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Living

This is

A resource for today’s seniors & their families

Spring 2012 HEALTH, RECREATION & LIFESTYLE

Steele County, Minnesota

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1414 S. Oak Avenue, Suite 3 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7000

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Senior Living 2012

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Ad

Index

n Apartments The Gateway ..............................18 n Appliance Service On the Spot Appliance Service........................................9 n Assisted Living Oakpark Place ............................11 Prairie Manor ................................7 Traditions of Owatonna .................4 Valleyview of Owatonna................5 Whispering Oak Assisted Living Community .......................24 n Clinics Mayo Clinic Health System Owatonna ...................................11 n Dental Main Street Dental ......................21 n Education Grandparents for Education .......10 n Entertainment Steele County Free Fair ..............18 n Financial Profinium Financial .....................12 n Fitness Curves/Silver Sneakers ..............16 n Funeral Services Michaelson Funeral Home..........24 n Handicap Aids Premier Lift Products ..................15 n Hearing Centers Ultimate Hearing Inc.....................2

Editorial Index

n Home Care All Generations Home Care....... 13 Visiting Angels ........................... 10

n Summertime and living is easy: Helpful hints for hot and humid times.......4

n Insurance United Prairie Insurance ...............9

n Drifting into the shadows: Seeing the signs of Alzheimer’s.................8

n Memory Care Traditions II ...................................4

n Older and out of work: Organization overcomes the obstacles of unemployment ...........................................12

n Monument Owatonna Granite & Monument ...............................17

n Sharing the road: Program aims to keep older drivers at the top of their game .......................................16

n Newspaper/Media Owatonna People’s Press ...........20

n Seniors go green Environmentally sound ways of life ........19

n Physical Therapy In Touch Physical Therapy ...........6

n Senior Living Resource Directory........22

n Printing J-C Press ....................................24 n Restaurants Costas Candies & Restaurant ....14 n Senior Living Morehouse Place........................13 Realife Cooperative of Owatonna .............................19 Westside Board & Lodge Home.............................12 n Senior Services SeniorPlace/Steele County Senior & Caregiver Expo .........................8 n Travel Cedar Travel .................................8 Travel Headquarters .....................7

This is Living A RESOURCE GUIDE FOR SENIORS LIVING IN OR AROUND STEELE COUNTY

A special project of The Owatonna People’s Press 135 W. Pearl, Owatonna, MN 55060 Publisher and Editor Ron Ensley Advertising Director Debbie Ensley Managing Editor Jeffrey Jackson Sales Constultants Betty Frost, Diane Gengler, Rachel Ebbers Deb Theisen, Luke Brown Ad Design Jenine Kubista, Kelly Kubista, Kerri Lynch, Sue Schuster Cover Design Kerri Lynch All advertising contained herein is the responsibility of the advertisers. All rights reserved. ©2012.

Look for this section on

Owatonna.com Senior Living 2012

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Summertime and living is easy …

Or at least it can be if you remember a few helpful Keep doing and healthful hints for those hot and humid times

what you love

By JEFFREY JACKSON jjackson@owatonna.com

S

ummer is right around the corner, and with it will come a desire in many folks — including those in the senior set — to get out and enjoy that warmer weather. By all means, seniors should get out and about, health experts say. But they also warn that the warmer summer months can present special problems for us all as we get older. And those special problems can have dangerous, even deadly, consequences. Each year, exposure to high temperatures and humidity leads to hundreds of deaths across the country. Seniors comprise a large percentage of heat-related illnesses and death.

See SUMMERTIME

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page 5

Senior Living 2012

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LIFESTYLE AMENITIES AND SERVICES: • Apartment Rental and Utilities • 24 Hour Building Security • 3 Meals Plus Snacks Daily • Restaurant-Style Dining • Social, Cultural, Spiritual and Education Program • Weekly Apartment Housekeeping

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TRADITIONS OF OWATONNA 195 24th Place NW | Owatonna | 507-455-0700 TRADITIONS OF OWATONNA II 150 24th Street NE | Owatonna | 507-451-0433 WWW.TRADITIONSOFMINNESOTA.COM

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SUMMERTIME Continued from page 4

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that “People aged 65 or older are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature.” And so, says the CDC, the older we get, the more we need to be reminded of some simple health advice to protect us when the weather starts to warm up. And the first reminder? Drink more fluids. “The older you are, the more prone you are to dehydration, and the higher risk you have for fluid loss,” says Jodie Smith, a nurse practitioner at Mayo Clinic Health System in Owatonna. One reason is that the older we get, the more we begin to lose the sensation of thirst. Without the desire to drink regularly, we can become dehydrated very easily. So the CDC recommends that seniors — and everyone for that matter — drink more water when the weather is warm and that they don’t wait until they’re thirsty to drink that water. And note: That recommendation is for water. “Water is the best,” says Smith. “Water is what your body is based on. Anything with other additives is unnecessary.” Indeed, Smith adds, not only are some of those other additives, like the caffeine in soda pop, unnecessary, but they can actually be counterproductive. Caffeine, for example, is diuretic that, if drunk in great quantities can cause dehydration rather than quenching the thirst, she says. What’s more, Smith cautions, seniors need to be aware of their own particular health needs and health issues, even when it comes to something seemingly so simple as consumption of water and other fluids. “It varies from person to person,” Smith says about how much water is enough and how much is too much. A person, for example, who has congestive heart failure —a disease that causes fluid to build up and cause congestion in the body — may be told by his or her physician to limit the intake of fluids because of the tendency of fluid to accumulate in the lungs and surrounding tissue. If there’s any question, consult your physician, Smith says.

See SUMMERTIME page 6

This is Living 2012.indd 5

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SUMMERTIME Continued from page 5

Along with the right intake of fluids, seniors should make certain they’re eating a healthy diet during the summer months. Health experts recommend that people skip hot, heavy meals and opt for cooler fare to keep the body temperature colder. “The good thing about these months is the fresh fruits and fresh veggies,” says Smith. Not only do the foods taste great, but they are good for you and part of a “nice healthy diet,” she says. And while you are indulging in those healthy fruits and vegetables, you should limit your fat intake and not eat excessive salt, Smith says, because those things can increase your chances of dehydration. But what about being outdoors when it’s hot? By all means, head out of doors when the weather warms, but be careful and mindful of some basic health tips. “Especially in the summer, we have a great opportunity for walking and exercise — activities that release endorphins and put you in a better mood,” says Smith. Endorphins are chemicals that the body releases when it exercises. The chemicals interact with the brain and reduce one’s feeling of pain, but also trigger a positive feeling in the body. So Smith recommends engaging in physical activity such as taking a walk, gardening, even “antiquing or garage-saling.” “It will put you in a good frame of mind,” Smith says. At the same time, she cautions that you should “know your own limitations.” The older we get, the more apt we are to fall, Smith says, and the more dangerous those falls can become. “There’s a fine line between finding what you like to do and what is good for you,” she says. So though you may like to go rollerblading, as you grow older, you may need to rethink that as an activity. And that primary concern for staying sufficiently hydrated comes into play when one is outside and engaging in physical activity. When a person becomes dehydrated and the body temperature begins to change, that person can experience confusion, falls and other preventable adverse effects. Then there is the danger of heat stroke, the most serious heat-related illness. The CDC warns that elderly people — those 65 years of age or older — are more prone to heat stress, including heat stroke, than younger people because: • Seniors do not adjust as well as young people to

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changes in weather. • Seniors are more likely to have a chronic medical condition that changes normal body responses to heat. • Seniors are more likely to take prescription medicines that impair the body’s ability to regulate its temperature or that might inhibit perspiration. As for heat stroke, the CDC says it “occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature.” “It can cause seizures, confusion, difficulty breathing, and the pulse rate to go up,” says Smith.

