Issuu on Google+

1

QUALITY OF LIFE INITIATIVE 

CITY OF OWASSO, OKLAHOMA 

Prepared by:  Alaback Design Associates / Guy Engineering 

PRELIMINARY DRAFT  January 2011 


2

QUALITY OF LIFE INITIATIVE 

CITY OF OWASSO, OKLAHOMA 

Prepared by:  Alaback Design Associates / Guy Engineering 

PRELIMINARY DRAFT  January 2011 


3

QUALITY OF LIFE INITIATIVE 

CITY OF OWASSO, OKLAHOMA 

Prepared by:  Alaback Design Associates / Guy Engineering 

PRELIMINARY DRAFT  January 2011 


4

QUALITY OF LIFE INITIATIVE 

CITY OF OWASSO, OKLAHOMA 

Prepared by:  Alaback Design Associates / Guy Engineering 

PRELIMINARY DRAFT  January 2011 


5

QUALITY OF LIFE INITIATIVE 

CITY OF OWASSO, OKLAHOMA 

Prepared by:  Alaback Design Associates / Guy Engineering 

PRELIMINARY DRAFT  January 2011 


Owasso Quality of Life Initiative  Preliminary Draft Report ‐ January 2011                           

Prepared for :  City of Owasso, Oklahoma   

   Prepared by:   Alaback Design Associates   Guy Engineering Services    


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS   

The Owasso Quality of Life Initiative was developed with the assistance and input from numerous organizations and individuals.    Special thanks go to the many citizens, community leaders, elected officials and City of Owasso staff members who have provided  valuable guidance to this planning effort.  We are also grateful to the following organizations that graciously offered their   facilities to host community workshops:  Owasso Public Schools, Baptist Village and Discovery Bible Fellowship Church.    Appreciation is also extended to Karl Fritschen for his dedication as project coordinator for this important planning initiative.   

 

                                    CITY COUNCIL   

 

Doug Bonebrake, Mayor (Ward 5)    John Sinex, Vice‐Mayor (Ward 4)    Bryan Stovall (Ward 1)    Stephen Cataudella (Ward 2)    Wayne Guevara (Ward 3)     

Rodney Ray, City Manager  Warren Lehr, Assistant City Manager  Sherry Bishop, Assistant City Manager  Karl Fritschen, Community Development Director  Chelsea Harkins, Economic Development Department Director  David Warren, Parks Department Director  Roger Stevens, Public Works Department Director  Jerry Fowler, Neighborhood Coordinator  Teresa Wilson, Information Technology Director   

 

 

 

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT CONSULTANT 

PLANNING CONSULTANT TEAM 

 

Wikiplanning 

   

CITY OF OWASSO 

 

 

Alaback Design Associates, Inc.   Guy Engineering Services, Inc.         

   


Table of Contents   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 

 

List of Figures .................................................................................................................................................................................... i      1.0   Introduction    1.1        Project Overview and Objectives .............................................................................................................................. 1‐2    1.2  What is Quality of Life? ............................................................................................................................................. 1‐4    1.3  Why is Quality of Life Important? ............................................................................................................................. 1‐6    1.4  Planning Process ....................................................................................................................................................... 1‐8   

2.0                                    3.0                  

Community Analysis  2.1  Owasso’s Heritage and Culture ................................................................................................................................. 2‐2  2.2  Community Context .................................................................................................................................................. 2‐6  2.3  City‐Wide Development Framework ........................................................................................................................ 2‐8  2.4  Community Parks  ..................................................................................................................................................... 2‐11      Ator Park Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 2‐12      Centennial Park Overview ............................................................................................................................. 2‐14      Elm Creek Park Overview .............................................................................................................................. 2‐18      Friendship and Rayola Parks Overview ......................................................................................................... 2‐22      Funtastic Island Park / Veteran’s Memorial Overview ................................................................................. 2‐26      McCarty Park Overview ................................................................................................................................. 2‐28      Owasso Sports Park Overview ...................................................................................................................... 2‐30      Skate Park Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 2‐34      Veterans Park Overview ................................................................................................................................ 2‐36  2.5  Existing Pedestrian / Bicycle Circulation ................................................................................................................... 2‐38  2.6  Streetscape Opportunities ........................................................................................................................................ 2‐44  2.7  Summary of Opportunities and Constraints ............................................................................................................. 2‐46      Community Participation  3.1  Public Outreach Objectives ....................................................................................................................................... 3‐2  3.2  Community Workshops ............................................................................................................................................ 3‐3  3.3  7th Grade Student Workshop ................................................................................................................................... 3‐6  3.4  Wikiplanning Civic Engagement Campaign ............................................................................................................... 3‐9      Overview of Wikiplanning Activities ............................................................................................................. 3‐9      Summary of Citizen Survey Results ............................................................................................................... 3‐11  3.5  Community Participation Summary .......................................................................................................................... 3‐16       


4.0                                                                

 

Owasso Quality of Life Enhancements  4.1        Overview of Long‐Range Community Vision ............................................................................................................. 4‐2  4.2  Parks and Recreation ................................................................................................................................................. 4‐6      2015 Parks Master Plan ................................................................................................................................. 4‐6      Passive Recreation / Family Activities ............................................................................................................ 4‐8      Active Recreation / Sports Facilities ............................................................................................................... 4‐12      Creative Play .................................................................................................................................................. 4‐14      Splash Pad / Water Play ................................................................................................................................. 4‐16      Community Swimming Pool / Water Park ..................................................................................................... 4‐18      Off‐Leash Dog Parks ....................................................................................................................................... 4‐20      Youth‐Oriented Alternative Sports Park......................................................................................................... 4‐22      Environmental Learning / Nature Parks ........................................................................................................ 4‐24      Healing Gardens / Meditation Parks ............................................................................................................. 4‐26  4.3  Youth Sports ............................................................................................................................................................... 4‐28      Youth Softball ................................................................................................................................................. 4‐28      Youth Baseball ............................................................................................................................................... 4‐31                 Youth Soccer ................................................................................................................................................... 4‐34      Special Needs Youth Sports ............................................................................................................................ 4‐36      Youth Football ................................................................................................................................................ 4‐38  4.4  Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements ...................................................................................................................... 4‐40      Regional Trail Linkages .................................................................................................................................. 4‐40      City‐Wide Pedestrian / Bicycle System ........................................................................................................... 4‐42        On‐Street Bike Routes and Sidewalks ................................................................................................ 4‐42        Multi‐Use Trails .................................................................................................................................. 4‐44      Transportation Design Strategies .................................................................................................................. 4‐46  4.5  Community Image and Landscaping .......................................................................................................................... 4‐50      Community Image and Appearance Opportunities………………………………………………………………………………….. 4‐50      Public Art ........................................................................................................................................................ 4‐54      Highway 169 Image Opportunities ................................................................................................................ 4‐56        Highway 169 Design / Aesthetics ...................................................................................................... 4‐56        Highway 169 Corridor Landscaping ................................................................................................... 4‐60   


Table of Contents (continued) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 

   

      4.5  Community Image and Landscaping (Continued)        Community Gateways and Landmarks ......................................................................................................... 4‐66        Community‐Wide Landscape Development .................................................................................................. 4‐72        Streetscaping and Green Streets ................................................................................................................... 4‐76    4.6  Community Gathering Places and Cultural Facilities ................................................................................................ 4‐80        Festival / Events Park .................................................................................................................................... 4‐80        Outdoor Amphitheater .................................................................................................................................. 4‐82        Multi‐Purpose Events Pavilion ...................................................................................................................... 4‐84        Community Lake ............................................................................................................................................ 4‐85        Multi‐Purpose Regional Stormwater Detention ........................................................................................... 4‐88        Performing Arts Center ................................................................................................................................. 4‐92        Community Center Facilities ......................................................................................................................... 4‐93    4.7  Pedestrian‐Oriented Development ........................................................................................................................... 4‐94        Mixed‐Use Development ............................................................................................................................... 4‐94        Tulsa Tech Owasso Campus Opportunities ................................................................................................... 4‐97        Downtown Revitalization .............................................................................................................................. 4‐100    4.8  Environment and Sustainability ................................................................................................................................ 4‐102        Community‐Wide Focus on Sustainable Principles (Go Green! Initiative) .................................................... 4‐102        Fitness, Wellness and Healthy Lifestyles ....................................................................................................... 4‐104    4.9  Strong Neighborhoods .............................................................................................................................................. 4‐106        Owasso Strong Neighborhood Initiative ....................................................................................................... 4‐106          5.0  Summary    5.1  Next Steps ................................................................................................................................................................. 5‐2    5.2  Keys to Success ......................................................................................................................................................... 5‐5      APPENDICIES  A.    May 2010 Community Meetings Summary  B.    7th Grade Student Workshop Summary    C.     Wikiplanning On‐Line Civic Engagement Campaign ‐ Executive Summary and Survey Data             


List of Figures            Figure 1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           Page 

Owasso Location Map .................................................................................................................................................... 1‐3 

 

Figure 2 

Regional Context ............................................................................................................................................................ 2‐7 

 

Figure 3 

City‐Wide Development Framework .............................................................................................................................. 2‐9 

 

Figure 4 

Ator Park ‐ Existing Conditions ....................................................................................................................................... 2‐13 

 

Figure 5 

Centennial Park ‐ Existing Conditions ............................................................................................................................. 2‐15 

 

Figure 6 

Elm Creek Park ‐ Existing Conditions .............................................................................................................................. 2‐19 

 

Figure 7 

Friendship and Rayola Parks ‐ Existing Conditions ......................................................................................................... 2‐23 

 

Figure 8 

Funtastic Island Park / Veteran’s Memorial ‐ Existing Conditions ................................................................................. 2‐27 

 

Figure 9 

McCarty Park ‐ Existing Conditions ................................................................................................................................ 2‐29 

 

Figure 10  Owasso Sports Park North ‐ Existing Conditions ............................................................................................................ 2‐31   

Figure 11  Owasso Sports Park (North and South) .......................................................................................................................... 2‐33   

Figure 12  Skate Park ‐ Existing Conditions ..................................................................................................................................... 2‐35   

Figure 13  Veterans Park ‐ Existing Conditions ................................................................................................................................ 2‐37   

Figure 14  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Southwest Quadrant ........................................................................................................... 2‐40   

Figure 15  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Southeast Quadrant ............................................................................................................ 2‐41   

Figure 16  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Northwest Quadrant ........................................................................................................... 2‐42   

Figure 17  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Northeast Quadrant ............................................................................................................ 2‐43 

 


1.0   Introduction 

 


SECTION 1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         INTRODUCTION 

1.1  Project Overview and Objectives     As  one  of  the  fastest  growing  cities  in  Oklahoma,  Owasso  has  made  the  transition from a small agricultural community into a diverse city in which  thousands  of  residents  make  their  home.    Alongside  this  rapid  growth  in  population, the city has experienced dynamic growth in business and retail  opportunities.  As Owasso has grown and changed, so have the needs of its  residents as they look to their community to become the place where they  can work and enjoy time with family and friends.  As a result, Owasso’s ser‐ vices  and  amenities  must  also  evolve  to  meet  the  needs  of  citizens.    The  Owasso Quality of Life Initiative is intended to create a long‐term vision that  will guide the city’s growth as a sustainable and desirable place to live and  work.    The primary goal of this effort is to improve and promote quality of life ele‐ ments  and  activities  that  will  help  expand  the  livability  of  the  community  for its residents, and serve as an encouragement to those who want to be‐ come part of an exceptional community.  The Quality of Life Initiative will  be part of the city’s comprehensive planning efforts to incorporate charac‐ teristics that are associated with livability.  It represents a unique opportu‐ nity  to  create  community  gathering  places,  and  to  integrate  and  expand  parks  and  recreation  throughout  the  city  in  a  creative  manner  that  im‐ proves upon the quality of life enjoyed by residents.  It will increase accessi‐ bility to natural landscapes and amenities not currently available within the  city.    A key component of this initiative is to build upon the community strengths  in which Owasso already excels, and then to create an innovative vision to  add the missing ingredients that can elevate the city from “really good” to  “great.”    Ultimately,  the  objective  is  to  plan  quality  of  life  amenities  that  result in the attitude of “I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else!”   

1 ‐ 2 


SECTION 1    INTRODUCTION 

 

 

 

 

                                SECTION 1          INTRODUCTION 

Figure 1:  Owasso Location Map   

1 ‐ 3 


SECTION 1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         INTRODUCTION 

1.2  What is Quality of Life?    Defining what the phrase Quality of Life means is fundamental to this plan‐ ning initiative.  There are a myriad of definitions for this phrase and it can  take on a different meaning for every person.  Some of the elements that  are usually associated with good quality of life include good schools, walk‐ ing / biking trails, recreational opportunities, nice parks, scenic open spaces  and attractive architecture and landscape features.  Quality of life also gen‐ erally includes cultural facilities, community gathering places and art.  Basic  elements  such  as  affordable  housing  and  well‐maintained  streets  can  also  be considered to improve quality of life.    Expansion Management ranks quality of life for communities by evaluating  the following criteria:     Standard of Living   Quality of Workforce   Lack of Traffic Congestion   Quality of Schools   Adult Education Levels   Housing Affordability   Continuing Education   Access to Air Travel   Peace of Mind    In reality, quality of life is highly subjective and an individual choice.  It can  include intangibles like a sense of well being or security.  Ultimately, it is the  way that Owasso’s residents answer this question that matters most to al‐ low for the creation of a vision that meets their goals.  A major focus of this  study has centered on involving Owasso’s citizens toward this end.     

1 ‐ 4 


SECTION 1    INTRODUCTION 

 

 

 

 

 

                                SECTION 1          INTRODUCTION 

  There are many definitions for quality of life; however, for purposes of this project   it is defined as “the things in your community that you take pride in and enjoy”.    

1 ‐ 5 


SECTION 1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         INTRODUCTION 

1.3  Why is Quality of Life Important?    A recent television news segment highlighted a ranking of com‐ munities with populations under 50,000.  A joint effort by CNN,  Fortune and Money magazines produced BEST PLACES TO LIVE ‐  Money’s list of America’s best small towns.  The top small com‐ munities  offered  great  school  systems,  short  drives  to  larger  metropolitan  cities,  strong  economies  with  good  jobs,  great  healthcare,  low  crime  rates,  plenty  of  shopping  and  Americana  with a small town feel, and in almost every case, numerous rec‐ reational opportunities for their residents.  Here are some brief  looks  at  what  the  top  five  most  livable  small  towns  in  America  have  to  offer:  #1  –  Louisville,  CO  –  “The  top  reason  residents  give  for  moving  here?  The  great  outdoors  ‐  Louisville  is  laced  with  nearly  30  miles  of  trails,  Rocky  Mountain  National  Park  is  less  than  an  hour  away,  and  eight  world‐class  ski  resorts  are  within  two  hours.”  #2  –  Chanhassen,  MN  –  “The  town  has  11  lakes, 34 parks, and the 1,047‐acre Minnesota Landscape Arbo‐ retum.” #3 – Papillion, NE – “Papillion has acres of open space.  Last year the town opened Sumpter Amphi‐theater, a $1.5 mil‐ lion  perform‐ing  arts  center  that  hosts  free  movies,  concerts,  and wine tastings. And  a new AAA baseball stadium is planned  for  2011.”    #4  –  Middleton,  WI  –  “The  town  has  a  1,000‐acre  network of parks, bike paths, and running and cross‐country ski  trails.”  #5 – Milton, MA – “Milton is full of historic homes, tree‐ lined  streets,  and  well‐tended  gardens,  plus  lots  of  parks  and  playgrounds.”    Owasso has all the requisite amenities of these great communi‐ ties except for one key missing ingredient – standout recreation,  health,    and  entertainment  features.    Granted,  some  of  the  lo‐

1 ‐ 6 

cales  that  were  recognized  are  blessed  with  incredible  physical  settings, but many that aren’t have made up for their locations  with man made amenities for all to enjoy.  Whether it is a net‐ work of trails and bike paths, a festival park and amphitheater, a  sports park makeover, a  nature  center, a water park, or  simply   key enhancements  to existing parks, Owasso can benefit in the  decades  ahead  from  the  differentiating  recreational  and  aes‐ thetic features that create real quality of life.  Owasso has spent  the  last  fifteen  years  allocating  a  major  portion  of  Capital  Im‐ provement  funds  to  streets,  water,  wastewater,  and  public  safety.    Owasso’s  school  system  is  top  notch.    Healthcare  op‐ tions  are  tremendous.    Owasso  has  excellent  shopping  and  a  small town feel, and at the same time has quick access to every‐ thing  Tulsa  has  to  offer.    What  Owasso  doesn’t  have  are  those  key amenities that make new generations feel that this is where  they  want  to  raise  their  families;  those  features  that  can  be  shown off to visitors and that catch the attention of prospective  new residents.   

  Owasso has so much to be proud of and thankful for, but could  benefit  even  more  with  those  “quality  of  life”  amenities  that  create  pride  of  ownership  and  the  attitude  of    “We  wouldn’t  want  to  live  anyplace  else.    We  love  living  and  playing  in  Owasso.”    “Quality  of  Life”  includes  not  only  the  previously  mentioned  basics,  but  also  the  well  planned  recreational  and  cultural features that give the community a “wow” factor.  Ac‐ cessibility to parks, activities, and nature has a tremendous im‐ pact on the overall quality of lifestyle.  

  The high value placed upon outdoor recreation is evident when  you drive by Centennial Park on a nice day.  It is not uncommon 


SECTION 1    INTRODUCTION  to see twenty or more cars in the parking lot that belong to peo‐ ple enjoying one of the community’s nicest trail systems or our  new disc golf course. Many are typically enjoying the children’s  playground or fishing in the small lake there.  Or you see it when  you drive by Rayola Park on a warm day and note that the new  splash park is literally brimming with small children enjoying the  water  features  there.    You  see  it  in  the  busloads  and  families  spending  hours  upon  hours  at  the  Sports  Park  or  at  Funtastic  Island,  the  culmination  of  a  great  citywide  team  efforts.    How‐ ever, to stay on the leading edge when it comes to retaining and  attracting families to Owasso, the community needs much more  than a few nice parks and a place for children to play ball. 

  Creating excellent quality of life goes far beyond aesthetics and  amenities for its residents; there are significant economic bene‐ fits as well.  It has been demonstrated many times in the Tulsa  area alone that quality of life plays a major role in attracting and  retaining  jobs.    Oklahoma  City  also  provides  a  strong  example  that  substantial  private  investment  has  followed  the  commu‐ nity’s  decision  to  invest  in  their  downtown  through  the  MAPS  program. 

  With  the    increased  mobility  of  today’s  businesses,  they  often  decide to locate their companies in areas with a high quality of  life (such as natural amenities).  Two of the fastest growing sec‐ tors in the economy, people working in knowledge‐based indus‐ tries and retirees, often have a choice of where to live.  Surveys  have  consistently  identified  natural  amenities  and  recreational  opportunities  as  key  factors  determining  where  entrepreneurs  and retirees choose to locate.  For companies relocating a rela‐ tively high percentage of professional talent, quality of life issues   

 

 

 

 

                                SECTION 1          INTRODUCTION 

can  be  a  critical  factor.    Quality  of  life  will  directly  impact  the  ability of a company to entice people to move with the job.  For  national recruiting, it can make the difference in whether or not  they can attract the best talent.    Real estate industry analysts also confirm quality of life as a de‐ termining factor in real estate values and economic vitality.  One  1998 industry report calls livability “a litmus test for determining  the  strength  of  the  real  estate  investment  market.    If  people  want to live in place, companies, stores, hotels and apartments  will follow.”  A 1996 report by Arthur Anderson Consulting Com‐ pany found that executives increasingly choose to work in loca‐ tions  that  offer  a  high  quality  of  life  outside  of  the  workplace.   Availability  of  education  was  also  found  to  be  of  prime  impor‐ tance,  and  not  far  behind  were  recreation,  cultural  institutions  and  a  safe  environment.    Proximity  to  open  space  was  consid‐ ered an important benefit, too.      Across the United States, parks and open space are increasingly  recognized as vital to the quality of life levels that fuel economic  health.  Convenient access to parks and open space has become  an important measure of community wealth ‐ an important way  to attract businesses and residents by guaranteeing both quality  of  life  and  economic  vitality.    According  to  Attracting  Invest‐ ment, (The Trust for Public Land) corporate CEOs say that quality  of life is the third most important factor in locating a business,  behind  only  access  to  domestic  markets  and  availability  of  skilled labor. 

1 ‐ 7 


SECTION 1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         INTRODUCTION 

1.4  Planning Process    The  consulting  team  (Alaback  Design  Associates  and  Guy  Engi‐ neering  Services)  met  regularly  throughout  the  project’s  dura‐ tion with a committed group of City of Owasso representatives.   An  essential  part  of  the  project’s  scope  was  the  integration  of  community  participation  throughout  the  entire  planning  proc‐ ess.    Obtaining  meaningful  public  input  was  critical  to  ensure  that the plans created reflected the desires of the citizens.    The  following  summary  provides  an  overview  of  the  major  steps  in  the planning process to develop the Owasso Quality of Life Ini‐ tiative:     EXISTING CONDITIONS INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS    The first major phase of the planning effort was an analysis  of city‐wide features that had the potential to influence fu‐ ture  quality  of  life  improvements,  with  a  focus  on  parks  /  trails,  community  gathering  places  and  youth  sports.    This  inventory  also  included  an  evaluation  of  the  existing  side‐ walk  system  and  opportunities  for  streetscape  enhance‐ ment.                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION AND OUTREACH  A primary focus for this initiative was to engage the citizens  of Owasso in a significant participation effort.  The main ob‐ jective for public outreach was to clearly identify the type of  community  that  Owasso  residents  desire  for  their  future.   Working closely with City of Owasso staff, the project team  facilitated  a  series  of  five  community  workshops  to  allow  residents  to  express  their  goals,  desires  and  concerns  for   Owasso's  future  growth.    A  web‐based  civic  engagement 

1– 8 

campaign, developed in conjunction with Wikiplanning, also  allowed  for  citizen  input  over  a  three‐month  period.    Addi‐ tional efforts to gain community feedback included a work‐ shop with Owasso’s 7th grade students and a half‐day work‐ shop with City of Owasso department leaders.     DEVELOPMENT OF PROPOSED QUALITY OF LIFE PLAN  Based  upon  the  information  learned  from  the  analysis  and  community  outreach  tasks,  a  preliminary  plan  was  devel‐ oped  for  proposed  quality  of  life  enhancements.    The  plan  establishes  a  long‐range  vision  for  the  community  to  reach  the objectives outlined earlier in this chapter.  Specific prod‐ ucts  for  this  task  include  a  PowerPoint  presentation  and  a  comprehensive  report  that  describes  proposed  enhance‐ ments in both narrative and graphic form.  Following review  and refinement of the preliminary plan, the Owasso Quality  of Life Initiative findings will be presented to the community. 

A major public participation effort allowed   the citizens of Owasso to identify their   desired vision for the city’s future.


2.0   Community Analysis 

 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

2.1  Owasso’s Heritage and Culture    An  understanding  of  Owasso’s  historical  development  provides  useful  in‐ sight into the modern day community.   The following brief overview is sum‐ marized from materials developed by the Owasso Historical Society.    Owasso began as a settlement in 1881, in the  Cooweescoowee dis‐ trict of the Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, near what is now 66th  Street North and North 129th East Avenue.  Located along Elm Creek,  a tributary of Bird Creek, the new settlement became known as the  Elm  Creek  Settlement.    The  first  settler  was  H.T.  (Tole)  Richardson.   By  1893,  the  settlement  contained  several  residences,  a  blacksmith  shop  and  a  general  store.    Preston  Ballard,  owner  of  the  general  store, established a post office in the store on February 10, 1898 and  was  appointed  the  first  postmaster.    The  Joseph  Barnes  family  moved  to  the  settlement  in  1897,  and  Joseph  and  Luther  Barnes  bought the blacksmith shop in 1898.    In  1897,  the  Kansas,  Oklahoma  Central  and  Southwestern  Railway  Company acquired right‐of‐way near what is now 86th Street north  and north Mingo Road, dammed a natural spring to form a lake as a  water supply for the rail line and built a depot about a mile south of  the  lake.    The  depot  was  torn  down  in  1942.    Because  the  rail  line  missed the Elm Creek settlement, the residents and businesses began  moving their buildings to the area around the depot.  Late in 1898,  Joseph  and  Luther  Barnes  moved  their  blacksmith  shop  to  the  new  community.  The shop became a temporary home for the Joseph Bar‐ nes  family  and  was  the  first  residence  officially  moved  to  the  new  depot community.      Preston Ballard moved his general store and post office at about the  same  time,  and  the  new  community  became  known  as  Elm  Creek,  2 ‐ 2  intentionally 

The Owasso Historical Museum is housed in the brick  structure known as the Komma Building, built by  John Komma in 1928 to house Mapes and Komma  Grocery and market  The Owasso Historical Society  purchased the building on August 31, 1987, and used  volunteer labor to refurbish the structure to be used  as a museum.  The museum was officially opened on  November 3, 1991.   


