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2015 ANNUAL REPORT O WATO N N A P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

Chief of Police—Keith E. Hiller 204 East Pearl Street, Owatonna, MN 55060 ci.owatonna.mn.us


2015 ANNUAL REPORT C i t y o f O wa t o n n a / C h i e f ’s M e s s a g e

3-4

M i s s i o n , Va l u e s , Vi s i o n / O r g a n i z a t i o n a l C h a r t

5-6

D e p a r t me n t B u d g e t / Pe r s o n n e l C h a n g e s

7-8

A d mi n i s t r a t ive D iv i s i o n General Over view / Professional Standards

9-10

D e p a r t m e n t Tr a i n i n g

11-12

F i e l d Tr a i n i n g P r o g r a m / S WAT Ta c t i c a l Te a m

13-14

Pa t r o l D iv i s i o n G e n e r a l O v e r v i e w / Po l i c i n g D i s t r i c t s

15-16

2015 Highlights

17-18

Canine Unit / Chaplains

19-20

De t e c t ive B u r e a u / C r i m i n a l Inve s t i g a t i o n s D iv i s i o n General Over view / Statistics

21-22

2015 Highlights

23-24

School Resource Officers / SCDIU

25-26


TABLE OF

CONTENTS

C o mp l i a n c e I n i t i a t ive s A l c o h o l & To b a c c o C o m p l i a n c e

27

Predator y Offender Registr y

28

De t e c t ive B u r e a u S u p p o r t For feitures

29

Proper ty & Evidence / Crime Scene Unit

30

Suppor t Ser vices Reser ves / Community Ser vice Officers

31-32

A n i m a l / Pa r k i n g C o n t r o l

33-34

Rice/St eele 911 Cent er / Records Division

35-36

C o mmu n i t y P r og r a m s S a f e t y C a m p / Po l a r P l u n g e

37-38

Explorer s / COL A

39-40

To w a r d Z e r o D e a t h s / N i g h t t o U n i t e

41-42

D a t a Tr e n d

43-46


CITY OF OWATONNA

1 8 5 4 ~ O RG A N I Z E D A S A M U N I C I PA L I T Y

M AYO R :

Thomas A. Kuntz

A D M I N I S T R A TO R :

Kris M. Busse

G OV E R N M E N T:

Mayor—Council

POPULATION:

25,660

LOCATION:

Crossroads of I35 & U.S. Hwys 14 & 218

LAND AREA:

14.45 Square Miles

C I T Y B U D G E T:

$26,002,416

ROA DWAY S :

155 Lane Miles

A I R P O RT:

Runway 1—5,500’ x

100’

Runway 2—3,000’ x

75’

Page 3 ~ Owatonna Police Department


POLICE CHIEF’S

MESSAGE

Citizens of Owatonna Mayor and City Council Members City Administration and Staff I have the privilege to present the 2015 Annual Report on behalf of the finest law enforcement officers honored to work for the City of Owatonna. The perception of constant turmoil over the last year(s) between law enforcement and community members creates a false narrative in many communities. The community members living, working, and enjoying recreation in our city create an atmosphere of collaboration, friendliness, hard work, love, and pride. These values promote a healthy community, and fosters positive relationships between police officers, and the community. The Owatonna Police Department must continue to demonstrate our humanity and desire to respect the ones we serve on a daily basis. We forge our relationships through positive contacts on a daily basis. The police officers interact with our citizen’s within the Owatonna School District, Police Citizen’s Academy, Safety Camp, United Way, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Shop with a Cop, Safe and Drug Free Coalition, and a host of weekly visits with daycares, non-profits and businesses. The professionalism of our staff is at the forefront of their decision making and values. This annual report captures the essence of these interactions with our neighbors, friends and relatives. As you experience our successes through this annual report, I hope you are as proud of the men and women that serve you on a daily basis as I am. You will be pleased to see that the City of Owatonna is a safe and vibrant community to live in or visit. We are mindful of the most recent spike in reported robberies, aggravated assaults, and burglaries. I assure you the staff at the Owatonna Police Department will address this most current crime trend with vigor, compassion, and a sense of attainment for a better outcome. I would like to thank our community members for their outward support and appreciation. It is your watchful eyes, passion for a safe community and your wherewithal that police officers are a mere extension of our wonderful community members and not an adversary that makes Owatonna one of the most desirable places to live in the State and Country. My wish for all of you is a safe, healthy, and prosperous year. Warmest Regards,

Keith E. Hiller, Chief of Police City of Owatonna, Minnesota

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 4


MISSION, VALUES & VISION OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT HONESTY

-

INTEGRITY

- TRUST

-

COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE

TEAMWORK

-

RESPECT

- ACCOUNTABILTY

- POSITIVE ATTITUDE

EXCELLENCE

MISSION We are a value driven organization that serves the community by: 

Protecting Life & Property,

Preventing Crime,

Enforcing the Law, and

Maintaining Order for All Citizens.

VALUES In serving our community we emphasize: 

Education of Citizens,

Voluntary Compliance,

Partnership with the Community,

Visual Presence in the Community, and

Offender Detection & Apprehension.

Achieving Mission Through: 

Planning & Problem Solving,

Personal Responsibility,

Customer Orientation,

Fairness & Equity,

Teamwork, and

INTEGRITY Above All.

VISION All Members of the Owatonna Police Department are dedicated to providing a safe and secure community through partnerships, leadership, and an unwavering commitment to excellence. Policing excellence through our people, our work, and our relationships.

Page 5 ~ Owatonna Police Department


ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

Chief (1)

Administrative Assistant (1)

Patrol Operations

Captain (1)

Records

Professional Standards

Records Clerks (4)

Support Services

Administrative Assistant (1)

Captain (1)

Administrative Assistant (1)

Community Service Officers (3) Includes Parking Control & Animal Control

Chaplains (5) Sergeants (6)

Reserve Officers (20)

Investigations

Drug Investigations

Explorer Post

Patrol Officers (20)

SCDIU

Sergeant (.5)

Includes:

Commander(.5)

K9 Unit (1)

OHS & OJHS School Security

Crime Scene Techs (3) SWAT (4)

Community Service Officers (3)

Investigators(2)

OPD SCDIU Agent (1)

Field Training (6) Gang (2) School

Firearms/Use of Force (4)

Resource Officers (2)

Divisions:

Command Staff

Sworn Staff

Civilian Staff

SCDIU Agents (3)

Shared Staff

Volunteers

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 6


DEPARTMENT

BUDGET

The Owatonna City Council approved the 2015 annual base and capital improvement budgets after a series of presentations by:

Chief of Police, City Administrator and Finance Director OWATONNA POLICE

REVENUES

2015 ACTUAL

$940,371

$4,472,726

$3,532,355

2015 PROPOSED

$957,359

$4,563,827

$3,606,468

2014 ACTUAL

$908,098

$4,499,405

$3,591,307

2014 PROPOSED

$932,222

$4,490,655

$3,558,433

2013 ACTUAL

$829,991

$4,224,967

$3,394,976

2013 PROPOSED

$803,947

$4,199,196

$3,395,249

***

EXPENDITURES

TOTAL

The police department had major expenditures of approximately $60,000 for two Ford utility police interceptors for the Patrol Unit as well as $78,000 for three unmarked vehicles.