See SUMMERTIME page 7

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SUMMERTIME Continued from page 6

And what are the signs that one may be in danger of suffering from heat stroke? First, the body’s temperature rises rapidly — up to 106 degrees or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. And because the body loses its ability to sweat, it becomes unable to regulate its temperature. “If you’re outside and feeling hot, but then stop feeling hot, that’s not a good sign,” says Smith. Smith says other signs are cramping, a rash on the skin, nausea and vomiting. If these symptoms occur, she says, the person should seek medical help immediately. Health experts agree on some strategies to combat the heat: • Move slowly. Rushing around in hot weather can cause body temperature to rise more quickly and make you even hotter. Slow down when it is warm and do plenty of relaxing. • Know the ambient temperature indoors. The heat inside can quickly rise. Keep curtains and blinds drawn to reduce the amount of heat from the sun. Check the thermostat to find out the temperature. If you have an air

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conditioner or fan, turn it on to cool down the house if the temperature is creeping above 85 degree. Otherwise, seek a cooler location — an air-conditioned shopping center or a public library — to cool off. • Plan outdoor activities during cooler hours. If you must spend time outdoors, do so early in the morning or in the evening when the temperatures are bound to be lower and less taxing. • Indulge in a little “cooling off.” Take a dip in a neighborhood pool or take a cool shower, bath or sponge bath. Even treat yourself to an ice cream sundae. Do what you need to stay cool. And two last bits of advice from Jodie Smith: “Dress appropriately for the weather,” she says. The skin of an older adult is thinner, much more fragile and more “friable,” Smith says. Because the skin is more sensitive, it is absolutely essential that older adults use sunscreen and wear hats when they go out in the sun. And finally, she says, “know your limitations and don’t over-exert.”

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Drifting into the shadows Seeing the signs of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia By JEFFREY JACKSON jjackson@owatonna.com

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hat do former president Ronald Reagan, actress Rita Hayworth, composer Aaron Copland, artist Norman Rockwell, boxer Sugar Ray Robinson and author E.B. White have in common?

progressive degeneration of the brain that is the most common form of dementia. Although there are more than 40 different types of dementia, Alzheimer’s accounts for 50 percent to 80 percent of all dementia cases, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

See ALZHEIMER’S

They all were afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease, a

page 9

CEDAR TRAVEL Would Like to Thank Our Customers For Over 22 Years of Business!

9th Annual

Steele County Senior & Caregiver Expo Four Seasons Centre • Steele County Fairgrounds

“We Take Time To Care”

Wednesday, May 2 • 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • FREE! nd

• Informational Speakers • American Blood Drive 12-5pm • Brown Bag Review w/ Pharmacist • 60+ Informational Booths • Parking Lot Shuttle • Health Screenings— Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Glucose, Balance & Strength Checks, & Vehicle Inspections

Laurie, Colleen, Dave & Ronda

111 North Cedar, Owatonna

507-455-1170 www.cedartravel.net

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Transportation available by calling Semcac Transportation at 1-866-238-9389 Volunteers will be available from Blooming Prairie, Ellendale & Medford (Must call by 12 PM May 1st) Suggested Donation is $500 round trip. Sponsored by EARN (Elderly Advisory Resource Network of Steele County) More information available on the SeniorPlace website: http://ci.owatonna.mn.us/parksrecreation/senior-place or call SeniorPlace: 507-444-4280

4061239 Senior Place Living OPP 4.27 kL 4/25/12 12:14 PM


ALZHEIMER’S Continued from page 8

What’s more, Alzheimer’s, which claims the lives of 23,000 Americans a year, is the eighth leading cause of death among the elderly in the U.S. It’s symptoms include memory loss, disorientation and other intellectual impairment, making it a frightening disease to cope with. Melissa Block understands how frightening the prospect of Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia can be on family members, particularly the older spouses, of those stricken with the disease. “If they have been together for 50 to 60 years, they’re a little more hesitant and scared,” said Block. And she has seen it up close and personal in her work as the activities director for Traditions II of Owatonna, a 46-bed memory care unit. “The ‘taboo-ness’ of Alzheimer’s is still out there,” Block said, especially, she added, for older folks.

For younger people — those of what Block called “the computer generation” — there is so much information readily available on the Internet about the various types of dementia that the taboo is diminishing, if not breaking down altogether. Also of great help, Block said, are the number of support groups out there that help individuals and families cope with the stresses that accompany caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s. But what are the warning signs of Alzheimer’s and how can you tell if a loved one might be afflicted with the condition? “Ask a question,” Block says. “Is memory disrupting daily life? Is the person forgetting recently learned information?” Block says when families visit Traditions II to ask if their loved ones might be suffering with some form of dementia, the staff suggests to undergo a little test with the person: Ask the person to go get a glass of water and bring it back. If the person goes into the room to get it, but then hesitates or even forgets to get the water — perhaps sitting down or turning on the television instead — then memory loss may be an issue. “If they can remember the first step, but can’t remember step two or three, if they’re confused with time and place, then there may be a problem,” Block says. When such things begin to happen, she says, then the family should start to chart the “little changes in the daily routine, the behavioral changes.” And, of course, she recommends taking the person to the doctor to get a proper diagnosis.

See ALZHEIMER’S page 10

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Senior Living 2012

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ALZHEIMER’S Continued from page 9

2. Difficulty planning. And, of course, though most commonly associated Some people might start to exhibit difficulty following with older people, the disease is not exclusive to the a plan or working with numbers, be it following a recipe elderly. Up to 5 percent of people with the disease have early-onset Alzheimer’s, which most often appears when or paying the monthly bills. Concentration is often difficult for those exhibiting symptoms of Alzheimer’s. someone is in his 40s or 50s. Because it can strike men and women even if they 3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks. aren’t elderly, it’s important to know these 10 warning Daily tasks such as driving to work or remembersigns of Alzheimer’s, courtesy of the Alzheimer’s Asing the rules of a familiar game will prove difficult for sociation and the Alzheimer Society of Canada. people with Alzheimer’s. 1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life. 4. Disorientation with regards to time and/or place. Memory loss is one of the most common signs of Nearly everyone has had momentary lapses where Alzheimer’s. This is especially so if men and women they forget what time it is or what day it is. But such forget things that happened very recently, which can lapses are not momentary for people with Alzheimer’s, negatively impact their daily lives. Additional signs who might even get lost on their own street and not include forgetting important dates and events; asking for the same information over and over again; or relying remember how to get home. on memory aides such as reminder notes or even family See ALZHEIMER’S members for things individuals could once remember on page 11 their own.

“GFE is making a huge difference in the lives of the youth in Owatonna.”

“The students are very receptive to us ‘Old Folks.’”

–Community Member

“Because of GFE’s help, the kids averaged 3 years of growth in reading skills.” –Owatonna Teacher

–Grandparents for Education Member

“We love the time they spend with us. I love to read to them.” –Owatonna Student

“These volunteer services provide additional opportunities for students to further their knowledge.”

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Contact Ron or Sondra von Arb 507-451-8661 or 507-676-0905 (cell) usronsonva@aol.com (email) Visit us at www.grandparentsforeducation.net

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ALZHEIMER’S Continued from page 10

5. Trouble understanding images and spatial relationships. Some people with Alzheimer’s have difficulty reading, judging distance or determining color or contrast. For example, a person with Alzheimer’s might walk past a mirror and not realize he or she is the person in the mirror. 6. New problems with words in speaking or writing. People with Alzheimer’s might experience trouble holding or joining a conversation. An example is stopping in the middle of a conversation and having no idea how to continue. They might also struggle with vocabulary, often having trouble finding the right word to express what they’re thinking. 7. Misplacing things. People with Alzheimer’s might put things in unusual places and then experience difficulty retracing their steps to find those items. This tends to occur more frequently over time, and they often accuse others of stealing items they simply can’t find. 8. Decreased or poor judgment. Poor judgment, such as not visiting the doctor or mishandling finances, is another warning sign for Alzheimer’s. These poor decisions can extend to personal grooming, which men and women with

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Alzheimer’s might neglect. 9. Withdrawal from society. Men and women with Alzheimer’s might start to withdraw from society, removing themselves from social activities, projects at work or hobbies. Avid sports fans might no longer be able to follow their favorite team, while social butterflies might grow reclusive. 10. Changes in mood and personality. People with Alzheimer’s might experience mood swings for no apparent reason and can become anxious, confused, depressed, fearful, or suspicious. Acting out of character might also be indicative of Alzheimer’s. More information about Alzheimer’s disease is available at www.alz.org and www. alzheimer.ca.

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For more information call 507-451-1120. 2200 26th Street NW, Owatonna, MN 55060 mayoclinichealthsystem.org / ©2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.