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

since the post office retained its name.  The name of the Elm Creek post  officewas  changed  on  January  24,  1900  to  Owasso.    Owasso  is  an  Osage  word  interpreted  to  mean  “the  end”  or  “turn  around”  because  the rail line ended in the area where the Owasso Public Works Admini‐ stration building is now located.  The steam locomotives got their water  supply at the lake, and were turned around near the depot and headed  back north.  The rail line was not extended into Tulsa until 1905.    On  March  26,  1904,  a  plat  for  the  Town  of  Owasso,  Cherokee  nation,  I.T. was signed by the Secretary of the Interior and the town was incor‐ porated.    When  the  plat  was  signed,  there  were  three  streets  running  north and south:  Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri.  Of the eight streets  running east and west, the northern four were named for Union gener‐ als (Sheridan, Thomas, Sherman and Grant), and the southern four (Lee,  Johnson,  Jackson  and  Longstreet)  were  named  for  Confederate  gener‐ als.  In about 1960, the streets were changed to their current names.    By the time Oklahoma became a state on November 16, 1907, Owasso  had  a  population  of  379  within  the  town  limits,  but  more  than  three  times that many in the surrounding area.  The town had three hotels,  two  grain  elevators,  a  bank,  drug  stores,  general  stores,  millinery  stores, hardware stores, livery stables, grain and fed companies, cotton  gins, lumber companies, blacksmith shops, restaurants, grocery stores,  coal  companies,  barber  shops,  construction  companies,  livestock  auc‐ tioneers,  stockyards,  meat  and  produce  markets,  dry  goods  stores,  a  real  estate  company,  a  development  company,  an  attorney,  doctors  and dentists.   

 

2 ‐ 3 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

After  World  War  I,  the  automobile  gained  prominence  and  road  construc‐ tion began.  The modern day Main Street alignment was developed as High‐ way  75 / 169.  During the early to mid 1920’s, Owasso “turned around” and  reoriented  its  development  away  from  the  railroad  toward  the  new  high‐ way.    Through  the  Depression  era  and  up  until  World  War  II,  growth  in  Owasso was limited.  The small town experienced  economic growth in the  1940s and 1950s when American Airlines and the Tulsa Airport were estab‐ lished and employed a large percentage of Owasso’s work force.  Following  the  Second  World  War,  soldiers  returned  home  and  the  town  grew  more  rapidly  through  the  1960s.    The  automobile  and  roads  became  prominent  elements  of  the  community.    Dairy  farming  was  a  popular  occupation  at  that time, with 50 dairy farms within the school district.  Later these farms  were sold and subdivided into small residential lots.      With  a  lack  of  manufacturing  or  major  employers  within  the  community,  growth  within  Owasso  was  somewhat  limited.    For  many  years  Owasso  functioned primarily as a bedroom community to Tulsa.    For the past sev‐ eral  decades  years,  Owasso  has  experienced  strong  growth  and  continued  development, primarily to the east of the Owasso Expressway.      Today, Owasso is one of Oklahoma’s fastest growing communities.  With a  population  of  approximately  38,000  and  strong  growth  in  health  care  and  retail  businesses,  Owasso  has  successfully  evolved  into  a  full‐service  com‐ munity.      Although  more  than  a  century  old,  most  of  the  original  or  older  buildings  no  longer  exist.    There  is  a  remarkable  absence  of  physical  evi‐ dence of Owasso’s heritage, with the Owasso Historical Society Building on  N. Main Street providing a solitary tribute to its past.  Fires, tornadoes and  bulldozers have claimed the original buildings from Owasso’s earlier years.   Opportunities  to  reinforce  Owasso’s  unique  heritage  should  be  an  impor‐ tant part of the long‐term vision for quality of life improvements.     

2 ‐ 4 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

Understanding Owasso’s culture is also important in planning for the city’s  future development.  Owasso is widely recognized for being family‐oriented  and for having strong community spirit. Whether it involves supporting the  school  or  the  independent  sports  team,  or  maybe  just  helping  out  with  a  local  cause,  this  civic  spirit  helps  unite  the  citizens  and  neighbors  of   Owasso.  There are also a great number of churches in Owasso, with several  different faiths and beliefs practiced within the community.    The  community’s  culture  is  also  well  illustrated  through  Owasso’s  City  of  Character Initiative, which began in 2002.  Owasso joined local and interna‐ tional communities in a commitment to the promotion of an environment  that emphasizes positive character qualities in every sector of the city.  This  program  is  promoted  through  several  means,  including  placing  banners  around the city which identify the “character trait of the month” (i.e., Com‐ passion,  Dependability,  Generosity,  Honor,  etc.)  And  finally,  the  spirit  of  Owasso’s citizens is well summarized in the city’s slogan:  Owasso – The City  Without Limits. 

 

2 ‐ 5 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

2.2    Community Context    On  the  following  page,  Figure  2  illustrates  the  regional  context  of  Owasso  within the larger Tulsa metropolitan area.  Owasso is strategically located at  the center of several highway transportation systems.  Highways 75 and 169  are  major  north/  south  highways,  and  Highway  20  is  a  major  east  /  west  highway.  All three‐highway systems combine to provide easy access to and  from  Owasso  in  all  directions.    Owasso’s  central  location  on  Highway  169   provides fast access to Tulsa and Interstates 40 and 44.  An excellent trans‐ portation network and convenient access to Tulsa and the surrounding ar‐ eas  is  a  tremendous  asset  for  Owasso.    Close  proximity  to  Tulsa’s  services  and cultural opportunities is also a major advantage for Owasso.    The Tulsa international Airport is located approximately seven miles to the  south of Owasso.  In addition to providing passenger and cargo services, this  4,000‐acre  complex  accommodates  more  than  100  aviation  related  busi‐ nesses  and  agencies.  South  of  Owasso,  Bird  Creek  and  its  adjacent  flood‐ plain separates the city from Tulsa and ensures that Owasso will retain its  physical identity as a distinct community.    According  to  Owasso’s  on‐line  community  profile,  the  city’s  population  of  38, 412 is projected to grow more than 15% by 2014.  The Owasso commu‐ nity includes many people who live within the Owasso fence Line (Planning  boundary) and within the school district, but not within the official city lim‐ its.  More than 80% of the households in Owasso are families, and the aver‐ age household income is over $83,000 (Source:  2008 Nielsen Claeitas). 

 

2 ‐ 6 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

Figure 2 ‐ Regional Context 

2 ‐ 7 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

2.3  City‐Wide Development Framework    Figure 3 illustrates Owasso’s development framework, which identifies ma‐ jor physical  features as well as planned projects.  The city is positioned to  benefit  from  the  large  employment  centers  that  are  nearby,  including  the  Cherokee Industrial Park, the Port of Catoosa, and American Airlines.  The  Port of Catoosa is located at the head of the McClellan‐Kerr Arkansas River  Navigation System.  This port is fully intermodal and contains a 2,000‐acre  industrial park.  Three miles west of Owasso, the Cherokee Industrial Park  contains over 1,300 acres that provides employment for many Owasso resi‐ dents.    North of 106th Street, the Tulsa Tech Campus is under construction and will  create  potential  for  adding  new  developments  in  the  adjacent  areas  that  support  this  campus.    Figure  3  also  show  the  locations  for  Owasso’s  two  state‐of‐the‐art hospitals (Bailey Medical Center and St. John Owasso).  As  shown in the lower left corner the drawing, the Owasso Mohawk Trail and  Bikeway will soon link the city with the regional trail network.     Owasso’s street system is a key element of the community’s infrastructure.   The city has invested in its street network to provide access to growing resi‐ dential and commercial properties throughout the community.  The graphic  shown  on  page  2‐10  provides  a  good  overview  of  completed  projects,  in‐ progress projects, and future projects for the city’s arterial streets.  Contin‐ ued investment will be needed to complete expansion of the major street  grid, particularly in the less developed northern areas.     

 

2 ‐ 8 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

NORTH 

 

Figure 3 ‐ City‐Wide Development Framework 

2 ‐ 9 


SECTION 2 

 

2 ‐ 10 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Current Status of Owasso’s Arterial Street System (December 2010) 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

2.4  Community Parks    An analysis of Owasso’s park system has been an important component of this  study.      A  community’s  parks  and  greenways  are  one  of  the  most  important  elements  in  determining  the  quality  of  life  for  its  residents.      The  following  pages provide a summary for each of  Owasso’s parks,  including an inventory  of  current  recreational  facilities,    events  and  observations  on  the  park’s  cur‐ rent condition.  The project team visited each park to gain an understanding of  existing  facilities,  vehicular  and  pedestrian  circulation,  drainage  and  topogra‐ phy, trees, vegetation and aesthetic qualities.    Owasso’s  park  system  is  very  diverse  and  includes  a  broad  range  of  recrea‐ tional facilities.   Currently there are 12 parks, several of which are combined  within a single contiguous property, ranging from small neighborhood parks to  larger community parks of nearly 50 acres.  The parks incorporate a wide vari‐ ety  of  activities,  including  passive  recreation,  active  play,  youth  sports  and  open space.  The condition of recreational facilities within the parks varies con‐ siderably, from newer facilities such as those in Centennial Park and Funtastic  Island, to older parks where additional investment is needed.  With a good un‐ derstanding of current recreational resources, future planning can establish a  clear vision of how the  park system can become an even more important ele‐ ment in improving the quality of life for Owasso’s residents. 

 

2 ‐ 11 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Ator Park Overview    As shown on the facing page in Figure 4, Ator Park  is located within an established neighborhood on  the south of West 20th Street.   This 4‐acre site  is  bisected  by  a  creek,  and  the  property  includes  nice  open  spaces  and  mature  wooded  areas.     Currently, the park has fairly minimal recreational  improvements  consisting  of  playground  equip‐ ment  and  picnic  tables.    However,  the  park  pro‐ vides  functional  space  for  informal  play.  Further  improvements  can  enhance  this  scenic  neighbor‐ hood park that is an important asset to area resi‐ dents.   

Location: 303 West 18th Street  Total Area:  3.78 Acres  Facilities:     Picnic Tables   Playground Equipment  Past Events:   Block Party  Preliminary Site Observations:   Small Neighborhood Park   Minimal Play Equipment   No Parking Available On‐site or Adjacent to Park   Large Drainage Swale  Cuts Through Park North to South   Views in Each Direction:  Bailey Ranch Residential   

2 ‐ 12 

Ator Park is a pleasant neighborhood scale   recreational space that is enhanced with   large trees, play equipment, and public art. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 2

Figure 4:  Ator Park ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 13 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Centennial Park Overview    Due to its size and beautiful natural character, Centennial Park has become  a great place for passive recreation and a significant community gathering  place.   Featuring the longest trails in Owasso, this 47‐acre park has become  a popular destination for walkers, jogger, bicyclists and children.  The park  has been well developed to a high level of quality through the construction  of  paved/lighted  trails,  playgrounds,  and  an  attractive  picnic  shelter.    As  shown in Figure 5, Centennial Park is an irregularly shaped property that is  bisected by a creek that runs through the entire length of the park.    With a  parking lot and main entry off of 86th Street, the park is easily accessible to  the  Owasso  community.      A  second  access  point  and  parking  area  at  the  park’s north end provides good access to adjacent neighborhoods.    Location: 15301 East 86th Street North  Total Area:  47 Acres  Facilities:     3 Mile Walking / Jogging Trail   Restrooms and Water Fountains   Picnic Shelters   Fishing Ponds   Playground Equipment   Disc Golf (18 Holes)  Past Events:   Harvest Festival  Preliminary Site Observations:   Shelter, Restroom Facilities and Playground in Good Condition   Disc Golf Course in Northeast Portion of Site; Large Creek Runs Through  the Site and Connects to Secondary Pond     Open Area East of Main Pond has Potential for Development   

2 ‐ 14 

Centennial Park’s three mile long lighted trail is one   of the best places to walk, run or bike in Owasso.    


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 2

Figure 5:  Centennial Park ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 15 


SECTION 2 

 

2 ‐ 16 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

The large pond at the south end of Centennial Park is scenic and provides a great natural   setting for the existing walking trails, large picnic shelter,  and for other park users.     Floating fountains are attractive and help improve the pond’s water quality. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 2

Centennial Park’s improvements include playground equipment, a disc golf course and a signature   pedestrian bridge.   The park has a diverse environmental habitat that includes large trees,   open fields, several ponds and a creek that meanders through the scenic 47‐acre property. 

2 ‐ 17 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Elm Creek Park Overview    As illustrated in Figure 6 on the facing page, Elm Creek Park is a large park  with a central pond that is surrounded by homes on all sides.  The park has  been developed with a wide range of recreational improvements, including  two vehicular access points / parking areas and restroom facilities.  The park  also has a large open space at the east end that is used for informal sports  and play.   Although there are currently erosion issues around the lake pe‐ rimeter that detract from the park’s visual environment, this park has excel‐ lent potential for enhancements that can make it a valued neighborhood /  community park.    Location: 12501 East 77th Street North  Total Area:  21.75 Acres  Facilities:     1/2 Mile Walking / Jogging Trail   Restrooms and Water Fountains   3 Picnic Shelters   Tennis Courts   Playground Equipment  Past Events:   Rotary Fishing Derby  Preliminary Site Observations:   Large Neighborhood Park with Parking On‐Site   Existing Trees in Fair to Good Condition   Existing Shelter, Restroom Facilities, Picnic Tables, Play Equipment and  Walking Trail  around Pond   Central Pond has Erosion Issues at Banks   Several Low Areas with Standing Water         

2 ‐ 18 

Elm Creek Park – Walking Trails and Bridge 

Large open recreation area at east end of park 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 2

Figure 6:  Elm Creek Park ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 19 


SECTION 2 

 

2 ‐ 20 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Elm Creek Park currently has a wide range of recreational facilities, as shown in the photographs above.  This large   park incorporates scenic natural areas, picnicking, walking, tennis and children’s play.  Additional site improvements   and upgrades to park facilities can make Elm Creek Park an even more popular community gathering place. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 2

Elm Creek Park currently has significant issues with erosion   and stabilization of pond banks and at the water’s edge.    However, these problems can be addressed through the use   of native stone and natural plantings.  These improvements   have the potential to reduce siltation in the  pond, and   as a result, water quality would also improve.   

2 ‐ 21 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Friendship and Rayola Parks Overview   

Located  on  the  east  edge  of  Owasso’s  original  downtown  neighborhood,  these  two  parks  are  highly  visible  and  easily  accessible  from  Highway  169  and its frontage road. As described below, Rayola Park’s 19 acres accommo‐ date  significant  recreational  facilities  and  sports  fields.      The  park  also  is  home to the Owasso Family YMCA, which is a very well used activity center  for  the  community.      Friendship  Park’s  gazebo  is  a  recognizable  structure  and a popular venue for civic events.  The park’s central location and promi‐ nence make continued improvements a sound investment.   

Location: 8400 Mingo Valley Expressway / 8300 Owasso Expressway  Total Area:  2.15 Acres (Friendship Park) / 19 Acres (Rayola Park)  Facilities:     Playground Equipment   Gazebo   Picnic Shelter   Baseball Fields   Restrooms and Water Fountain   Ornamental Gas Lighting   Sand Volleyball Court    Memorial Trees   Basketball Court   Butterfly Garden   Spray Park   3/4 Mile Walking Trail    Preliminary Site Observations:   Play Equipment Somewhat Disconnected from Other Pieces   Noise and fast‐paced traffic on Highway 169 is noticeable   Area West of Shelter Slopes and Drains Down to Shelter   Splash Pad  Constructed in summer of 2007; Drains to Creek    Views to South, North and West:  Residential   Views to East: HWY 169 and Access Road   Baseball Field in Fair to Good Condition; Could Use Facility Upgrades   Practice Baseball Fields on West Side of Property with Poor Facilities   Park Needs Another Connection Across Drainageway    Restroom Facilities are Adjacent to Splash Pad on South End of Park   

2 ‐ 22 

Past Events:     Art In The Park   Winter Wonderland   Outdoor Concerts   Easter Sunrise Services   YMCA Hog Jog   Sell‐A‐Bration In The Park   Good Sam’s Convention 

The gazebo in Friendship Park is a popular   gathering place for community events, and is also   an important landmark element  for Owasso. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 2

FRIENDSHIP   PARK

RAYOLA PARK

YMCA

 

Figure 7:  Friendship and Rayola Parks ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 23 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  Located in the center of   Rayola Park, the Owasso  Family YMCA has become   a great place for fitness   and community gathering.    The YMCA is easily   accessible to the community  from Highway 169, and its   contemporary architectural  style creates a highly   visible landmark. 

 

2 ‐ 24 

The south end of Rayola Park accommodates a wide variety of   recreational facilities, including playground equipment, a basketball   court and a sand volleyball court.   A recently constructed spray park   has been a popular addition to the park’s recreational opportunities. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

Existing Baseball field north of the YMCA  (Future master planning for the park should coordinate   with the YMCA’s future expansion plans.) 

Existing drainageway through the center of Rayola Park   

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 2

Baseball practice fields adjacent to neighborhoods 

Existing picnic shelter and play equipment   at the south end of Rayola Park 

2 ‐ 25 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Funtastic Island Park  / Veteran’s Memorial Overview    As  illustrated  In  Figure  8,  two  distinctly  different  parks  are  located  on  the  north side of the Owasso Sports Park.  Access is provided from 116th Street,  with a single paved parking lot available for visitors to both areas.  The Vet‐ eran’s  Memorial  has  been  nicely  developed  with  a  walking  trail  that  links  granite monuments that pay tribute to the five branches of US military ser‐ vice.  Funtastic Island is an outstanding destination‐quality play area that is  a  great  example  of  successful  citizen  involvement.    To  achieve  the  goal  of  creating fun for all ages, the playground was designed and built in 2005 by  community volunteers and subsequently donated to the City of Owasso.    Location: 10320 East 116th Street North  Total Area:  3 Acres  Funtastic Island Facilities:     Playground Equipment (Swings, Climbing Equipment, Slides, Etc.)   Restrooms and Water Fountains   Picnic Facilities   Picnic Shelter  Preliminary Site Observations (Funtastic Island Park):   Excellent / Well‐Used Destination Play Area   Trees in Fair Condition; Serve as Screening to Adjacent Properties and    Between Different Spaces   Several Open Areas for Possible Additional Development   Facilities in Good Condition   Some Areas around Play Equipment Have Drainage Problems   Mulch in Play Areas is Wood Chip    Veteran’s Memorial Facilities:     Granite Monuments and Benches  Past Events:   Annual Veteran’s Day Ceremony   

2 ‐ 26 

Funtastic Island—Existing Play Features / Pavilion 

Veteran’s Memorial— Granite Monuments / Walkway  


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

Figure 8:  Funtastic Island Park / Veteran’s Memorial ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 27 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

McCarty Park Overview    McCarty Park is located in a somewhat sparsely populated area on the west  side of Owasso,  with access from 86th Street North.  As shown in Figure 9,  the park has been developed to include soccer fields, baseball fields, and a  rodeo arena that is used by the Owasso Roundup Club.   The park also ac‐ commodates  a  restroom  and  parking  areas.      A  new  dog  park  is  currently  planned  to  be  constructed  in  the  southeast  corner  of  the  park,  which  will  include perimeter fencing to allow dogs to be off‐leash.   McCarty Park in‐ cludes open space that could be utilized for future recreational activities.    Location: 8200 North 91st East Avenue  Total Area:  19 Acres  Facilities:     Baseball Fields   Soccer Fields   Restrooms / Concession Facility   Rodeo Grounds  Past Events:   Trail Days Rodeo   Juneteenth Rodeo   Baseball Tournaments  Preliminary Site Observations:   Park Location is in Outlying Area of City   No Signage for Park;  Difficult to Find from 86th Street, Including dead    end Sign on 91st East Avenue    Very Flat Site   Parking in Fair to Poor Condition   Existing Trees in Good Condition        

2 ‐ 28 

The west side of McCarty Park currently accommodates  a rodeo arena and undeveloped open space. 

McCarty Park’s east side has been developed with  baseball fields and soccer fields.   A new dog park is  planned to be located in the southeast corner. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

Figure 9:  McCarty Park ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 29 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Owasso Sports Park Overview     As  shown  in  Figure  10,  Owasso’s  Sports  Park  North  provides  youth  sports  fields for soccer, baseball, softball, and flag football. (Refer to the list of fa‐ cilities  below  for  details.)    As  the  primary  activity  center  for  these  sports,  this park is heavily utilized for league games and tournaments.   Currently,  the  park  is  only  accessible  from  a  single  point  of  entry  from  116th  Street  and as a result traffic congestion can be significant at times.  Existing fields  are generally in good condition.  The Owasso Sports Park has been recently  expanded  to  include  74  acres  to  the  south  of  the  current  park,  which  will  allow a much needed second point of access from 106th Street.      Location: 10320 East 116th Street North  Total Area:  151.47 Acres (Includes 74.2 Acre  Sports Park South Expansion)  Sports Park North Facilities:     Flag Football Fields   Softball Four‐Plex   Park Office / Maintenance   Baseball Four‐Plex   “Walk in the Park” Program   Multi‐Use Four‐Plex   Restroom Facilities and Water   Soccer Fields (13)     Fountains (3)  Sports Park South Facilities:     Home to Funtastic Island and    Baseball Field (365 ft.)    Veteran’s Memorial  Past Events:   NAIA Softball Tournament ‐ 1995   Annual Burning of the Greens   Softball / Baseball Tournaments  Currently Planned Improvements (Sports Park South):   Baseball Field (365 ft.)   Football Fields (7)   Baseball Four‐Plex (2‐250 ft.)   Parks Department Main Office     

2 ‐ 30 

The Owasso Sports Park provides fields for four youth  sports and is a major recreational destination.  

Existing softball and baseball fields have good fencing  and lighting to provide very functional play.  Future  planning for youth sports should also consider the ad‐ dition of  amenities that will further enhance the en‐ joyment for players and spectators. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

Figure 10:  Owasso Sports Park North ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 31 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

The Owasso Sports Park has been well developed with youth sports fields and support facilities.  The majority of the parking   is centrally located and is convenient  for users of the fields for several sports (see photo above in lower right corner).    However, all traffic must enter and exit the park from a single point of entry that connects with 116th Street.    Improving the paving condition of the parking lot and providing  improved traffic flow are major needs for the park.   

2 ‐ 32 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

The architectural style and   quality  level of the park’s   facilities is an asset to the park.    Existing buildings in the Owasso  Sports Park North include   restrooms and several   maintenance structures. 

Figure 11:  Owasso Sports Park North and South   

As illustrated in this view looking south, the new 74‐acre Owasso   Sports Park South is currently home to one baseball field.   As shown in  Figure 11, this large addition will provide excellent potential for future  growth of youth sports programs in Owasso. Future planning for the  park should consider the most beneficial manner in which to integrate  existing sports fields with planned expansion of fields in the new parcel. 

2‐33 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Skate Park Overview    As  illustrated  in  Figure  12,    Owasso’s  Skate  Park  is  located  west  of  Main  Street, with primary access from 76th Street.   The park provides an alterna‐ tive  form  of  recreation  that  adds  diversity  to  Owasso’s  park  system.      The  skate park includes a number of above‐ground play features and ramps on a  large slab of pavement.   Future planning for the park should consider op‐ portunities to upgrade the facilities for skate boarding and bike enthusiasts,   including the possibility of a below‐grade poured concrete skate park.     Location: 456 South Main Street  Facilities:     11 Skateboard Features   Restrooms , Water Fountain, and Paved Parking  Preliminary Site Observations:   Open Areas to North and Southeast with Potential for Development   Some Existing Graffiti on Ramps; Possible Opportunity for Graffiti     Art Contest   Views To North:  City Vehicle Maintenance Facility   Views to East:  City Recycling Center   Views to South:  Animal Shelter   Views to West;  Tree‐Screened Railroad Tracks 

Currently Owasso’s Skate Park accommodates   eleven features / jumps on a large concrete slab. 

 

2 ‐ 34 

Support facilities for the skate park include an existing   restroom building, drinking fountain and paved parking lot.  


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

Figure 12:  Skate Park ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 35 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Veterans Park Overview    As shown in Figure 13, Veterans Park is a small 3‐acre park that is located  north of 86th Street North.   Currently, this property is completely undevel‐ oped  and  lacks  visible  definition  as  a  park,  and  has  no  vehicular  access  or  parking.      Veteran’s  Park  is  bordered  by  single‐family  homes  to  the  north,  and the south edge of the park is exposed to noise from 86th Street traffic.  The park’s physical features include open lawn areas as well as mature trees  at  the  east  end  of  the  property.    Future  planning  for  the  park  should  ad‐ dress  buffering  traffic  / noise  from  86th  Street,  as  well  as creating  recrea‐ tion  areas  that  are  safely  separated  from  the  adjacent  arterial  street.    Owasso’s  2015  Parks  Master  Plan  includes  a  trail  linkage  that  will  connect  Veteran’s Park with the community’s planned trail network.    Location: 12001 East 86th Street North  Total Area:  3 Acres  Past Events:     United Way ‐ “Name that Park”  Preliminary Site Observations:   Park Fronts 86th Street  (Noise / Traffic)   No Existing Recreational Improvements   Rolling Terrain Slopes toward Drainageway;  Cuts Through Site and     Drains to Culvert under 86th Street   Existing Tree Groupings in Good Health   Above‐Ground Manholes for Storm Sewer on Site   No Parking or Vehicular Access to the Park   Large Utility / Cell Tower in Northwest Corner of the Park   Views to North and West:  Existing Residential Areas   Views to East:  Power Substation   Views to South:  86th Street   

2 ‐ 36 

A large drainageway bisects Veterans Park,   flowing through the 3‐acre park under 86th Street. 