***

There were 6 resignations that impacted the actual budget.

***

Fiduciary responsibility by managing expenditures at 2.06% below the proposed budget was at the center of our decision making process in the year 2015.

Page 7 ~ Owatonna Police Department


PERSONNEL CHANGES NEW HIRES Tommy Adams—Patrol Officer Alan Callahan—Patrol Officer

Derrik Quinlan—Patrol Officer

Katie Friesen—Community Service Officer Brandon Sell—Community Service Officer

RESIGNATIONS John Bata—Patrol Sergeant

Brandon Fandel—Patrol Officer

Said Hilowle—Patrol Officer

Brianne Lesnau—Patrol Officer

Andrew Seifert—Patrol Officer Cody Mosher—Community Service Officer

Authorized number of personnel / positions filled has maintained at a total of 35 for the past five years.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 8


ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION OVERVIEW The Administrative Division is comprised of the chief of police, captain of the patrol division, captain of support services, and an executive administrative assistant. The captains are responsible for their respective divisions where the bulk of their duties involve patrol and investigative tasks/functions. The executive assistant is responsible for daily administrative operations and records management. The administrative team is responsible for the day-to-day operations that provide public safety services to

the citizens of Owatonna and for a budget of approximately $4.5 million with staff of 64 full-time, part -time, and volunteers. The administrative team prides itself in its daily pursuit of distinction. We find value in seeking constant improvement in all aspects of our operations. We are mindful of our image, and the legitimate and referent power the position of a police officer has within our community. We will engender the principles of equity and diversity as well as develop and shape our department in an effort to balance the needs of our community. The engaged and watchful citizens of our community significantly impact our direction, mission, and outcomes. The team values the aforementioned principles, with justice for all being the motivation behind all our actions. The following principles guide our organizations pride, attitude, conduct, and expected behavior:

HONESTY:

Being truthful and open in our interactions with each other and the citizens we serve.

INTEGRITY: Being above reproach, ethical and doing what is right. TRUST:

Being honorable; maintaining a high level of trust with each other and the members of our community.

RESPECT:

Valuing each other and citizens by showing understanding and appreciation of our similarities and differences.

ACCOUNTABILITY: Conscientious, professional, dependable, and accountable for our actions by the citizens we serve. COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE: Adhering to strict standards of conduct and performance in everything we do. POSITIVE ATTITUDE: We strive to bring positive constructive influences when dealing with each other & our community. TEAMWORK:

We work in our department and with members of our community to achieve our goals; making use of diverse skills, abilities, roles and views.

EXCELLENCE: We are compelled to be leaders and always do our best. We strive to be known for taking the extra step, going the extra mile, leaving no stone unturned in our work. This calls for people with an enduring commitment and dedication to the mission. It requires us to have a commitment to service before self.

Page 9 ~ Owatonna Police Department


PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS The Owatonna Police Department recognizes the need to set high standards for ourselves. We have a duty and responsibility to m e e t t h e needs and expectations of

our community members and visitors through effective, efficient, and professional police service. We strive for excellence in all aspects of our c o m m u n i t y As an organization, we try very hard to provide quality cus-

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES: - Ensure Integrity of the Owatonna Police Department - Monitor Relationships with the Community - Strive to Create Mutual Trust -

tomer service to all of our citizens. Policing is a very difficult and complex job in today's society; we realize that mistakes can be made

and that the actions of our personnel may fall short of your expectations. Professional Standards serves as a transparent method of internal accountability by receiving, processing, and investigating complaints concerning police conduct. These complaints may allege violations of criminal law, department policy, or officer performance and may originate from outside sources or from within the agency. The Owatonna Police Department makes every effort to act with professionalism and integrity in everything we do; however, in the event a complaint against an officer is received, an internal affairs investigation is initiated in an attempt to allow the citizen who believes they were treated unfairly to voice their concerns. It also serves as a means to determine whether an act of misconduct occurred and disciplinary or corrective action is necessary or if the officer acted in a justified, lawful, or proper manner. If criminal wrongdoing is alleged, the Owatonna PD often requests an outside law enforce-

ment agency complete the criminal investigation. In 2015, there were fifteen internal investigations conducted involving the same number of employees. These investigations resulted in fourteen disciplinary actions—disciplinary actions can include oral and written reprimands, suspensions, demotions, or terminations. The fourteen disciplinary actions included eleven oral reprimands and three written reprimands. The final investigation was halted after meeting with the citizen over the allegation and the formal complaint was withdrawn. More precisely, we are proud to report that during this year, there were no internal affair investigations completed as a result of a formal citizen complaint—all of our investigation were the result of a minor rules infraction of our established guidelines.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 10


OWATONNA POLICE

2015 FIREARMS The Owatonna Police Department had four certified firearms instructors to include Sergeant Drenth, Sergeant Sorensen, Officer Ackerson, and Officer Johnson. These instructors dedicated themselves to a variety of instructor level courses throughout the year which aided them in providing the members of our department valuable training. Some of the instructor certifications included handgun, patrol rifle and shotgun instructor’s courses, vehicle close quarter combat, armorer courses, and active

shooter response.

In 2015, the firearms training unit conducted three training courses—annual qualification, active shooter response, and an inclement

weather/low light shoot. Our firearms training unit prides itself on providing critical guidance and exercises for its officers that might save their life, their partner’s life, or the life of another. They attempt to create realistic scenarios that induce stress in each officer while having the officer practice sound decision making that can often happen in a split second.

Page 11 ~ Owatonna Police Department


DEPARTMENT TRAINING

2015 USE OF FORCE AND TASER Sergeant Sorensen and Detective Oeltjenbruns were the defensive tactics instructors for the

Owatonna Police Department in 2015. Combined, they have a training experience level of thirteen years in this field. Officer Hennen has been appointed to an instructor position within the group and will be attending some instructor level classes early in 2016. These instructors have received specialized training in defensive tactics and follow the Pressure Point Control Techniques (PPCT) training curriculum. Other training regimens of focus include SPEAR, L.O.C.K.U.P., TASER, and ASP. Because the TASER is recognized as a valuable tool to obtain subject compliance, our agency has outfitted each sworn officer with an X26 TASER. Detective Oeltjenbruns instructs TASER and takes care of the maintenance and downloading of data when these units are deployed in the

field. This past year, the instructors dedicated two full days of training to provide a minimum of eight (8) hours of continuing education to all sworn officers as well as the community service officers of the Owatonna Police Department.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 12


FIELD TRAINING PROGRAM The field training process of any police department is a critical component of any successful police department. New officers are put through an extensive five-phase field training and evaluation period in which they are critiqued on a daily basis in ten areas of core competency. The first four phases involve an intense sixteen week training period where the new officer is assigned to a field training officer. Each newly hired officer spends time working at least one training task during the day, evening, and night shifts. Each phase involves direction and coaching from a different field training officer. During the fourth phase, the field training officer rides along in plain clothes and acts as an observer to the probationary officer. The team of dedicated field training officers are committed to the development and success of the new police officers as well as promoting the department’s mission as a whole. Upon successful completion of the field training program, the police officer candidates are certified for solo patrol duties.