Senior Living 2012

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03/29/12 -- Cardiology -- 3.65” x 4.9” CMYK

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Older & Out of Work For many unemployed seniors, self-esteem — or the lack of it — is a major obstacle By JEFFREY JACKSON jjackson@owatonna.com

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hen people come in to see Rachel Cobenais for the first time, many are, in Cobenais’ words “not exactly in good shape.” “Most come in confused and they lack direction. They

need help and don’t know what’s available,” she said. “They come in and say, ‘What are we going to do? Who’s going to hire us?’” Cobenais is the employment and training coordinator for a southern Minnesota chapter of Experience Works, an organization that provides training and work for lowincome older individuals. In addition to Steele County, Cobenais’ eight-county region includes Rice, Waseca, Le Sueur, Freeborn, Dakota and Sibley counties.

See SENIOR JOBS page 13

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Senior Living 2012

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Many unemployed older workers believe that their age is preventing them from being hired and are afraid that they will never be able to get another job. (Metro Creative Services)

SENIOR JOBS Continued from page 12

Some of the people who seek the services of Experience Works have been unemployed for two years or more, and aren’t sure if they’ll ever find gainful employment again. In a word, they’re afraid and aren’t sure where to turn. “Most say their age in holding them back,” Cobenais said. “Our job is to get them hired.” That’s not always as easily done as they would hope. Indeed, the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development has said that unemployed workers age 55 or older face different challenges than their

younger counterparts. “Those who’ve been displaced after a lengthy tenure with one employer may find their resume, networking, and interviewing skills need an update. Those investigating a new career field may find themselves competing with younger workers with high levels of education and knowledge of current technologies related to a particular field,” DEED reported in a March 2009 report — a report issued just about the time the state was seeing its highest level of unemployment of the Great Recession. “Whatever their situation, displaced older workers may find that their age is a factor in their job search, whether an advantage or disadvantage.”

See SENIOR JOBS page 14

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IDEAL LOCATION! Cooperative Living for Independent Seniors 55 & above

Activities of daily living

(includes eating, grooming, dressing, bathing, toileting, transferring, mobility, and positioning)

Health-related functions Instrumental activities of daily living

(includes meal planning and preparation, shopping for essential items, performing essential household tasks, and participating in the community)

Redirection & intervention for behavior Call us at 507-451-2223 for information and to set up a tour 353 Lemond Rd, Owatonna, MN morehouse@lasson.net • www.morehouseplace.com

(includes observation

& monitoring of behavior)

Homemaker Services | Respite Services | RN Supervision of PCAs 135 W Main Street | Suite G | Owatonna, MN 507.214.8007 | www.allgenerationshomecare.org

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Many unemployed older workers believe that their age is preventing them from being hired and are afraid that they will never be able to get another job. (Metro Creative Services)

SENIOR JOBS Continued from page 12

Some of the people who seek the services of Experience Works have been unemployed for two years or more, and aren’t sure if they’ll ever find gainful employment again. In a word, they’re afraid and aren’t sure where to turn. “Most say their age in holding them back,” Cobenais said. “Our job is to get them hired.” That’s not always as easily done as they would hope. Indeed, the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development has said that unemployed workers age 55 or older face different challenges than their

younger counterparts. “Those who’ve been displaced after a lengthy tenure with one employer may find their resume, networking, and interviewing skills need an update. Those investigating a new career field may find themselves competing with younger workers with high levels of education and knowledge of current technologies related to a particular field,” DEED reported in a March 2009 report — a report issued just about the time the state was seeing its highest level of unemployment of the Great Recession. “Whatever their situation, displaced older workers may find that their age is a factor in their job search, whether an advantage or disadvantage.”

See SENIOR JOBS page 14

For a real sense of community, join our family at

home care with heart

PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANCE & SERVICES

IDEAL LOCATION! Cooperative Living for Independent Seniors 55 & above

Activities of daily living

(includes eating, grooming, dressing, bathing, toileting, transferring, mobility, and positioning)

Health-related functions Instrumental activities of daily living

(includes meal planning and preparation, shopping for essential items, performing essential household tasks, and participating in the community)

Redirection & intervention for behavior Call us at 507-451-2223 for information and to set up a tour 353 Lemond Rd, Owatonna, MN morehouse@lasson.net • www.morehouseplace.com

(includes observation

& monitoring of behavior)

Homemaker Services | Respite Services | RN Supervision of PCAs 135 W Main Street | Suite G | Owatonna, MN 507.214.8007 | www.allgenerationshomecare.org

Senior Living 2012

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SENIOR JOBS Continued from page 13

In the months leading up to that report, participation by older workers in the labor market was strong, with the labor force participation rate for Minnesotans age 55 to 64 growing from 64.7 percent in 2000 to 71.6 percent in 2008. But participation rates for people 65 or older was considerably less. In 2000, the rate for those 65 years or older was 19.7 percent. That rate fell in 2008 to 15.9 percent, with 2,000 individuals in that age group looking for a job. That’s not all the numbers show. According to the Congressional Research Service, in the year 2007, 47 percent of male seniors and 34 percent of female seniors were employed. But those numbers were from 2007 — before the brunt of the Great Recession hit the economy. When the current economic downturn hit with all its fury, many senior citizens found themselves looking to return to work because of the impact that the financial crisis had on their retirement plans. At the same time they found themselves wanting — and in many cases needing — to return to work, they found jobs scarce. And that’s where an organization like Experience Works comes into play. The biggest program offered by Experience Works is the Senior Community Service Employment Program — a program funded through Title V of the Older Americans Act that helps workers 55 years old or older find employment. Cobenais said that though the organization has always had a number of clients -- though the organization prefers to call them “participants” — it has seen an increase over the past few years in the number of people age 55 to 60 seeking to use its services. The increase in that age group she attributes to the economic downturn and the fact that workers in that age group were losing their jobs. “Before, the people who used our program were people who had already retired and found out that they couldn’t live on their retirement income,” Cobenais said. “Now the number of ‘younger people’ coming to us has increased.” In fact, she said, as a result of the economic downturn the organization has even seen many people who are younger than 55 — and hence, not eligible to participate in the program — come in seeking help.

See SENIOR JOBS

14 –

page 15

Senior Living 2012

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When competing against younger people for jobs in today’s marketplace, older workers need to have honed their computer skills. For many, that is not easy because it is not a skill set that they grew up with. (Metro Creative Services)

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4/25/12 12:17 PM

“Th peop serve old e Th that t 55 ye unem certa der t guid then in a c assig 20 ho are e any s they An Wor “A Cobe set. T the c Wh ing t Bu Cobe train they less p who drivi tract seve a cer Wh “mor On then whic skill ers c “E said. expe to of Th


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SENIOR JOBS Continued from page 13

In the months leading up to that report, participation by older workers in the labor market was strong, with the labor force participation rate for Minnesotans age 55 to 64 growing from 64.7 percent in 2000 to 71.6 percent in 2008. But participation rates for people 65 or older was considerably less. In 2000, the rate for those 65 years or older was 19.7 percent. That rate fell in 2008 to 15.9 percent, with 2,000 individuals in that age group looking for a job. That’s not all the numbers show. According to the Congressional Research Service, in the year 2007, 47 percent of male seniors and 34 percent of female seniors were employed. But those numbers were from 2007 — before the brunt of the Great Recession hit the economy. When the current economic downturn hit with all its fury, many senior citizens found themselves looking to return to work because of the impact that the financial crisis had on their retirement plans. At the same time they found themselves wanting — and in many cases needing — to return to work, they found jobs scarce. And that’s where an organization like Experience Works comes into play. The biggest program offered by Experience Works is the Senior Community Service Employment Program — a program funded through Title V of the Older Americans Act that helps workers 55 years old or older find employment. Cobenais said that though the organization has always had a number of clients -- though the organization prefers to call them “participants” — it has seen an increase over the past few years in the number of people age 55 to 60 seeking to use its services. The increase in that age group she attributes to the economic downturn and the fact that workers in that age group were losing their jobs. “Before, the people who used our program were people who had already retired and found out that they couldn’t live on their retirement income,” Cobenais said. “Now the number of ‘younger people’ coming to us has increased.” In fact, she said, as a result of the economic downturn the organization has even seen many people who are younger than 55 — and hence, not eligible to participate in the program — come in seeking help.