Large native trees at the park’s eastern end   could provide nice shade for future park users. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

Figure 13:  Veterans Park  ‐ Existing Conditions 

2 ‐ 37 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

2.5  Existing Pedestrian / Bicycle Circulation    Another important component of Owasso’s infrastructure that has a signifi‐ cant effect on quality of life is the pedestrian and bicycle circulation system.   A  major  goal  that  has  been  identified  for  this  study  is  the  creation  of  one  contiguous  pedestrian  trail  system.    A  walkable  community  is  made  up  of  trails and walks that connect neighborhoods, schools, parks and other com‐ munity  destinations.    This  system  has  several  components,  including  off‐ road trails and sidewalks that are within the public street right‐of‐way.  Bike  facilities include a combination of dedicated bike lanes in addition to streets  that are designated as shared bikeways.     In this section, drawings are included (Figures 14‐17) that illustrate the gen‐ eral extent of the existing sidewalk system along Owasso’s arterial streets.   These  maps  divide  the  city  into  four  quadrants  and  show  locations  where  sidewalks  currently  exist  along  main  roadways.      In  general,  the  sidewalk  system is more complete in core areas of the community, particularly along  streets that have been improved or widened in recent years.   There are still  significant  areas  of  the  city  where  there  are  no  sidewalks  along  arterial  streets,  especially  where  main  roads  are  2  lanes  and  have  not  been  im‐ proved.   Currently, arterial streets crossing under Highway 169 do not ac‐ commodate pedestrians or bikes adequately, although the planned highway  construction project (between 56th and 116th Streets) will create an impor‐ tant opportunity to remedy this.      Off‐road  pedestrian  trail  routes  and  “Share  the  Road”  Bikeways  are  pro‐ posed on the Owasso 2010 Land Use Master Plan. Proposed trail alignments  are also shown on the 2015 Parks Master Plan.  These proposed trails gen‐ erally follow drainageways, the SKO railroad, and the Highway 169 corridor.    To date, none of these planned trails have been constructed.     

2 ‐ 38 

Recent City of Owasso projects with good sidewalks  include Main Street in the downtown area (top photo)  and 129th East Avenue (bottom photo).  Both of these  projects provide universal access and meet the   guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

As illustrated above and to the  left, the 76th Street underpass   at Highway 169 does not   currently have adequate   space for bikes or pedestrians. 

As illustrated in the two photographs above, 76th   Street would benefit from sidewalks and bike facilities   to accommodate other modes of travel. 

Several of Owasso’s parks have  existing trail networks, including  Elm Creek Park (left).  Centennial  Park also has a very good trail  that is approximately 3 miles in  length.  Future planning should  address connecting these, and  other parks, in a continuous   trail network. 

 

2 ‐ 39 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  LEGEND    EXISTING   SIDEWALK  (ON ARTERIAL  STREETS)    CITY LIMITS                                  SIDEWALK LIMITS  ARE APPROXIMATE  (MARCH 2010) 

 

2 ‐ 40 

Figure 14:  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Southwest Quadrant 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2 LEGEND    EXISTING   SIDEWALK  (ON ARTERIAL  STREETS)    CITY LIMITS                                  SIDEWALK LIMITS  ARE APPROXIMATE  (MARCH 2010) 

 

Figure 15:  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Southeast Quadrant 

2 ‐ 41 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  LEGEND    EXISTING   SIDEWALK  (ON ARTERIAL  STREETS)    CITY LIMITS                                  SIDEWALK LIMITS  ARE APPROXIMATE  (MARCH 2010) 

 

2 ‐ 42 

Figure 16:  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Northwest Quadrant 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2 LEGEND    EXISTING   SIDEWALK  (ON ARTERIAL  STREETS)    CITY LIMITS                                  SIDEWALK LIMITS  ARE APPROXIMATE  (MARCH 2010) 

 

Figure 17:  Existing Sidewalk System ‐ Northeast Quadrant 

2 ‐ 43 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

  2.6  Streetscape Opportunities    The visual quality of the street scene along public roadways plays a major  factor  in  shaping  a  community’s  image,  potentially  creating  either  a  very  positive or negative perception.  The presence of street trees alone, given  time to mature and grow, can radically change the image of a community  and its thoroughfares.  Reviewing existing conditions and opportunities for  Owasso’s streetscaping  is an important part of the initiative to enhance the  community’s  quality  of  life.      Streetscape  elements  typically  include  land‐ scaping, lighting, pedestrian paving, signage, public art and site furnishings  (benches, bike racks, litter receptacles, planters, etc.) Streetscape elements  will vary with the context of each street setting.   For example, the design of  a street through a residential area will  be different than the character of a  street in a downtown or other urban context.    Currently,  Owasso  has  few  streets  that  have  been  developed  with  signifi‐ cant streetscape elements.   The most recent example of streetscape devel‐ opment is along Main Street, between 76th and Broadway Streets in down‐ town Owasso.  As shown in the photographs to the right, Main Street was  improved  with  new  sidewalks  and  crosswalks,  decorative  paving,  stone  planters,  trees,  shrubs,  and  site  furnishings.      The  addition  of  decorative  street lighting with colorful banners is one of the most visible enhancement  elements.    Future  construction  phases  are  planned  to  extend  this  street‐ scape treatment north on Main Street to 86th Street, and along 76th Street  between Main and Highway 169.     

 

2 ‐ 44 

Streetscaping was completed in Owasso downtown  several years ago.  Enhancements include decorative  lighting, paving and site furnishings. 


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

129th East Avenue is an example of a recent street   widening project that could be further enhanced with  landscaping.  Overhead power lines must be considered  in choosing tree types to avoid future conflicts. 

76th Street, as illustrated in this photo   looking east from Main Street, would   benefit from streetscape enhancements.   

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2

The addition of streetscape elements to Owasso’s arterial streets and major  collector streets has the potential to significantly enhance Owasso’s image.   Streetscaping  should  be  included  with  every  new  street  and  intersection  project within the city.  Landscaping can also be added to existing streets,  including recently widened roads such as 129th East Avenue.    Priority  should  be  given  to  higher  visibility  corridors  that  are  most  impor‐ tant  in  the  effort  to  establish  and  maintain  a  quality  image  for  Owasso.    Due  to  their  many  environmental  benefits,  durable  shade  trees  should  be  the  focus  of  streetscape  efforts  in  most  areas.    Where  possible,  overhead  electrical  and  phone  lines  should  be  buried  to  achieve  the  benefits  of  re‐ duced  power  outages,  improved  appearance,  and  elimination  of  conflicts  with  tree  branches.    Lower  growing  tree  varieties  should  be  used  where  overhead lines cannot be placed below grade.   

The Hwy. 169 corridor through Owasso  represents a tremendous opportunity   to create high‐impact landscaping.  

As shown in this view looking north along  Highway 169, landscaping can enhance  Owasso’s image in this highly visible area. 

2 ‐ 45 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

2.7  Summary of Opportunities and Constraints 

 

  Understanding  Owasso’s  unique  community  culture,  develop‐ ment  patterns,  and  physical  framework  is  an  important  part  of  the planning process for the Quality of Life Initiative.  In combi‐ nation with identifying the goals of its citizens, this information  will  form  the  basis  for  a  creating  an  effective  long‐range  vision  for Owasso’s future growth.  The following is a brief summary of  significant opportunities and constraints that will have an impact   on Owasso’s quality of life.     Opportunities   The  planned  Highway  169  construction  project  through  the  core of Owasso is an Incredible opportunity to redefine the  city’s image from this heavily travelled roadway.  This project  creates opportunities for gateways, as well as natural oppor‐ tunities to create a high impact landscape corridor.  The ex‐ pansion  of  Highway  169  will  also  provide  smoother  traffic  flow through Owasso.    The  city  currently  has  undertaken  a  number  of  progressive   community  programs,  including  the  Owasso  Strong  Neighborhood Initiative, Go Green! Initiative, and Character  Initiative.  A Capital Improvements Strategic Plan is also be‐ ing  developed.  Owasso  has  already  demonstrated  their  in‐ tent  to  become  a  sustainable  community  that  is  investing  time and effort in planning for its full potential.   Owasso has excellent potential to invest in and improve ex‐ isting park properties.  The 2015 Parks Master Plan outlines  many  innovative  objectives  and  plans  for  major  enhance‐ ment to the city’s park system, providing strong guidance for  long range development and expansion.          

 

2 ‐ 46 



Centennial and Elm Creek Parks have the natural assets and  size  to  become  outstanding  recreational  facilities.    With  its  recent  74‐acre  expansion,  the  Owasso  Sports  Park  also  has  great potential to become a premier youth sports complex.   The  recent  expansion  of  the  sports  park  also  provides  the  ability  to  add  a  much  needed  second  point  of  access  from  adjacent  streets.  The  Owasso  Family  YMCA,  located  within  Rayola Park, is also a major activity center that has become  an  important  part  of  the  community’s  fabric.    Future  plan‐ ning  should  consider  the  need  for  additional  neighborhood  parks,  as  well  as  potentially  more  community‐wide  parks  that add new forms of recreation.   In the near future, Mohawk Trail will connect Owasso to the  Tulsa  Regional  Trail  Network  with  a  new  linkage  from  Mo‐ hawk Park north to 76th Street.  There is an opportunity to  create a trailhead at 76th Street to connect to this new trail  segment.  In addition, this new connection to the metropoli‐ tan  area  network  is  a  chance  for  Owasso  to  increase  its      efforts for the  development of trail network within the com‐ munity  that  will  connect  major  use  areas  (neighborhoods,  schools, parks, shopping areas, etc.).   Owasso’s  land  resources  are  also  an  asset  for  the  commu‐ nity’s future quality of life. The city limits include substantial  areas of undeveloped land, and there is even more potential  within the Owasso Fence Line planning boundaries. This land  availability creates an opportunity to plan for new park prop‐ erties, as shown on the 2015 Parks Master Plan, and also to  achieve other potential community goals for future facilities.   


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  











Owasso  is  strategically  located    at  the  center  of  several  transportation corridors, including Highways 75, 169, and 20.    All three highways provide fast, easy access in all directions.   This  creates  the  opportunity  for  Owasso  residents  to  take  advantage of its proximity to Tulsa’s diverse resources.  Just  as importantly, this creates the potential for people living in  northeast  Oklahoma,  and  beyond,  to  travel  to  Owasso  for  shopping, recreation or to visit cultural attractions.  Upcoming  street  widening  projects  In  Owasso  provide  an  opportunity  for  significant  enhancements  that  would  be  planned in conjunction with design of the streets.   The city’s  streets  could  be  designed  to  integrate  “Complete  the  Streets”  strategies  to  accommodate  all  modes  of  travel,  in‐ cluding pedestrians and bicycles.  Streetscaping could also be  incorporated to enhance the community’s image.  Owasso has a strong public art program that has been highly  successful in bringing art and sculpture to many areas of the  city.  This focus provides momentum for continued emphasis  on art as a key element of the community’s culture.  Owasso’s public schools are widely recognized as being out‐ standing. The creativity and energy of Owasso’s youth can be  a major resource in shaping Owasso’s future growth.  In ad‐ dition  to  the  school  system,  Owasso’s  excellent  health  care  facilities  can  also  be  great  community  partners  to  promote  healthy living / wellness and physical fitness.  The  Tulsa  Tech  Owasso  Campus,  now  beginning  construc‐ tion,  can  become  a  great  educational  asset  to  the  commu‐ nity.   Planning for adjacent areas should maximize the value  of this new facility.    

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 2



On the south side of Owasso, an existing railroad bridge that  spans  Highway  169  creates  an  opportunity  for  a  new  com‐ munity gateway through creative enhancement of the bridge  structure.   Located on the southeast edge of Owasso, the Stone Canyon  development has incorporated a variety of uses that are be‐ ing developed to a high level of quality.    Stone Canyon in‐ cludes a large lake and natural areas that can be a significant  asset to the community. 

2 ‐ 47 


SECTION 2 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Constraints   One of the most significant issues that impacts Owasso’s quality of life is  the  current  lack  of  facilities  for  bikes  and  pedestrians  along  many  city  streets.  There  is  a  also  significant  amount  of  work  needed  to  create  a  complete  pedestrian  trail  system  that  connects  neighborhoods  with  schools, parks, and other major community activities.      In spite of past investment in the city’s transportation system, there are  still  significant  amounts  of  street  and  intersection  improvements  that  are needed.  Many of the city’s arterial streets are two lanes in width,  and there are areas where traffic congestion occurs.  As an example, the  Owasso Sports Park is a major recreational destination that is accessible  only from an unimproved arterial street,  resulting in poor traffic flow.    Creating a consistently positive community image is a challenge that can  be addressed through quality of life improvements.  Visual image issues  include  commercial  developments  with  little  or  no  landscaping,  over‐ head electric lines that are unattractive and limit streetscape potential  and  the  lack  of  streetscaping  and  trees  along  most  of  the  city  streets.   Improving  views  from  Highway  169  should  also  be  a  priority,  including  landscaping  of  the  highway  corridor  itself  and  screening  unattractive  views in several areas along the highway.   Revitalizing  Downtown  Owasso  remains  a  challenge,  with  limited  pro‐ gress since the completion of the master plan in 2001.  The lack of his‐ torical buildings that create an identifiable identity is a basic issue that is  difficult to address.  Downtown projects, such as the recent Main Street  streetscaping  and  the  proposed  historical  CNG  filling  station,  are  posi‐ tive steps that can build momentum.   Currently, Owasso’s commercial developments are automobile oriented  and  are  generally  “one  stop”  shopping.      The  city  would  benefit  from   pedestrian‐oriented mixed use developments ,  as well as other cultural  or recreational destinations, that can become true community gathering  places.        2 ‐ 48   

In summary, the positive attributes and opportunities  for  Owasso  outweigh  the  city’s  challenges  for  its  fu‐ ture  growth  and  development.        The  character  and  community spirit of Owasso’s citizens are clearly sum‐ marized in “The City Without Limits” slogan.  Owasso  has the potential to become a city that attracts both  residents  and  quality  jobs,  and  provides  an  array  of  amenities for those who live and work here.          


3.0   Community Participation 

 


SECTION 3 

 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

3.1  Public Outreach Objectives    Planning for and building the ideal community begins with a shared vision  between residents, businesses, and city leadership. Creating the ideal vision  involves progressive thinking with future generations in mind.   A key focus  for the Quality of Life Initiative has been to engage the citizens of Owasso in  a significant public participation effort.  The primary goal for this public out‐ reach  was  to  clearly  identify  the  type  of  community  that  residents  of  Owasso desire for their future.   Defining the community’s vision for its de‐ sired quality of life is the critical foundation upon which planning proposals  are  conceived  and  developed.  Ultimately,  a  community’s  vision  for  its  growth will only be successfully implemented if there is strong community‐ wide consensus, which is only possible when there is effective participation  from citizens during development of a plan. In order to make participating  in the planning process convenient for all citizens, the Quality of Life Initia‐ tive has included several different ways to contribute.       Community Workshops:  In May 2010, five community meetings were held  to allow citizens to interact in a group setting to share ideas and have ques‐ tions answered.  7th  Grade  Student  Workshop:  Held in June 2010, Owasso students were  invited to participate in a Town Hall meeting to express their ideas for the  community’s future from their unique perspective.  Wikiplanning  Civic  Engagement  Campaign:   A unique web‐based strategy  allowed  interaction  from  citizens  by  accessing  a  website  that  was  specifi‐ cally created for the Quality of Life Initiative.  This website provided infor‐ mation about the project, and allowed citizens to take part in a number of  activities to communicate their ideas or concerns for Owasso.    The  following  section  of  the  report  provides  a  brief  overview  for  each  of  these community involvement forums.   (Refer also to Appendices A, B, and  C of this study for more detailed summaries.)   

3 ‐ 2 

The primary objective was to engage the   community in answering the question   “What is your vision for Owasso’s future?”. 


COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 3

3.2    Community Workshops    Beginning May 3, 2010, five community meetings were held over a 3 week  period to allow citizens of Owasso to take part in determining a future vi‐ sion for their city.   These meetings were facilitated by the planning team,  with significant involvement from City of Owasso employees.   These work‐ shops  were  well  attended  and  allowed  Owasso  residents  to  learn  more  about this important planning initiative and to share their thoughts on the  quality of life features they desired for their community. 

The community workshops provided an opportunity to  interact with city representatives and the planning  team.   These meetings also provided an informal   setting for citizens to provide input, listen to views of  other residents, view maps and displays, and learn  more about the project’s scope and objectives.   

Five Community Workshops were held throughout the city in May 2010.   

3 ‐ 3 


SECTION 3 

 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

Each  of  the  community  meetings  began  with  an  introduction  by  a  City  of  Owasso  representative,  which  provided  perspective  on  the  City’s  goals  for  the  planning  initiative.    This  was  followed  by  a  slide  show  presentation  by  the planning team that began with a short summary of the project’s scope,  schedule and planning process.  A major focus of the slide show addressed  the important question of “What is Quality of Life?”, with the premise that  this means something different to every individual.    To stimulate ideas and  to  provide  a  starting  point  for  discussion,  the  planning  team  presented  a  broad  range  of  images  that  are  typically  associated  with  a  good  quality  of  life.    A few of these are illustrated in the photographs to the right, including  elements such as trails, sports facilities, family activities, and basic elements  such  as  good  streets.      Other  elements  that  were  presented  included  land‐ scaping, pedestrian‐friendly developments, public art and public lakes.      The introductory presentation at each of the community meetings included a  brief review of the proposed concept of “Building on Owasso’s Excellence.”   The quality of life study is focused on adding elements and features that are  currently not available within the community.  It is very important to begin  this  planning  initiative  with  the  understanding  that  Owasso  already  has  a  number  of  outstanding  characteristics,  and  that  future  enhancements  will  building upon the foundation of these strengths.  Owasso currently enjoys a  strong  reputation  for  having  excellent  schools,  neighborhoods,  churches,  health care, shopping / dining, as well as several good golf courses and rec‐ reational facilities.       

Trails

Sports Facilities

Good Streets

 

3‐ 4 

Community meetings included a   presentation of examples of things that are  typically associated with good quality of life . 


COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 3

Following the conclusion of opening remarks and a  review  of  the  slide  presentation,  citizens  were  in‐ vited to adjourn to 5 different “break out” discus‐ sion groups that were dispersed in different areas  of  the  meeting  room.      These  discussion  sessions,  facilitated by planning team and City staff, created  an  informal  setting  to  ask  questions  and  share  ideas or concerns.  Each of the 5 groups areas were  set up with display boards (maps and photos) that  showed  existing  Owasso  facilities  and  images  of  potential quality of life features.   As shown in the  diagrams  to  the  right,  the  discussion  groups  cov‐ ered  diverse  topics.      Group  facilitators  recorded  citizen comments on large flip charts.     

Group discussions provided a good forum to   communicate ideas.   In addition, residents at each  workshop were invited to use comment forms     To submit written suggestions to the City. 

In  summary,  the  five  community  workshops  were  well  attended  and  provided  very  good  input  for  consideration  in  the  development  of  potential  quality  of  life  enhancements  for  Owasso.    A  com‐ plete record of citizen comments from the 5 work‐ shops is included in Appendix A at the end of this  report.   Public comments were quite diverse, but  were  generally  positive  and  offered  constructive  feedback  for  creating  an  innovative  vision  for  the  community.    The  time  invested  by  Owasso’s  citi‐ zens  and  City  staff  in  the  workshops  will  help  to  ensure  that  the  proposed  quality  of  life  elements  reflect the desires of the community to the great‐ est extent possible.                         

3 ‐ 5 


SECTION 3 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

 

3.3  7th Grade Student Workshop     Another  unique  forum  for  community  participation  involved  a  group  of  stu‐ dents from Owasso.  On June 10, 2010, the City of Owasso and planning con‐ sultants  held  a  Quality  of  Life  Workshop  with  Owasso  7th  graders.    Below  is  a  brief  summary  of  the  interactive  exercises  that  the  students  participated  in.   (Also see Appendix B for a more detailed review of this workshop and the re‐ sults of each activity.)    After  opening  comments  by  the  Honorable  Mayor  of  Owasso  and  others,  the  students  were  shown  a  “Boos  and  Cheers”  presentation,  during  which  they  were  shown  images  of  positive  and  negative  events  /  amenities  and  asked  to  “boo” or “cheer” in response.  As expected, the students cheered for features  they  liked  and  expressed  their  dislike  for  negative  elements.    After  the  group  presentation, the students were directed to four activity stations to participate  in  a  variety  of  exercises  that  allowed  them  to  share  their  vision  for  Owasso’s  ideal future.  A review of each station is presented in this summary.    Exercise 1:  The Sliding Value Scale  Group  leaders  read  a  total  of  15  statements  while  the  students  physically  aligned  themselves  on  a  large  sliding  scale  marked  with  “Strongly  Agree”  and  “Strongly Disagree.”  As illustrated in the photograph below, students were all  in  agreement  with  the  statement  that  they  should  have  a  voice  in  how  their  community grows.  QUESTION:    

I should have a   say in how my   community grows.   

3‐ 6 

Students participated in a lively exercise, where  they reacted to a wide variety of images by booing  or cheering to express their likes and dislikes. 


COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

Students provided creative park ideas! 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 3

Exercise 2:  “Draw a Park” Mural  Students were presented with a large wall mural and asked to draw or write  things  that  they  desired  in  a  city  park.  The  group  leader  offered  ideas  to  spark creativity, such as a fishing pond, playground equipment, gazebos, am‐ phitheater, trails, splash pad, etc.  While they drew, the students were asked   questions such:    What is your favorite park in Owasso?          Think of a park in another city.  What does that park have that Owasso  doesn’t?  How would you change that park to make it even better?      How do you think you will use parks in 10, 15 or even 20 years?    Do you think it is important for parks to appeal to all age groups?       How can you make parks safer?     Exercise 3:  Sticker Voting  Photographs of various activities and amenities were printed on posters and  placed on the wall, and students were given green dot stickers with which to  vote  on  elements  that  they  felt  were  most  important  to  Quality  of  Life  in  Owasso.  The images below reflect the “voting” results provided by the stu‐ dents.     

Facilitators encouraged discussion with questions   such as “If you had to choose one of these photos   that most represents your likes or interests,     which one would it be and why?” 

3 ‐ 7 


SECTION 3 

 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

Exercise 4:  What Do You Think is Important?  Students were given the opportunity to write down, from their perspective,  what three things were most important to kids, adults and parents and sen‐ ior citizens and grandparents.  The images at the bottom of this page illus‐ trate  the  students  responses.      While  they  deliberated  and  as  they  wrote,  they were posed questions for discussion that included:   How would you characterize the types of things you think kids most en‐ joy  in  our  community?  Are  they  largely  recreational  activities?  Parks?  Shopping and retail? Improvements to streets?    How would you characterize the types of things you think your parents  or other adults enjoy the most in our community?   How  would  you  characterize  the  types  of  things  you  think  your  grand‐ parents or other senior citizens enjoy the most in our community?   If  there  were  one  new  thing  that  could  be  built  in  Owasso  that  would  appeal to all three of these groups, what would it be? Why do you think  that would appeal to all three age groups?   

 

 

3‐ 8 

  

Students were challenged to think about their   community from the perspective of several generations. 

Students displayed creativity and thoughtfulness   in all four of the interactive exercises. 

Creative thinking is an important first step in develop‐ ing a vision for the best way for Owasso to grow and  reach its potential.  The students who participated   in this workshop shared many insightful ideas. 


COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 3

3.4  Wikiplanning Civic  Engagement Campaign   

Overview  of Wikiplanning Activities   

Owasso residents who visited the  Wikiplanning site  could take part in several interactive activities that   allowed them to share ideas, images, and comments.   

In  an  effort  to  involve  as  many  community  members  as  possible,  the  Owasso  Quality  of  Life  Initiative  included  a  web‐based  civic  engagement  tool that was provided by Wikiplanning.  This innovative program has been  effective on other planning projects in reaching out to residents who gener‐ ally  don’t  attend  public  meetings,  and  it  allows  a  format  that  encourages  candid comments.      The Wikiplanning site, which was accessed using a zip code and email ad‐ dress, included a “welcome” from City representatives, after which  citizens  could proceed to a number of interactive activities.  Visitors to the website  could take a quality of life survey, review other City of Owasso planning re‐ ports, or post photographs with comments.   The site also offered an oppor‐ tunity to map where people live, work and play.   A message board allowed  residents to post and read comments.    On April 14, 2010, the  project website went “live” and allowed the citizens  of Owasso the opportunity to participate in their city’s Quality of Life Initia‐ tive in the comfort of their homes or offices, or wherever they had access to  the  internet.    After  92  days  of  online  availability  that  ended  on  July  16,  2010, Wikiplanning proved to be an effective way of reaching hundreds of  residents  and  gaining  their  input  into  their  city’s  Quality  of  Life  Initiative  Plan  process.  At  the  close  of  the  civic  engagement  campaign,  there  had  been 812 distinct logins to the Wikiplanning project site and over 550 peo‐ ple had left their opinions about the quality of life in Owasso.  

3 ‐ 9 


SECTION 3 

 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

SURVEY   Survey questions were developed in collaboration with the City of Owasso Plan‐ ning Department, the city’s planning consultant and Wikiplanning staff in hopes  of  gaining  public  input  into  the  values  on  which  the  plan  was  being  built  and  new ideas that might be considered. The goal  was not to  have local residents  choose between planning scenarios, but rather express their opinions about the  future development of Owasso in terms of quality of life attributes. In doing so,  the  intent  was  to  help  participants  better  understand  how  their  perspective  ranked  relative  to  others.  To  accomplish  that,  all  individual  survey  responses  were immediately aggregated and viewable on the Wikiplanning website allow‐ ing real time access to the constantly evolving public commentary.   (A tabula‐ tion of the responses to survey questions is provided later in the section of the  report.)    DISCUSSION BOARD   Embedded  in  the  survey  were  two  open‐ended  essay  questions  seeking  infor‐ mation  on  the  City  of  Owasso’s  assets  and  challenges.  The  answers  to  these  questions appeared on the Discussion Board where additional comments could  also  be  left.    All  citizen  comments  were  immediately  posted  on  the  Wikiplan‐ ning website allowing real time access to the accruing public commentary. (The  final Wikiplanning report, available on the City of Owasso’s website,  provides a  complete listing of these comments.)     PICTURE POSTINGS   Project  participants  uploaded  20  images  to  the  Photo  Posting  Activity.  Partici‐ pants were asked to post photos that they felt embodied both Owasso’s assets  and challenges. Other participants were encouraged to post comments relative  to the previously posted images, and several did so.  The photographs shown to  the  right  are  examples  of  photographs  that  were  posted,  along  with  some  of  the community’s comments and reactions to these images.     