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT 2015 FIELD TRAINING Sergeant DuChene coordinates and supervises the Owatonna Police Department’s Field Training

Program. Field training officers assigned to this unit in 2015 were Officers Petterson, Johnson, and Schumaker. Officer Matejcek was promoted to Sergeant in 2015 after severing as a field training officer for 6 years and is no longer serving on the Field Training Unit. Newly hired Officers Callahan and Quinlan have both successfully completed the first four phases of the field training program in December of 2015 and have begun solo patrol.

FTO Petterson is shown (left) recapping the day with his probationer—Officer Callahan.

Page 13 ~ Owatonna Police Department


SWAT TACTICAL TEAM SWAT CALL OUTS

1

2007

6

2008

5

2009

3

2010

4

2011

21

2012

9

9

2013

2014

5

2015

The South Central Drug Investigation Unit’s Tactical Team (SWAT) was comprised of 18 operators, 2 negotiators, and 2 medics from seven different law enforcement agencies within Steele, Freeborn, Waseca, and Faribault Counties. In 2015, the Owatonna Police Department provided five officers to serve on this team: Sgt. Jason Petterson – Team Leader, Sgt. J. Laddie Bata - Operator, Detective Joel Hunt - Operator, Detective Matt Oeltjenbruns - Operator, and Officer Jessie Ackerson – Operator. During 2015, Sgt. J. Laddie Bata left the Owatonna Police Department to further his career opportunities with the Morehead Police Department. Sgt. J. Laddie Bata was an invaluable asset to the team; his experience and knowledge is certainly missed. All officers assigned to the Tactical Team maintain proficiency through attendance of monthly ten hour training days. Officers from OPD are allowed to conduct additional six hour monthly trainings in order to maintain the National Tactical Officers Association’s training recommendation. Throughout the course of the year, every member of the team received additional training in marksmanship, entry tactics, breaching, team movements, and scenario based training.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 14


PATROL DIVISION OVERVIEW

Sergeant DuChene accepts an AED on behalf of the Owatonna PD from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN OWATONNA POLICE OFFICER

The Patrol Division is the uniformed staff of the Owatonna Police Department whose primary responsibility is to protect life and property through enforcement of laws and ordinances. Patrol Division uniformed officers are the first responders to a wide variety of emergency calls and investigate citizen complaints or crimes that occur in a police officer’s presence. They take enforcement action

in the way of a warning, citation, complaint, or custodial arrest. The police officers are also problem solvers and work closely with other public safety partners and healthcare professionals to make necessary community referrals. The Patrol Division is very much involved in the community and participate in proactive policing by expanding patrols outside the patrol vehicle through 24-hour business checks, hotel and motel interdiction, bar walks, predatory offender checks, probation/parole checks, traffic safety initiatives, education, and outreach programs. In 2015, the Patrol Division was staffed with 20 police officers and 6 patrol sergeants where each sergeant had three patrol officers under his/her span of control assigned to a specific patrol district.

Page 15 ~ Owatonna Police Department


POLICING DISTRICTS

Dividing up Owatonna into smaller policing districts, where each officer is assigned to a specific geographical field, provides the Owatonna Police Department an opportunity to collaborate on a more personal level with citizens in the business and residential areas of our community. Below is a chart that shows four separate types of calls compared by district—North, South, and

West Central. Officers may respond to similar types of calls within each district, but the volume of each type can vary significantly. For example, notice that in the West Central district, traffic stops far exceed the North and South districts. This is generally due to the fact that most of the area is a business region traveled by vehicle much more frequently. In the North and South districts, the number of calls for animals is higher than in West Central because those districts are larger in residential, parks and grassland areas. While we have three separate districts mapped out, one does not take precedence over another in the eyes of our officers. We work

hard to apply our highest standards and integrity to each and every call that comes into the Owatonna PD.

2015 COMPARISON BY DISTRICT

WEST

3299

NORTH

SOUTH

1717

CENTRAL

1879 590

Traffic Stops

175

462

Animal Calls

420

202

637

Thefts

339

545

467

Medicals

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 16


PATROL DIVISION MAY 2015:

At a May Owatonna City Council Meeting,

Mayor Thomas Kuntz read a proclamation announcing Thursday, May 28th as Zackary Schumaker Day in honor of Zack being named by the Moonlighters Exchange Club as the Owatonna Police Officer of the Year. As a member of the department, Zack has worked his way up the ranks so to speak. He was hired in 2011 as a community service officer, later in 2011 as a part-time police officer and a fulltime officer in 2012. Zack has been active in the Owatonna community with the Police Explorer Program, Shop with a Cop, Steele County Safety Camp and donates his time as a fishing guide for the live auction winner of a package offered by the police department to the Big Brothers Big Sisters Evening for Kids’ Sake—all the while performing his police officer duties at a high level and putting an emphasis on DWI enforcement. Congratulations Zack on this wonderful honor!

AUGUST 2015:

The Owatonna Police Department and the Steele County Sheriff’s Office played

host to the 3rd District Public Defender’s Office for the Statewide Paralegal Quarterly Training—the objective of the training was for the group to learn and understand law enforcement in a Greater Minnesota community. The Owatonna Police Department had various officers serve as presenters, including Chief Keith Hiller, Captain Eric Rethemeier, Sergeant Jason Petterson, Detectives Joel Hunt and Sean Cooper and K9 Officer John Petterson. Individually, the officers spoke about their respective areas of expertise, including a department overview, policing philosophy, domestic abuse investigations, our canine program, the South Central Drug Investigation Unit, the South Central Tactical Unit (SWAT) and gang intelligence. In addition, the group toured the Rice/Steele 911 Communications Center and the Steele County Detention Center. On Thursday, the day before the training, a number of the group members rode along

with officers from the department.

Page 17 ~ Owatonna Police Department


2015

SEPTEMBER 2015:

HIGHLIGHTS

This month marked the First Annual Chief’s Top Shot at the Owatonna Po-

lice Department. Officer Jesse Ackerson demonstrated his superior firearms skills at the competition that involved a course set up for various weaponry use and included fundamentals of marksmanship, different shooting positions, movement, reloading drills, and transition drills. The course was safe and fun, and demonstrated each participant’s proficiency. Congratulations Officer Ackerson! Back in August, Sergeant Laddie Bata left the Owatonna Police Department to take a position with the Moorhead Police Department; Bata’s departure left us with a void to fill in our supervisory ranks. After a competitive promotional process, Jason Matejcek was promoted to the rank of sergeant. Jason began his career with the Owatonna Police Department in 1997 and over the next 18 years, he has served our community as a patrol officer, investigator, a SWAT tactical officer, bike patrol officer, and a field training officer. Jason began his new supervisory career on September 23rd assigned to the Patrol Division.