See SENIOR JOBS

14 –

page 15

Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 14

When competing against younger people for jobs in today’s marketplace, older workers need to have honed their computer skills. For many, that is not easy because it is not a skill set that they grew up with. (Metro Creative Services)

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“Th peop serve old e Th that t 55 ye unem certa der t guid then in a c assig 20 ho are e any s they An Wor “A Cobe set. T the c Wh ing t Bu Cobe train they less p who drivi tract seve a cer Wh “mor On then whic skill ers c “E said. expe to of Th


15

SENIOR JOBS Continued from page 14

the participants, Cobenais said. “There are a lot of “They come to us at their people who we can’t worst, and we help put toserve because they’re not gether the whole person. We old enough,” she said. get people up on their feet and The program requires make them a whole person,” that the participants be she said. “For many of them, 55 years or older, are self-esteem is a big issue. unemployed and meet There are a lot who are homecertain guidelines unless or in danger of losing der the federal poverty their hoes through forecloguidelines. Participants sure. They’ve burned through then must be involved their retirement. They’ve in a community service been unemployed for multiple assignment for at least years and can’t get anyone to 20 hours before they hire them. Their self-esteem is Having a job can increase the self-esteem of older people, experts say. (Metro Creative Connection) are eligible to receive very low. Most of our success any sort of re-training stories mention that as a huge they might need to secure a job in today’s job market. thing — building up their self-esteem.” And most everyone who comes in to Experience For more information about Experience Works, visit Works needs some sort of training, Cobenais said. the organization’s website at experienceworks.org or “About 98 percent go through computer training,” call the organization’s Owatonna office at 507-451Cobenais said. “In most cases the problem is their skill 0989. set. They belong to a generation that did not grow up on the computer.” When competing against younger people for jobs, having those computer skills is vital. But it’s not just computer skills that participants seek, Cobenais said. Though most seniors take computer Accessibility Specialists training or some sort of secretarial training because Since 1995 they are looking for work that is more sedentary and Let us help with your accessibility needs less physical, that’s not always the case. One man who recently went through the program received truck driving training that will allow him to operate the big • Stair Lifts tractor-trailer trucks on the road. A woman went through • Home Elevators several medical terminology courses in order to become • Patient Lifters a certified nursing assistant. Whatever the training they receive, it helps make them • Door Operators “more competitive in the work place,” Cobenais said. • Wheelchair Lifts Once the participants get the sort of training they need, then they are ready to rejoin the workforce — something which happens often because in addition to their new skill set, they bring something which the younger workers can’t bring, namely experience. Member Better Business Bureau A+ rating “Experience Works — the name says it all,” Cobenais Licensed (MN-CE00130)/Bonded & Insured said. “We don’t look at age as a detriment. Their life Locally Owned–Dixon Rypka, President experience alone is so valuable that they have so much www.premierliftproducts.com to offer the workforce.” The work of Experience Works can be life-changing for Senior Living 2012 – 15

507-444-9802

This is Living 2012.indd 15

4/25/12 12:17 PM


15

SENIOR JOBS Continued from page 14

the participants, Cobenais said. “There are a lot of “They come to us at their people who we can’t worst, and we help put toserve because they’re not gether the whole person. We old enough,” she said. get people up on their feet and The program requires make them a whole person,” that the participants be she said. “For many of them, 55 years or older, are self-esteem is a big issue. unemployed and meet There are a lot who are homecertain guidelines unless or in danger of losing der the federal poverty their hoes through forecloguidelines. Participants sure. They’ve burned through then must be involved their retirement. They’ve in a community service been unemployed for multiple assignment for at least years and can’t get anyone to 20 hours before they hire them. Their self-esteem is Having a job can increase the self-esteem of older people, experts say. (Metro Creative Connection) are eligible to receive very low. Most of our success any sort of re-training stories mention that as a huge they might need to secure a job in today’s job market. thing — building up their self-esteem.” And most everyone who comes in to Experience For more information about Experience Works, visit Works needs some sort of training, Cobenais said. the organization’s website at experienceworks.org or “About 98 percent go through computer training,” call the organization’s Owatonna office at 507-451Cobenais said. “In most cases the problem is their skill 0989. set. They belong to a generation that did not grow up on the computer.” When competing against younger people for jobs, having those computer skills is vital. But it’s not just computer skills that participants seek, Cobenais said. Though most seniors take computer Accessibility Specialists training or some sort of secretarial training because Since 1995 they are looking for work that is more sedentary and Let us help with your accessibility needs less physical, that’s not always the case. One man who recently went through the program received truck driving training that will allow him to operate the big • Stair Lifts tractor-trailer trucks on the road. A woman went through • Home Elevators several medical terminology courses in order to become • Patient Lifters a certified nursing assistant. Whatever the training they receive, it helps make them • Door Operators “more competitive in the work place,” Cobenais said. • Wheelchair Lifts Once the participants get the sort of training they need, then they are ready to rejoin the workforce — something which happens often because in addition to their new skill set, they bring something which the younger workers can’t bring, namely experience. Member Better Business Bureau A+ rating “Experience Works — the name says it all,” Cobenais Licensed (MN-CE00130)/Bonded & Insured said. “We don’t look at age as a detriment. Their life Locally Owned–Dixon Rypka, President experience alone is so valuable that they have so much www.premierliftproducts.com to offer the workforce.” The work of Experience Works can be life-changing for Senior Living 2012 – 15

507-444-9802

This is Living 2012.indd 15

4/25/12 12:17 PM


16

Sharing the road As America’s population grows older, more and more drivers will be senior citizens. Here’s what one program aims to do to keep those drivers at the top of their game when they’re behind the wheel By JEFFREY JACKSON jjackson@owatonna.com

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e’ve all heard the jokes and know the stereotypes about older Americans who continue to drive their vehicles even though they are advanced in their years.

507-455-4060 1828 S. CEDAR AVE OWATONNA, MN 55060

See DRIVING page 17

16 –

Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 16

4/25/12 12:17 PM


16

Sharing the road As America’s population grows older, more and more drivers will be senior citizens. Here’s what one program aims to do to keep those drivers at the top of their game when they’re behind the wheel By JEFFREY JACKSON jjackson@owatonna.com

Curves® & SilverSneakers: Working out just keeps getting better. If you’re a SilverSneakers® Fitness Program member, you could be getting fit at Curves free*! Call us to see if you qualify.

silversneakers.com

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e’ve all heard the jokes and know the stereotypes about older Americans who continue to drive their vehicles even though they are advanced in their years.

507-455-4060 1828 S. CEDAR AVE OWATONNA, MN 55060

See DRIVING page 17

16 –

Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 16

4/25/12 12:17 PM


17

DRIVING

Continued from page 16

population — or The image is about 40 million that of an elderly people — were woman who is people age 65 or navigating an older. But that same automobile as big year, 5,288 people as a boat and who in that age group can barely see were killed and anover the dashother 187,000 were board. Or perhaps injured in traffic it’s that of an crashes. That means older man who is that 8 percent of all traveling down the people injured in highway for miles traffic crashes that and miles, his year were older indileft turn indicator According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, the number of licensed older drives — drivers 65 years old viduals. At the same continuing to blink or older — increased 20 percent over a 9-year period. (Metro Creative Connection) time, a whopping 16 and to confuse percent of all traffic other drivers. And fatalities were elderly individuals. if there’s one thing in common about all these stereotypes of older drivers, it’s that the drivers all drive slow. See DRIVING Incredibly slow. Excruciatingly slow. page 18 But whether the stereotypes have a kernel of truth to them or just fanciful exaggerations, one thing is for certain: There are a lot of older drivers out there and the numbers are getting bigger each year. And why is that? Simply put, it’s because the nation’s senior population is growing. For one thing, life expectancy continues to expand. And as people live longer, they are likely to want to drive their automobiles longer. Furthermore, now, as the first wave of the baby boomer generation has reached their golden years, it is likely that more and more drivers will have white hair to match the white on their sidewall tires. According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, in 2008 — the last year for which numbers are available — there were 32 million licensed older drivers, that is, drivers 65 years old or older. That marks a 20 percent increase from 1999. “In contrast, the total number of licensed drivers increased by only 11 percent from 1999 to 2008,” the NHTA reports. “Older drivers made up 15 percent of all licensed drivers in 2008, compared with 14 percent in John Heerema Owner 1999.” Katie Mulcahey - Sales Ed Cunningham - Sales That being said, it should also be pointed out that there is a disproportionate number of crashes, including fatal 1180 Frontage Rd. East • 507-455-9551 crashes, involving older drivers. www.owatonnagranite.com According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, in 2009, 13 percent of the total U.S. resident Senior Living 2012 – 17 This is Living 2012.indd 17

