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2016/2017 OUTWARD ANNUAL REPORT AND ACCOUNTS


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Building foundations for future growth

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Supporting people with complex needs

10 Love, friendship and wellbeing

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the year in brief


Chair’s Report Making customer wellbeing our priority

In our last Annual Report, I wrote that we were proud to be a genuinely customer-focussed organisation, and I highlighted some of our projects that really proved this.  This year I’d like to touch on something less tangible but no less important. It is something that is fundamental to all of us, that makes for a happy existence and that should be at the forefront of supporting people to lead fulfilling lives – wellbeing. This year, we have made improving our customers’ wellbeing the focus of what we do. They say that ‘home is where the heart is’. Having a safe and secure  place to call one’s own brings peace of mind and is vital for us all to have a sense of wellbeing. Ever since Outward came into existence more than forty years ago, housing has been at the heart of its mission. Back in the 1970s, this mission was to enable people with learning disabilities to move out of hospitals, ‘the wards’, and into the community. We supported a group of women to move into a shared house in Leytonstone. Four decades later, we want to give our customers something bigger and better. A flat of their own! This dream will become a reality at Doubleday Court in Leyton, where we are opening twelve individual flats for people with

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learning disabilities. Several existing Outward customers are looking forward to opening this new chapter in their lives. Feeling good in oneself also comes from having a purpose. Unfortunately, only 6% of people with a learning disability or autistic spectrum condition are in paid employment. Outward recognises that this is not acceptable and is doing as much as possible to support people into employment. For example, this year we supported our customers in Hackney to take part in ‘Real Opportunities’, a pre-employment programme to develop confidence, motivation and the skills to find work. I think of my own small courtyard garden in South London as my sanctuary, especially when the sun is shining. It is vital to my wellbeing. Earlier this year, I visited some of the gardens entered into our Gardening Competition. It was a real joy to see the immense pride which people took in their gardens, balconies and courtyards, keeping scrapbooks and growing produce that went into healthy meals and snacks. Getting outdoors, getting active and seeing the fruits (literally!) of one’s labour lifts the spirit and brings true wellbeing.

Jackie Ballard Chair of the Outward Board


CEO’s Review of the Year Valuing and retaining our hardworking dedicated staff, and continuing to be innovative and creative, in the face of austerity This year has been a successful one for our charity. Put into the context of ongoing reductions in social care funding, we have increased our services and continued to develop new much-needed services. In the coming year, we have new properties coming into management, providing much-needed homes, plus expansion plans for our effective support services for people on the autistic spectrum. You often hear charities say that our greatest asset is our people, the staff who do the real work, supporting the vulnerable and disabled people to whom we provide services. I have worked at Outward for many years. Unfortunately, during the last 10 years, the reality of how care and support staff are regarded by wider society and our own sector, coupled with austerity and high-profile scandals, have eaten away at the regard for, and the rewards given, to social care staff. I believe the biggest challenge facing Outward in the coming year is to continue recruiting and retaining good people. My own experience of meeting our frontline staff is of dedicated,

caring and innovative people who really do engage, enable and empower our customers. We now need to ensure we continue to attract and keep good people, the people who are the very heart of Outward. Those commissioning social care face increasing demands with smaller budgets. Some choose the short-term solution of demanding lower and lower costs for the same or more services, leading to unsustainable poor pay for frontline staff. Our intention is to break out of this negative cycle by developing new, more customer-focussed solutions. We will continue being innovative and creative. For example, by working in the Newlon Group we will refurbish and develop buildings, providing great homes to the people we support. We are not asking our staff to do more for less. Rather, we are working in partnership to make the best use of the resources available to deliver real sustainable solutions.

Peter Little

We need to continue to attract and keep good people, who are the very heart of Outward.

CEO of Outward 5


Building foundations for future growth

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Doubleday Court Our three-storey development in Leyton will give twelve new homes and new independence to people with learning disabilities

Two Outward customers have donned their hard hats and are ready to see their new homes for the first time. They have seen the exterior of Doubleday Court many times, since they live only a ten minute walk away, but this is their first chance to see it on the inside. The flats are still being kitted out, but it is now possible to make out the living room, bathroom, kitchen, storage spaces and other areas of each flat. Both customers are really impressed with the size of the top-storey flat that they are shown round, which features a large curved window with great views.