Congratulations to Jason on this deserving promotion! Officer Adam Hennen has been assigned to work with the City of Owatonna Landlord Association (COLA) as a police liaison and a Crime Free Multi Housing (CFMH) Coordinator. CFMH is a crime prevention program geared toward rental properties and offered to COLA members to assist landlords and apartment managers take proactive measures to protect their property and their tenants. In September, Adam gave a presentation to the group at a training session held at the OPD.

DECEMBER 2015:

Hats off to our police explorer post and

advisors!! In December, our explorers spent some time at Trinity Church to help with the Toys for Tots program. The group helped with distributing toys and goods to local families. Our explorer officers had great interactions with the public and built a solid rapport. The explorers learned how important community policing and community involvement is for success. Our Police Explorer group is led by Officers Adam Dupic and Melissa Michael.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 18


CANINE UNIT The Owatonna Police Department’s K9 Kash and his handler John Petterson have been partners now for two years and have been keeping very busy! The pair has been involved in numerous drug arrests for meth and marijuana and have even assisted in the tracking of fleeing suspects. Over the past year, they have worked together with multiple K9 Units to include Rice County Deputies, the Faribault PD, and the Faribault Correctional K9 Unit. They have searched many schools for narcotics and continue to assist twice per year to deter youth from bringing drugs into school buildings. The team has given several demonstrations for civic groups, Steele County Safety Camp, kindergarten classes as well as trained closely with the Faribault Correctional Prison K9 handlers searching for narcotics within the prison.

Over the winter, Captain Mundale, Officer Petterson, and the CSOs received much help from the Parks and Recreation carpentry shop to rebuild the K9 agility equipment which is now set up at the Detention Center. The previous equipment was at its end; so much time was spent on this project to get the equipment back in useful working condition. Thanks again to all those who helped make this happen! Kash received a bullet proof vest in 2015 from Kayla Klinkenberg—a very motivated 12 year old local girl who raised money over a few weeks time to pay for the vest and other miscellaneous items for our K9 program. A big thank you to Kayla and all those who cared enough for Kash to invest in his safety! Currently, Kash passed his Narcotics Recertification in Worthington, MN with the Region 12 USPCA. His training will continue with his PD1 (Patrol Dog) trials coming up in June of 2016. Kash has made exceptional progress over the last few months, which just proves that the newly built agility equipment is definitely serving its purpose and being put to good use.

Page 19 ~ Owatonna Police Department


CHAPLAINS Police Chaplains are volunteer members of our community currently active in ministry who serve the police department in a non-denominational capacity and on an asneeded basis. They support our staff by offering grievance counseling, and emotional and / or spiritual support. In most instances, the chaplains are called upon by officers to assist with next of kin death notifications or to help care for a person that is grieving the loss of a loved one in which law enforcement was called to a scene. Chaplains ridealong with the Patrol Division, participate in police-community events such as Night To Unite, citizen / police officer awards and commendation ceremonies, and the blessing and swearing in of new police officers. In 2015, the chaplains donated 95 volunteer hours to the community and the Owatonna Police Department. We are very thankful for their service and the presence they bring. Chaplains pictured below are (back row) Reverend Ron Wilson, Reverend Brent Carlson, and Reverend Mark Rosenau and (front row) Reverend Loren Olson and Parish Nurse Nancy Deetz.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 20


DETECTIVE BUREAU OVERVIEW In 2015, the Detective Bureau was comprised of a captain, a detective sergeant, one corporal detective, four detectives, and an administrative assistant. The captain oversees the overall operation of the bureau while the detective sergeant oversees the bureau’s daily workflow. The detective sergeant assigned to the bureau also currently serves as the commander of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU). In addition to these responsibilities, the detective sergeant oversees the

investigation and management of the registered sex offender database, acts as a liaison to the Steele County Attorney’s Office and Steele County Human Services and serves as a police representative on the Steele/Waseca Drug Court Committee. Two detectives are assigned to the Owatonna Public Schools during the school year, serving as school resource officers. Detectives receive specialized training in the areas of interview and interrogation, crime and death scene investigations, and writing search warrants. The administrative assistant serves in a support role to investigations and to the SCDIU. The administrative assistant also serves as the department’s property and evidence officer, compiles monthly statistical analysis, prepares completed prosecutorial case files, and is a certified physical evidence officer. For the SCDIU, the administrative assistant serves as the fiscal agent, property and evidence officer, and prepares statistical analysis.

Main Types of Cases Referred to Detective Bureau:

Crimes against Persons

involve criminal sexual assault, child/adult protection, assaults, arson, robbery and homicide.

Crimes against Property include theft, burglary, fraud/forgery, financial and computer crime.

Beyond conducting follow-up investigations, our detectives conduct liquor and tobacco licensing investigations and compliance enforcement activities, coordinate predatory offender compliance verifications, conduct pre-employment background investigations, oversee the Retailer’s Protection Agency (RPA) program, and gather gang and criminal intelligence.

Page 21 ~ Owatonna Police Department


CRIMINAL

INVESTIGATIONS

2015 DETECTIVE BUREAU STATISTICS Total Cases Referred: 1281 Cases Referred Cases Assigned Cleared –Referred to Co. Attny Cleared Citation Cleared Civil Exceptionally Cleared Cases Unfounded Inactive

1281

817

OWATONNA PD DETECTIVE BUREAU primarily serves in a support role by concentrating on the

19

1

2

13

298

51

investigation of criminal matters that have previously been re-

ported to the Patrol Division. All reports are routed to the detective sergeant who evaluates each case for solvability and those cases that have solv54%

16%

ability factors are assigned to an investigator for further follow-up. The Detective Bureau also initiates proactive investi-

3%

gations into general criminal,

27%

narcotics and gang-related activity by conducing video and physical surveillance. Addition-

2015 INVESTIGATIONS BY TYPE

ally, the Bureau works in partnership with other local, state

Crimes against Persons

Crimes against Property

Child/Adult Protection

Other Part II Crimes

and federal agencies.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 22


INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION JANUARY 2015:

The South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) investigated the sale of prescription medication. An agent with the SCDIU set up an undercover buy for Sub Oxone strips, a schedule III narcotic. The buy was set up to take place at McDonald’s in Owatonna. At approximately 3:11 PM, a black Honda Accord, carrying a black male and white female arrived to McDonald to sell the drugs. The black male exited the vehicle and made the exchange for $140. The black male returned to the vehicle and drove away to the Kwik Trip parking lot across the street where it was stopped by an Owatonna police officer. Both the male and the female were arrested. Following the arrest, both the male and the female had in their possession marked buy funds used to purchase the drugs. Sadly, officers also found a 5-year old child in the vehicle who was turned over to child protective services. Kimberly K. Kuiper, age 34, was formally charged with 4th Degree Sales of a Controlled Substance—a felony and Child Endangerment—a gross Misdemeanor. Abdi M. Mohamed, age 27, was formally charged with 4th Degree Sales of a Controlled Substance and 5th Degree Possession of a Controlled Substance—both felonies. In March and April, the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) :MARCH/APRIL 2015 initiated and conducted a two-day undercover operation focusing on human trafficking and related sex crimes. These operations were conducted in Owatonna on March 20th & in Albert Lea on April 7th at cooperating area hotel(s). The operation in April was conducted in partnership with the Rochester PD’s Street Crimes Unit. This partnered operation also served as a training session designed to instruct law enforcement on investigative techniques to combat human trafficking and related sex crimes occurring in their jurisdictions. The training also focused on current trends, victimization, and legal updates associated with human trafficking and sex crimes. As a result of the two operations, 18 individuals were arrested, booked and released—10 of the arrests were made during the operation in Owatonna. All individuals are facing formal complaint charges for Solicitation of Prostitution.