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17

DRIVING

Continued from page 16

population — or The image is about 40 million that of an elderly people — were woman who is people age 65 or navigating an older. But that same automobile as big year, 5,288 people as a boat and who in that age group can barely see were killed and anover the dashother 187,000 were board. Or perhaps injured in traffic it’s that of an crashes. That means older man who is that 8 percent of all traveling down the people injured in highway for miles traffic crashes that and miles, his year were older indileft turn indicator According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, the number of licensed older drives — drivers 65 years old viduals. At the same continuing to blink or older — increased 20 percent over a 9-year period. (Metro Creative Connection) time, a whopping 16 and to confuse percent of all traffic other drivers. And fatalities were elderly individuals. if there’s one thing in common about all these stereotypes of older drivers, it’s that the drivers all drive slow. See DRIVING Incredibly slow. Excruciatingly slow. page 18 But whether the stereotypes have a kernel of truth to them or just fanciful exaggerations, one thing is for certain: There are a lot of older drivers out there and the numbers are getting bigger each year. And why is that? Simply put, it’s because the nation’s senior population is growing. For one thing, life expectancy continues to expand. And as people live longer, they are likely to want to drive their automobiles longer. Furthermore, now, as the first wave of the baby boomer generation has reached their golden years, it is likely that more and more drivers will have white hair to match the white on their sidewall tires. According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, in 2008 — the last year for which numbers are available — there were 32 million licensed older drivers, that is, drivers 65 years old or older. That marks a 20 percent increase from 1999. “In contrast, the total number of licensed drivers increased by only 11 percent from 1999 to 2008,” the NHTA reports. “Older drivers made up 15 percent of all licensed drivers in 2008, compared with 14 percent in John Heerema Owner 1999.” Katie Mulcahey - Sales Ed Cunningham - Sales That being said, it should also be pointed out that there is a disproportionate number of crashes, including fatal 1180 Frontage Rd. East • 507-455-9551 crashes, involving older drivers. www.owatonnagranite.com According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, in 2009, 13 percent of the total U.S. resident Senior Living 2012 – 17 This is Living 2012.indd 17

4/25/12 12:18 PM


18

DRIVING

Continued from page 17

And that’s a marked improvement. Compared to 2008, fatalities among people age 65 and older decreased by 5 percent, according to the NHTA. Many people wonder if the reason for the disproportionate fatalities among older drivers is due in part that older drivers have more difficulty seeing at night. But the truth is that most traffic fatalities involving older drivers in 2009 occurred during the daytime (81 percent) and on weekdays (71 percent), according to the NHTA. To help older drivers keep their driving skills sharp — and to reduce the amount they have to pay for their insurance — AARP has instituted a driver safety program. The program has been active here in Owatonna since 1987. “The instructors are trained by AARP,” said Ann Pleskonko, director of SeniorPlace in Owatonna. The program, dubbed “55 Alive Mature Driving Program,” has been associated with SeniorPlace almost since the driving program’s beginning. And as the name implies, it’s open to anyone who is 55 of age or older. When Malcolm Stephenson first initiated the program in Owatonna in 1987, he, along with Elmer Lamont, taught the course in several churches around town as well as in the now defunct Owatonna Inn. A year later, the course moved to SeniorPlace where the participants found the program more “customer-service friendly.” Many of those involved in teaching the class were not only instructors, but they were senior citizens them-

Carefree Living

selves. Stephenson, who started the program, remained active in teaching the program for 11 years, stepping down in 1998 when he was 85 years old. Lamont continued until 2007 — a 20-year run — when he “tried to retire” at the age of 87. Currently, the program is being overseen by Don Overlie, a retired educator who has been with the program since 2007. So what does the program consist of? The first time a person takes it, he or she must go through an 8-hour course, divided up into two 4-hour sessions. The class is a reminder of some of the basic things that motorists learn when they first learn to drive. There is no test to take, just classes to participate in. After that 8-hour course, AARP issues a certificate to the participant which the participant can then take to his or her insurance agent. That certificate is worth a 10 percent discount on automobile insurance rates and is good for three years. When the three-year period is up and its time to renew that certificate, the driver has to take one 4-hour refresher course. Beside the discount on the insurance rates, is the course worth it? You bet, said Pleskonko. “From what I’ve seen, it’s great to be reminded of the safe ways to drive,” said Pleskonko. “It’s too bad we have to wait until we’re 55. I’ve seen some people out there who are 30 who could use the course.”

U.S. BANK SENIOR DAY: THURSDAY, AUGUST 16TH Free parking until Noon at the Fairgrounds general lot for all seniors 62 and over compliments of U.S. Bank. Reduced prices at many food vendors for Special entertainment | Fair Square Park | 10:15 AM–6:15 PM Senior Citizens all day. The “Country Pickers”, “Banjo Boys” and “Over 60 Band” Recognition of the 2011 Senior Citizen “Volunteers of the Year” in Fair Square Park | 5:45

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Aug. 14th–Aug. 19th, 2012

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Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 18

4/25/12 12:18 PM

th no


18

DRIVING

Continued from page 17

And that’s a marked improvement. Compared to 2008, fatalities among people age 65 and older decreased by 5 percent, according to the NHTA. Many people wonder if the reason for the disproportionate fatalities among older drivers is due in part that older drivers have more difficulty seeing at night. But the truth is that most traffic fatalities involving older drivers in 2009 occurred during the daytime (81 percent) and on weekdays (71 percent), according to the NHTA. To help older drivers keep their driving skills sharp — and to reduce the amount they have to pay for their insurance — AARP has instituted a driver safety program. The program has been active here in Owatonna since 1987. “The instructors are trained by AARP,” said Ann Pleskonko, director of SeniorPlace in Owatonna. The program, dubbed “55 Alive Mature Driving Program,” has been associated with SeniorPlace almost since the driving program’s beginning. And as the name implies, it’s open to anyone who is 55 of age or older. When Malcolm Stephenson first initiated the program in Owatonna in 1987, he, along with Elmer Lamont, taught the course in several churches around town as well as in the now defunct Owatonna Inn. A year later, the course moved to SeniorPlace where the participants found the program more “customer-service friendly.” Many of those involved in teaching the class were not only instructors, but they were senior citizens them-

Carefree Living

selves. Stephenson, who started the program, remained active in teaching the program for 11 years, stepping down in 1998 when he was 85 years old. Lamont continued until 2007 — a 20-year run — when he “tried to retire” at the age of 87. Currently, the program is being overseen by Don Overlie, a retired educator who has been with the program since 2007. So what does the program consist of? The first time a person takes it, he or she must go through an 8-hour course, divided up into two 4-hour sessions. The class is a reminder of some of the basic things that motorists learn when they first learn to drive. There is no test to take, just classes to participate in. After that 8-hour course, AARP issues a certificate to the participant which the participant can then take to his or her insurance agent. That certificate is worth a 10 percent discount on automobile insurance rates and is good for three years. When the three-year period is up and its time to renew that certificate, the driver has to take one 4-hour refresher course. Beside the discount on the insurance rates, is the course worth it? You bet, said Pleskonko. “From what I’ve seen, it’s great to be reminded of the safe ways to drive,” said Pleskonko. “It’s too bad we have to wait until we’re 55. I’ve seen some people out there who are 30 who could use the course.”

