, service learning, character education, and leadership experience. The programs are based on the Learning for Life Mission Statement: "The mission for Learning for Life is to serve others by helping instill core values in young people and in other ways prepare them to make ethical choices throughout their lives so they can achieve their full potential." Members of the Owatonna Police Department Explorer Post #204 participate in training meetings, which expose them to a wide variety of situations that law enforcement officers experience, and in community events where their assistance is valuable to the police department, all while giving them insight into the many varied duties of the department. The Explorers have spent this year preparing for the State Law Enforcement Explorer Competition in Rochester, MN that will be held in the spring of 2010. Several previous Explorer members are now sworn officers, and several more are currently majoring in college law enforcement programs.


SAFE AND SOBER GRANT The Owatonna Police Department has been involved the Safe and Sober program since 1998. In 1998 the Owatonna Police Department submitted traffic enforcement initiatives that Owatonna was doing on their own to prevent traffic infractions for the Safe and Sober Challenge, receiving and award of $2000 to be used towards traffic related equipment and/or overtime traffic enforcement. Since 1998 the Owatonna Police Department has joined in a partnership with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office and Blooming Prairie Police Departments in applying for Safe and Sober overtime grant monies that allow officers to work specific hours during each of the specific traffic enforcement campaigns. The grant period begins October 1 and goes through September 30th the following year. During a grant period, the particular violation focus of traffic enforcement is designated by the Office of Traffic Safety. These campaigns or waves as they are called are for alcohol and/or drug impairment to speeding to underage consumption and seatbelt/child restraint violations. Even though there is a specific focus for enforcement, officers working these overtime shifts still enforce all traffic infractions. The wave’s focus is determined through statistical analysis done by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. During the holiday seasons of Christmas and New Year’s, Memorial Day, and Labor Day, the focus is mainly on alcohol and/or drug impairment and underage consumption. Throughout the year, month long initiatives are dedicated to special campaigns that focus on specific types of traffic enforcement. For instance, in May and October the focus of traffic enforcement is seatbelts. The “Buckle Up, Click it or Ticket” campaign is to battle unbuckled motorists. All passengers in all vehicles must be buckled and children under the age of 11 should be in age appropriate child safety seats or seatbelts in the back seats. The “Seven Days of Summer” in July is when officers all over southeast Minnesota are out during the same days and times with a focus on speed enforcement. August focuses on the “Move Over Law” that was named in honor of State Patrol Trooper Ted Foss who was killed in 2000 by an errant driver during a traffic stop on Interstate 90 in Winona County. The state law requires drivers travelling on multi-lane highways to move one lane away from emergency vehicles on the roadway or shoulder. Officers look for traffic violations and write traffic citations throughout the year. Just remember “Click it or Ticket,” and “You Drink, You Drive, You Lose.” If you break the law you are subject to a ticket and/or can be arrested.


DATA TREND Owatonna Police Department Total Part I & II Crimes CRIME

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Homicide

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Rape

5

8

8

3

7

5

10

Robbery

4

10

4

4

7

1

3

Aggravated Assault

32

35

30

19

17

19

22

Burglary

121

132

141

135

164

74

83

Theft

519

609

621

499

502

357

402

Auto Theft

24

26

33

30

29

15

18

Arson

6

0

2

7

2

4

1

Total Part I

711

820

839

697

728

475

539

Total Part II

1573

1700

1582

1603

1237

962

904

Total

2284

2520

2421

2300

1965

1437

1443


DATA TREND Part I Crimes

Murder Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Total Part I Part II Crimes Other Assaults Forgery/Counterfeiting Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property Vandalism Weapons Prostitution Other Sex Offenses Narcotics Gambling Family/Children DUI Liquor Laws Disorderly Conduct Other Offenses Total Part II GRAND TOTAL

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

Crime Rate per 100,000

0 10 3 22 83 402 18 1 539

0 8 3 20 12 166 2 0

0 80 100 90 14 41 11 0

0 40 12 88 332 1608 72 4

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

Crime Rate per 100,000

142 17 44 0 3 237

106 9 15 0 3 18

74 52 34 0 100 7

568 68 176 0 12 948

2

1

50

8

1 35 54 0 14 142 48 31 134 904

1 18 52 0 5 138 47 23 117 553

100 51 96 0 35 97 97 74 87 61

4 140 216 0 56 568 192 124 536 3616

1443

764

52

5772

*Statistics furnished from the 2009 Version of the Minnesota BCA/CJIS Uniform Crime Report


DATA TREND FIRST QUARTER 2009


DATA TREND SECOND QUARTER 2009


DATA TREND THIRD QUARTER 2009


DATA TREND FOURTH QUARTER 2009


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Socrates Credits Many people within the Owatonna Police Department contributed to the development of this report. The following individual deserves special recognition for her efforts: Kimberly Dub, Administrative Assistant This document and all its contents are the property of the Owatonna Police Department. Reproduction or distribution of this document in whole or in part is permitted subject to appropriate source citation and the express prior written consent of the Chief of Police of the Owatonna Police Department. This document is also available in PDF format on our website at www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/police. Please visit our site for additional information about our organization.


WE ARE PROACTIVE • WE EXIST TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY • HOW WE EXCELLENCE GET THE JOB DONE IS AS IMPORTANT AS GETTING THE JOB DONE • WE BELIEVE IN THE PERSONAL TOUCH • WE ARE FAIR BUT FIRM • WE ARE INNOVATION PROACTIVE • WE EXIST TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY • HOW WE GET THE JOB DONE IS AS IMPORTANT AS GETTING THE JOB DONE • WE INTEGRITY BELIEVE IN THE PERSONAL TOUCH • WE

ARE

FA I R

BUT

FIRM

Profile for Owatonna Police Department

Owatonna Police Department 2009 Annual Report  

Owatonna Police Department 2009 Annual Report