3 ‐ 10 

One of the most interactive activities of the  Wikiplanning site allowed  the community to   post photographs that illustrated images of   elements they desired for Owasso’s future, or   were examples on negative features to be avoided. 


COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

      

 

 

                 SECTION 3 

Summary of Citizen Survey Results    The Wikiplanning civic  engagement effort contained a comprehensive survey, and as previously mentioned, almost 550 participants  submitted their responses.  The following summary provides an overview of the survey results, which will provide essential input that  will guide the City in creating a long‐range vision for Owasso’s future.  Appendix C in this report provides a more detailed version of the  survey results.  (The entire Wikiplanning Quality of Life report is also available on‐line through the City of Owasso’s website.)    The on‐line survey included 27 questions, with the primary objective of allowing citizens to help identify quality of life features that  would enable Owasso to become an attractive, sustainable and livable community for future generations.  One of the first and most  important steps in this process is to understand the needs, desires and concerns of Owasso citizens.  The following section of this re‐ port provides a summary of responses submitted by the community.  As shown below, the first six questions dealt with an evaluation  of current conditions in Owasso.  The lowest rated factors were Parks and Recreation, and Roads and Streets. 

 

3 ‐ 11 


SECTION 3 

 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

As  shown  above,  the  highest  ranked  factors  for  “why  people  choose  to  live  or  work  in  Owasso”  are  quality  of  schools,  followed  by  family  oriented  /  friendly  atmosphere  and  safety  /  low  crime  rate.    Owasso’s  proximity  to  Tulsa,  as  well  as  neighborhoods  /  housing  availability were also important factors.    The survey also provided 16 questions that included statements about Owasso with which  respondents could agree or disagree.  The chart on the following page provides a summary  of the responses, with a tabulation of “strongly agree” and “agree” answers shown as a per‐ centage for each of the potential community elements.   For the 550 Owasso residents who  participated, there was a clear interest in creating an environmentally sustainable commu‐ nity  that  fostered  health  and  fitness  as  two  of  the  top  needs.    Equally  important  was  the  need to develop amenities that attract jobs.  Other elements that were well supported in‐ clude  trails,  a  festival  /  events  area  and  recreation  /  entertainment  geared  toward  young  professionals.  All of the elements listed as potential needs were supported, by varying per‐   centages, by at least half the survey participants.  

3 ‐ 12 


COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 3

Summary of Survey Data  Wikiplanning On‐Line Civic Engagement Campaign 

This  chart provides a tabulation of the responses to 15 of the survey questions, with the results shown in order of   importance to the 550 Owasso residents who participated.  The highest rated need is for Healthy Lifestyles, fitness and wellness.   

3 ‐ 13 


SECTION 3 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

 

The Wikiplanning survey also included two open‐ended questions.  The fol‐ lowing  is  a  summary  of  the  responses  received  to  the  first  question:    “In  your opinion, what are the things about Owasso that make it a great place  to  live,  work  or  visit?”  143 responses were submitted, and the following  provides a generalized tabulation of the top responses by listing the num‐ ber of times a specific comment was mentioned.  Specific comments were  grouped into the general categories that are shown below.  (See Appendix C  for complete results.)  Comment 

Number of  Occurrences 

Sense of Community / The People  / Family‐Friendly / Caring 

70 

Good Schools 

56 

Safe / Low Crime (Good Police and Fire Department) 

45 

Good Shopping and Dining 

45 

Small Town Feel / Atmosphere 

32 

Proximity to Tulsa /Convenient Location 

25 

   

3 ‐ 14 


COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 3

The second question asked:  “If you could change one thing about Owasso to  make it a better community, what would it be?”  394 responses were submit‐ ted, and the following provides a generalized tabulation of the most frequent  responses by listing the number of times a specific comment was mentioned.   (See Appendix C for a complete tabulation of all responses.)    Comment 

Number of  Occurrences 

Community Swimming Pool / Water Park 

45 

More Walking / Bike Trails 

44 

Better Sports Complex 

36 

Fix Roads / Better Roads 

27 

Small Town Feel / Atmosphere 

32 

Proximity to Tulsa /Convenient Location 

25 

 

 

3 ‐ 15 


SECTION 3 

 

 

                                   COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 

3.5  Community Participation Summary    Through  the  successful  completion  of  the  community  participation  activities  that were previously described, the citizens of Owasso have contributed signifi‐ cantly by expressing their ideas for the future of their city.   The level of involve‐ ment has been excellent, including the on‐line campaign that Wikiplanning has  indicated  is  the  most  successful  of  any  planning  project  to  date.    The  City  of  Owasso has subsequently launched The Ideal Owasso website to continue com‐ munication with citizens and provide a forum to express ideas for a shared vi‐ sion.  Residents can continue to upload photos, complete surveys, leave com‐ ments, and view master plan data on this site.    The following statement from the City of Owasso’s website  (April 2010) sum‐ marizes  the  community  involvement  process  in  which  many  citizens  have  in‐ vested their time:  “Citizens will have the opportunity to provide input on what  areas of service and opportunities are most important to them and their fami‐ lies.  City staff will then take this information and use it to develop priorities for  further  study  and  action.    Just  as  “Rome  wasn’t  built  in  a  day”,  the  future  of  Owasso  will  be  constructed  using  the  insight  of  individual  citizens  themselves,  thus  ensuring  Owasso  continues  to  be  an  attractive,  progressive  community  that  ‐above  all  else‐cares  for  its  citizens  and  works  to  ensure  the  city  truly  is  their community.”     The ideas, suggestions, and concerns that have been expressed by Owasso citi‐ zens provide a sound understanding of the community’s vision for their future.  This  guidance,  combined  with  the  analysis  of  the  community’s  physical  assets  that were reviewed in section 2 of this study, provides the foundation for the  development  of  conceptual  features  that  can  significantly  enhance  Owasso’s  quality of life in the decades ahead.   On the pages that follow, section 4 pre‐ sents proposed quality of life features for the City of Owasso.     

3 ‐ 16 


4.0   Owasso Quality of        Life Enhancement 

 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.1  Overview of Community‐Wide Vision  Excellent Schools

 

This  chapter  proposes  a  long‐range  vision  which  will  become  the  roadmap  toward  a  future  in  which  Owasso  can  attract  both  residents  and  quality  jobs.    This  future  vision  also  encourages  sustainable living practices and provides diverse opportunities and amenities for those who live  and work in Owasso.  Proposed quality of life features represent the “building blocks” to create a  great community.  

Quality Neighborhoods

Great Churches

 

Recommended quality of life enhancements have been developed in response to this initiative’s  goals,  combined  with  significant  participation  from  Owasso’s  citizens  and  an  understanding  of  the city’s unique opportunities and constraints.  An important foundation of this plan is the rec‐ ognition  that  Owasso  already  has  many  community  components  that  are  recognized  as  being  outstanding.    Proposed  quality  of  life  elements  build  on  Owasso’s  excellence,  adding  missing  features as well as continuing to make progress toward completion of initiatives that are under‐ way.  It is also important to recognize that Owasso will continue to require investment in its in‐ frastructure.    The  ultimate  goal  will  be  for  Owasso  to  develop  a  balanced  strategy  that  inte‐ grates quality of life elements along with basic community needs.  

Parks and Golf Courses

Health Care

Shopping and Dining

 

Owasso  is  often  called  “Oklahoma’s  Premier  Hometown”  and  as  illustrated  to  the  right,  there  are many reasons to support this.  Education is one of the city’s best assets;  the Owasso Public  School System has a proven record of excellence due to the long‐term commitment by city resi‐ dents.  Owasso Public Schools are among the highest ranked in Oklahoma and are ranked above  average nationally.  With its reputation as a good place to raise a family, Owasso’s many quality  neighborhoods are also an important asset.  The city benefits from a strong sense of community  spirit, built upon the character of its citizens and businesses.  Blessed with a deep spiritual heri‐ tage, Owasso is home to dozens of churches and faith communities.    Owasso’s long‐time desire to become a full‐service community is becoming a reality, in part be‐ cause of two state‐of‐the‐art hospitals that opened in 2006.  Bailey Medical Center and St. John  ‐ Owasso offer a full range of primary and specialty care, along with 24‐hour emergency cover‐ age.   

4 ‐ 2 

BOk Center

Close Proximity to Tulsa

Owasso has many outstanding  community features that   provide a great foundation for  quality of life enhancements. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Owasso residents have many recreational choices, including nu‐ merous parks, trails and athletic facilities.  Youth sports and sup‐ port for school teams is a deep‐rooted tradition.  The city’s golf  courses  include  the  four‐star  rated  Bailey  Ranch  Golf  Club  and  the recently constructed Patriot Golf Club which has world‐class  potential.    Owasso  has  experienced  strong  economic  growth  in  recent  years;  national  retailers  have  discovered  that  the  city  has  a  unique  retail  trade  area  that  far  exceeds  its  population.    Owasso’s close proximity to Tulsa is also a great advantage, with  convenient access to many entertainment and cultural activities.   Regional  attractions  include  four  nationally  recognized  muse‐ ums,  the  Tulsa  Zoo,  17  golf  courses,  the  Oklahoma  Aquarium,  OneOK Field and the iconic BOk Center. 

 

4 ‐ 3 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

The proposed elements that make up the long‐range vision for creating the  ���Ideal Owasso” are organized in several broad categories:     Parks and Recreation   Youth Sports   Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements   Community Image and Landscaping   Community Gathering Places and Cultural Facilities   Pedestrian‐Oriented Development   Environments and Sustainability   Strong Neighborhoods    As summarized in the chart on the facing page, there are a number of spe‐ cific features that collectively work together to create an exceptional com‐ munity.  The pages that follow include goals, photographs and sketches that  have  been developed  to  illustrate  these  proposed  elements.    Drawings  in‐ clude  “before”  and  “after”  images  that  provide  a  photograph  of  current  conditions at a specific site, along with an illustration of potential features  and enhancements.  Photographs of other communities have also been in‐ tegrated to help communicate the visual character of proposed features.      These  features  and  strategies  represent  conceptual  ideas  that  will  require  more  detailed  planning  and  development  for  implementation.    The  pro‐ posed  quality  of  life  enhancements  include  many  new  elements  or  pro‐ grams that Owasso does not currently have.  Proposals also include a num‐ ber of initiatives that are already in place and should be pursued and devel‐ oped further in the years ahead. 

 

4 ‐ 4 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

PROPOSED QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS   

PARKS AND RECREATION 

 

COMMUNITY IMAGE   AND LANDSCAPING 

YOUTH SPORTS 

GATHERING PLACES AND  CULTURAL FACILITIES 



2015 Parks Master Plan



Youth Softball



Public Art



Festival / Events Park



Passive Recreation /  Family Activities



Youth Baseball





Outdoor Amphitheater



Special Needs Ball Field

Highway 169 Image           Opportunities



Active Recreation / Sports  Facilities



Youth Soccer

Multi‐Purpose Events        Pavilion



Creative Play

Youth Football

Community Lake 







Splash Pad / Water Play





Community Swimming       Pool / Water Park



Off‐Leash Dog Parks



Youth‐Oriented          Alternative Sports Park 

Environmental Learning /  Nature Parks



Community Gateways and  Landmarks Community‐Wide               Landscape Development

 

Streetscaping and               Green Streets

 



 

PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE  IMPROVEMENTS  







Regional Trail Linkages

Healing / Therapeutic       Gardens



Mixed‐Use Development

 Tulsa Tech Owasso         Campus Opportunities

 

STRONG   NEIGHBORHOODS  

Owasso Strong             Neighborhood Initiative



PEDESTRIAN‐ORIENTED  DEVELOPMENT 

City‐Wide Pedestrian /    Bicycle System Transportation Design      Strategies



Multi‐purpose Regional  Stormwater Detention  Performing Arts Center 

   



 





Community Center            Facilities 

 

ENVIRONMENT AND  SUSTAINABILITY  

Community‐Wide Focus on  Sustainable Principles       (Go Green! Initiative)



Fitness, Wellness and  Healthy Lifestyles

Downtown Revitalization

4 ‐ 5 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.2    Parks and Recreation    2015 Parks Master Plan    REVIEW AND COORDINATE QUALITY OF LIFE GOALS  WITH THE 2015 PARKS MASTER PLAN.    The 2015 Owasso Parks Master Plan established specific objectives for en‐ hancing each existing park, as well as ideas for potential new parks and new  recreation opportunities.  The plan provides valuable guidance for the en‐ hancement  of  existing  parks  and  for  the  development  of  new  parks.    Re‐ view, evaluate, and refine these proposals to achieve the goal of an excep‐ tional  parks  and  recreation  system  for  Owasso.      The  following  provides  a  brief  overview  of  key  goals  and  recommendations  from  the  2015  Owasso  Parks Master Plan.     The  plan  establishes  guidelines  for  future  parks  development,  facility  development and operation / management of the parks and recreation  system.     The plan is an overall policy guide for short and long‐term development  and a foundation for decision making.     It  outlines  specific  objectives  for  community  recreation  services  in  re‐ sponse to general land use patterns and community character.     The  plan  advances  measures  and  provides  facilities  that  encourage  a  healthy lifestyle and appreciation of Owasso’s natural resources.     

4 ‐ 6 

Elm Creek Park 

Centennial Park 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT               

 

    SECTION 4

Specific  objectives  of  the  2015  Parks  Master  Plan  include  focusing  efforts  on  developing  large  community  parks.   Other objectives involve the creation of standards for park  construction  and  encouraging  developers  to  create  neighborhood parks.  Other major goals include the devel‐ opment of a park geared toward young adults, potentially  incorporating an outdoor amphitheater.  Pursuing the de‐ velopment  of  a  waterfront  project  near  the  downtown  area is recommended. 

  

A major component of the 2015 Parks Master Plan is the  development of a detailed list of potential enhancements  foe Owasso’s existing parks.  As illustrated in the drawing  to  the  right,  general  locations  are  also  identified  for  a  number of new park types.  These include a city‐wide trails  system,  mountain  bike  park,  dog  park,  large  water  park  and a rock climbing facility.  A new park is proposed in the  northeast  quadrant of Owasso ‐ an area that is currently  underserved by the parks system. 

 

4 ‐ 7 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Passive Recreation / Family Activities   

Goal:  Enhance existing parks with more opportunities  for passive recreation and family play.    

Owasso  enjoys  a  reputation  as  an  outstanding  community  for  families,  and  the  city’s  parks  system  can  continue  to  be  an  asset  as  a  place  for  passive  recreation  and  informal  play.    The  2015  Owasso  Parks  Master  Plan  proposes  specific  enhancements  for  many  existing  parks  including  picnic  shelters,  fishing  ponds,  trails  and  support  facilities  such  as  rest‐ rooms  and  parking.    In  addition  to  these  proposals,  developing  new  neighborhood  and  community  parks  will  also  create  needed  places  for  passive recreation and informal play.  Generally, passive recreation  ar‐ eas are most enjoyable when they are separated from active sports. 

   

Consider facilities to accommodate:  Picnics / Cooking Out  Family Fun  Neighborhood Get‐Togethers  Walking and Bicycling  Fishing  Informal Play (Run, Play, Fly Kites, Toss Frisbee, Play Games)  Traditional Games (Croquet, Horseshoes, Bocce Ball, etc.)  Enjoying Nature 

 

4 ‐ 8 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Parks should provide large open spaces that function as flexible areas for informal    recreation and play.  It is also important for parks to preserve resources such as   woodlands, creeks, wetlands and grasslands.  These natural  areas provide valuable   environmental habitats that create opportunities to experience nature.   

4 ‐ 9 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  Veterans Park provides an example of an undeveloped park that can be enhanced with  features that create useful places for family activities.  As shown to the left, the park is  bisected by a large creek with eroded banks.  Conceptual enhancements, illustrated be‐ low, can include a gazebo, walking trails, landscaping and a boulder‐lined creek spanned  by a decorative foot bridge. 

 

4 ‐ 10 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Centennial Park, shown to the left, has opportunities for further enhancement to make  it an even more popular community park.  As envisioned in the sketch below,  future  improvement could include a fishing dock, boating facilities, seating areas, native boul‐ ders, natural areas and a widened trail. 

 

4 ‐ 11 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Active Recreation / Sports Facilities   

Goal:  Enhance existing parks with a wide variety   of active recreational choices.    

Owasso’s  park  system  serves  a  valuable  role  in  providing  places  for  active  sports,  in  addition  to  facilities  provided  by  schools,  churches,  and  the  Owasso Family YMCA.  The 2015 Parks Master Plan includes a wide variety  of proposed facility improvements for active sports.  Owasso’s parks should  provide a wide variety of opportunities for active sports, with an emphasis  on  those  that  have  been  identified  as  most  needed  by  Owasso  residents.   (Youth  sports  facilities  for  softball,  baseball,  soccer  and  football  are  ad‐ dressed in section 4.3 of this report.) 

  

Consider additional facilities to increase opportunities for sports such as:  Sand Volleyball Courts  Tennis Courts  Basketball / Multi‐Purpose Hard Surface Courts  Park Roads and Trails for Cycling and Running Events  Disc Golf Courses  Rodeo Arena Facility Enhancements (McCarty Park)  Multi‐Purpose Practice Fields for Youth Sports 

 

Park trails and roadways can accommodate   a variety of running and bicycle events.   

4 ‐ 12 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Active sports such as tennis, volleyball, basketball and cycling should continue to be an important component of Owasso’s   parks and recreation system.  Providing well‐maintained sports facilities also helps create an active, healthy community.   

4 ‐ 13 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Creative Play   

Goal:  Enhance Owasso’s parks with creative play   opportunities.    

Play areas should incorporate interactive play structures that stimulate  the imagination and promote fitness.  Provide play areas and appropri‐ ate equipment for children of all age groups that is designed specifically  for their changing physical and social skills. 

  

Play areas provide an excellent opportunity for innovative themes that  add excitement and interest. 

  

Consider  the  addition  of  natural  elements  such  as  large  rocks  or  tree  trunks to create new forms of recreation that allow kids to experience  nature. 

  

Ensure that existing and new play areas have enough shade for kids and  adults (gazebos / pavilions, fabric structures and trees). 

Owasso’s Stone Canyon development has created   an innovative natural play area, using a simple   grass slope and large limestone boulders. 

  

Take  full  advantage  of  play  areas  as  places  to  incorporate  color,  art,  sculptural elements and innovative signage. 

  

Ensure that all play areas meet the requirements for universal accessi‐ bility.    

  

 

Provide  recreational  equipment  that  is  sustainable  and    manufactured  through environmentally‐friendly processes.  Select equipment that pro‐ vides value in terms of life‐cycle costs / long‐term maintenance needs.   

4 ‐ 14 

Shade is a very important element for creating play  areas that are enjoyable during hot summer months. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Playgrounds can incorporate natural elements and climbing features. 

Play areas provide a great opportunity to integrate  themed elements that are whimsical and stimulate   the imagination of children.   Color, art and     sculpture can also enhance the play experience.  

Play equipment should be interactive and capable of  accommodating all  age groups.   As shown in the photographs above, kids enjoy innovative  features that allow them to use their imagination and physical skills. 

4 ‐ 15 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Splash Pad / Water Play   

Goal:  Develop additional splash pads / water play‐ grounds to enhance Owasso’s parks.    

Develop more water play areas to complement the existing Rayola Park  splash  pad.    Strategically  locate  new  splash  pads  in  Owasso’s  parks  to  provide convenient access to all neighborhoods.  Consider developing at  least one “destination level” water play area (similar to the scale of the  Tulsa River Parks 41st Street Plaza and Playground). 

  

     

Potential Features:  Creative / Interactive Environment  Colorful Paving Patterns   High‐Quality Equipment / Paint Finishes to Minimize    Long‐Term Maintenance Expenses  Shade Structures / Trees  Reuse Water Runoff for Irrigation Use in Parks (Capture Water in        Below‐Ground Storage Tank)  Include Diverse Equipment and Water Effects  Play Zones for Several Age Groups   

Rayola Park Splash Pad                                                          

4 ‐ 16 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

 

    SECTION 4

Splash pads provide a popular form of recreation that can be expanded in Owasso beyond the current facility in Rayola   Park.  The play experience is accentuated through themed designs, colorful paving and a wide variety of above‐ground   features and in‐ground spray nozzles.  Typically, a splash pad is manually activated by kids, beginning an automatic   cycle that operates all play features in a programmed sequence. 

4 ‐ 17 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Community Swimming Pool / Water Park   

Goal:  Provide Owasso with an outdoor community  swimming pool to fill a major gap in recreational          opportunities.    

A  community  swimming  pool  /  water  park  was  a  highly  requested  item  from  Owasso  citizens  in  response  to  the  Wikiplanning  survey  questions  “If  you  could  change  one  thing  about  Owasso,  what  would  it  be?”.    To  address this need, consider opportunities for construction of an outdoor  swimming pool or water park in Owasso. 

  

Create  a  state‐of‐the‐art  pool  or  water  park  with  an  innovative  design  that can include features for all ages ‐ zero depth / beach entry, varying  pool depth, slides and water toys, large deck areas and shade structures. 

  

Explore  funding  options  so  that  the  pool’s  construction  and  long‐term  operation are not necessarily funded through tax dollars / city budgets. 

  

Explore  opportunities  for  the  City  of  Owasso  to  partner  with  other  or‐ ganizations  (YMCA,  Owasso  Public  Schools,  etc.).    Consider  a  scenario  where an expanded YMCA indoor pool can serve needs for competitive /  lap swimming.  The drawing to the right illustrates a conceptual plan for  an outdoor “lazy river” water park that is proposed as part of expansion  plans for the Owasso Family YMCA.     

 

4 ‐ 18 

Illustration of proposed Owasso Family YMCA Phase  III Expansion, which includes an outdoor “lazy river”  water park adjacent to the current indoor swimming  pool. (Drawing by Selser Schaefer Architects) 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Over the years, swimming pools and water parks continue to be a popular summertime destination for children of all ages.    Pools have evolved from simple rectangles to innovative styles that include colorful play features, slides, flumes with moving     streams and wade‐in “beach” entries.  Spacious deck areas and plentiful shade structures are also important design elements. 

4 ‐ 19 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Off‐Leash Dog Parks  Goal:  Develop one or more off‐leash dog parks.    

The  development  of  off‐leash  dog  parks  in  the  United  States  is  a  rapidly  growing  trend  and  is  becoming  a  popular  amenity  for  communities  of  all  sizes in Oklahoma.  As of 2009, there were dog parks in Norman, Del City,  Mustang,  Yukon,  Edmond,  Oklahoma  City.  Tulsa  has  opened  several  dog  parks with plans to open more.  A benefit of these “bark parks” is healthy  socialization  between  dogs  (as  well  as  dog  owners).    Safety  consideration  should be top priority in designing dog parks, with clearly defined rules and  guidelines.  Large breeds are typically separated from smaller ones by dou‐ ble  gated  fences.    It  is  critical  for  dog  owners  and  clubs  to  be  actively  in‐ volved in on‐going management of the parks for best success. 

  

A dog park is currently planned for construction in the southeast corner of  McCarty Park.  This location offers the benefits of being able to share exist‐ ing parking and restroom facilities.  The park will include a large breed area  with a swimming pond, as well as a separate area for small dogs.  Proposed  features also include fencing and small berms for interest. 

  

                   

Desirable Features for Dog Parks Include:  ‐ Perimeter Fencing  ‐ Double Gate System  ‐ Separate Areas for Large and Small Dogs  ‐ Parking and Restroom  ‐ Big Trees and Shade Structures (Shade is Essential)  ‐ Water (Hydrant and Drinking Fountain)  ‐ Litter Stations  ‐ Well‐Defined Rules / Signage  ‐ Irrigation System to Aid Turfgrass Growth   

4 ‐ 20 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

An off‐leash dog park would create a unique recreational opportunity in Owasso.  Dog parks are highly   social for dog owners as well as for their pets;  they are a great place for people to meet and interact.   

4 ‐ 21 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Youth‐Oriented Alternative Sports Park    Goal:  Develop an “Xtreme” park for new types of   recreation geared toward Owasso’s youth / young  adults.    

As proposed in the Owasso 2015 Parks Master Plan, consider the devel‐ opment of a park geared toward young adults.  This park could poten‐ tially have an outdoor amphitheater for performances by local artists,  similar to The Rivers Edge performance area in Tulsa’s River Parks.  An  alternative  sports  park  could  be  developed  as  a  new  park,  or  include  facilities in more than one park. 

  

Consider innovative activities / facilities that include:  Mountain Bike Trails  BMX Bike Courses (Non‐Motorized)  Skate Park (Update or Replace Current Skate Park)   Disc Golf  Climbing Walls  Other Alternative Sports 

 

4 ‐ 22 

Disc golf has grown in popularity and is very   economical in terms of construction costs.  Centennial  Park currently provides an 18‐hole course.  Courses  are most interesting when they incorporate natural  features such as creeks and wooded areas. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Creating a park that is geared toward younger age groups is one of the primary proposals in Owasso’s 2015 Parks Master Plan.      A new park, dedicated to alternative sports, would complement existing recreational facilities and could become a major destination. 