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Many of the new tenants moving into Doubleday Court have, up until now, either been living in shared houses or with their own families. One existing Outward customer, who is moving to the new scheme, can’t wait to have a place to call her own. She currently shares a house with three other people, which she finds quite draining: “It’s an old house that has creaky floorboards. You can hear everyone moving about. I have to wake up early in the morning to use the shower. In my new flat, I can get up when I want and have friends to come over to visit.” Doubleday Court is a joint venture with Newlon Housing Trust, our

Group parent company. Newlon sorts out the bricks and mortar, while Outward provides the specialist care and support to the people living there. It is a relationship that has worked positively for over forty years. We believe that this latest development will genuinely start a new chapter in the lives of twelve people who will now have their own self-contained homes. As the Chair of our Board wrote in her Chair’s Report, ‘home is where the heart is’ and we hope that the new tenants will fall in love with Doubleday Court.


Making a house a home A home is somewhere you are proud to call your own. It is a refuge from the outside world and a place to relax with friends and family. It is somewhere you feel comfortable and content. We want our customers to have a home, and not just a house. Leander Court in Hackney is a good example of where we have really tried to make our tenants feel comfortable. This is a housing with care scheme for older people with medium to high needs. Salman, the Scheme Manager, noticed that not many tenants were socialising in the communal areas or garden. “When I started as Scheme Manager in August 2016, I really wanted to encourage tenants to come out of their flats and socialise with others” Salman tells us. “We redesigned the garden, repainted the communal areas in brighter colours and put up wall art. We have a tenant who wants to live by the seaside, so I bought a huge seaside painting for the lounge, keeping her in mind, and she loves it.” Gardening has also played a big part in making Outward houses more homely. It encourages people to take pride in where they live. Outward launched its third annual Gardening Competition and had a record number of nineteen entries, involving dozens of our customers.

When I started as Scheme Manager in August 2016, I really wanted to encourage tenants to come out of their flats and socialise with others.

In addition to lush raised beds and colourful hanging baskets, we saw lots of herbs and vegetable produce, encouraging healthy eating, as well as sensory garden areas. Customers kept scrapbooks to show their progress and were clearly very proud of their achievements, as were we.

9


Love, friendship and wellbeing

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Here’s to the happy couple … We couldn’t be happier for two Outward customers who got married last year. It was a beautiful day.

In May 2016 we celebrated a very special occasion at Tower Hamlets Registry Office. Two Outward customers, Shaun and Ayleen, finally tied the knot, after many years of being engaged. There was not a dry eye in the room. The theme of ‘Learning Disability Week’ in 2016 was love and relationships. Meaningful relationships are such a big part of what makes us happy. Most people want to find love, and this is no different for people with learning disabilities. 12 OUTWARD REPORT AND ACCOUNTS 2016/17

As a charity, Outward exists to support people to get the most out of their lives, and this includes supporting them to meet new people, form relationships and maintain these relationships. Shaun and Ayleen have been engaged for many years and had always hoped to move in together and eventually get married. We are delighted that this has finally happened. Outward staff were on hand to support the couple through every decision in the build-up to the wedding. Ayleen was supported to pick

her own dress, Shaun to buy the rings and book the reception venue, and both to send out the invitations. The wedding day itself was a joyous event for everyone involved, and the smiles on Shaun and Ayleen’s faces proved that this was the right decision for them, made possible with a little help from their key workers, friends and family.


More than just a Youth Club At the end of 2016, our Learning Disabilities Outreach team in Tower Hamlets partnered with a major local youth charity to launch a new social club for young people with special educational needs. This was a first of its kind in the borough and something that was desperately needed, to support a potentially isolated group of young people to broaden its horizons. We are particularly proud of our Outreach staff, led by Abul Bashar, for using their initiative to make the new social club happen. Firstly, the team realised that a group of younger people it supports, mainly coming from the local Bangladeshi community, were struggling to find their own social network. Abul approached Newark Youth London, a long-established charity in the borough, about funding and a venue. Newark Youth jumped at the chance to reach a group of young people it had previously struggled to engage with.

We are particularly proud of our staff team. The team realised that a group of younger people it supports were struggling to find their own social network.