JUNE 2015: Officers responded to a string of burglary calls at Grace

Baptist Church/Owatonna Christian School, Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, Tri-Valley Head Start, Party Plus, and Centro Campesino. Entry was gained at the locations by breaking windows or through an unlocked door. Multiple items were taken during the burglaries to include candy, soda, money, condoms, and lighters. Officers received a citizen tip that two juvenile subjects were trying to gain entry into Straight River Sports by throwing rocks at the door. Responding officers apprehended two juvenile suspects at the scene and were taken into custody. Officers processing the various crime scenes found blood on broken window sills and also collected several items identified by the suspects as stolen. Both juveniles admitted to the burglaries and also admitted to a burglary of a residence. Both juveniles, ages 13, were arrested, held in juvenile detention and charged with several counts of burglary.

Page 23 ~ Owatonna Police Department


2015 HIGHLIGHTS AUGUST 2015:

On an early Wednesday morning in August, an Owatonna officer on patrol noticed a vehicle parked in the wash stall at the Husky Car Wash. The officer conducted a premise check on the building and entered the car wash through the walk-in door. The officer approached the vehicle and observed it occupied by a female driver and male passenger. As the officer walked up to the passenger door, he observed the male was lighting a glass pipe with a lighter—the officer believed the male was smoking meth. The male looked at the officer with a surprised look and froze. When the male exited the vehicle, an open beer bottle was found between his legs and a mint container in his lap. The mint container was later found to contain presumptive positive methamphetamine and other pills. Underneath the driver’s seat another pipe was located that contained presumptive positive meth residue—the driver later admitted the pipe belonged to her. The driver, Skylar M. Lavenz, age 21 and the passenger, Keith Beene, age 37 were arrested and formally charged with 5th Degree Possession of a Controlled Substance—both felonies. On September 11th, the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) :SEPTEMBER 2015 and the Cannon River Drug & Violent Offender Task Force came together to execute a search warrant at 615 Carlanna Place. Assisted by the SCDIU Tactical Team and the Owatonna PD, the warrant was executed and a baggie containing 1.8 grams of presumptive positive methamphetamine was located and as a result, a male and female were arrested. A further search of the residence uncovered an additional 192 grams of presumptive positive meth and several firearms. One firearm, a Smith & Wesson handgun, was reported stolen by the Eagle Grove PD in Iowa. Lastly, a scale and pay/owe ledger, commonly used to document drug / currency exchanges, was uncovered in a safe. Heather M. Saurer, age 32, and Robert J. Schirmer, age 49, have been arrested and charged in connection with this investigation. Saurer was charged with 5th Degree Possession of a Controlled Subst. and Schirmer was charged with 1st Degree Possession of a Controlled Subst., 1st Degree Sale of a Controlled Subst. & Receiving Stolen Property.

OCTOBER 2015:

Midday on October 14th, a vehicle was stolen from the area of the Owatonna Public Works Facility. Later that day, an officer was fueling her squad at the same facility when she observed a vehicle matching the description of the stolen vehicle drive by. The officer followed the vehicle and attempted to stop it near the Auto Zone store. When the officer initiated the stop, the vehicle pulled over and three males exited the vehicle and fled on foot—none of the occupants were apprehended. Using squad video, an informant was able to identify the driver of the stolen vehicle. Additionally, detectives, using a receipt found in the recovered vehicle, were able to track a transaction to Wal-Mart in Faribault. Wal-Mart surveillance video of the transaction showed the same person identified by the informant making a purchase. On October 16th, the identified suspect was located by officers and placed under arrest. In an interview, he admitted to being the driver of the stolen vehicle. Jeffrey A. Wolf, age 27, has been formally charged with Motor Vehicle Theft and Fleeing an Officer on Foot.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 24


SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS 2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR CALLS

265

168

32

41

55

13

52

44

7

Two Owatonna Police Department school resource officers are assigned to work within the local schools of

Owatonna. They serve as an avenue to improve safety and prevent crime and violence in our schools. School resource officers collaborate with administration and staff to investigate crime on school property and improve reporting of criminal activity as well as serve as an educational resource by bringing their expertise as guest instructors into certain facets of the education curriculum. We continued in 2015 with our partnership with the Owatonna Public Schools by providing a full-time and part-time CSO in the Owatonna High School (OHS) and a full-time CSO in the Owatonna Junior High School (OJHS). The CSOs in the high school work in conjunction with the OHS school resource officer (SRO) and OHS administrators. Their primary duties are staffing a single point of entry during school hours, monitoring student activity in the hallways and lunch periods, school property parking, and being a visible deterrent in the school. At the OJHS, the CSO also works in conjunction with the SRO and administrative staff and is primarily responsible for the staffing of the single point of entry, hallway patrol, access security, and being a visible deterrent in the school. In addition, the school CSOs provide additional security at special school district functions, such as sporting events or dances. When school is not in session, these three CSOs are assigned back to the department to perform traditional CSO duties and focus on being a uniformed presence at summer school sessions, summer lunch programs, or any other community events that may draw youth from the community.

Page 25 ~ Owatonna Police Department


SO CENTRAL DRUG

INVESTIGATIONS

The Owatonna Police Department continued its leadership role as the fiscal agent of the South Central Drug Investigation Unit (SCDIU) - a grant funded Violent Crimes Enforcement Team (VCET), in 2015. This leadership role included the assignment of a police sergeant as the commander as well as an administrative assistant. The Owatonna Police Department also continued to co-fund a field agent position in conjunction with the Steele County Sheriff’s Office. The SCDIU is a federally funded multi-jurisdictional VECT formed in cooperation with member agencies within the four counties of Freeborn, Faribault, Steele, and Waseca. The coverage area encompasses approximately 2,500 square miles. In early 2015, the SCDIU became co-located at the Owatonna Law Enforcement Center, after space was repurposed and remodeled. Aside from the commander and administrative coordinator, five specially trained agents from the following agencies—Owatonna and Albert Lea Police Departments and Freeborn, Faribault, and Waseca County Sheriff Offices concentrated their efforts on narcotic distribution and related violent crime investigations. The SCDIU has developed strong partnerships with adjoining VECT’s, the MN Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA), along with other federal law enforcement agencies—ATF, DEA, FBI, and Homeland Security. Together they all take part in investigating cases that stretch beyond the boundaries of the SCDIU and have a direct impact on the flow of illegal drugs into our area. The agents also focus on public education by conducting presentations at schools, churches, civic organizations and in the work place.