4 ‐ 23 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Environmental Learning / Nature Parks   

Goal:  Provide Natural Areas that create environ‐ mental habitat and educational opportunities.    

      

    

      

Explore potential for natural habitat areas in new parks, as well as in   existing  parks  such  as  Elm  Creek  Park  and  Centennial  Park.    Evaluate  locations for environmental learning on existing school properties.  Provide environmental learning opportunities that will benefit Owasso   Public School children, as well as other age groups.  Consider features that may include nature trails, interpretive signage,   diverse habitats (prairie, woodland, water, wetlands) and a nature   center building.  Take advantage of Owasso’s close proximity to Oxley Nature Center /  Mohawk Park and Redbud Valley. 

       

 

4 ‐ 24 

As illustrated in the photographs above, the   Oxley Nature Center in nearby Mohawk Park is an               environmentally diverse nature park.  Because   this beautiful 800‐acre park is so convenient to  Owasso, it offers a great learning resource and   place to interact with nature. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

 

    SECTION 4

Opportunities should be explored to incorporate natural habitat areas and environmental learning into   Owasso’s existing and future parks.  Nature trails can be carefully integrated through habitat areas, with interpretive   signage added to communicate information about native vegetation, wildlife and other features. 

4 ‐ 25 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Healing Gardens / Meditation Parks   

Goal:  Enrich Owasso’s quality of life by providing   scenic new garden‐like environments that offer   therapeutic benefits .    

One of the objectives of the 2015 Parks Master Plan is to develop two  meditation parks in close proximity to existing hospitals (Bailey Medical  Center and St. John Hospital).  The creation of these new parks would  be  a  great health  and  wellness  benefit  to  the  hospitals,  as  well  as  for  the community at large.  Evaluate opportunities to partner with these  existing medical facilities for locational decisions, planning / design and  construction.  Elements to consider including are: 

  Private, Secluded Areas for Reflection, Meditation and Prayer  Fully Accessible Design for All Levels of Ability  Security / Fencing  “Hands‐On” Gardening Opportunities  Looped Walking Paths  Site Features to assist Physical Therapy and Mental Stimulation  Landscape Materials for Year‐round Interest (“Old‐fashioned”  

  Varieties, Butterfly‐attracting Varieties and Aromatic plants)     Develop  a  scenic  natural  park  in  Owasso,  potentially  in  conjunction  with  a  meditation  park  /  healing  garden.    The  park  should  have  out‐ standing natural beauty and scenic qualities.  Tulsa’s Woodward park is  a good example of the potential park’s visual character and features. 

 

4 ‐ 26 

Tulsa’s Lineaus Garden (top) and Woodward Park   are beautiful natural parks that are well‐known   landmarks.  Lineaus Garden is also an educational   resource for the Tulsa Master Gardener program. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

 

    SECTION 4

As shown in these examples, healing / therapeutic gardens can combine natural beauty,   art elements and hardscaping to create a wonderful outdoor environment. 

4 ‐ 27 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.3  Youth Sports   

The  following  section  of  this  report  provides  conceptual  illustrations  and  descriptions of ideal facilities for Owasso’s youth sports programs.  The pro‐ posals  for  youth  softball,  baseball,  soccer  and  football  define  the  general  features  and  visual  character  to  create  state‐of‐the‐art  facilities  for  each  sport.  Because there are many similarities in the way these sports function,  many of the proposed features for each sport are the same.  Wherever pos‐ sible,  support  facilities  such  as  restrooms  and  parking  can  be  shared.   (Specific numbers of fields and field sizes have not been included.)   

Currently, the Owasso Sports Park North accommodates the majority of the  existing fields for youth baseball, softball and soccer.  With the recent 74‐ acre expansion of the park, additional study is recommended to determine  the  most  beneficial  strategy  for  integration  of  future  and  existing  fields.   This  discussion  should  also  consider  the  possibility  of  using  other  sites  to  meet the long‐term needs for all sports.   

Youth Softball   

Goal:    Develop  a  first‐class  youth  softball  complex  for  leagues and tournaments.    

           

Elements to consider:  ‐ Tournament Level Lighting  ‐ High Quality Concessions / Restrooms  ‐ Common Areas with Open Space, Play Equipment and Picnic Areas  ‐ Quality Fields (Irrigation, Fencing / Backstops and Good Drainage)  ‐ Practice Fields  ‐ Shade for Bleachers, Dugouts and Common Areas   

4 ‐ 28 

‐ Tournament Amenities / Room for Tents  ‐ Proximity to Major Roads, Restaurants and Hotels  ‐ One Championship Replica Field  ‐ Paved Parking  ‐ One Special Needs Field  ‐ Durable Shade Trees 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

As illustrated in the sketch to the left, a  well‐designed  parking  lot  can  include  a  drop‐off  area  for  players  and  family  members.  As  shown  below,  providing  shade  structure  over  dugouts  and  bleachers  is  of  great  importance  to  the  players’ and spectators’ comfort. 

 

4 ‐ 29 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  Centrally  located  playground  areas  are  an  important  amenity,  providing  a  safe  place for young siblings.  Shade for these  areas  is  also  essential,  and  can  be  ac‐ complished  using  trees  or  overhead  canopies.    Attractive  multi‐function  buildings  are  also  a  key  element  of  a  great  softball  complex,  potentially  com‐ bining  concessions,  restrooms  and  shaded seating areas. 

 

4 ‐ 30 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Youth Baseball   

Goal:  Develop a first‐class, tournament level baseball  complex.    

Elements to consider:  Tournament Level Lighting  High Quality Concessions / Restrooms  Batting Cages / Practice Fields  Common Areas with Open Space, Play Equipment and Picnic Areas  Quality Fields (Irrigation, Fencing / Backstops and Good Drainage)   Shade for Bleachers, Dugouts and Common Areas  Tournament Amenities / Room for Tents  Proximity to Major Roads, Restaurants and Hotels   One Championship Replica Field  Paved Parking  One Special Needs Field  Durable Shade Trees 

 

 

4 ‐ 31 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Above, a conceptual illustration shows the potential to create a 5‐plex of baseball fields.   This creates greater efficiency in sharing common facilities such as restrooms, conces‐ sions  and  playground  areas.    This  “ideal”  complex  also  integrates  open  lawn  areas,  shade  trees  and  generous  sidewalks  to  create  an  enjoyable  experience  for  everyone.   Parking and a large drop‐off zone are also conveniently located adjacent to the fields. 

 

4 ‐ 32 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Unique  amenities  and  site  features  help  to  create  an  image  of  quality.    Above,  a  site  plan illustrates a grand entry that replicates  a  baseball  field  through  pavement  design  and concrete “baseball” bollards.  

Creating an outstanding baseball complex begins with quality fields that are well‐fenced, properly sloped, irrigated and have durable  turfgrass.  Spacious plazas and shaded concessions / seating areas are also elements that create a user‐friendly atmosphere.   

4 ‐ 33 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Youth Soccer   

Goal:  Develop a first‐class tournament level soccer  complex.    

Potential site features:  High Quality Concessions / Restrooms  Common Areas with Open Space, Play Equipment and Picnic Areas  High Quality Fields (Irrigation, Good Drainage, Turf and Fencing)  Proximity to Major Roads, Restaurants and Hotels  Championship Field / Tournament Amenities  Good Paved Parking and Road System  Practice Fields (Can Be Dispersed Throughout City)  Potential for Indoor Soccer Facility 

  

Consider potential location for a new soccer complex in Stone Canyon  (would require widening of 76th Street for good traffic flow). 

   

 

4 ‐ 34 

A soccer complex in Overland Park, Kansas   provides an example of a sports facility   with well designed amenities. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

As shown above, an indoor soccer facility can   potentially be integrated with outdoor fields.    During tournaments, it is also a great advantage   to have places to shop and eat nearby. 

Practice fields for soccer can be accommodated in multi‐purpose practice areas  that can be shared between football, baseball and softball teams (bottom left).   

4 ‐ 35 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Special Needs Youth Sports   

Goal:  Develop a special needs field to allow children of  all abilities to play softball and baseball.  Provide soccer  programs to accommodate children with special needs.     Baseball / Softball   Develop  one  shared  special  needs  field  to  accommodate  players  of  all  abilities.    Features  should  include  a  rubberized  surface  and  wheelchair  accessible dugouts.     Consider being part of the 240 Miracle League organizations.  Based on  the idea that “every kid deserves the chance to play baseball,” the Mira‐ cle  League  removes  the  barriers  that  keep  children  with  disabilities  off  the baseball field.  Since completion of the first field in 2000, this inno‐ vative program has served over 200,000 children and young adults with  disabilities.    Soccer   Consider  initiating  a  program  similar  to  the  TOPSoccer  (The  Outreach  Program for Soccer) for kids with special needs.  This program pairs kids  with physical and/or cognitive needs with community volunteers.  TOP‐ Soccer  is  an  outreach  program  of  the  U.S.  Soccer  Association  that  is  open to all kids with a physical or mental disability between the ages of  6 ‐ 18. 

 

4 ‐ 36 

Programs like TOPSoccer make it possible for every   child to have the opportunity to enjoy playing soccer.   The experience is rewarding to the athletes and the   community volunteers.  


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Accessible fields for baseball and softball are custom designed with specific features that address potential safety hazards for players in  wheelchairs or walkers.  Fields that have been developed by the Miracle League typically include a cushioned rubberized surface, wheel‐   chair accessible dugouts and a  flat surface to eliminate any barriers to wheelchair‐bound or visually impaired players. 

4 ‐ 37 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Youth Football   

Goal:  Develop a first‐class football complex.    

Current Fields:  Owasso Sports Park North (Flag)  Ator Park  Owasso Public Schools Sites 

  

Elements to consider:  Quality Playing Fields (Irrigation, Good Turf, Drainage System, Fencing)  Lighting  Bleachers  Common Areas with Playground Equipment  Good Paved Parking / Circulation  One Artificial Turf Field for Bad Weather Play  Practice Fields  Championship Field 

  

Consider  the  optimum  relationship  between  flag  football  fields  (currently at the Sports Park) and tackle football fields.  In conjunction  with other youth sports, evaluate the best scenario to utilize the existing  and expanded site areas of Owasso Sports Park (North and South). 

   

 

4 ‐ 38 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

Quality fields are an essential component of a good football complex.    Basic elements needed include tournament‐level lighting, vinyl‐coated   fencing, irrigation and well‐maintained turfgrass. 

 

    SECTION 4

State‐of‐the‐art football complexes include  common areas with amenities such as play‐ grounds, pavilions and hardscape areas. 

4 ‐ 39 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.4  Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements   

Regional Trail Linkages   

Goal:  Plan Owasso to maximize the value of regional  trail linkages (per INCOG Regional Trail System Plan).    

Coordinate the INCOG Regional trail Plan with  Owasso’s Land Use Mas‐ ter Plan.  As illustrated on the facing page, the Tulsa Regional Trail Sys‐ tem Plan includes several trail linkages that connect Owasso with the re‐ gional system.  Trail linkages include the Owasso Mohawk Trail, which is  planned to extend along the west edge of Owasso north to Collinsville. 

  

Short  term  goal:    Create  a  new  trailhead  at  76th  Street  (west  of  down‐ town) to provide convenient access for Owasso residents to the regional  trail network.  (The Owasso Mohawk Trail and Bikeway construction was  scheduled to begin in 2010.) 

  

Acquire trail easements to allow for future trail construction. 

  

Modify the subdivision regulations to preserve / protect trail corridors. 

     

  The Taychas Trail Trailhead in Frisco, Texas is an   example of a well designed entrance to a multi‐use trail.   

4 ‐ 40 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

  The Indian Nation Council of Governments’ (INCOG) trail network is an outstanding quality of life feature for all communities within the  Tulsa metropolitan area.  The trails plan includes multi‐use trails, which are generally paved 10 ft. wide for use by pedestrians and cy‐ clists (separated from vehicular traffic).  The trails plan also includes bikeways, which are bicycle routes that use existing streets that  have some improvements to accommodate bikes.  The inset above illustrates an important linkage to Owasso that will be constructed  in the near future.  As shown, a combination of on‐street bikeways and multi‐use trails will extend north from Mohawk Park along East  86th Street  and Mingo Road.  This linkage will connect with Owasso at 76th Street, ending near the SKO railroad tracks.   

4 ‐ 41 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

City‐Wide Pedestrian / Bicycle System   

On‐Street Bike Routes and Sidewalks   

Goal:  Create a complete city‐wide bike / pedestrian sys‐ tem that is safe and provides excellent connectivity.    

Provide  additional  sidewalks  and  bike  lanes  along  Owasso’s  arterial  streets to fill in missing walk linkages.  Provide safe pedestrian and bike  circulation along collector and local streets. 

  

For new street projects, incorporate pedestrian and bike needs early in  the  design  process.    Implement  “Complete  the  Streets”  strategies  that  meet  the  needs  of  all  modes  of  travel.    Ensure  that  all  pedestrian  and  bike needs are incorporated into the new Highway 169 project design. 

  

Incorporate  state‐of‐the‐art  transportation  design  strategies  such  as  bike boxes, sharrows, etc. 

  

Provide universal access for all bike / pedestrian pathways. 

           

Owasso’s connectivity and quality of life can   be greatly enhances with city streets that safely   accommodate pedestrians and bicycles. 

 

4 ‐ 42 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Currently, the city’s sidewalk system does not allow adequate east‐west circula‐ tion along arterial streets that cross under Highway 169 at six locations.  The 76th  Street underpass is shown to the left as an example of typical conditions.  How‐ ever, the planned construction project for the highway will provide an excellent  opportunity to address this challenge.  As shown in the concept below, new high‐ way bridges over Owasso’s arterial streets can be designed to safely integrate all  modes of travel. 

 

4 ‐ 43 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Multi‐Use Trails   

Goal:  Provide multi‐use trails throughout the commu‐ nity that connect major use areas.    

Design  and  implement  a  continuous  trail  system  in  coordination  with   Owasso’s Land Use Master Plan and INCOG’s Regional Trails Plan. 

  

Provide trail linkages between neighborhoods, schools, parks, shopping  areas and other major community destinations. 

  

Create a state‐of‐the‐art trail system comparable to Tulsa’s River Parks  recently  renovated  trails  (11th  to  71st  Streets).    Provide  wide  single  trails or dual trails, where feasible, for better bike and pedestrian com‐ patibility. 

  

Provide land dedication for areas along planned greenways, particularly  along Ranch Creek.  (Consider conservation easements and the Trust for  Public Land for tax incentives.) 

     

 

4 ‐ 44 

Ranch Creek (shown near its crossing with 86th   Street, provides a potential trail alignment   along the west side of Owasso. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

As illustrated in the two photographs  directly above, there are existing trails  through Elm Creek Park (top) and   Centennial Park (bottom).  These and  other existing park trails can be   connected with future trail linkages  throughout Owasso to form a   complete network.    Exceptional trail systems incorporate amenities with the natural environment.  Attractive rest  areas, pedestrian bridges and well designed trail pavement add to the enjoyment of users.   

4 ‐ 45 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Transportation Design Strategies   

Goal:  Continue to improve Owasso’s street systems as  an important component of overall quality of life.  Pro‐ vide an increased focus on integrating all modes of  travel, including pedestrians and cyclists.    

Fund  and  implement  street  and  intersection  projects  in  coordination  with  Owasso’s  Strategic  Capital  Improvements  Plan  /  Capital  Improve‐ ments Committee. 

  

For  all  new  street  projects,  design  to  allow  all  modes  of  travel  (cars,  bikes,  pedestrians  and    transit)  in  accordance  with  the  “Complete  the  Streets” techniques.   

  

Incorporate streetscaping with all arterial street projects. 

  

Consider  medians  and  boulevards  where  appropriate,  and  avoid  long,  straight  roads  and  unattractive  streets.    Incorporate  traffic  calming  measures and retrofit problem areas with round‐a‐bouts, speed tables,  chicanes or other effective techniques. 

 

 

4 ‐ 46 

Most streets throughout the United States have been  designed  almost  exclusively  for  the  automobile  with  little  thought  given  to  the  needs  of  pedestrians  and  bicyclists.  However, there is a growing movement in  transportation design for safely accommodating bicy‐ clists, pedestrians and automobiles into a single, inte‐ grated system.  One rapidly growing initiative, known  as  “Complete  the  Streets,”  is  being  advanced  by  a  broad  coalition  of  advocates  and  transportation  pro‐ fessionals (National Complete Streets Coalition).  It is  being proven that all modes of travel can coexist in an  urban  environment  that  helps  create  sustainable,  walkable communities. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Owasso’s transportation system is a vital part of the community’s infrastructure, which will require on‐going investment for mainte‐ nance  as  well  as  improvements  projects.    Future  street  projects  should  include  innovative  strategies  that  create  safe,  aesthetically  pleasing streets that accommodate all forms of travel.  To address areas where vehicle speeds are problems in neighborhoods, traffic  calming techniques such as traffic circles should be considered.   

4 ‐ 47 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

As shown in this view looking north, 129th East Avenue has been recently improved to provide four   travel lanes and a center turn lane.  A sidewalk has also been constructed several feet from the street.   

4 ‐ 48 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

The perspective above illustrates conceptual ideas for enhancing Owasso’s arterial streets.  This image shows the same view of 129th  East Avenue from the facing page, with proposed strategies to create an attractive street that works well for transit, automobiles, bicy‐ clists  and  pedestrians.    The  design  includes  a  wide  sidewalk  that  is  separated  from  the  roadway  for  safety  and    to  create  space  for  street trees and decorative lighting.  A landscaped center median is proposed that also transitions to a center turn lane where needed.    (Overhead electrical lines ideally should be buried below ground.) 

4 ‐ 49 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.5  Community Image and Landscaping    Community Image and Appearance Opportunities   

Goal:  Create a livable community with exceptional civic  spaces, architecture, streetscaping, art and pedestrian‐ oriented developments.    

A community’s image is a significant factor in the perception of its over‐ all  quality  and  desirability  as  a  place  to  live  or  work.    This  perception,  including both positive and negative elements, is created by a combina‐ tion  of  elements:    buildings,  streets  and  highways,  landscaping,  green  spaces and landmarks.  Owasso should strive to present a high‐level im‐ age that clearly conveys the city’s pride and quality of life. 

  

Create and reinforce current city standards for landscaping, site devel‐ opment  and  architecture  to  enhance  Owasso’s  image.    Site  and  archi‐ tectural  standards  are  particularly  important  for  undeveloped  areas,  including locations near the Tulsa Tech Owasso Campus. 

  

Encourage citizen involvement with programs to enhance Owasso’s vis‐ ual  environment.    (Adopt‐a‐park  /  highway  for  litter  control,  adopt‐a‐ planting bed, tree planting projects, fence repair, etc.)   

  

Consider establishing a “beautification patrol” to make monthly reports  on  negative  /  positive  appearance  issues  in  the  city  (litter,  mowing  /  weeds, illegal signs, etc.). 

     

4 ‐ 50 

Photo Credit:  Jamie Jamieson 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

 

    SECTION 4

Mixed‐use developments that are pedestrian‐friendly and well designed can help enhance a community’s image.    Pleasing architecture, landscaping and site amenities can work together cohesively to create a memorable impression. 

4 ‐ 51 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  There are opportunities to enhance Owasso’s image and identity throughout the commu‐ nity. These opportunities are most important to take advantage of in highly visible loca‐ tions.  As an example, the existing drainageway ( shown at left) immediately south of the  YMCA has potential to be transformed into a positive feature.  As illustrated below, this  creek can be improved with large segmental block walls that create a stone appearance.   Other enhancements could include new trails, trees, native plantings and small waterfalls. 

 

4 ‐ 52 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

The large concrete drainage structures that are northwest of the Highway 169 / 76th  Street  intersection  provide  another  opportunity  for  enhancement.    As  conceptually  illustrated  below,  this  highly  visible  area  can  retain  its  flood  control  functions  in  a  much  more  aesthetically  pleasing  fashion.    The  existing  drainage  structure  can  be  overlaid with stone veneer to create a bridge effect.  Natural boulders and landscap‐ ing can also be used to create a scenic water feature. 

 

4 ‐ 53 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Public Art   

Goal:  Continue and expand public art initiatives to en‐ hance Owasso’s cultural environment and appearance.    

Build  on  the  success  of    current  City  of  Owasso  art  programs  (The  Timmy and Cindy Project). 

  

Continue to encourage art in public spaces as well as on private devel‐ opments.  Take advantage of Oklahoma’s Art in Public Places Program,  which dedicates 1.5% of the cost of state construction projects that cost  at least $250,000.  Develop distinctive landmarks and community iden‐ tity  elements  that  reflect  Owasso’s  unique  heritage  and  community  character.  Promote diverse expressions of art. 

  

Explore  opportunities  for  temporary  art  displays.    Consider  opportuni‐ ties to actively involve schools / youthful creativity. 

   

Consider the establishment of a sculpture garden in Owasso. 

  

Provide dedicated places for temporary art displays. 

 

4 ‐ 54 

The photographs above reflect the diversity of public art. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Owasso has a number of outstanding art  pieces; primarily bronze sculptures.  Art   can be found in parks throughout the   community, including the widely   recognized Timmy and Cindy sculptures. 

The Timmy and Cindy Project is a public arts initiative that utilizes  bronze castings of an active young boy and girl.  As of 2008, 33   castings were in place at strategic locations throughout the   community.  Purchase of the castings is funded by individuals,   families or organizations.  Site selection is made by city staff with    assistance from the Arts and Humanities Council of Owasso. 

4 ‐ 55 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Highway 169 Image Opportunities   

Highway 169 Design / Aesthetics   

Goal:  Maximize aesthetic opportunities for the new  U.S. Highway 169 widening project (56th Street to  116th Street).    

The  new  project  for  improvements  to  U.S.  Highway  169  presents  a  unique opportunity to establish an excellent image for this high‐visibility  corridor.    This  project  will  include  the  widening  of  the  highway  to  six  lanes between 56th Street North and 116th Street North.  Owasso has  great visibility from this six‐mile stretch of highway through the heart of  the  city,  and  the  design  and  aesthetics  of  this  project  will  impact  the  community’s image for many decades. 

  

Proactively  partner  with  the  Oklahoma  Department  of  Transportation  during  the  design  process.    Encourage  the  preparation  of  an  aesthetic  study for the project to ensure attractive design for bridges, lighting and  landscape  elements.    (As  an  example,  see  the  I‐44  Aesthetic  Enhance‐ ment Report, Tulsa ‐   December 2007.) 

  

Ensure that the new highway design provides sufficient space for bike /  pedestrian circulation for arterial streets that cross the highway. 

   

 

4 ‐ 56 

Limits for the Highway 169 Widening Project 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT                

 

 

    SECTION 4

NOTE:  Illustrations for Highway 169 are conceptual and are intended to depict potential design  character and appearance only.  Final layout of bridges and roadways will be determined during  preparation of construction plans for the Highway 169 (56th Street to 116th Street) project. 

As shown in this character sketch, the bridge structures can be designed to have nice form, texture and color.    It is also important for the roadway and bridge design to safely accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists. 

4 ‐ 57 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  NOTE:  Illustrations for Highway 169 are conceptual and are intended to depict potential design  character and appearance only.  Final layout of bridges and roadways will be determined during  preparation of construction plans for the Highway 169 (56th Street to 116th Street) project. 

The widening project for Highway 169 through Owasso will require the removal and reconstruction of bridges over arterial streets.  The  conceptual illustration above indicates the potential character and visual qualities of these new bridges.   Landscaping and lighting can  also create a positive image.   

4 ‐ 58 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

The design of highways and bridges can have a major ef‐ fect  on  a  community’s  image.      These  illustrations  were  created for the I‐44 Aesthetic Enhancement Report, which  provides design guidance for the segment of I‐44 currently  under  construction  in  Tulsa  (Yale  Avenue  to  Riverside  Drive).    Conceptual  guidelines  were  created  for  design  of  bridges, walls, signage, lighting and landscaping.  The pro‐ posed  concepts  are  being  implemented,  including  walls  and  gateway  markers  that  were  inspired  by  Tulsa’s  Art  Deco style. 

 

4 ‐ 59 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Highway 169 Corridor Landscaping    

Goal:  In coordination with the new Highway 169 con‐ struction, create a high impact landscaped corridor.    

Highway 169 is in most cases the first impression one has when entering  Owasso.    Its  current  alignment  through  the  center  of  the  city  is  highly  visible  and  contributes  significantly  to  Owasso’s  image.    The  new  high‐ way construction between 56th Street and 116th Street creates a special  opportunity for a sustainable and appealing landscape treatment. 

  

New  landscape  design  concepts  should  focus  on  large‐scale  tree  mass‐ ings for greatest impact.  Low maintenance plantings at bridges can also  be  attractive,  with  the  added  benefit  of  reducing  hard‐to‐mow  grass  slopes.    Where  appropriate,  consider  adding  areas  of  native  grasses  /  plantings for a portion of the highway right‐of‐way. 

  

All  plant  materials  should  be  tough  and  drought  resistant.    Long‐term  maintenance  needs  should  be  considered  in  budgets,  including  provi‐ sions for watering through establishment of plants.   

  

Use landscape plantings to screen unsightly areas adjacent to the high‐ way corridor. 

       

 

4 ‐ 60 

The Highway 169 corridor bisects Owasso,  providing  a great opportunity for landscape enhancement.


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Adjacent to the Tulsa International Airport, Highway 11 provides an example of effective landscape treatment.   The majority of the  landscape plantings shown in these photos were installed approximately three years ago to enhance the community’s image for arriv‐ ing visitors.  Landscaping along the highway right‐of‐way focused on large‐scale groupings of evergreen and deciduous trees.  Plantings  also included large beds of durable grasses and shrubs on the steep banks near the Virgin Street bridge.   These landscape strategies  should be considered as potential design concepts for Owasso’s Highway 169 corridor.    