So, following months of planning, the club was launched. The weekly club sessions are a chance for young people aged 18–25 with a learning disability to get together, socialise, try new activities and share important life skills. From only a few members at the beginning, the youth club now welcomes dozens every week. The hard work of the Outreach team was rewarded at the 33rd annual Newark Youth Awards in May 2017. Applauded by local dignitaries, including Rushanara Ali MP, Abul received a special award for his tireless work to set up and run the club. Outward customer Shahin also took home an award for all his efforts volunteering at the club. 13


We’re all going on a Nutley Edge holiday We’ve just got back from another supported holiday at Nutley Edge and had a whale of a time! Nutley Edge is our holiday project in the beautiful Ashdown Forest in East Sussex. The holidays are called Activity Breaks and are aimed at people with learning disabilities and autistic spectrum conditions. One of our guests has laid out her photos and souvenirs from her time away, and tells us what she liked about her holiday: “We travelled down by coach and stayed in one of the comfy cottages on site. Everyone had their own rooms. Florence, who runs the holidays, helped people introduce themselves when we got there and we went bowling in the evening. The next day we had lunch on a steam train and went to a museum all about local history. The best thing about a holiday at Nutley Edge is that you get to do loads of new things, but with support from the Outward staff. Annika, Simon and Lisa were really helpful when I didn’t know how something worked or how to get somewhere. Aleks was there to keep me calm when I held a big tawny owl on a glove. Thanks to Owls About Town for bringing all the owls to Nutley Edge! I will definitely go on another Activity Break next year.” We are running more Activity Breaks in 2018. Each holiday has a different theme to appeal to different interests, from Mad about Animals and East Sussex Sightseeing to our Festive Christmas break and Halloween holiday. We’ll be taking lots more photos to share with you. Visit www.nutleyedge.org.uk, call 020 8980 7101 or email info@outward.org.uk to find out what’s happening! 14 OUTWARD REPORT AND ACCOUNTS 2016/17


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16 OUTWARD REPORT AND ACCOUNTS 2016/17


Supporting people with complex needs

17


Our new services in Bromley We have focussed on putting in place a consistent staff team and making a house a home for our new customers In late November 2016, following a successful tender process, we took over three new services in Bromley, building upon our existing supported living services for people with learning disabilities in the borough. The Glade, Coppice and Spinney are three bungalows, built on part of the former Cheyne Centre children’s hospital site, and provide purposebuilt homes to 11 people who have significant learning and physical disabilities, some also having autistic spectrum conditions and/or mental health needs. In addition, many of the customers have complex and profound health issues, and therefore require a high level of staff support both day and night. 18 OUTWARD REPORT AND ACCOUNTS 2016/17

Nearly one year on from taking over the new services, we can reflect on what has been both a challenging and highly rewarding process. We continue to strive to make improvements to the lives of our new customers, in both their housing situation and in the support and care they receive to lead fulfilling lives. After a challenging transition process, one of the ongoing issues we face is to increase the number of regular staff and reduce the high level of agency staffing, which has been impacting upon the quality of service. The first step to improving quality is to attract the best staff possible, a real challenge in the social care sector in 2017. We decided to start by improving the

terms and conditions for frontline staff, with the vast majority receiving a 20% increase overall in their annual pay. This commitment has helped us reduce staff turnover and recruit new staff. We want our customers to be confident that they will be supported by people they know and trust on a day-to-day basis. At The Glade, in particular, we have seen a reduction in incidents of challenging behaviour as a direct consequence of a consistent, trained and experienced staff team. Our other priority in Bromley was to work in partnership with the landlord, Golden Lane Housing, to improve the buildings themselves and ensure that, as part of our business plan objectives, each person we support has a ‘home’,


not just a ‘house’. We have positively advocated for property upgrades and The Glade, for example, is now a much improved environment, with newly decorated lounge and communal spaces. We have invested in new furniture, chosen by customers, to make the homes welcoming and personal.

As we move forward we will continue to act upon feedback from customers, families, staff and other stakeholders and invest in senior management support, staff training and ongoing monitoring to continuously improve the service for customers and their families.

ASD Outreach branches out Supporting people with autistic spectrum conditions (ASC) to engage in their local communities, to develop their independent living skills and cope with the challenges posed by being on the spectrum is a key area of focus for us. We have been supporting people on the autistic spectrum for over 40 years and have invested heavily to make sure that our services are the ones people choose and really value. For example, we have invested in resources such as specialist staff training, ASC specialist management and accreditation through the National Autistic Society. This year we have seen an increase in referrals and support provided, particularly for people living alone or with their

families and requiring community outreach support. Now working with almost thirty people across nine London boroughs, we continue to invest in areas such as positive behaviour support planning to meet the increasing complexity of need among our current and future customers. Our hardworking, dedicated and experienced staff team have played a really important role in making this success happen. They continue to work very closely with families and, at the start of 2017, took the initiative to set up a weekly art club for customers on the spectrum to channel their creativity and meet new people and socialise.