SCDIU

83

57

23

18

8

14

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 26


COMPLIANCE INITIATIVES 2014 / 2015 COMPLIANCE CHECKS

100% 95% 90% 85% 80% 2014 Checks

2015 Checks

2014 Checks

Alcohol 2014 Pass

2015 Pass

2015 Checks

Tobacco Fail

2014 Pass

2015 Pass

The Owatonna Police Department Detective Bureau conducts multiple alcohol and tobacco compliance checks with licensed on/off liquor and tobacco retailers operating within the city. Compliance checks are utilized to help ensure retailers are complying with regulations that are designed to keep these products out of the hands of our youth. Our detectives conduct these checks at least twice annually using trained, underage operatives. When conducting the checks, the hope is that retailers are following the laws as well as their own policies and 100% compliance is achieved. Unfortunately, illegal

sales are sometimes made and enforcement action is needed. A sale of alcohol or tobacco to an underage person is a criminal matter and may result in criminal charges. The sale of tobacco to someone underage is a misdemeanor offense, or if it is a second violation within five years—a gross misdemeanor. The sale of alcohol to an underage person is a gross misdemeanor. In addition to criminal charges, a retailer who commits an underage alcohol sale offense may have their liquor license suspended or revoked by the city council. In the case of a tobacco sale offense (including e-cigarettes or other tobacco related products) the retailer may face an administrative fine of up to $500 and/or a license suspension, depending upon the number of times the retailer has committed an offense.

Page 27 ~ Owatonna Police Department


ALCOHOL / TOBACCO & POR PREDATORY OFFENDERS REGISTRY 2015 OVERVIEW 

Registered Predatory Offenders Monitored: 107

Change Forms Processed: 128

Registration Period Completed: 2

Offenders Moved into Owatonna: 47

Offenders Moved out of Owatonna: 35

Incarcerated: 23

Offenders may have moved in, moved out, submitted change forms or were incarcerated more than once throughout the year.

TOTAL NON-COMPLIANCE INVESTIGATIONS: 10 

Formal Complaints: 5

Referred to Another Agency: 1

Exceptionally Cleared: 2

Unfounded: 2

COMPLIANCE CHECKS

SPRING

FALL

Completed:

70

67

Change Forms Completed:

32

30

Non-Compliance Reports:

4

3

Spring—2 formal complaints, 1 unfounded, 1 exceptionally cleared Fall—1 formal complaint, 1 unfounded, 1 exceptionally cleared

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 28


DETECTIVE BUREAU SUPPORT—FORFEITTURES

The forfeiture account sees receipts and expenditures resulting from cash and vehicles taken in due to DWI, Controlled Substance, Fleeing and Theft cases. Minnesota State Statute 609:5315 governs the distribution of forfeited property and states that money or proceeds from the sale of forfeited property must be distributed 70% to the appropriate agency as a supplement to the agency’s operating fund or for law enforcement use, 20% to the prosecuting authority for controlled substance, fleeing and theft cases and 30% for DWIs. The remaining 10% goes to the State Treasury for controlled substance, fleeing and theft cases only. Through the course of 2015, the following receipts and expenses were made to the Owatonna Police

2015 Beginning Balance Funds Received Total Assets

$24,457.42 47,579.14 $72,036.56

Expenditures Tow Expenses

$ 6,376.50

Vehicle Titles

290.50

Certified Mail

34.36

County Attorney State Treasurer Auction Expenses

9,317.03 515.73 3,770.85

Vehicle Supplies

48.07

Event Expenses

1,404.10

Detective Vehicle

26,688.25

8 Detective Rifles

6,400.00

Total Expenditures

Ending Fund Balance

Page 29 ~ Owatonna Police Department

$54,845.39

$17,191.17


PROPERTY / EVIDENCE & CRIME SCENE UNIT OPD PROPERTY & EVIDENCE CRIME SCENE UNIT The Crime Scene Unit is

8000

called upon to assist the

6000

Patrol and Investigative

5000

Divisions of the Owatonna Police Department for the purpose of evidence

7415

7000

4000 3000

2894

2000

and preservation. Crime

1942

1000

trained in areas of crime

Items Entered

Items Released

Total Items

scene photography, latent print development and recovery, biological and trace evidence recovery, as well as tool mark and footwear impression recovery. 2894 Released / Destroyed

The Crime Scene Unit uses technology such as a Cyanoacrylate Fuming Chamber. This chamber assists the technicians in the development and preservation of latent impressions left by fingers

and hands. The Crime Scene Unit also utilizes

1942 Entered

an Evidence Drying Cabinet to protect and dry wet evidence such as bedding and clothing. Members of the unit strive to obtain the most

7415 Total Items

up to date training and equipment available in crime scene processing.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 30


SUPPORT SERVICES—RESERVES

This was the third successful year the Owatonna Police Department was able to utilize its Reserve Officer program and a success it certainly was! The program was overseen by Patrol Sergeants Andy DeVinny and Robbe Kniefel and in 2015 alone, 15 members put in a total of 1,134 volunteer hours of service to our Owatonna community. Reserve officers are committed to a broad scope of duties that range from monthly meetings and training to involvement in community activities that include traffic control at parades, emergency call backs for fire and crime scene assistance, security at street dances, and park patrol. Other specific events they help out with include the Steele County Safety Camp, Night to Unite, Shop with a Cop, Four Seasons Center events, and community walks / runs.

If you or you know someone who is interested in becoming a member of our Reserve Officer program, please visit our website at the link below to view the objectives and requirements, and learn how to file a written application.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHyYKxWqcaE&feature=youtu.be

Page 31 ~ Owatonna Police Department


COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS In 2015, the Owatonna Police Department employed seven community services officers (CSOs)—five part-time and two full-time. Four of the part-time CSOs served in a traditional role by supporting the Patrol Division, Detective Bureau and Administrative Division. The other part-time CSO and the two full-time CSOs were primarily assigned to the Owatonna Public School District to enhance security in the Owatonna High School and the Owatonna Junior High School. Our traditional CSOs support the efforts of the department by providing services to the community while also supporting other divisions within the police department. The CSOs provide a great deal to our community in that they often respond to calls for service that do not require a licensed police officer and in return, our licensed officers are more readily available to respond to emergencies.

When not managing primary responsibilities of parking and animal control, CSOs work other duties:    

Traffic Control, Public Events, Funeral Escorts Patrol City Parks & Schools, House Checks, Tow Releases Ordinance Enforcement, Warning Citation Checks Law Enforcement Center Tours, Squad Car Tours

CSOs may also respond to non-emergency calls:   

Minor Accidents Thefts Vandalism

CSOs work closely with the Owatonna Park & Rec

The CSOs are also tasked with our department’s fleet

Department by reporting and documenting

vehicles by monitoring mileage and scheduling routine

damage in the city parks and trails as well as assist

maintenance and vehicle repairs with mechanics in the

with locking buildings at park closing times.

City of Owatonna’s Public Works Department.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 32


ANIMAL CONTROL TOTAL CALLS FOR SERVICE

Animal control calls keep our Community Service Officers at the Owatonna Police Department plenty busy!