4 ‐ 61 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

As shown in this view looking north along Highway 169, the existing right‐of‐way is very wide and in many areas provides very little vis‐ ual interest.  The planned expansion of the highway to 6 lanes is planned to the inside of the existing roadway.  In addition to the unat‐ tractiveness of some areas of the highway, there is on‐going expense by ODOT to mow these large spaces.  The sketch on the following  page illustrates this same view with a proposed landscape concept that would significantly impact the roadway corridor.   

4 ‐ 62 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

As illustrated in this conceptual landscape strategy for Highway 169, there are  opportunities to significantly improve the appearance of this highly visible road‐ way that runs through Owasso.  The proposed concept defines a new boundary  for mowed bermuda grass, which would remain adjacent to the roadway.   The  outer edges of the right‐of‐way would be planted with native grasses (see pho‐ tos  to  the  right)  as  well  as  durable  trees.      The  mowed  grass  areas  could  be    planted with wildflowers to add seasonal impact. 

4 ‐ 63 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  The photograph to the left shows an aerial view of the existing Highway 169  interchange  with  116th  Street.      This  interchange  is  the  northern  limit  for  the  planned  highway  widening  project.    The  sketch  below,  showing  this  same  view,  is  an  example  of  a  new  landscape  treatment  that  is  similar  to  the  proposal  on  the  previous  page.    This  concept  includes  defining  signifi‐ cant areas of native grasses / trees, which provides visual benefits and also   has the advantage of reducing the acreage that would require mowing.  Na‐ tive plantings are also proposed adjacent to the new bridge. 

 

4 ‐ 64 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

As  shown  in  the  photograph  to  the  right,  Highway  169  bridges  through  Owasso have been built with expansive concrete slope walls.   These large  concrete slabs create unattractive views for the many cars that pass under  these bridges.   The planned highway construction project will include new  bridge structures, and a great opportunity to replace concrete slope walls  with a more aesthetically appealing solution.  As shown in the concept be‐ low, slopes adjacent to the bridges can be terraced using decorative retain‐ ing  walls.      Landscaping  for  these  terraces  can  include  drought‐resistant  grasses, shrubs and trees to enhance views. 

 

4 ‐ 65 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Community Gateways and Landmarks   

Goal:  Enhance Owasso’s image through the addition of  signature gateway elements and community landmarks.    

Establish large‐scale gateway elements / signage at the city’s north and  south entries on Highway 169.   

  

Consider  potential  treatments  to  the  railroad  bridge  over  Highway  169  near Bird Creek to enhance the entry experience into Owasso for north‐ bound traffic.  In addition, screen unsightly views (east side of Highway  169) for traffic arriving from the south. 

  

Incorporate gateway elements and other enhancement features at new  Highway  169  interchanges,  in  conjunction  with  the  planned  highway  construction project. 

  

Establish  appropriately  scaled  gateways  and  signage  for  other  commu‐ nity arrival points  (76th Street, etc.) 

  

Community landmarks may include art / sculpture, water features, sign‐ age,  architectural monuments and major landscape features. 

 

4 ‐ 66 

The Owasso Downtown District Master Plan (2001)  included concepts for creating  gateway elements. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Community gateways and landmark elements  can take many forms, including well designed  bridge structures, signage walls, architectural  markers, water features, and artwork.  These  features,  which  should  reflect  the  unique  style and character of a community, can help  create  a  strong  identity  and    positive  image  for visitors.   

4 ‐ 67 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  Vehicles  travelling  north  on  Highway  169  pass  under  a  railroad  bridge  as  they  initially  gain  a  panoramic  view  of  Owasso.    As  shown  in  the  concept  below,  this  arrival  experience  can  be  en‐ hanced  with  decorative  treatment  of  the  bridge  structure.    This  enhancement can include elements such as stone veneer over the  concrete columns, signage, new paint and an arched steel truss.  

 

4 ‐ 68 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

The photograph above shows the current condi‐ tions  at  the  north  bound  76th  Street  off‐ramp  from  Highway  169.    This  intersection  provides  a  large  area  and  opportunities  to  create  a  signifi‐ cant gateway into the community.   (The planned  highway construction project may alter the align‐ ment of the ramps in this area.)  Several concepts  have  been  developed  to  illustrate  the  possible  character of a new community gateway feature.    The  first  concept  features  a  large  scale  Native  American sculpture, inspired by Owasso’s “End of  the Trail” heritage, along with a signage wall and  high impact landscaping.   A second concept inte‐ grates a natural water feature, landscaping, natu‐ ral  stone,  and  signage.      The  gateway  includes  sculptures of several rams to reflect the Owasso  Public  School’s  mascot.    A  key  element  of  both  concepts is the goal to create a feature of appro‐ priate size that matches the scale of the site and  the speed of exiting vehicles.   

4 ‐ 69 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  The interchange at 126th Street North and Highway 169 is an excellent opportunity  to create a significant gateway into Owasso for south‐bound vehicles entering the  city.  As shown to the left, this interchange includes very large right‐of‐way areas at  each  corner.    Currently,  this  space  offers  little  visual  interest  and  no  identity  for  Owasso.  Several concepts have been developed to illustrate potential landscape‐ oriented gateway ideas.  The first concept, shown below, shows excavation along  the existing drainage ways to create wetlands that are surrounded by natural plant‐ ings.  Potential benefits include the natural filtering of stormwater runoff,  reduced  mowing expense and attractive views.  “Welcome to Owasso” signage could also be  added to the bridge structure.  

There are many examples  throughout the state of wetlands  that are incorporated within or  adjacent to highways.  The photo  immediately above illustrates  large ponds along Hefner   Parkway in Oklahoma City.   

4 ‐ 70 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

A second concept for development of a potential “north” community gateway at 126th Street is shown in the sketch above.    The expansive mowed grass areas within the Highway 169 ramps can accommodate large areas of native plantings and trees.      This concept also includes widening the existing drainage channels to create a natural character and add stormwater capacity.  

4 ‐ 71 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Community‐Wide Landscape Development   

Goal:  Maximize landscape development to create a  more beautiful and sustainable city.    

               

Encourage landscape enhancement of:  ‐ Individual Homes  ‐ Neighborhoods  ‐ Multi‐Family Housing  ‐ Streets and Highways  ‐ Commercial / Office Developments  ‐ Parks and Civic Spaces  ‐ Schools   

   

Take steps to become an official “Tree City USA.”  Continue  to  partner  with  the  Up  with  Trees  organization.    Encourage  participation  in  their  Citizen  Forester  program  and  Apache  Foundation  Tree Grant Program.   

   

            

Encourage citizen involvement with:  ‐ Adopt‐a‐Park  ‐ Adopt‐a‐Planting Bed  ‐ Adopt‐a‐Highway  ‐ Adopt‐a‐School  Promote community‐wide tree planting to take advantage of their many  environmental and visual benefits.   Develop  landscape  standards  to  include  proper  height  trees  for  street  areas with overhead power lines.  Promote  the  use  of  well‐adapted  native  plant  materials  to  create  a   more sustainable community. 

4 ‐ 72 

“The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.    The second best time to plant a tree is now!”    There may be no more effective way to substantially  enhance Owasso’s visual image and environment  than a community‐wide effort to plant trees.    Although it make several decades for full impact, even  a small tree will mature to enhance property values,  create wonderful shade and produce clean air. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Landscape development is important in every segment of a community, beginning with individual homes and neighborhoods.    Well designed and properly maintained landscaping can also enhance shopping areas, office developments, business parks,     streets and highways.  Effective city‐wide landscaping has a major impact on a community’s image and environmental quality. 

4 ‐ 73 


SECTION 4 

 

4 ‐ 74 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Conceptual Illustration of a Typical Arterial Street Underpass along U.S. Highway 169 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Landscaping  along  the  Highway  169  corridor  through  Owasso  can  create  an  image  of  excellence  and  sustainability  for  the  community.  As shown in the conceptual illustration to the left,  massings    of  large,  durable  trees  create  an  attractive  appear‐ ance  that  is  in  scale  with  sight  distances  and  responds  to  the  speed  of  the  vehicles.      Landscaping  can  also  be  an  effective  technique to buffer areas along roadways that are visually clut‐ tered  or  unattractive.  Groupings  of  evergreen trees  are  gener‐ ally the best way to improve views and screen unsightly areas.    As shown in the sketch below, where overhead utility lines are  present it is important to select tree varieties that will not grow  to a height that would require pruning (“topping”) to avoid con‐ flicts. 

 

4 ‐ 75 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Streetscaping and Green Streets   

Goal:  Enhance Owasso’s environmental and visual  quality through significant landscape treatments of city  streets.    

Create a streetscaping / green streets plan to identify major thorough‐ fares that can be enhanced with sustainable landscaping.   

  

Incorporate streetscaping or beautification elements on all new streets  and  transportation  projects.    Develop  streetscape  standards  for  all  street classifications.  (Include lighting, landscape materials, site furnish‐ ings and paving materials.) 

  

Plan for long‐term maintenance of streetscaping.  Include irrigation for  all new landscaping.  Begin to plan for reuse of graywater for irrigation. 

  

Identify  opportunities  for  new  streets  where  boulevards  and  medians  can be developed with sustainable landscaping. 

  

Make  every  effort  to  bury  electrical  and  phone  lines  below  grade  on  new  street  projects.        In  addition  to  the  visual  benefits  and  ability  to  plant streets trees, there are also long‐term advantages from eliminat‐ ing  power  outages  during  ice  storms,  high  winds,  and  other  severe  weather. 

       

4 ‐ 76 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Streetscaping  is  an  important  element  that  contributes  signifi‐ cantly  to  the  aesthetic  qualities  and  function  of  city  streets.    As  shown  in  these  examples,  creatively  designed  site  furnishings,  lighting, signage and landscaping can create an attractive setting  that    enhances the vitality of business areas.     For  best  success  with  new  street  trees  in  urban  areas,  provide  large planting areas with substantial soil volumes that allow good  root  growth.  Avoid  small  “cut  outs”  within  sidewalks  that  are  hampered  by  poor  drainage  and  lack  of  sub‐surface  oxygen.    Also, where street trees are provided in paved areas, consider the  use of “Structural Soil” as the sub‐base material below sidewalks  for its benefits to tree health.  This innovative material, consisting  of gravel, soil, and a binding polymer, creates a structurally sound  base below pavement that also encourages healthy root develop‐ ment for street trees.  Photo Credit:  Jamie Jamieson 

 

4 ‐ 77 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

The sketches to the right illustrate  design concepts for the recently constructed  first  phase  of  Main  Street  streetscaping  in  Downtown  Owasso.    As  described  previously in section 2.6, Main Street has been renovated between 76th Street  and  Broadway,  with  plans  to  extend  this  treatment  north  along  Main  to  86th  Street  and  east  along  76th  Street  to  Highway  169.      The  standards  that  have  been  established  for  paving,  lighting  and  site  furnishings  should  be  used  for    future phases to provide visual continuity. 

The main entrance into Stone Canyon from 76th Street is an excellent example  of the visual benefits from a landscape median.  Although these plantings are  relatively  new,  they  create  significant  impact  and  a  sense  of  quality.    Future  street  projects  in  Owasso  should  be  evaluated  for  opportunities  to  create    boulevards.    Landscaping  in  center  medians  should  be  designed  to  be               sustainable, with durable plants that will thrive in the typically harsh urban con‐ ditions.    Provisions  for  watering  and  maintenance  must  also  be  factored  into     the landscape design of medians and boulevards. 

4 ‐ 78 

Streetscape Concepts for Main Street  In Downtown Owasso 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

A “before and after” illustration has been developed to show potential streetscape  development on Owasso’s thoroughfares.   As an example, the photo to the left is a  current view of 129th Street looking toward the north.   The sketch below, showing  this same view, provides an image of how this street could be transformed through  streetscaping.      Potential  enhancements  include  widened  sidewalks,    decorative  street lights, and landscaping.  Overhead power lines are present in this particular  location,  so  trees  with  suitably  low  heights  are  proposed  (such  as  Crapemyrtles,  Foster Holly, etc.).   The streetscape concept also illustrates the potential for a cen‐ ter landscaped median. 

 

4 ‐ 79 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.6 Community Gathering Places and Cultural Facilities    Festival / Events Park   

Goal:  Create a festival / events park in Owasso that  can accommodate diverse events and activities.    

Create  an  outstanding  venue  to  host  a  wide  variety  of  events  such  as  concerts, cultural events, festivals, fireworks displays, balloon festivals,  etc.    Consider  the  potential  to  incorporate  an  outdoor  amphitheater  and  a  multi‐use  events  pavilion  (for  indoor  events)  within  the  festival  park.  Evaluate required site size to ensure adequate capacity for all de‐ sired events and long‐range growth. 

  

Locational Considerations:   Select site with good street access, utilities,  land  use  compatibility and  good  synergy  with  other  city  facilities.    The  city’s  transportation  system  must  be  able  to  provide  adequate  ingress  and egress to the selected site for good traffic flow during larger events. 

  

Potential  Site  Facilities:    Parking  /  roadways,  utility  systems,  lighting,  restrooms,  RV  parking  areas  and  trails.    Consider  including  a  drop‐off  area to allow bus shuttles from off‐site parking for large events.  Plans  should  include    over‐flow  parking  areas  (reinforced  turfgrass)  to  avoid  the expense of paving large areas that may only be fully utilized several  times a year.  Consider additional recreational facilities to allow the fes‐ tival park to also function as a community park on an every day basis. 

  

Potential  Site  Area  Needed:    30  to  50  +  Acres  (Approximate).    Provide  the ability to accommodate multiple events as well as events of varying   size. 

4 ‐ 80 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

A festival park in Owasso can become a  valuable addition to the community, providing a place for a wide variety of events.  Other uses  that  can be integrated with a large festival park include an outdoor amphitheater, events pavilion, and farmers market.   

4 ‐ 81 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Outdoor Amphitheater   

Goal:  Develop an outdoor amphitheater to accommo‐ date a wide variety of events.    

Consider  opportunities  to  integrate  an  amphitheater  with  a  new  festi‐ val  /  events  park.    Complement  the  planned  amphitheater  at  Tulsa  Tech’s Owasso Campus. 

  

Evaluate  event  sizes  /  seating  capacity.    Design  for  potential  overflow  onto lawn areas. 

  

          

     

Locational Considerations:  ‐ Good Access from Streets / Highways  ‐ Neighborhood Compatibility (Noise, Traffic)  ‐ Topography / Slopes  ‐ Utilities (Electricity, Sanitary Sewer and Water)  Design Options:  ‐ Seating ‐ Concrete Structures, All‐Lawn or Combination  ‐ Shade Canopy over Stage and Seating  ‐ Permanent Stage (with Light and Sound Truss) vs. Temporary Stage  The amphitheater at RiverWalk Crossing in Jenks has  been an important part of the development’s success.   

 

4 ‐ 82 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Outdoor amphitheaters can be designed in a wide variety of styles, including simple sloped lawns that provide great flexibility and are  low cost.   Amphitheaters can also be constructed with concrete seating terraces, or with a combination of lawn terraces and stone seat  walls.  There are also many options for construction of a stage, which may include a canopy for weather protection and visual impact.   

4 ‐ 83 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Multi‐Purpose Events Pavilion   

Goal:  Develop a multi‐purpose pavilion to enable  Owasso to host a wide variety of events requiring in‐ door space.    

Take advantage of Owasso’s excellent location and proximity to regional  transportation  by  developing  a  state‐of‐the‐art  events  building  that  brings significant events and revenue to the City.  (Consider a location  within a new festival park.) 

  

          

             

Potential events include:  ‐ Trade Shows  ‐ Meetings  ‐ Concerts  ‐ Special Events (Class Reunions, Weddings, etc.)  Potential Building Features:  ‐ Concrete Events Floor  ‐ Flexibility to Divide Floor for Multiple Event Sizes  ‐ Accommodations for Catering / Storage Needs  ‐ Clear Definition of public / spectator areas vs. service functions  ‐Sustainable / low impact design features such as natural lighting,      high performance HVAC systems, solar / PV panels, cool roofs, etc.  ‐Future Expansion Potential 

 

4 ‐ 84 

The River Center at Three Forks Harbor, Muskogee  was designed by GH2 Architects.  This 10,000 square  foot facility includes a multi‐purpose space for public  events and educational sessions.        


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Community Lake   

Goal:  Create a community lake that can become an  important civic gathering place.    

A new lake can be integrated within a community park, with potential  to become the key element for diverse uses such as recreation, shop‐ ping,  office  and  pedestrian‐oriented  developments.    As  a  natural  at‐ traction  that  people  are  typically  drawn  to,  a  lake  can  become  the  premier community gathering place for the Owasso community. 

  

Explore  potential  use  of  Stone  Canyon  Lake  and  the  nearby  rock  quarry that has long‐range potential as a large, scenic lake. 

  

Consider opportunities to integrate activities such as fishing, boating  and walking trails. 

  

Consider the environmental benefits of a large community lake.   With  proper  management,  a  lake  can  provide  diverse  natural  habitat  and  opportunities  for  development  of  nature  trails,  interpretive  centers,  and other forms of environmental education. 

 

 

4 ‐ 85 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Community lakes can take many forms and provide a   wide range of recreational activities, including fishing,   boating and enjoying nature.  Good water quality   can be maintained by ensuring sufficient water depth,   as well as by adding floating fountains for aeration.    

4 ‐ 86 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

As conceptually illustrated above, a large lake has the potential to become the central feature for a community destination that in‐ cludes diverse facilities and recreational opportunities.  The lake provides a scenic backdrop for performances at an outdoor amphithea‐ ter as well as for festivals.  The lake can also provide a great setting for picnicking, family activities, trails, boating, fishing, and natural    habitat areas.  A pedestrian‐oriented mixed use development can also benefit tremendously from being adjacent to water. 

4 ‐ 87 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Multi‐Purpose Regional Stormwater Detention   

Goal:  For new City of Owasso detention basins, create  multi‐purpose designs that provide versatile public uses  in addition to flood control.    

Continue  to  focus  on  regional  flood  control  that  can  become  valuable  recreation space (not small basins that are maintenance problems). 

  

                   

Design Considerations:  ‐ Function:  Create Usable Spaces that Enhance Quality of Life  ‐ Aesthetics:  Integrate Early in the Design Process to Avoid Simply    Landscaping an Engineered Solution  ‐ Long‐Term Maintenance  ‐ Potential Features:  Walkways, Open Space, Play Fields, Lakes,     Streams and Natural Features  ‐ Environmental Sensitivity:  Design to Save Existing Trees and      Sensitive Habitat Areas 

Owasso’s Elm Creek Park has excellent potential for  improvements that can enhance the park’s ability to  meet a variety of community needs.  Several illustra‐ tions are included on the following pages to show po‐ tential improvements to Elm Creek Park.   

4 ‐ 88 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Located immediately east of Tulsa’s downtown, Centennial Park provides a good exam‐ ple of a multi‐purpose flood control facility.   A plan was developed for this 11‐acre park  that integrated large‐scale flood control without compromising the site’s aesthetic and  environmental qualities.  Completed approximately 4 years ago, the park now includes a  permanent lake, community center, lakeside terrace, stream, lighted trails, open space  and natural landscaping.  A key element of the park’s design was to preserve as many of  its large trees as possible.  Sandstone boulder retaining wall terraces were landscaped  with  over 50 varieties of plants to create a pleasing and sustainable environment.  In  the center of the park, a stone bridge and waterfall create a pedestrian space that has  become a popular landmark for photographs. 

 

4 ‐ 89 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT  Owasso’s  Elm  Creek  Park,  shown  to  the  left  in  its  existing  condition,  can  be  en‐ hanced to have a similar character to Tulsa’s Centennial Park.   The sketch below  provides  a  vision  of  potential  improvements,  which  can  include  natural  stone  for  lake edging and terraced walls that will help address erosion issues.  Native / low  maintenance plantings are also proposed to stabilize the pond banks and provide  environmental  benefits.    Water  quality  improvements  should  also  be  considered,  including dredging / silt removal, floating aerators or subsurface aeration systems. 

 

4 ‐ 90 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Elm Creek Park can also be improved by upgrading existing site features, including pe‐ destrian bridges, walkways, and lighting.   Older picnic shelters, as shown in the photo  to the right, can also be replaced with a new structure that can enhance the park’s im‐ age and usefulness.  As envisioned in the sketch below, a new pavilion with stone col‐ umns and durable metal roof creates a great setting for picnics and family gatherings.   The addition of a fishing deck, seat walls and natural landscaping is also proposed. 

 

4 ‐ 91 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Performing Arts Center   

Goal:  Plan for a future performing arts center in  Owasso.    

Analyze  the  economic  potential  and  benefits  to  Owasso  citizens  that  would be possible with a performing arts center. 

  

Study  and  learn  from  other  regional  performing  art  center  facilities  (Claremore, Bartlesville, Bristow, Broken Arrow, etc.). 

  

Determine  the  optimal  size  to  fit  Owasso’s  current  and  future  needs.   Consider options for phased construction. 

  

       

Strategically  review  needs  in  consideration  of  Owasso’s  other  existing  and planned facilities to determine how to best complement:  ‐ Tulsa Tech Owasso Campus     (New auditoriums are planned to seat 375 and 250 people)  ‐ Owasso Schools (High School P.A.C.)  ‐ Bailey Medical Center Auditorium 

Several communities in northeastern Oklahoma have  built excellent performing arts centers.   These include  Broken Arrow (top), Bartlesville (left) and Claremore  (bottom right). 

 

4 ‐ 92 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Community Center Facilities   

Goal:  Utilize a combination of existing resources  to meet Owasso’s facility needs for community  events and indoor recreation.    

As  the  City  of  Owasso  grows  larger,  it  will  continue  to  have  needs  for  community  gatherings  and  meetings.      Needs  for  in‐ door recreation space will also be important to address. Poten‐ tial functions include indoor recreation / multi‐purpose gym and  meeting rooms for civic organizations. 

  The Owasso Community Center, located on   Cedar Street south of Downtown, has   convenient access from 76th Street. 



After careful evaluation of options to address the community’s  needs, the recommended strategy includes making use  of  sev‐ eral  facilities  that  currently  exist  or  will  be  constructed  soon.    These include the following resources:    Existing  Owasso  Community  Center:      The  current  facility    provides  functional  space  for  senior  activities  and  other    groups.    Owasso  Family  YMCA:      This  outstanding  facility,  which  is    already  planned  for  expansion,  can  help  meet  the  demand    for indoor recreation and indoor swimming.      Tulsa  Tech  Owasso  Campus:    Now  under  construction,    these new facilities will provide excellent space for commu‐   nity meetings and many types of other events.     Owasso  Public  Schools  and  churches:      These  facilities  in‐   clude  a  number  of  gymnasiums  which  can  help  meet  the    needs for indoor sports and league games. 

   

4 ‐ 93 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.7 Pedestrian‐Oriented Development   

Mixed‐Use Development   

Goal:  Diversify and enhance Owasso’s quality of life  with exceptional new mixed‐use developments.    

Maximize  efforts  that  lead  to  the  construction  of  pedestrian‐oriented  developments  in  Owasso,  including  lifestyle  centers  that  integrate  a  wide  variety  of  uses.    Developments  should  create  attractive  architec‐ ture  and  high  quality  site  features  and  amenities.    The  addition  of  a  mixed‐use  project  can  complement  Owasso’s  existing  shopping  areas  and  restaurants,  with  the  potential  to  create  a  community  gathering  place that can attract visitors from other communities. 

  

Mixed‐use  development  project  uses  can  include  a  combination  of  re‐ tail, restaurant, office, and residential.   Recreational uses and trails can  also complement the developments. 

  

Consider opportunities to create public spaces (parks, lakes, etc.) to ac‐ celerate private investment.   As an example, a scenic lake or large open  space can create a unique setting that would be a significant asset to a  pedestrian‐oriented development that encourages walking and outdoor  dining.  

  

 

Create pedestrian connections to new developments to make Owasso a  more walkable city.     

4 ‐ 94 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

Photo Credit:  Jamie Jamieson 

 

    SECTION 4

Photo Credit:  Jamie Jamieson 

Successful mixed‐use developments provide well designed pedestrian spaces that encourage patrons to walk to a number of destina‐ tions.   Good pedestrian spaces typically include attractive site furniture, landscaping, lighting, artwork, and decorative pavement.     Developments that are adjacent to water benefit from a unique atmosphere that is conducive to relaxing and dining outside.     

4 ‐ 95 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

The development of a pedestrian‐oriented mixed use project in Owasso would be a great complement to existing shopping areas   and restaurants.   In the conceptual illustration shown above, retail stores and restaurants can be integrated on lower levels     with offices and residential space on upper floors.  Pedestrian areas are enhanced with lake views and outdoor eating areas.  

4 ‐ 96 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Tulsa Tech Owasso Campus Opportunities   

Goal:  Maximize opportunities created by the new Tulsa  Tech Owasso campus to enhance Owasso’s quality of  life.    

Maximize the value of investment in this new campus by planning for  “highest and best use” for adjacent properties.  Plan for exceptional de‐ velopments surrounding the new campus that are complementary and  synergistic.  Consider opportunities to create pedestrian‐oriented mixed ‐use developments in the areas surrounding the new campus. 

  

Review the planned facilities to identify how this new campus will ac‐ commodate elements of Owasso’s long‐range vision (Performing Arts  Center / Community Center functions). 