We have invested heavily to make sure that our services are the ones people choose and value. Pictured on this spread: West Wickam scheme with residents and support staff. 19


Statement of financial activities for the year ended 31 March 2017

2017

2016

Unrestricted

Restricted

Total

Unrestricted

Restricted

Total

£

£

£

£

£

£

44,026

-

44,026

760

1,359

2,119

Income from: Donations and legacies Charitable activities: Rent

3,967,985

-

3,967,985

4,072,730

-

4,072,730

Service Charges

2,680,325

-

2,680,325

2,457,112

-

2,457,112

Care and tenancy support

12,039,037

-

12,039,037

11,583,845

-

11,583,845

160,841

-

160,841

93,094

-

93,094

19,315

-

19,315

25,234

-

25,234

-

-

-

75,516

-

75,516

18,911,529

-

18,911,529

18,308,291

1,359

18,309,650

-

-

-

10,194

-

10,194

Rent

4,063,094

-

4,063,094

3,960,959

-

3,960,959

Service Charges

2,686,968

-

2,686,968

2,457,112

-

2,457,112

Care and tenancy support

11,592,404

-

11,592,404

11,676,185

-

11,676,185

225,676

-

225,676

136,862

1,359

138,221

18,568,141

-

18,568,141

18,241,312

1,359

18,242,671

343,388

-

343,388

66,979

-

66,979

82,628

-

82,628

89,120

-

89,120

426,016

-

426,016

156,099

-

156,099

-

-

-

279,577

-

279,577

426,016

-

426,016

435,676

-

435,676

Total funds brought forward

6,160,214

34,300

6,194,514

5,724,538

34,300

5,758,838

Total funds carried forward

6,586,230

34,300

6,620,530

6,160,214

34,300

6,194,514

Other trading activities Investments Other Total income Expenditure on: Raising funds Charitable activities:

Other Total expenditure Net income before net gains on investments Net gains on investments Net income before other recognised gains and losses Gains on revaluation of fixed assets Net movement in funds Reconciliation of funds:

20 OUTWARD REPORT AND ACCOUNTS 2016/17


Balance sheet as at 31 March 2017

2017 £

£

2016 £

£

Fixed assets: Tangible assets Investment properties Investments

1,214,873

1,267,063

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,070

1,070

2,915,943

2,868,133

Current assets: Debtors Investments Cash at bank and in hand

1,472,329

2,050,308

-

-

6,274,883

4,656,739

7,747,212

6,707,047

2,504,187

2,118,746

Liabilities: Creditors: amounts falling due within one year Net current assets

5,243,025

4,588,301

Total assets less current liabilities

8,158,968

7,456,434

Creditors: amounts falling due after one year

1,538,438

1,261,920

6,620,530

6,194,514

34,300

34,300

Total net assets The funds of the charity: Restricted income funds Unrestricted income funds: Designated funds Revaluation reserve General funds

1,752,477

1,752,477

714,191

714,191

4,119,562

3,693,546

Total unrestricted funds

6,586,230

6,160,214

Total charity funds

6,620,530

6,194,514

All of the results in the statement of financial activities are derived from continuing activities. There are no other recognised gains or losses other than those included in the statement. The financial summary represents Outward’s financial statements for year ended March 2017. For a better understanding of the Charity’s financial position and the results of its operations, please refer to the detailed, audited financial statements which can be obtained from our registered office, Newlon House, 4 Daneland Walk, Hale Village, London, N17 9FE. 21


Our year in numbers

60 customers who took part in our 3rd annual Gardening Competition

380 days

th a learning disability of supported holidays at Nutley Edge

22 OUTWARD REPORT AND ACCOUNTS 2016/17

250 people

volunteering for our Hackney Volunteer & Befriending Service


837 homes

that we manage for people with support needs

28 adults

supported by our autistic spectrum outreach service

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Outward Housing trading as Outward is a company limited by guarantee. Registered office: Newlon House 4 Daneland Walk Hale Village London N17 9FE Registered company no. 2151434 Registered charity no. 800529 Registered CQC no. CRT1 - 439476463. Š Outward 2017. All rights reserved.

Certification No.000000

Outward Annual Report 2016-17 - people at the heart of what we do  

We are really pleased you have taken time to look through our 2016-17 Annual Report. We hope you find it an interesting and informative read...

Outward Annual Report 2016-17 - people at the heart of what we do  

We are really pleased you have taken time to look through our 2016-17 Annual Report. We hope you find it an interesting and informative read...

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