In

2015, animal control calls comprised

approximately 4.5% of our total calls for service and are typically responded to solely by our CSOs.

As a result,

they are normally the investigating authority to all animal related calls for

2011

2012

2013

2014

*2015

service that generally include a barking dog, a dog/cat biting incident, a dog/ cat at large ,or in correspondence with

* Admin Directive 03/12/15: The process of recording CAD “events” changed to reduce the number of events that do not require a detailed disposition.

state statue, declaring a dog potential-

ly dangerous or

dangerous. The

Owatonna PD has its own animal control shelter and on a daily basis, CSOs are responsible for the care of impounded animals being held at the shelter as well as the maintenance of the facility. Please take a moment to

Gray male cat taken in by Angel of Hope Rescue.

Black & white female dog taken in by a local family.

visit, like and share our Owatonna Animal Shelter Facebook page by clicking

the icon below where you can keep in the loop with what’s happening there. It has always been our goal to find a safe for

home all

animals

Page 33 ~ Owatonna Police Department

the

2015 ANIMAL CALLS


PARKING CONTROL DIVISION MISSION:

To create a fair use of available parking within the City of Owatonna by enforcing parking laws.

DIVISION STRATEGY:

To maximize the use of all existing parking spaces for downtown customers, businesses, and residents. To accomplish this strategy, parking restrictions are enforced to encourage employees, business owners and residents to use long-term parking spaces located on the fringe of the downtown area, while making available short-term parking spaces located in the center of downtown for shoppers and customers.

Odd/ Even Violations

Parking Violations

2-4 Hr Tickets Issued

2012

2013

2014

2015

Parking Violations are issued by the patrol division along with community services officers. Enforced parking violations range from parking in the yellow zone to the odd and even winter parking restriction. Refer below to chapter 72 of the City of Owatonna’s ordinance code—Parking Rules for further details. http://amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Minnesota/owatonna_mn/titleviitrafficcode/chapter72parkingrulesgenerally? f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:owatonna_mn$anc=JD_Chapter72

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 34


RICE/STEELE 911

CENTER

The Rice/Steele 911 Center provides 24/7 public safety communications for all law enforcement agencies, fire departments and emergency medical services that operate within the Southern Minnesota Counties of Rice and Steele. The 911 Center employs 15 full-time dispatchers, 2 full-time dispatch supervisors, 2 part-time dispatchers, and 4 administrative staff members. Eleven dispatchers each have over 10 years of service with 4 of them passing the 20 year mark.

Rice/Steele 911 Center

Dispatchers work 12-hour shifts where they screen emergency and non-emergency telephone calls, dispatch appropriate police and fire units, monitor radio activity, and provide supplemental information via multiple law enforcement databases. They do warrant checks, calls for tow, driver’s license and license plate checks, and relay information from other jurisdictions. One of the top priorities of our dispatchers is officer safety. In addition to providing information when applicable, once officers are put on a call the dispatcher regularly checks their status at 2 minute intervals. Dispatchers work in a call taker/dispatcher partnership. The call taker questions callers for pertinent and necessary information and immediately enters that information to the Computer Aided Dispatch software. The Dispatcher will then contact the appropriate responders even as the call taker continues to talk with the caller and update information.

Due to their extensive experience coupled with their outstanding teamwork, the Rice/Steele 911 Center provides top notch information gathering and relaying in the care of our responders and citizens. The Owatonna Police Department relies heavily on maintaining a solid partnership with 911 Center staff and could not function or provide the service that our community deserves without that expertise on the other line. We can’t say thank you enough for all you do.

Page 35 ~ Owatonna Police Department


LEC RECORDS DIVISION The Law Enforcement Center houses a Records Division that is jointly utilized by the Steele County Sheriff’s Office and the Owatonna Police Department. The Records Division personnel consists of four full-time Steele County employees with the Owatonna PD contributing 50% toward their salaries for services. Records specialists are mainly responsible for the maintenance and updating of all law enforcement records to include entry of incident reports and criminal case files that are generated by

both agencies. Public hours of operation are Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Generate statistical reports or summaries as requested Retrieve and update corresponding data from formal complaints Disseminate data in accordance with data privacy / MN statutes Prepare and process gun permits Research and compile background information Compile and process digital case files for the Steele County Attorney’s Office and coordinate officer’s court schedules The Records Division plays a vital role in law enforcement in that it holds the official memory of our agency’s day to day operations, investigations and case management. We pride ourselves knowing that the records specialists are always working hard to provide immediate, accurate, and reliable information to us internally as well as externally to the public. The Owatonna Police Department is extremely grateful for their professionalism and honored to work together as a team.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 36


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS—SAFETY

CAMP

The annual Steele County Safety Camp took place June 4 & 5, 2015. Collectively, 224 graduating 3rd graders attended the camp which focused on fishing safety, boat/canoe safety, camping/hiking safety, bike safety, firearms safety, first aid, electrical safety, and fire safety amongst other fun events for the kids to take part in. The Owatonna Police Department played a large role in the event with Officers Jesse Ackerson, John Petterson, Andrew Van Osdale, Steven Bowman, Community Service Officers Travis Johnson, Dave Schroeder, Kyle Martin, Reserve Officer Michael Leyva, and Police Explorers Logan Ringhofer and Cade Brede all serving as camp counselors. Detective Joel Hunt serves as the department's representative on the camp's planning board and is it's chair. A new class taught by Detective Hunt was the NetSmartz program from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The interactive presentation was very helpful to inform the kids about the internet and real world safety. If your child will be heading into 3rd grade next year and is interested in signing up to be a part of future Steele County Safety Camps, please visit us at the link below.

http://ci.owatonna.mn.us/police/programs/safety-camp

Page 37 ~ Owatonna Police Department


POLAR PLUNGE The Polar Plunge wouldn’t happen without the support of Law Enforcement! Plunges are a part of the year-round fundraising program called the Law Enforcement Torch Run, through which law enforcement personnel from across the state raise funds and awareness for Special Olympics Minnesota. Throughout the year, men and women in law enforcement volunteer their time and energy to host events to support the cause as well as sit on the planning committees at Plunge locations, volunteer on Plunge days, recruit the dive teams to ensure safety of the participants, help with set up and tear down of the Plunge sites—which all make these events a huge success. In the frigid month of January 2015, a total of 165 participants to include the Owatonna Police Department, Owatonna Scuba and Diving Club, Steele County Sheriff’s Office, City of Owatonna, and the Parks and Recreation Department met at Lake Kohlmier to root on the Plungers and show their support for Special Olympics Minnesota. They were all so proud to raise $36,635 for the cause! Article starts here….

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 38


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS—EXPLORERS

2015 EXPLORER POST #204 The post was founded in 1998 and in 2015, the program had two active Explorer Advisors—Officer Schumaker and Detective Oeltjenbruns. The Police Explorer program is a young adult career education program for young men and women who are 14 years of age and graduates of eighth grade or are 15 through 20 years of age. There were 4 youth participants in 2015. Law Enforcement Explorers is a youth development program centered on law enforcement careers and is a cooperative effort between the Owatonna Police Department and the Boy Scouts of America. The purpose of this program is to provide experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Members of the Owatonna Police Department Explorer Post #204 participate in training meetings which expose them to a wide variety of situations that law enforcement officers experience. They also participate in community events where their assistance is valuable to the police department and gives them insight into the many varied duties of the department.