  Illustration:  Crafton Tull Sparks 

As shown in the Tulsa Tech Owasso Campus site plan,  the new campus development will occur on the east  side of Highway 169 between 106th and 116th Streets  North.  Tulsa Technology Center is a career and tech‐ nology school district dedicated to preparing people for  success in the workplace.  Tulsa Tech has multiple cam‐ pus locations throughout the Tulsa region. 



Develop an overlay district for  the new campus area to ensure quality  control of landscaping, building setbacks, architecture, etc. 

   

 

4 ‐ 97 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Illustrations:  Crafton Tull Sparks 

The 30‐acre Tulsa Tech Owasso Campus will be a significant educational  asset to the community.  As illustrated in the perspective sketch above,   campus site features will include several large ponds, floating fountains,  walking trails, wildflower areas and native grass plantings.  The access  road on the west side of the campus has been named to honor Harold  Charney, who has been a Tulsa Tech board member for 35 years.     

4 ‐ 98 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Illustrations:  Crafton Tull Sparks 

Scheduled to be completed in 2013, plans include the construction of an approximately 255,000 square feet building to be built   with state‐of‐the‐art techniques.  Power for the building is planned to be provided through wind, solar, geothermal, and graywater  methods.  The new building will provide 2 large meeting rooms that can accommodate a variety of public events.  

4 ‐ 99 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Downtown Revitalization   

Goal:  Revitalize Owasso’s Downtown District to be‐ come a vibrant civic core.    

Provide  focused  efforts  to  implement  the  Owasso  Downtown  District  Conceptual  Plan  and  Implementation  Strategy  (2001).    Continue  work‐ ing  to  create  a  more  recognizable  identity  for  Downtown,  and  take  steps  to  strengthen  businesses.    Implement  additional  Main  Street  streetscape  phases,  including  the  76th  Street  /  Main  intersection  and  the Main Street corridor between Broadway and 86th Street. 

  

Build  on  the  existing  downtown  investment  that  created  key  anchors  (City Hall /  Police Station, City / County Library and the Owasso Histori‐ cal Society Museum). 

  

Continue current efforts to encourage downtown investment, including  a new compressed natural gas filling station that has a historic appear‐ ance.  Explore potential benefits from the proposed waterfront project  on  the  west  side  of  downtown.    Support  potential  expansion  of  the  Owasso  Family  YMCA  to  reinforce  its  role  as  a  vital  downtown  facility  and important community focal point.   

 

 

4 ‐ 100 

Owasso’s downtown is home to several major   public facilities, including the Owasso Municipal   Building and the City / County Library.  The Owasso  Historical Society Museum also adds significantly   to the identity of  downtown as the most   significant remaining historical building. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

As shown in this perspective of the 76th and Main Street intersection,  the long‐range vision for Owasso includes a pedestrian‐oriented   downtown with a real sense of identity.  Ultimately, Downtown   Owasso should be developed with greater density that includes a     diverse mix of uses and opportunities to integrate transit. 

 

    SECTION 4

As shown in the two drawings above, Owasso’s   downtown master plan included a land use plan as   well as a plan to create four districts (top), each of   which had a unique character and guidelines. 

4 ‐ 101 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.8 Environment and Sustainability   

Community Wide Focus on Sustainable Principles  (Go Green! Initiative)   

Goal:  Make Owasso a model city for sustainability and   environmental impacts.    

As  a  community,  plan  for  a  future  that  responsibly  preserves  the  environ‐ ment, protects natural resources and enhances quality of life in a way that  is sustainable for future generations. 

  

Continue efforts to promote and implement Owasso’s GO GREEN! Initiative,  including reducing environmental impacts and “greener” approaches to lo‐ cal  government.  (90%  of  the  Wikiplanning  survey  respondents  agreed  or  strongly agreed with the need for Owasso to respect the environment, recy‐ cle and promote conservation.) 

  

                     

On a community‐wide basis, implement sustainable strategies such as:  ‐ Recycling  (Support and Improve the Owasso Recycling Center and       Disposal Station; Continue Relationship with M.E.T.)  ‐ City‐Wide Campaign to Plant Trees   ‐ Sustainable Site Development Features (Rain Gardens, Bioswales,     Permeable Paving Systems,  Xeriscaping, Green Roofs, etc.)  ‐ Utilize Treated Graywater for Irrigation of Parks and Public     Spaces (Install Pipes in Preparation for Eventually Providing      Irrigation with All Road / Infrastructure Projects.)   ‐ Transit (Public Education / Increased Use)  ‐ Stormwater Re‐Use     

4 ‐ 102 

A community‐wide focus on planting  trees has great potential to enhance  Owasso’s quality of life.  Environmental  benefits include purification of the air,  temperature reduction during hot  weather and energy conservation. 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

 

Protection of the Natural Environment 

Permeable Paving 

 

Environmental Education 

Composting 

Recycling 

Sustainable Landscaping / Native Plants 

4 ‐ 103 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Fitness, Wellness and Healthy Lifestyles   

Goal:  Promote and encourage healthy lifestyles, fitness  and wellness for the community.    

The  desire  for  health  and  wellness  had  very  high  consensus  on  the  Wikiplanning survey.  (51% strongly agreed with this goal, and another  39% agreed.)  Owasso has the opportunity to become a model commu‐ nity  for  healthy  living.    Partner  with  organizations  like  the  YMCA,  Owasso Public Schools and local health care institutions for community  education and initiation of health and wellness‐oriented strategies.. 

  

                   

Provide education programs and facilities to encourage:  ‐ Get Moving!  Run, Walk, Bike  ‐ Fitness Stations Along Trails  ‐ Active Play for Kids ‐ Get Outside and Enjoy Nature  ‐ Creative Play Opportunities  ‐ Swimming / Water Play  ‐ Community Gardening, Farmer’s Market, “Buy Local” Produce  ‐ Healthy Eating  / Nutrition Education for All Ages     (Educate School Kids, Let Them Become Family Leaders)    ‐ Ensure Trail Easements are Acquired During Subdivision Platting to    Enhance Future Trail Development 

 

4 ‐ 104 


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

A healthy and physically fit population will benefit Owasso for the decades ahead.    There are many simple ways to encourage a healthy, fun‐filled lifestyle.   

4 ‐ 105 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

4.9 Strong Neighborhoods    Owasso Strong Neighborhood Initiative   

Goal:  Strengthen Owasso’s outstanding neighborhoods  and reinforce their quality of life opportunities    

Facilitate the Owasso Strong Neighborhood Initiative’s mission to part‐ ner  with  stakeholders  and  improve  quality  of  life  so  that  Owasso  is  as  attractive tomorrow as it is today for residents and businesses. 

  

Continue with consistent code enforcement. 

  

                     

Encourage  and  promote  healthy  neighborhoods  as  a  critical  building  block of Owasso, with activities and programs such as:  ‐ Block Parties / Neighborhood Events  ‐ Encourage Neighbors to Get Outside and Get to Know Each Other  ‐ Encourage Kids to Play Outdoors  ‐ Community / Neighborhood Gardening  ‐ Neighborhood Improvement Projects (Repair / Beautification)  ‐ Neighborhood Watch Programs  ‐ Beautification Patrols     (Monthly Reports on Positives / Negatives:  Litter, Mowing      Illegal Signs, etc.)   

 

4 ‐ 106 

Funded by the city’s hotel tax, the Owasso Strong  Neighborhood Initiative began in 2008 with the goal  to build and maintain strong neighborhoods, which in  turn preserves the city’s social and economic stability.  


OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT              

 

    SECTION 4

Many  communities  are  faced  with  the  task  of  revitalizing  neighborhoods  in  an  effort  to  impact  property values and the health and welfare of residents.  Owasso’s leaders recognized the value in  taking proactive steps to assist aging neighborhoods remain healthy.  One of the most basic ele‐ ments of a strong neighborhood is for its residents to get to know each other and to take part in  activities  together.    Good  starting  points  are  to  encourage  children  to  play  together  and  for  neighbors  to start walking.  (This also has great health benefits!)  Block parties, neighborhood im‐ provement projects and other social events also build neighborhood pride and community spirit. 

 

4 ‐ 107 


SECTION 4 

 

 

           OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENT 

Owasso is committed to the preservation and renewal of its neighborhoods.   A  key  component  of  the  Strong  Neighborhood  Initiative  is  the  Neighbor‐ hood Matching Grant Program, which is administered by the Owasso Com‐ munity Foundation.  This program Is designed to provide matching funds to   neighborhoods  for  a  range  of  projects  that  will  improve  and  strengthen  them.  There is not a specific list of allowable projects, however, examples  include  landscaping,  entry  signs,  traffic  calming,  educational  programs,  neighborhood clean‐up efforts and neighborhood watch activities.    Another  program  that  has  been  highly  successful  in  other  communities  is  the creation of a city‐wide “beautification patrol.”  Developing this type of  program in Owasso would be of value to the city and could be a great activ‐ ity with which neighbors could become involved.  The beauty patrols typi‐ cally meet monthly to drive main roadways to observe and record positive  or negative things related to litter, illegal signs, mowing, etc.  The monthly  inspections  also  provide  an  opportunity  to  commend  neighborhoods  or  businesses for excellence in landscaping, maintenance, etc.   

 

4 ‐ 108 


5.0   Summary 

 


SECTION 5 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   SUMMARY 

5.1  Next Steps    A  bold  Quality  of  Life  Initiative  would  be  a  community  investment  that  would pay off almost immediately – and well into the future.  The continu‐ ous growth of the community and the aging of existing facilities require tak‐ ing action soon to make Owasso an attractive place to live and for business  investment.    Owasso’s  comprehensive  and  long‐range  quality  of  life  plan  must provide the basis for the future development of amenities.  Without  adequate planning, quality of life improvements may not be given the ap‐ propriate priorities, may not be properly located, or may not even be real‐ ized; Owasso may never have that “wow” factor.    Owasso’s next generation depends on today’s leaders to continue to lay a  strong base for their future.  A bold approach to improving  quality of life by  providing  attractive  public  amenities  also  works  in  establishing  a  sound  fi‐ nancial position for the city.  Just like a business or a home, a city must rein‐ vest  in  order  to  maintain  the  soundness  and  value  of  the  original  invest‐ ment.  The decision for a city to reinvest is difficult because of the political and fi‐ nancial risk involved.  Owasso, like every city or family, has an abundance of  needs and limited resources to apply to those needs.  So, it is only natural  that when faced with a decision to invest tax dollars into projects that pro‐ vide solutions to meet short and long term needs, there will be discussion  about whether or not the decision is a good one.    Over the years, Owasso’s leaders have recognized the need for reinvesting  in facilities and infrastructure.  The strategy of reinvesting in infrastructure  has  a  demonstrated  history  of  success.    By  any  measure,  the  citizen– taxpayer  has  received  a  good  return  on  his  investment  in  Owasso.  As  the  city continues to grow in the coming years, there will be significant needs to    

5 ‐ 2 

     


COMMUNITY ANALYSIS  

 

 

 

 

                 SECTION 5

improve  streets,  utilities  and  other  essential  elements.      This  plan  recom‐ mends  implementing  quality  of  life  elements  within  a  balanced  strategy  that  includes  basic  infrastructure  improvements  as  well  as  enhancements  and amenities. It is now important for a city that values the investment of  its residents to remain vigorous and make wise decisions concerning quality  of life.  A sound reinvestment strategy is critical to the long‐term livability  and fiscal stability of Owasso.    As  illustrated  in  the  diagram  below,  planning  for  Owasso’s  future  growth  and quality of life is a long‐term process, with a number of steps to be ac‐ complished in the right sequence.  As described earlier in this study, an im‐ portant first step for this project has been to create opportunities for mean‐ ingful input from citizens regarding their goals, desires and concerns.  The  second  major  effort  has  been  the  creation  of  a  long‐range  vision  for  pro‐ posed quality of life enhancements, which has been included with section 4  of this study.   There are also several important tasks that will need to be  completed by the community as an ongoing effort.   The third step involves  the establishment of priorities, from the broad range of proposed elements,  to create a phased implementation strategy.  This effort should be done as  a partnership between Owasso citizens and city leaders.  The development  of priorities should also be done in coordination with the Capital Improve‐ ments Strategic Plan that is currently underway.     

PLANNING PROCESS STEP 1

STEP 2

DEVELOP PLAN

COMMUNITY INPUT

 

LONG-RANGE VISION

STEP 3

PRIORITIZE PROJECTS

IDENTIFY PRIORITIES FOR INITIAL PROJECTS

STEP 4

IMPLEMENT IN PHASES

•COST ESTIMATES •FUNDING •CONSTRUCTION

5 ‐ 3 


SECTION 5 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   SUMMARY 

    Following the development of priorities for both short and long‐term qual‐ ity of life projects, the final step is to fund and implement specific improve‐ ments.   This step involves a number of tasks that generally include prepara‐ tion  of  cost  estimates,  funding,  development  of  detailed  project  designs  /  construction plans, and construction / implementation.   To assist with the  preparation of an accurate project budget, which is essential in the efforts  to fund specific improvements, it may be necessary to complete more de‐ tailed  plans  for  quality  of  life  elements  that  have  been  proposed.    These  preliminary  plans  would  develop  site  specific  drawings  for  the  individual  elements that were included in the previous section of this study.   A signifi‐ cant benefit of these plans will be the ability to do accurate cost estimating  from  scaled  plans  for  specific  projects.        Additional  planning  may  include  the  preparation  of  a  Recreation  Plan,  which  would  specific  enhancements  for existing parks as well as locations and elements for new parks.   A de‐ tailed Greenbelt / Trails Plan and a Streetscaping Plan can also provide use‐ ful guidance for identifying and implementing phased projects.    Once  individual  projects  have  been  prioritized  and  project  budgets  have  been established,  potential funding sources can be determined that best fit  the specific projects.   Depending on the nature of the project, funding may  include a combination of sources (private, public, grants, non‐profit founda‐ tions, etc.)    Public funding may include a combination of city, county, state  and federal sources. Many of the proposed quality of life elements are ei‐ ther low cost or no‐cost, with programs and initiatives that encourage citi‐ zen  participation  in  creating  a  better  community.      It  is  also  important  to  note that proposed community features include a number of elements that  would  be  privately  funded,  such  as  the  creation  of  a  pedestrian‐oriented  mixed use development.    Partnerships between the public and private sec‐ tors should be pursued where possible.   Success in obtaining project fund‐   ing will require persistence, creativity and pursuing all possible sources.  

5‐ 4 

 


SUMMARY     

  

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 5

5.2    Keys to Success 

 

The proposed elements that comprise the Owasso Quality of Life Initiative  are ambitious, and reflect “The City Without Limits” spirit and the goal to  become a great community.  What will it take to succeed?  The following  discussion outlines several essential keys to implement this long‐range vi‐ sion for Owasso.    Community Consensus    Long‐term  success  in  enhancing  the  city’s  quality  of  life  will  require  true  consensus within Owasso including citizens, city leaders, and the business  community.   It will take a real partnership, with all stakeholders working  together to reach a common goal and shared vision.   An important step in  the planning process for the Quality of Life Initiative has been a major civic  engagement  campaign,  with  residents  being  able  to  voice  their  desires  early in the  project. As  a result, the ideas and  priorities of Owasso’s resi‐ dents  have  been  a  very  important  element  in  the  creation  of  proposed  community features.   Ultimately,  the Quality of Life Initiative will only be  successful  if  there  is  true  buy‐in  from  the  community:    this  must  be  Owasso’s plan.    Committed Leadership    As  a  long‐range  plan  that  identifies  proposed  enhancements  for  the  city,  this initiative will require on‐going and dedicated leadership.  This leader‐ ship  must  include  all  segments  of  the  community:    City  representatives,  business leaders, civic groups, and the community at large.  Effective lead‐ ership will take a long‐range focus, persistence, energy and passion to help  Owasso reach its full potential.      

5 ‐ 5 


SECTION 5 

 

 

                                              COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 

Citizen Involvement and Community Pride    Successful implementation of the Quality of Life Initiative will only be pos‐ sible  through  community‐wide  action  and  pride.  It  is  important  for  Owasso’s citizens to individually and collectively take ownership in the de‐ sire  to  make  Owasso  a  better  community  today  than  it  was  yesterday.  Many  of  the  recommendations  that  are  part  of  this  study  are  initiatives  and  programs  that  simply  involve  participation  from  citizens  in  helping  Owasso  become  a  sustainable  community  that  values  the  environment,  neighborhood  vitality,  and  healthy  lifestyles.    Citizens  can  also  join  with  their  neighborhood,  church,  school  or  civic  group  to  become  actively  en‐ gaged in implementing quality of life features.  Owasso residents have al‐ ready  demonstrated  their  willingness  to  get  involved  with  their  commu‐ nity;  one of the best examples is the planning and construction of Funtas‐ tic  Island  in  Owasso’s  Sports  Park.    In  a  weeklong  process,  families,  neighbors  and  friends  came  together  to  build a  large‐scale  play area that  has  become  a  popular  recreational  destination.    The  creativity  and  team‐ work that made this effort a success can become a model for repeating this  type of community action on future enhancement projects    Flexibility    Because our society is changing so rapidly, it is essential to re‐evaluate this  plan on a regular basis.  The recommendations and proposals that are rele‐ vant today must be updated in the years and decades ahead to ensure that  they meet the changing needs of Owasso’s citizens.   

     

5‐ 6 


SUMMARY     

  

 

 

 

 

 

    SECTION 5

Visible Success    Building  and  maintaining  momentum  for  any  long‐term  project  is  impor‐ tant, and the Quality of Life Initiative is no exception.  As projects are com‐ pleted  ‐  one  by  one  ‐  the  community  will  be  energized  by  seeing  tangible  signs  of  positive  change.      Completion  of  larger  projects  provides  instant  recognition  that  improvements  and  enhancements  are  occurring  that  add  to the enjoyment of living in Owasso.   It is equally important to recognize  that no step forward is insignificant.  Progress can be as simple as a home‐ owner  planting  a  small  tree  that  years  from  now  will  provide  wonderful  shade  and  clean  air.  Or,    a  school  child  who  runs  home  to  tell  his  parents  about  new  ideas  for  healthy  eating  or  fitness.    It  can  be  as  simple  as  a  neighborhood beautifying their entry, a civic group adopting a mile of high‐ way to pick up litter or a business that is adding jobs because they like what  is going on in Owasso.   Every household that makes a commitment to recy‐ cling or composting helps to make a more sustainable community. 

 

5 ‐ 7 


SECTION 5 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   SUMMARY 

Conclusion    The goals that the City has already achieved have been reached by focusing  on the  future and recognizing how the community can be even better to‐ morrow  than  it  is  right  now.      The  Owasso  of  today  has  many  very  good  things:      community  spirit,  neighborhoods,  schools,  churches,  parks  and  places to shop.  But, the Owasso of tomorrow has opportunities for great‐ ness!  The proposed quality of life elements and strategies are intended to  become  the  “building  blocks”  for  Owasso  to  reach  its  full  potential  in  the  future.  The plan is based upon the foundational idea of building upon the  existing community strengths to add the missing elements that would cre‐ ate an attitude of “why would you want to live anywhere else?” The Owasso  Quality of Life Initiative was also designed to create a community that will  be just as good an investment 20 years from now as it is today.   Creating  this type of community will take leadership and commitment.  It will take an  investment of time and resources.  But, the results will be very worthwhile.     Quality of life has now become an issue that deserves major focus and at‐ tention.  It is time to work together to make Owasso a community that its  children and grandchildren will be proud to call home.   A true  city without  limits! 

 

5‐ 8 


May 2010 Community Meetings Summary  7th Grade Student Workshop Summary  Wikiplanning On‐Line Civic Engagement Campaign  Executive Summary and Survey Data 

  APPENDICES 

Appendix A:      Appendix B:      Appendix C:       


APPENDIX A 

APPENDIX A    MAY 2010    OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE  COMMUNITY MEETINGS SUMMARY 

 

A ‐ 1 


APPENDIX A SECTION 4      

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS 

Owasso Quality of Life Initiative   May 2010 Community Meetings Summary  Prepared by Alaback Design Associates    The following is a summary of public comments from five community workshops that were facilitated by The City of Owasso and plan‐ ning consultants during May 2010.  Comments were recorded on large flip chart note pads during breakout group discussions sessions,  as well as notes taken by facilitators.  Citizen comments that are summarized below are unedited / as written.    May 3, 2010 (6:30 pm – Discovery Bible Fellowship, 11600 N Garnett Road)    SUMMARY OF FLIP CHART COMMENTS   Dog Park   Don’t reduce number of ball fields in area of YMCA   Basketball court in park(s)   Tennis courts/basketball courts combined   Outdoor Pool (city pool) (regular size) – Adult Pool/ Kid Pool **multiple votes**   Pool options that don’t cost as much as the YMCA   Concerned about interconnectivity  of parks – kids in danger crossing streets between parks   Interconnectivity of all sidewalks   3rd court sidewalk needs replaced (some was replaced, but not all) **at Rayola Park**   Think connectivity of trails is a great idea   Recycling center is good   Advertise skate park better   New playground equipment at Rayola (more modern/creative toys)   Establish features for each park i.e. one park have tennis courts, one park a farmers’ market, one park basketball court, etc.   Owasso Farmers’ Market – more signage on the day of the event. 10‐12 vendors. Best year 17‐20 vendors   BA Farmers’ Market is a good example   Wine (in the Farmers’ Market – municipal code issue   Centrally located area with a green   Fall festivals   Water feature – “Utica Park meets Stone Canyon lake”     Botanical Gardens 

A ‐ 2 


SECTION 4      

 

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS       APPENDIX A  

Sidewalks in Old Town behind YMCA in poor repair. Please repair.  Will frontage roads be built on both sides of US 169? Would like to have.  Sewer treatment plant – when will it be enlarged for growth of Owasso?  Youth baseball facilities that match the quality of H.S. baseball facilities  No new taxes or fees 

  NOTES FROM ALABACK DESIGN STAFF   People aren’t going to use connective trails from park to park   Add dog parks   Need more public spaces/pools. Don’t get rid of existing baseball fields, pools, etc.   Add city pools with adult/child separation   Worried about safety of children using bike trails from park to park   Not enough sidewalks. Kids and joggers need bike paths and sidewalks   Need a more central skate park   Need more recycling areas   Need businesses, such as Sam’s and a bookstore   Parks should have a feature such as farmers’ market, amphitheatre, etc.  May 6, 2010 (6:30 pm –Bailey Elementary School, 10221 E 96th Street North)    SUMMARY OF FLIP CHART COMMENTS   Just west of downtown – develop small lakeside area – make community around this area including expanded sports park,     hotels, etc.  Commerce, retail, outside dining, Owasso Riverpark type area – centralized parking, everything accessible by             pedestrians   Tie Mohawk trail into this area   Tie all parks with trails   Bike trails, running trails, fitness stations along the trails, running surface similar to a track   Dog park (incredible one in Edmond)   Bathrooms / water stations in all parks, well‐lit and alike   Splash pad in every park   Community amphitheater / gathering spot     Encourage cooperative effort between businesses, neighborhoods and churches to create park areas and walking trails  

A ‐ 3 


APPENDIX A SECTION 4       

      

              

    

 

A ‐ 4 

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS 

Trails around businesses, churches, hospitals that have huge lots and encourage them to build picnic areas that can be used by  them and the community (similar to TTC walking trail) connect all trails to one another.  Ponds, fishing ponds, canoes, paddleboats  Small fishing dock in park ponds  Outdoor education, covered area with climbing walls, agility courses, learn about nature (i.e. Camp Loughridge)  Competitive pool (run by the YMCA)  More museums,  culture  Expand YMCA  Using existing historical structures to set Owasso apart in redevelopment (such as bridge over Bird creek on 169‐move structure  when widening highway  Mass transit expansion – bus/taxi/limo depot – rail – downtown / airport  Central gathering point – event center, amphitheater, water feature, walking trail, retail, restaurants (all nostalgic)  Strong sense of community  Recreate / reinvigorate downtown  Revive golf course  No metal buildings, no facades (fake‐ades)  More sidewalks, bike lanes  Outlet mall north of city  Develop unique gateways north and south – example – overpass art on turnpike  Trees  Pedestrian and bike trails  Resting stations along trails  Picnic areas  Expand YMCA – more basketball courts, gym space, fields – BB, SB, Soccer  Reorganize youth sports groups – transparent, work with YMCA, should feed school sports.  Mid high needs more attention to  identify players.  Tournament promotion / coordination  Organize an adult sports recreational league  Leagues for disabled kids, handicapped access for fields  Golf short course for kids / player development 3‐9 holes with driving range and putting green  Indoor batting cages / soccer / multipurpose field 


SECTION 4 

 

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS       APPENDIX A  

Lake / Waterfront: incorporate sports park, shopping, restaurants, trails  Tie in with Tulsa trail system   Tie to golf course   Keep up neighborhood street repairs   Roadway lighting, especially at intersections (169 and arterial streets)   Bury electrical power lines with the new reconstructed streets   Provide more sidewalks especially in existing neighborhoods.   Improve arterial intersections, then widen roadways   In residential street repair and rehab, poor drainage.  When it comes due, fix drainage issues.  Concrete flumes across           drainage areas   Remove old asphalt from repairs   Streetscapes for major arterials – trees and lighting!     NOTES FROM ALABACK DESIGN STAFF   For neighborhoods to south of Bailey Med Center (bounded by 96th, Garnett, 106th and Mingo), there was considerable interest  in developing a new park. A new park here (south of the medical center) would benefit the neighborhoods, the medical center  and church nearby.  It may be possible for these groups to partner with the city to help make this park a reality.  It could be a  benefit to kids with families at the hospital, could include a fitness course to complement Bailey’s wellness programs, could be  used by church youth groups and would be a benefit to nearby neighborhoods.  This area appears to be underserved by the ex‐ isting parks system.   To running track/trails mentioned, add kiosks with information denoting distances, times, etc.   Add lighting to all trails, which has a “signature” look. All lighting should look the same.   Take advantage of the cooperative effort among churches, hospitals, residential, commercial, etc, to have them fund trails/ parks, etc, in a common open space.   Stress to citizens of Owasso the importance of volunteering to take part in THEIR community so that keeping things nice isn’t  such a huge burden to the city/taxes, etc.   Community involvement will be necessary to build these things and maintain them.   Desire for foliage everywhere, all year round, like California.   

