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Leauxcal Festival

The Big Easel Catherine Schoeffler Comeaux

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While just a freshman in high school, Jacob Broussard exhibited several of his paintings at The Big Easel art show in River Ranch. “A few pieces even sold,” he discloses in a humble voice that belies the talent he has since developed. Today, Broussard gravitates towards the human figure in seemingly everyday settings. At first glance we see vivid color, simple people, and well-captured natural gestures, but spend a moment with his work and beautiful oddities reveal themselves - a young girl wears a dog draped around her neck, faces are blurred as if to be anyone’s, a mysterious pair of lone shoes hangs on a line, the wrestling figures blend into a single person. While studying art in Italy, Jacob discovered the term pentimento to describe what he had been instinctually including in his work. Pentimento is used to refer to a remnant of a change purposefully left in a painting – a face that was turning away is now looking straight ahead yet the work still reveals the looking away. What many artists erase or paint over, Jacob includes in his final piece. This style of painting contains a bit of the history of its creation, and it has become a hallmark of his work. Since his first showing in The Big Easel, Broussard’s unique interpretation of southern imagery has evolved. He explores themes of violence, male honor and rites of passage with Milo’s art rap or Flannery 36 April 2014

O’Connor’s words playing the soundtrack to his work day. Last year, he was awarded The Big Easel’s Best In Show for his painting Elmo Jun and this May, he will again hang his work at The Big Easel. Like the artists that it promotes, the event has grown over the past several years. What was once a relatively open event featuring 20–30 artists is now an annual art show with a highly selective jury process beginning in September of the previous year. The show attracts collectors, gallery owners and other art enthusiasts from all over the country. Organized and coordinated by volunteers, The Big Easel’s mission is to give artists a place to showcase their work and help them further their careers. Kelli Kaufman, last year’s top selling artist, is an example of one such painter. Standing in front of her landscape paintings, one feels as if they are looking over her shoulder, invited into an expansive view, created with a true love of Louisiana in her brushstrokes. Even her cramped bayou scenes hint at a promise of light and openness. “The short glimpses of marsh grass and clouds reflected on the water while passing over bridges, or sighted between trees close to the road make me Overture Magazine

Profile for Overture

Overture April 2014  

Acadiana's Publication of the Arts

Overture April 2014  

Acadiana's Publication of the Arts

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