Page 39 ~ Owatonna Police Department


CITY OF OWATONNA LANDLORD

ASSN

DISORDERLY & NUISANCE CALLS 2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

As part of law enforcement involvement, the Owatonna Police Department continues to work diligently with landlords and managers acting in accordance with the City of Owatonna’s Disorderly Use and Nuisance Ordinance in order to make properties and neighborhoods secure and safe for all to reside in. In 2015, there were 100 disorderly use violations and 7 nuisance violations which were reported and resolved. COLA was established to help rental property owners accomplish the following:      

Participate in an exchange of information with fellow property owners & local law enforcement, Disseminate useful information to all members and inspire them to further educate themselves in the practical features of their rental operations, Advance the general welfare of the local rental property industry, Advocate a Code of Ethics to maintain high professional standards and sound business methods, among its members for the best interest of the industry and the public, Educate landlords, managers and owners as to their rights and responsibilities under the MN Landlord/Tenant Act and the Federal State Fair Housing Laws, and Promote the enactment and enforcement of local laws and regulations beneficial to rental property owners and to free enterprise.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 40


COMMUNITY PROGRAMS—TZD

The Minnesota Toward Zero Deaths program is the state’s cornerstone traffic safety program, employing an interdisciplinary approach to reducing traffic crashes, injuries, and deaths on Minnesota roads. While individual disciplines have a long history of successful traffic safety programs, TZD aims to tie these together with a common vision and mission for even greater success. The TZD program uses

data to target areas for improvement and employ proven countermeasures. The TZD program team works in partnership with community and corridor groups to improve the traffic safety of designated areas and that’s where we come into play. The Owatonna Police Department received a total of $5,094.38 in grant funds from the Minnesota TZD program in 2015 which provided us the means to conduct 108.50 additional hours of enhanced traffic enforcement in our community. The TZD program team has identified several major focus areas to reduce traffic injuries and fatalities. A combination of strategies from different focus areas is often most effective for solving problems. 

Education—Changing driver behavior is the focus of traffic safety education efforts. It is not enough for drivers to understand the "rules of the road." Drivers must be motivated to change their driving habits.

Emergency Medical & Trauma Services—The goal of the Toward Zero Deaths program is to reduce not just crashes, but total road injuries and fatalities. That means that when a crash does occur, fast, efficient, and coordinated emergency response is critical.

Enforcement—Ensuring compliance with traffic laws is a major component in changing driver behavior and reducing unsafe driving practices.

Engineering—Modifying or reconstructing roadways can be challenging and time consuming. Careful evaluation of road characteristics is the key to a solid investment in public safety.

Courts & Legislation—The passage of traffic safety legislation in Minnesota plays a major role in supporting TZD efforts. Once laws are in place, the judicial system supports TZD by upholding and carrying through on citations.

http://www.minnesotatzd.org/

Page 41 ~ Owatonna Police Department


NIGHT TO UNITE

Photos courtesy of Owatonna Peoples Press

Officers from the Owatonna Police Department, city officials and council members, Owatonna Fire Department staff, police reserves, and chaplains visited with over 28 different neighborhood groups and an estimated 1,200 community members during Night to Unite on Tuesday, August 4th, 2015.

NIGHT TO UNITE IS DESIGNED TO: 1. Heighten crime, drug, and violence prevention awareness 2. Generate support for, and participate in local anti-crime programs 3. Strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships 4. Send a message to criminals letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back If you are interested in hosting a block party in your neighborhood, please visit our website to fill out a registration form at the link below. We look forward to partnering with you!

http://ci.owatonna.mn.us/police/programs/night-to-unite-3

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 42


2015 DATA TREND Crime Rate

2015 Part I Crimes

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

per 100,000

Homicide

0

0

0

0

Rape

9

5

56

35

Robbery

14

6

43

55

Aggravated Assault

37

31

84

144

Burglary

142

23

16

554

Larceny

513

222

43

2,001

Motor Vehicle Theft

27

12

44

105

Arson

2

0

0

8

Human Trafficking

1

1

100

4

745

300

40

2,905

Total Part I

Crime Rate 2015 Part II Crimes

# of Offenses

Offenses Cleared

% Cleared

per 100,000

Other Assaults

156

127

81

608

Forgery/Counterfeiting

16

4

25

62

Fraud

68

25

37

265

Embezzlement

0

0

0

0

Stolen Property

3

2

67

12

Vandalism

207

20

10

807

Weapons

8

6

75

31

Prostitution

9

9

100

35

Other Sex Offenses

16

9

56

62

Drug Abuse

115

103

90

448

Gambling

0

0

0

0

Family/Children

6

2

33

23

DUI

112

105

94

437

Liquor Laws

24

24

100

94

Disorderly Conduct

28

27

96

109

Runaways

41

37

90

160

Other Offenses

121

97

80

472

Total Part II

930

597

64

3,625

1675

897

54

6,530

GRAND TOTAL

Page 43 ~ Owatonna Police Department


2015 DATA TREND FIVE YEAR COMPARISON

OWATONNA POLICE DEPARTMENT CRIME

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

Homicide

0

0

0

0

0

Rape

9

3

5

7

9

Robbery

14

6

6

1

12

Aggravated Assault

37

27

25

22

18

Burglary

142

79

114

82

119

Larceny

513

510

538

509

352

27

30

28

21

20

Arson

2

0

0

4

0

Human Trafficking

1

0

0

0

0

Total Part I

745

655

716

646

530

Total Part II

930

875

903

916

801

Motor Vehicle Theft

Statistics furnished from the Minnesota BCA / CJIS Uniform Crime Report.

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 44


2015 DATA TREND

2015 OFFENSES CLEARED BY AGENCY

Part I & II Crimes

Page 45 ~ Owatonna Police Department

Drug Abuse


2015 DATA TREND

DRUG ABUSE CASES CLEARED Drug Task Force Regions 2015 per Capita South Central Drug Investigative Unit Steele, Waseca, Faribault, and Freeborn Counties Population = 100,352 Total Narcotic Arrests = 303 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0030

MN River Valley Drug Task Force Martin, Watonwan, Nicollet, and Blue Earth Counties Population = 129,889 Total Narcotic Arrests = 426 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0033

SE MN Narcotics and Gang Task Force Olmsted, Winona, Goodhue, Dodge, Mower, Fillmore, Houston, and Wabasha Counties Population = 369,291 Total Narcotic Arrests = 900 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0024

Rice County Drug Task Force Rice County Population = 66,503 Total Narcotic Arrests = 170 Narcotic Arrests per Capita = .0026

2015 Annual Report ~ Page 46


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Owatonna Police Department 2015 Annual Report  

Owatonna Police Department 2015 Annual Report