U.S. BANK SENIOR DAY: THURSDAY, AUGUST 16TH Free parking until Noon at the Fairgrounds general lot for all seniors 62 and over compliments of U.S. Bank. Reduced prices at many food vendors for Special entertainment | Fair Square Park | 10:15 AM–6:15 PM Senior Citizens all day. The “Country Pickers”, “Banjo Boys” and “Over 60 Band” Recognition of the 2011 Senior Citizen “Volunteers of the Year” in Fair Square Park | 5:45

325 Hoffman Drive Owatonna 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom apartments Furnished apartments also available

Aug. 14th–Aug. 19th, 2012

OwatonnaGateway.com 507-451-8000

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Senior Living 2012

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19

Seniors go green Furst, who is a member of SeniorPlace in Owatonna, is a part of a growing movement of individuals who have “gone green” and that dirt that he transported from the northern part of the state down south was soil that was “certified organic” — soil that he wanted to use for his garden here. But when you ask Furst about “going green,” he scoffs. “This whole business of going green has become political,” he says. And if there’s one thing that the 80-year-old has little time for, it’s politics. Nor does he talk about “going green” to be in the limelight. In fact, he shuns the publicity that might come along with his campaign to get people to recycle and go organic, so much so that he insisted that he remain anonymous. “Bob Furst” isn’t even his real name. “I’m not in the business of running up and down the

See GOING GREEN page 20

Senior Housing From recycling to composting, the things that many seniors do are not only environmentally conscious, but an everyday way of life By JEFFREY JACKSON jjackson@owatonna.com

W This is Living 2012.indd 19

hen Bob Furst moved from northern Minnesota to Waseca, he brought his own dirt with him.

Realife Cooperative of Owatonna is a Senior Housing Cooperative offering independent living for individuals 55 and older. Cooperative living combines the best of renting and the best of owning. Call or stop by to learn more. 1 & 2 Bedroom Units Now Available 235 22nd St. SE Owatonna, MN 55060

507-455-3735 Senior Living 2012

– 19

4/25/12 12:18 PM


19

Seniors go green Furst, who is a member of SeniorPlace in Owatonna, is a part of a growing movement of individuals who have “gone green” and that dirt that he transported from the northern part of the state down south was soil that was “certified organic” — soil that he wanted to use for his garden here. But when you ask Furst about “going green,” he scoffs. “This whole business of going green has become political,” he says. And if there’s one thing that the 80-year-old has little time for, it’s politics. Nor does he talk about “going green” to be in the limelight. In fact, he shuns the publicity that might come along with his campaign to get people to recycle and go organic, so much so that he insisted that he remain anonymous. “Bob Furst” isn’t even his real name. “I’m not in the business of running up and down the

See GOING GREEN page 20

Senior Housing From recycling to composting, the things that many seniors do are not only environmentally conscious, but an everyday way of life By JEFFREY JACKSON jjackson@owatonna.com

W This is Living 2012.indd 19

hen Bob Furst moved from northern Minnesota to Waseca, he brought his own dirt with him.

Realife Cooperative of Owatonna is a Senior Housing Cooperative offering independent living for individuals 55 and older. Cooperative living combines the best of renting and the best of owning. Call or stop by to learn more. 1 & 2 Bedroom Units Now Available 235 22nd St. SE Owatonna, MN 55060

507-455-3735 Senior Living 2012

– 19

4/25/12 12:18 PM


20

GOING GREEN

But he won’t use the paper that butchers often use — paper with a wax coating on it — because the waxy Continued from page 19 butcher paper cannot be recycled. And what happens if street announcing it,” he said. “When you volunteer, you the butcher won’t use a different type of paper to wrap the meat in? Then Furst finds a different butcher. do it for nothing, not even for recognition.” He even makes his own soap. So what exactly has Furst done to go green? Plenty. “I haven’t bought a bar or box of soap in 35 years,” he “I don’t even have garbage service,” Furst says. Back home, Furst has his own bin for compost, which says. He makes his soap from the fat from around a kidney he then uses on his organic garden. And everything of a cow — an “all-natural product,” he calls it — he can put that compost bin goes in that compost bin. reduces it down and uses it to make everything from Those things that can’t go in bin — bones and fat from bath soap to dish soap and laundry soap. He even makes the meat — he disposes in other ways. The bones goes his own toothpaste. He also grows a lot in his organic to the neighbor’s dog, and the fat he throws away. garden, including 31 different kinds of herbs that he Yes, he does have some garbage. ‘Possibly a half a shopping bag every six weeks,” he said. uses to season his food. He’s not alone. It is estimated that the senior demographic may be And where does that go? the best generation to emulate when trying to live an “I have a deal with my neighbor who does have trash environmentally responsible lifestyle. service,” he said. And why is that? What he actually tries to do is to recycle. And he Chances are it’s because so many of the guideline manages to recycle nearly everything that he uses. And for being green have been a part of seniors’ lives for if he can’t recycle it, he finds alternatives. decades. For example, he discovered that he couldn’t recycle the styrofoam container that meat is placed on in a See GOING GREEN supermarket. His solution? Don’t buy it. Instead he goes page 21 to a butcher and has the butcher wrap the meat in paper.

Your

1

#

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Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 20

4/25/12 12:19 PM

Ap Grea serva survi like d diffic peop expe today to th War Th Furs Th that m now in or able ing l from savin item simil perso Fru what well. ucts plian they dicta In ages Nine in th 80 pe legac Wh truis Recy maki furth ting frien Fo dren gran kids.


20

GOING GREEN

But he won’t use the paper that butchers often use — paper with a wax coating on it — because the waxy Continued from page 19 butcher paper cannot be recycled. And what happens if street announcing it,” he said. “When you volunteer, you the butcher won’t use a different type of paper to wrap the meat in? Then Furst finds a different butcher. do it for nothing, not even for recognition.” He even makes his own soap. So what exactly has Furst done to go green? Plenty. “I haven’t bought a bar or box of soap in 35 years,” he “I don’t even have garbage service,” Furst says. Back home, Furst has his own bin for compost, which says. He makes his soap from the fat from around a kidney he then uses on his organic garden. And everything of a cow — an “all-natural product,” he calls it — he can put that compost bin goes in that compost bin. reduces it down and uses it to make everything from Those things that can’t go in bin — bones and fat from bath soap to dish soap and laundry soap. He even makes the meat — he disposes in other ways. The bones goes his own toothpaste. He also grows a lot in his organic to the neighbor’s dog, and the fat he throws away. garden, including 31 different kinds of herbs that he Yes, he does have some garbage. ‘Possibly a half a shopping bag every six weeks,” he said. uses to season his food. He’s not alone. It is estimated that the senior demographic may be And where does that go? the best generation to emulate when trying to live an “I have a deal with my neighbor who does have trash environmentally responsible lifestyle. service,” he said. And why is that? What he actually tries to do is to recycle. And he Chances are it’s because so many of the guideline manages to recycle nearly everything that he uses. And for being green have been a part of seniors’ lives for if he can’t recycle it, he finds alternatives. decades. For example, he discovered that he couldn’t recycle the styrofoam container that meat is placed on in a See GOING GREEN supermarket. His solution? Don’t buy it. Instead he goes page 21 to a butcher and has the butcher wrap the meat in paper.

Your

1

#

News Source

in print

& online

Owatonna.com

LOCAL & REGIONAL NEWS | OBITS | LOCAL & NATIONAL VIDEOS | ADVERTISING COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS | WEATHER | SPORTS | BREAKING NEWS

20 –

Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 20

4/25/12 12:19 PM

Ap Grea serva survi like d diffic peop expe today to th War Th Furs Th that m now in or able ing l from savin item simil perso Fru what well. ucts plian they dicta In ages Nine in th 80 pe legac Wh truis Recy maki furth ting frien Fo dren gran kids.