 

A ‐ 5 


APPENDIX A SECTION 4      

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS 

May 11, 2010 (6:30 pm –Hodson Elementary School, 14500 E 86th Street North)    SUMMARY OF FLIP CHART COMMENTS   Do projects 100%.  For example – Elm Creek dredging, poor embankment already sliding back in and parks aren’t self‐ sustaining.  They need regular attention, not redone every 10 years (Elm Creek specifically).   Centennial Park needs more parking either beside or across the street with an under‐the‐road crosswalk.   Outdoor water park at Rayola   Improve usage of Rayola and YMCA area   Bigger pool, indoor and outdoor   Tear down oldest portion of the YMCA and replace with a facility with more class space   Finish sports park   Keep floodplain area off of 76th as a naturalist area for educational purposes. Utilize it without ruining habitat.  Like Oxley Na‐ ture Center   East of Tulsa Tech, old house is for sale currently undeveloped.  Keep green with trails and natural areas (similar to tech wild‐ flowers and trails)   Parking near park shelters   Shopping strip backed up to creek area in Centennial Park with stores and restaurants   Inventory trees in parks (good Boy Scout project) what kind, how many, estimated age, label trees with info (similar to area SE  of Philbrook). Replace trees prior to them dying.   More Frisbee golf, even if it’s only 2 or 3 holes.   Use volunteers / schools to label trees and flowers   Encourage classes to plant trees with a plaque saying “Planted by ___ School, 2010)   Regulations on animal waste on walking paths.   Doggie disposal bags for waste   More trash containers in Elm Creek. Often get moved to shelters   More splash pads at parks   Fountain / wading areas   Paddle boats and little sail boats for rent   Inventory parking places at each park   Mile and Kilometer markings on trials and mark online.   Plant trees around elm creek drainage area   

A ‐ 6 


SECTION 4                                

 

 

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS       APPENDIX A  

Dog Park  Planting plan for parks, tree replacement plan, keeping maintained and alive plan  Trash cans around Frisbee golf course  More trash cans in parks  Benches in parks, around trails and playground areas  Build a sledding hill in park, could also be used for bike trails and city fireworks display  Strip of Irises (similar to Woodward)  RV Park, even a small one, would give RVers a place to stop in our community.  Pedestrian / bike trails  Bike lanes.  Cannot take children on 76th on bicycles  Need a way to get to new Mohawk trail  Same problem walking downtown  Clean roadways of glass and debris  76th Street – need better access  Add bicycle racks to office / shopping  Lighting / safety issues  Bring new multi‐use trail from Mohawk to Rayola park  Trails to new TTC Campus  Light rail system to connect to Tulsa  Community‐wide internet – small fee on utility bill  Traffic calming on residential streets  Green belt – separate Owasso from Tulsa  Signal Timing (86th)  Skybridge from OHS to Mid High  Street overlay / repair Elm Creek!  A place to have festivals – Festival Park  The Boulder Mall  ABQ Uptown  Community Gateway  Walkable shopping district with lofts 

A ‐ 7 


APPENDIX A SECTION 4             

 

            

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS 

Light rail  Not enough housing choices – condos and townhomes with garages, homes between 150 and 250K  Miniature golf  Downtown “neighborhood” development  New larger movie theater with IMAX  High density living downtown is OK, as long as it looks like the rest of downtown  Incentive‐based system to redevelop downtown – hometown, localized, neighborhood development (ped. oriented, Brookside,  Cherry Street, e.g.)  Different types of foods, not chains – Cuban, Cajun, seafood  Parking behind the shopping!  Make shopping pedestrian oriented – benches, fountains, shade trees, brick pavers, flowers, nice  sidewalks with Owasso emblems  Main Street brick and stone buildings, not metal  Gateway – advertising, signage, something that says, in theory, “You should live here!”  Teen center  New nicer movie theater – dinner theater, IMAX / 3D  Fine dining – Mahogany’s   Commuter Rail to proposed downtown / Park and Ride / airport  Promote population density around development areas.  Sidewalks on service roads and around YMCA  Separate bike trails from roadways  Need signs on how to get from parks to Mohawk trail  Existing trails need to be bicycle friendly  Need more enforcement of leash requirements  Retaining wall on 129th needs a fence or barrier to keep kids who climb on the wall from falling onto roadway 

  NOTES FROM ALABACK DESIGN STAFF   Elm Creek Park pond was drained and dredged, but city didn’t address erosion and stabilization of banks.  (Need to do things  completely, not partially.) Also need to make sure play equipment is maintained.   Elm Creek Park also needs places for fishing (dock or flat area next to pond).  The park needs more shade trees to replace trees  lost or damaged in the ice storm 2 years ago.   Elm Creek Park needs parking added at the east end of the park adjacent to the open field to support informal play, soccer, etc.   

A ‐ 8 


SECTION 4  

      

  

 

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS       APPENDIX A  

Elm Creek Park needs a splash pad and fitness stations on the walkway around the pond.  The park also needs trash cans that  are chained down.  Interest was expressed for a city swimming pool with diving boards / deep pool.    The city needs more tennis courts (well‐maintained).  The city needs a community recreation center for kids to have a place for recreation.  Add class space at YMCA for cooking classes, art classes, music classes, etc.  People are driving on walking trails to get to park shelters. Need parking near shelters.  Need more parks on south side of town.  Plant many different trees in parks (like near Woodward Park in Tulsa), with a tree map showing what trees and where. Don’t  just plant the same type of tree.  Need for people who can enforce picking up dog waste in parks.  Trash cans in parks need to be locked down so that people can’t move all of the trash cans to one area of the park.  Evaluate parking needs at every park. 

  May 13, 2010 (6:30 pm –Owasso Community Center, 301 South Cedar)  SUMMARY OF FLIP CHART COMMENTS   Need more tennis courts   Football complex for youth 5 fields minimum   Indoor batting cages   Outdoor archery range   Adult softball fields   Championship baseball fields for youth designed as replicas of famous big league parks   Renovate existing sports park to be more user friendly with green space areas to recreate during tournaments   Extend sports park road from 116th to 106th   Evaluate sports park layout   More trees and park benches in parks/sports park   Centrally located restrooms & concessions at sports park   Zone areas around sports park for commercial development   Rayola – permanent benches needed (all parks)   Need more trees at parks  

A ‐ 9 


APPENDIX A SECTION 4                             

      

 

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS 

Rayola – add fitness / workout stations along trail around Rayola  Connect Mohawk‐Owasso Trail to Rayola  Do something with drainage channel at Rayola – fortify bridge, make more attractive  Need splash pad at Funtastic Island  Need restrooms / pavilion at Stone Canyon – also along other trails  Shakespeare on the Lawn at amphitheatres at different parks  Need trail to connect Stone Canyon to 76th  Add dog park somewhere other than McCarty  Need outdoor pool / lap pool. Current pool too small.  Competition pool facility (indoor/outdoor) needed  Bike, running trails huge for triathletes. People moving to Jenks to bike & run.  Need a swimming lake (tent camping for girl/boy scouts)  Hwy 169 is ugly coming into Owasso from South. Do something with these open spaces around hwy.  Need trees to improve view of hwy (Bird Creek/ iron bridge)  Need connectivity through city (trails)  Need open dining areas (like Riverwalk, etc.) Romantic options.  Clean up wetland area – what about RR tracks  Amphitheatre needed for bands, performance (open air entertainment)  Need Farmers’ Market in open‐air area (like BA downtown farmers’ market)  Fishing ponds needed for kids around town (public) fishing derby  Owasso community theatre interested in outdoor venue  Arts in the park needed (Gazebo at Rayola)  Friendship park – needs to be expanded. Take baseball fields out and make into a festival park with good access to 169. Use for  farmers’ market, fireworks show, etc. Move baseball fields to Sports Park expansion area  Tie Funtastic Island into Sports Park for a place to play between games.  Need fishing pier at Elm Creek Park  Dog park needs to be in a location where people can walk their dogs to park (Veteran’s Park)  Possible festival park at Centennial (2nd choice to Friendship Park location)  Outdoor dining and commercial development adjacent to proposed Festival Park  Trails to connect all parks (preferably without crossing busy streets)  Connect multi‐use trail to Rayola Park & YMCA area 

A ‐ 10 


SECTION 4                

 

 

         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS       APPENDIX A  

Enforce all developers to construct trails through new developments in accordance with plan  Maps showing trails & bike routes in the fenceline  Connect city parks and show on map safest route  Phones (panic) along trails & lighted trails  Shelters / benches along trails  Streets & Utilities (see handout list – 8.5 x 11 typed comments)  Fine arts facility  Elevate, light, landscape all Timmy & Cindy statues  Main street development – 1) start from the ground up, 2) restaurants, upscale dining 3) music, 4) underground utilities  Upscale retail – 1) whole foods, 2) Barnes & Noble, 3) Clothing i.e. Abercrombie, Ann Taylor, Harold’s (w/money)  Owasso needs a Chinatown  Festival Park – 1) amphitheatre, 2) water feature, 3) farmers’ market  Outdoor / patio dining  Outdoor recreation (e.g. Puttnjump) – 1) mini golf, 2) kids’ center / rec. jumpers, 3) go cart tracks  More trees in the city, along r/w streets & parks 

  May 17, 2010 (6:30 pm –Baptist Village, 7410 North 127th East Avenue)    SUMMARY OF FLIP CHART COMMENTS   Activities for 16 year old age group   More jogging trails   New pool – outdoor   Dog Park!!!   Upgrade playground equipment   Parking – Centennial Park   More parking at all parks   Need sidewalks around the perimeter of Baptist Village property   Have to use street for lack of sidewalks   Arts / Cultural Center / Drama Center for music and plays   Beautify highways / plantings   Gateway sign   

A ‐ 11 


APPENDIX A         

Bury power lines  Trees  Support scouts (cub‐boy‐girl)  Adult sports needs attention  More tennis courts  Bike and walking trails tied with sports fields  Street improvements (Arterials)  Sidewalks on existing streets – Original Town 

  NOTES FROM ALABACK DESIGN STAFF   The number one priority needs to be work on streets /access into Owasso.  There is a lot of revenue that comes into the city  from shoppers who live outside of Owasso.   Bury the overhead phone/power lines!   For the sake of appearance, need to do something about the wood fences that are in poor repair along the main roads in  Owasso.  Consider using volunteer labor to help with this problem.   On September 11, the city will host a community‐wide service known as Owasso Cares to promote community pride and ser‐ vice.   Want shopping center that is pedestrian‐friendly where people linger, with benches, landscaping, etc. 

 

A ‐ 12 


APPENDIX B 

APPENDIX B         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE  7th GRADE STUDENT WORKSHOP SUMMARY 

 

B ‐ 1 


APPENDIX B   

 

           

Owasso Quality of Life Initiative   7TH Grade Student Workshop Summary    Prepared by Alaback Design Associates      On June 10, 2010, the City of Owasso and planning consultants held a Quality of Life Workshop with area 7th graders.  Below is a sum‐ mary of that information learned from the workshop and the means by which it was collected.    After opening comments by the Honorable Mayor of Owasso and others, the students were shown a “Boos and Cheers” PowerPoint  presentation, during which they were shown images of positive and negative events / amenities and asked to “Boo” or “Cheer” in re‐ sponse.  As expected, the students cheered for features they liked and expressed their dislike for negative elements.    After the group presentation, the students were directed to four activity stations to participate in a variety of exercises that allowed  them to share their vision for Owasso’s ideal future.  A review of each station is presented in this summary.    Exercise 1:  The Sliding Value Scale  Group  leaders  read  the  following  statements  while  the  students  aligned  themselves  on  a  large  sliding  scale  marked  with  “Strongly  Agree” and “Strongly Disagree.”  Photographs to the right of each question indicate the “answers” provided by the students.     

 

B ‐ 2 


Question 

Agree 

 

 

APPENDIX B APPENDIX C  Disagree 

I should have a say in how my community grows.                It is important to take care of the natural environment in our City.               I think recycling is important.              

 

B ‐ 3 


APPENDIX B   

 

            Question 

Agree 

I should have a say in how my community grows.                It is easy and safe to ride my bike or walk to neighborhood parks.               My community needs for areas for active recreation.            

 

  B ‐ 4 

Disagree 


APPENDIX B  Question 

Agree 

Disagree 

I wish we had a place for outdoor concerts and festivals.                There are places to go fishing in Owasso.              Traffic congestion is a problem in our city.               

 

B ‐ 5 


APPENDIX B   

 

            Question 

Agree 

Our skate park is cool and I like going there.                 Owasso needs more malls, shopping centers and restaurants.              It is important for me and my friends to have a sense of pride about our community.            

 

  B ‐ 6 

Disagree 


APPENDIX B  Question 

Agree 

Disagree 

I use sidewalks.  Sidewalks are important to me.                 My community needs more areas for passive   recreation for hanging out with friends and family.             We have enough swimming pools and splash pads.                   

 

B ‐ 7 


APPENDIX B   

 

 

Exercise 2:  “Draw a Park” Mural  Students were presented with a large wall mural with a horizon line and asked to draw or write things that they desired in a city park.  The group leader offered ideas to spark creativity, such as a fishing pond, playground equipment, gazebos, amphitheater, trails, splash  pad, etc.  While they drew, the students were asked the following questions (moderator‐noted answers are shown in italics):      What is your favorite park in Owasso?  What is it about that park that makes it your favorite?       Elm Creek, Funtastic Island / Playground Equipment    Think of a park in another city.  What does that park have that Owasso doesn’t? How would you change that park to make it    even better?        Pool, sidewalks without gravel    What do you think parks are for?  Why do you go to the park?  What makes you want to keep coming back?        Walking, playgrounds, exercise, parks can conserve nature / Feed the ducks, skip rocks, ride bikes and scooter, walk dogs    How do you use parks now?  How do you think you will use them in 10, 15 or even 20 years?      Ride scooters, read books, use water features    Do you think it is important for parks to appeal to all age groups?        Yes    Do you think it is important for a park to be safe during the day and at night?  How can you make parks safer?       Lights      The completed mural is shown below: 

 

B ‐ 8 


APPENDIX B  Desired park features that were drawn by the students included:  Bike Path 

Open Grassy Areas 

Street Lights 

Dog Park 

Swings 

Cleaner Restrooms 

Shaded Benches by Ponds to Feed Ducks  Rock Climbing Wall 

Pavilion 

Trampoline 

See‐Saws 

Lighted Tennis Courts 

Tree House 

Bird Bath 

Pool 

No Gravel 

Basketball Courts 

Slide into a Swimming Pool 

Slide 

Picnic Areas 

Amphitheater 

         

  Exercise 3:  Sticker Voting  Photographs of various activities and amenities were printed large‐scale and placed on the wall, and students were given green dot  stickers with which to vote on elements that they felt were most important to Quality of Life in Owasso.  The images below reflect the  “voting” results provided by the students.  Facilitators encouraged discussion during this exercise and encouraged voting consideration  with the following questions.        If you had to choose one of these photos that most represents your likes or interests, which one would it be and why?          Think about the things you most want to see in Owasso. Would it be a place where there is active recreation, a place to eat,       somewhere to shop, somewhere where you can hang out with your friends, or maybe some place where you and your      family could visit on the weekend or in the summer?        What is your least favorite photo? What about it makes it the least interesting to you?        Think about an older sibling or cousin, your parents, and your grandparents. Which of these photos do you think would appeal      to them the most?        Think about the photo that you thought most represents your likes and interests today. Do you think 10 years from now this       same photo would still represent your likes and interests?        How can we find things that appeal to all age groups?   

B ‐ 9 


APPENDIX B   

 

          

Moderator Notes:    Equal split – shopping vs. sports    Most Interested:  Swimming Pools    Least Interested:  Fishing  Recycling  Bike Park 

Comments:      Mom likes walking trails.  Pools need a good deep end and a diving board.  Recycling would be more interesting if we did it in school.   The whole family would enjoy lake activities like swimming and canoeing.  Owasso needs a college and more sports.  

 

B ‐ 10 


APPENDIX B  Exercise 4:  What Do You Think is Important?  Students were given the opportunity to write down, from their perspective, what three things were most important to kids, adults and  parents and senior citizens and grandparents.  The images at the bottom of this page illustrate the students responses.   While they de‐ liberated and as they wrote, they were posed the following questions for discussion.      How would you characterize the types of things you think kids most enjoy in our community? Are they largely recreational       activities? Parks? Shopping and retail? Improvements to streets?       How would you characterize the types of things you think your parents or other adults enjoy the most in our community?      How would you characterize the types of things you think your grandparents or other senior citizens enjoy the most in our       community?      What’s different about the things you enjoy and the things your parents enjoy?      What about the difference between you and your grandparents?      If there were one new thing that could be built in Owasso that would appeal to all three of these groups, what would it be?       Why do you think that would appeal to all three age groups?      Think about Owasso as it is today. Which of these age groups do you think Owasso is most oriented toward? Why do you think      this is?      Do you think you can help make Owasso more youth‐friendly?  

 

B ‐ 11 


APPENDIX B   

 

          

The moderator of exercise four noted the  following:    Recurring Themes:  Recreation, being out‐ doors, walking trails when brother is prac‐ ticing sports, family places, indoor and out‐ door concert hall, parks.    Kids need more to do.  Community Center  should hold dances.  Owasso is oriented  toward grown‐ups  

 

B ‐ 12 


APPENDIX B  GENERAL WORKSHOP COMMENTS  The following comments were noted by consultants:    Kids don’t get a lot of say – but parents do.  Want to keep trees and flowers.  Park is too far away and no sidewalk.  It should be closer to home.  Rock climbing, miniature golf, baseball.  Need “not so scary” skate park and swimming pool.  No festivals in parking lots.  More concerts and plays.  I don’t fish but I know people who do.  Incorporate fishing into parks.  Traffic sometimes takes too long.  Wal‐Mart area is worst and Blockbusters and Reasors.  Not enough lanes.  Skate park is not safe.  Bigger, lighting.  No malls, more quaint local antique shops.  Outlet mall, Del Taco, Incredible Pizza type places.  Bricktown.  We should be able to brag on our community.  Water areas are really pretty.  Things are looking nice.  Sidewalks still too bumpy.  Street is straight shot, sidewalk is not.  Streets can flood.  We need sidewalk to stay dry.  Need more benches and tables to hang out with friends.  Bowling alley and movies are boring.  Need pavilion.  Splash pad for teenagers and bigger.  Not just kids.  Community pool.  My neighborhood doesn’t have one.  Big with a deep end.   

B ‐ 13 


APPENDIX C 

APPENDIX C         OWASSO QUALITY OF LIFE INITIATIVE  WIKIPLANNING ON‐LINE CIVIC ENGAGEMENT CAMPAIGN    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND SURVEY DATA      NOTE:  The following Wikiplanning information does  not  include  the  entire    Civic  Engagement  Campaign    Report.  The full report is available through the City  of Owasso website (www.CityofOwasso.com).   

C‐ 1 


APPENDIX C   

 

C ‐ 2 

 

           


APPENDIX C 

 

C ‐ 3 


APPENDIX C   

 

C ‐ 4 

 

           


APPENDIX C 

 

C ‐ 5 


APPENDIX C   

 

C ‐ 6 

 

           


APPENDIX C 

 

C ‐ 7 


APPENDIX C   

 

C ‐ 8 

 

           


APPENDIX C 

 

C ‐ 9 


APPENDIX C   

 

C ‐ 10 

 

           


APPENDIX C 

Owasso Quality of Life Initiative ‐ Summary of Wikiplanning Comments  Prepared by Alaback Design Associates – July 27, 2010   

The following is a summary of the responses received to the Wikiplanning  survey question:  “In your opinion, what are the things  about Owasso that make it a great place to live, work, or visit?”  143 responses were submitted, and the following provides a general‐ ized assessment of the responses by listing the number of times a specific comment was mentioned.  Specific comments were grouped  into the general categories that are shown in the following table.  Comment 

 

Sense of Community / The People  / Family‐Friendly / Caring  Good Schools  Safe / Low Crime (Good Police and Fire Department)  Good Shopping and Dining  Small Town Feel / Atmosphere  Proximity to Tulsa /Convenient Location  Good Facilities (Don’t Have to Go to Tulsa)  Good Youth Sports  Clean / Attractive Community  Faith/Spiritual Emphasis  Good Neighborhoods (Safe and Affordable)  Progressive City/ Forward‐Thinking  Health Care  Good Parks  Open Space  Low Traffic Congestion  History  Walking Trails 

Number of  Occurrences  70  56  45  45  32  25  17  15  9  8  7  2  2  1  1  1  1  1 

C ‐ 11 


APPENDIX C   

 

           

Owasso Quality of Life Initiative ‐ Summary of Wikiplanning Comments  Prepared by Alaback Design Associates – July 27, 2010   

The following is a summary of the responses received to the Wikiplanning survey question:  “If you could change ONE thing about  Owasso to make it a better community, what would it be?”  394 responses were submitted, and the following provides a generalized  assessment of the responses by listing the number of times a specific comment was mentioned.  Specific comments were grouped into  the general categories that are shown in the following table.  Traffic Related Comments  Fix Roads / Better Roads  Better Traffic Planning / Flow In and Out of Owasso  Traffic Light Timing  Add Sidewalks and Make Safe Crosswalks Over 169  Bike Lanes on Streets  Widen Streets  Boulevard All  4 Lane Streets / Landscape While Widening  Add Bus Transportation / Vanpooling  Widen 86th Street  Widen 116th  Beautify 129th  Make All Arterial Streets 4 Lane  More 5 Lane Roads With Shoulders  Better Traffic Enforcement  Make Walkways More Accessible For Seniors  Add Roundabouts Instead Of 4 Way Stops  Widen 76th To Stone Canyon   

C ‐ 12 

Number of  Occurrences  27  19  16  13  12  4  3  3  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 


APPENDIX C 

Traffic Related Comments (Continued)  Widen 169 To Collinsville  Widen Streets around Sports Park  Change Out Street Lights with New Poles Like Downtown  Landscape‐Planning Related Comments  Community Image  Clean Up Main Street / Enhance Downtown / Old Town  Create Landscape and Architectural Standards  Bury Power Lines  More Trees  Gateway / Enhance Arrival into Owasso  City Needs Fence Ordinance / Repair Fences  Better Quality Homes / Neighborhoods  Beautify Town  Landscape The High School  Keep Open Fields Mowed  Clean Up Rubble at Golf Course on 86th from 75  Downtown Identity  Continue Character Traits  Remove Character Traits  Remove Litter  Paint Ram on Water Tower 

Number of  Occurrences  1  1  1  Number of  Occurrences  14  5  4  3  3  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 

 

C ‐ 13 


APPENDIX C   

 

            Policy / City Government Related Comments 

 

C ‐ 14 

No More Apartments  Curbside Recycling  Improve Police  Attract More Professional Jobs  Senior Living / Housing  More Affordable Housing  Stronger Enforcement of Gang / Drug Laws  Add Second High School  More Elementary Schools  Increase School Budgets  Transparency from Elected Officials  Require Developers to Pay for Amenities  Better Hospital / Full Service Hospital  More Teachers  Limit New Housing Additions  Light Ordinance for Star Viewing  Street Flooding  Add Resource Officers to Schools  Better Pay for City Employees  Lower Property Taxes  Dog Barking Laws  Enact Neighborhood Watch  Increase Speed Limits  Water Source  Redistrict Elementary Schools  Make Owasso English Only 

Number of  Occurrences  11  7  7  6  5  4  4  3  2  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 


APPENDIX C  Parks and Recreation Related Comments  Community Swimming Pool / Water Park  More Walking /Bike Trails  Better Sports Complex  Better Baseball  Recreation Center  More Parks and Outdoor Entertainment Options  Better Football Facilities  Community Fairgrounds / Festival Area / Amphitheater  Public Fishing Area / Lake  More Open Space / Nature Areas  Playgrounds and Picnic Areas  Better Softball Facilities  Build Another YMCA / Expand  Mountain Biking  Turn Rock Quarry Into a Lake  City Run Sports Program (Not FOR)  Dog Park  Fine Arts Center  Outdoor Exercise Area  More Youth Programs  BMX  Senior Community Center  Public Tennis Courts  Better Basketball Facilities 

Number of  Occurrences  45  44  36  17  17  14  13  8  4  4  4  4  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 

 

C ‐ 15 


APPENDIX C   

 

            Shopping / Entertainment Related Comments 

Book Store  Mini Golf  Town Square Area / Utica Square Area  More Things For Teenagers / Young Adults  Better Entertainment Options  More Retail  Sam’s Club / Costco  Better Nightlife / Bars / Comedy Club  More Restaurants  More Music Festivals / Cultural Events  Amusement Park  Farmers Market Expansion  Healthier Restaurants  River Park Area / Lake Front With Retail  Low Cost Entertainment  More Grocery Choices  Sporting Goods Store  Add a Mall  Add Upscale Restaurant 

 

C ‐ 16 

Number of  Occurrences  12  8  6  6  5  5  5  4  3  3  3  3  2  2  2  2  2  1  1 

Seafood Restaurant 

Spirit Bank Event Center 

Roller Skating Rink 

Ice Rink 

Community Theater 

Concerts at Smith Farm 



Quality of Life Preliminary Report