21

GOING GREEN Continued from page 20

A portion of today’s seniors grew up during the Great Depression or during World War II when conservation and recycling weren’t just trends. They were survival tactics. In a time when money was scarce, like during the Depression, or when resources were difficult to come by, like during World War II, many people made due with what resources they had. And experts note that many of the concepts associated with today’s environmental movement are strikingly similar to the ones employed during the Depression and World War II. That would correspond to the time period in which Furst grew up. The behaviors of an elderly parent or grandparent that may have seemed eccentric or odd at one time are now turning out to be what many people are embracing in order to live green. Concepts like relying on reusable handkerchiefs instead of disposable tissues; reusing lightly-soiled napkins; collecting discarded items from the curb and repairing them for renewed use; saving cans or food jars and using them to store other items; buying local products from smaller vendors; and similar things are methods of living ingrained in the persona of many older people. Frugality and awareness of what things cost and what constitutes waste are other concepts seniors know well. Many have never adapted to the notion that products are disposable, preferring instead to hold onto appliances, electronics, clothing, and other items because they still have utility, not because the current season dictates they should be upgraded. In 2008, Harris Interactive polled Baby Boomers ages 45 to 62 about their interest in the environment. Ninety-four percent of respondents said they took steps in the past 6 months to do something green. More than 80 percent were concerned about the environmental legacy that would be left for their grandchildren. While many seniors are going green today for altruistic reasons, it also makes good financial sense. Recycling items, conserving utilities and fuel and making smart choices can stretch a fixed income even further. Choosing to walk or ride a bike instead of getting behind the wheel may be not only environmentally friendly, but it’s financially savvy as well. For Furst, it is a way of life that he taught his children — all five of them — and has passed on his grandchildren and now is sharing with his great-grandkids. “Breaking them in,” he calls it. This is Living 2012.indd 21

Old-fashioned Ways to Go Green Here are some ways of living straight out of the Great Depression that can be put to use today. • Use the milkman. Although it may seem like the milkman is extinct, milk and other dairy products can still be delivered straight to a person’s home from a local dairy or farm. Adding reusable milk bottles reduces the reliance on disposable containers, while buying local cuts down on the fuel costs necessary to transport products. • Pass down clothing. Clothing that is gently worn can be passed down to children or even donated. • Walk. During the Depression, cars were a luxury many people could not afford. Walking or taking a bus or train were some popular modes of transportation, and such options are still available today. • Use cloth diapers and linens. Reusable items, like cloth diapers, handkerchiefs and linens, are more environmentally responsible. • Get outdoors. Instead of relying on television, which had yet to be invented during the Depression, children and adults went outdoors to socialize and have fun. • Open the windows. Instead of relying heavily on air conditioning, try opening the windows on nice days and let some fresh air in. • Use clothes lines. Clothes dryers use about 10 to 15 percent of domestic energy in the U.S. A clothesline can help reduce electric bills and energy consumption. • Get into gardening. If you can grow what you eat, that reduces the dependence on commercially produced and harvested crops.

Open Monday-Saturday and 2 Evenings 1170 E. Frontage Rd • Owatonna • 507-455-1000 405 E. Main St • Blooming Prairie & MC • 507-583-2141 3110 Wellner Drive NE • Rochester • 507-536-7700 132 N. Broadway • New Richland • 507-463-0502 Senior Living 2012

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21

GOING GREEN Continued from page 20

A portion of today’s seniors grew up during the Great Depression or during World War II when conservation and recycling weren’t just trends. They were survival tactics. In a time when money was scarce, like during the Depression, or when resources were difficult to come by, like during World War II, many people made due with what resources they had. And experts note that many of the concepts associated with today’s environmental movement are strikingly similar to the ones employed during the Depression and World War II. That would correspond to the time period in which Furst grew up. The behaviors of an elderly parent or grandparent that may have seemed eccentric or odd at one time are now turning out to be what many people are embracing in order to live green. Concepts like relying on reusable handkerchiefs instead of disposable tissues; reusing lightly-soiled napkins; collecting discarded items from the curb and repairing them for renewed use; saving cans or food jars and using them to store other items; buying local products from smaller vendors; and similar things are methods of living ingrained in the persona of many older people. Frugality and awareness of what things cost and what constitutes waste are other concepts seniors know well. Many have never adapted to the notion that products are disposable, preferring instead to hold onto appliances, electronics, clothing, and other items because they still have utility, not because the current season dictates they should be upgraded. In 2008, Harris Interactive polled Baby Boomers ages 45 to 62 about their interest in the environment. Ninety-four percent of respondents said they took steps in the past 6 months to do something green. More than 80 percent were concerned about the environmental legacy that would be left for their grandchildren. While many seniors are going green today for altruistic reasons, it also makes good financial sense. Recycling items, conserving utilities and fuel and making smart choices can stretch a fixed income even further. Choosing to walk or ride a bike instead of getting behind the wheel may be not only environmentally friendly, but it’s financially savvy as well. For Furst, it is a way of life that he taught his children — all five of them — and has passed on his grandchildren and now is sharing with his great-grandkids. “Breaking them in,” he calls it. This is Living 2012.indd 21

Old-fashioned Ways to Go Green Here are some ways of living straight out of the Great Depression that can be put to use today. • Use the milkman. Although it may seem like the milkman is extinct, milk and other dairy products can still be delivered straight to a person’s home from a local dairy or farm. Adding reusable milk bottles reduces the reliance on disposable containers, while buying local cuts down on the fuel costs necessary to transport products. • Pass down clothing. Clothing that is gently worn can be passed down to children or even donated. • Walk. During the Depression, cars were a luxury many people could not afford. Walking or taking a bus or train were some popular modes of transportation, and such options are still available today. • Use cloth diapers and linens. Reusable items, like cloth diapers, handkerchiefs and linens, are more environmentally responsible. • Get outdoors. Instead of relying on television, which had yet to be invented during the Depression, children and adults went outdoors to socialize and have fun. • Open the windows. Instead of relying heavily on air conditioning, try opening the windows on nice days and let some fresh air in. • Use clothes lines. Clothes dryers use about 10 to 15 percent of domestic energy in the U.S. A clothesline can help reduce electric bills and energy consumption. • Get into gardening. If you can grow what you eat, that reduces the dependence on commercially produced and harvested crops.

Open Monday-Saturday and 2 Evenings 1170 E. Frontage Rd • Owatonna • 507-455-1000 405 E. Main St • Blooming Prairie & MC • 507-583-2141 3110 Wellner Drive NE • Rochester • 507-536-7700 132 N. Broadway • New Richland • 507-463-0502 Senior Living 2012

– 21

4/25/12 12:19 PM


22

This is Living RESOURCE DIRECTORY

Apartments

■ The Gateway 325 Hoffman Drive Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-8000 www.owatonnagateway.com thegateway@paramark.us

Appliance Service

■ On The Spot Appliance Service 135 West Main Street • Suite O Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 214-8099 onthespotappliance@hotmail.com

Assisted Living ■ Oakpark Place 1615 Bridge Ave. Albert Lea, MN 56007 (507) 373-5600 ■ Owatonna Care Center 201 18th Street SW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-6800 ■ Prairie Manor 220 3rd Steet NW Blooming Prairie, MN (507) 583-4434 www.prairiemanorinc.com ■ Traditions of Owatonna 195 24th Place NW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-0700 www.traditionsofowatonna.com ■ Valleyview of Owatonna 1212 W. Frontage Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-0722 ■ Whispering Oak Assisted Living Community 903 Calverly Court Ellendale, MN 56026 (507) 684-3026 www.thewhisperingoak.com

Book Store

■ Little Professor Book Center 110 W. Park Square Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-0969 “We Will Deliver to You”

Clinics

Dental

■ Main Steet Dental 1170 E. Frontage Road, Owatonna - (507) 455-1000 405 E. Main St.,Blooming Prairie, MN - (507)-583-2141 3142 Wellner Drive NE, Rochester, MN - (507) 536-7700 132 N. Broadway, New Richland, MN - 507-463-0502

Education

■ Grandparents for Education Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-8661 www.grandparentsforeducation.net

Entertainment

■ Steele County Free Fair 1525 S. Cedar Ave. Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-5305 www.scff.org

Financial

■ Brad Running Ameriprise Financial 1850 Austin Road, Suite 104 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-4070 brad.l.running@ampf.com ■ Profinium Financial 1080 West Frontage Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 444-0111 www.profinium.com

Fitness

■ Curves/Silver Sneakers 1828 Cedar Avenue S. Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-4060

Funeral Services

■ Michaelson Funeral Home 1930 Austin Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7943

Handicap Aids

■ Premier Lift Products, Inc. 1875 SE 18th Street Owatonna, Minnesota 55060 (507) 444-9802 www.premierhomeelevator.com

■ Mayo Health System-Owatonna 2200 26th Street NW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-1120 www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org

22 –

Senior Living 2012

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22

This is Living RESOURCE DIRECTORY

Apartments

■ The Gateway 325 Hoffman Drive Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-8000 www.owatonnagateway.com thegateway@paramark.us

Appliance Service

■ On The Spot Appliance Service 135 West Main Street • Suite O Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 214-8099 onthespotappliance@hotmail.com

Assisted Living ■ Oakpark Place 1615 Bridge Ave. Albert Lea, MN 56007 (507) 373-5600 ■ Owatonna Care Center 201 18th Street SW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-6800 ■ Prairie Manor 220 3rd Steet NW Blooming Prairie, MN (507) 583-4434 www.prairiemanorinc.com ■ Traditions of Owatonna 195 24th Place NW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-0700 www.traditionsofowatonna.com ■ Valleyview of Owatonna 1212 W. Frontage Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-0722 ■ Whispering Oak Assisted Living Community 903 Calverly Court Ellendale, MN 56026 (507) 684-3026 www.thewhisperingoak.com

Book Store

■ Little Professor Book Center 110 W. Park Square Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-0969 “We Will Deliver to You”

Clinics

Dental

■ Main Steet Dental 1170 E. Frontage Road, Owatonna - (507) 455-1000 405 E. Main St.,Blooming Prairie, MN - (507)-583-2141 3142 Wellner Drive NE, Rochester, MN - (507) 536-7700 132 N. Broadway, New Richland, MN - 507-463-0502

Education

■ Grandparents for Education Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-8661 www.grandparentsforeducation.net

Entertainment

■ Steele County Free Fair 1525 S. Cedar Ave. Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-5305 www.scff.org

Financial

■ Brad Running Ameriprise Financial 1850 Austin Road, Suite 104 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-4070 brad.l.running@ampf.com ■ Profinium Financial 1080 West Frontage Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 444-0111 www.profinium.com

Fitness

■ Curves/Silver Sneakers 1828 Cedar Avenue S. Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-4060

Funeral Services

■ Michaelson Funeral Home 1930 Austin Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7943

Handicap Aids

■ Premier Lift Products, Inc. 1875 SE 18th Street Owatonna, Minnesota 55060 (507) 444-9802 www.premierhomeelevator.com

■ Mayo Health System-Owatonna 2200 26th Street NW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-1120 www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org

22 –

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23

This is Living RESOURCE DIRECTORY

Hearing Centers

■ Ultimate Hearing Inc. 1414 S. Oak Ave., Suite 3 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7000

Home Care

Restaurants

■ Costas Candies & Restaurant 112 N. Cedar Avenue Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-9050 www.costas-candies.com

■ All Generations Home Care, Inc. 135 W. Main Street • Suite G Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 214-8007 www.allgenerationshomecare.org

■ Kernel Restaurant 1011 Hoffman Drive Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-2585 www.kernelrestaurant.com

■ Visiting Angels 577 State Ave. Suite 3 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-1124 www.visitingangels.com/owatonna

■ The Kitchen 329 N. Cedar Avenue Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-9991

Insurance

■ United Prairie Insurance Agency 685 Bridge Street, Suite 1B Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-3879 www.amyswainhearingcenters.com

Memory Care ■ Traditions of Owatonna II 150 24th Street NE Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-0433 traditionsofminnesota.com

Monument

■ Owatonna Granite & Monument 1180 E. Frontage Road Owatonna, MN 5506 (507) 455-9551 www.owatonnagranite.com

Newspaper/Media

■ Owatonna People’s Press 135 West Pearl Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-2840 www.owatonna.com news@owatonna.com

Senior Center

■ SeniorPlace 500 Dunnel Drive Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 444-4280 www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/senior-place anne.pleskonko@ci.owatonna.mn.us

Senior Living ■ Morehouse Place 353 Lemond Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-2223 www.morehouseplace.com ■ Realife Cooperative of Owatonna 235 22nd Street SE Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-3735 www.realifecoop.com ■ Westside Board & Lodge Home 3003 Highway 14 West Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-0832

Transportation

Physical Therapy

■ Steele County Area Transit Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7777 (800) 597-SCAT

Printing

■ Cedar Travel 111 North Cedar Avenue Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-1170 www.cedartravel.net

■ In Touch Physical Therapy 123 W. Broadway Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7888 www.intouchpt.com ■ J-C Press 785 24th Avenue SW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 446-5300 www.j-cpress.com

Travel

■ Travel Headquarters 143 W. Bridge Street Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-5005 www.travelheadquarters-owatonna.com Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 23

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23

This is Living RESOURCE DIRECTORY

Hearing Centers

■ Ultimate Hearing Inc. 1414 S. Oak Ave., Suite 3 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7000

Home Care

Restaurants

■ Costas Candies & Restaurant 112 N. Cedar Avenue Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-9050 www.costas-candies.com

■ All Generations Home Care, Inc. 135 W. Main Street • Suite G Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 214-8007 www.allgenerationshomecare.org

■ Kernel Restaurant 1011 Hoffman Drive Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-2585 www.kernelrestaurant.com

■ Visiting Angels 577 State Ave. Suite 3 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-1124 www.visitingangels.com/owatonna

■ The Kitchen 329 N. Cedar Avenue Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-9991

Insurance

■ United Prairie Insurance Agency 685 Bridge Street, Suite 1B Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-3879 www.amyswainhearingcenters.com

Memory Care ■ Traditions of Owatonna II 150 24th Street NE Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-0433 traditionsofminnesota.com

Monument

■ Owatonna Granite & Monument 1180 E. Frontage Road Owatonna, MN 5506 (507) 455-9551 www.owatonnagranite.com

Newspaper/Media

■ Owatonna People’s Press 135 West Pearl Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-2840 www.owatonna.com news@owatonna.com

Senior Center

■ SeniorPlace 500 Dunnel Drive Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 444-4280 www.ci.owatonna.mn.us/senior-place anne.pleskonko@ci.owatonna.mn.us

Senior Living ■ Morehouse Place 353 Lemond Road Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-2223 www.morehouseplace.com ■ Realife Cooperative of Owatonna 235 22nd Street SE Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-3735 www.realifecoop.com ■ Westside Board & Lodge Home 3003 Highway 14 West Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-0832

Transportation

Physical Therapy

■ Steele County Area Transit Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7777 (800) 597-SCAT

Printing

■ Cedar Travel 111 North Cedar Avenue Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 455-1170 www.cedartravel.net

■ In Touch Physical Therapy 123 W. Broadway Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-7888 www.intouchpt.com ■ J-C Press 785 24th Avenue SW Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 446-5300 www.j-cpress.com

Travel

■ Travel Headquarters 143 W. Bridge Street Owatonna, MN 55060 (507) 451-5005 www.travelheadquarters-owatonna.com Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 23

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24

You may not always see what’s ahead... but you can plan for it.

• High Quality Printing • Digital Printing • Wide Format Printing • Complete Mailing Service • Bindery Services • Marketing Solutions • Web to Print • Quick Turn

Pre-planning benefits you and your family. - Plan for services based on today’s prices. - Protect assets from Medical assistance. - Plan with your spouse, not for your spouse.

Visit www.michaelsonfuneral.com 507-451-7943 Owatonna

Owatonna, MN • Phone: 507.446.5300

Independence Security

&

Whispering Oak offers mature adults the independence and privacy of their own apartment, with the convenience and companionship of living in a small, supportive community. You’ll find a sense of community and family; a haven of safety and comfort; a life filled with caring, compassion and the warmth and joy of being at home.

24 –

Coming Soon

4 New Units Tours Welcome Maryann Schlaak Resident Director 903 Calverly Court Ellendale 507-684-3026 thewhisperingoak.com

Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 24

4/25/12 12:20 PM


24

You may not always see what’s ahead... but you can plan for it.

• High Quality Printing • Digital Printing • Wide Format Printing • Complete Mailing Service • Bindery Services • Marketing Solutions • Web to Print • Quick Turn

Pre-planning benefits you and your family. - Plan for services based on today’s prices. - Protect assets from Medical assistance. - Plan with your spouse, not for your spouse.

Visit www.michaelsonfuneral.com 507-451-7943 Owatonna

Owatonna, MN • Phone: 507.446.5300

Independence Security

&

Whispering Oak offers mature adults the independence and privacy of their own apartment, with the convenience and companionship of living in a small, supportive community. You’ll find a sense of community and family; a haven of safety and comfort; a life filled with caring, compassion and the warmth and joy of being at home.

24 –

Coming Soon

4 New Units Tours Welcome Maryann Schlaak Resident Director 903 Calverly Court Ellendale 507-684-3026 thewhisperingoak.com

Senior Living 2012

This is Living 2012.indd 24

4/25/12 12:20 PM


This Is Living 2012