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2019

ANNUAL REPORT

BETTER PEOPLE. BETTER COMMUNITIES. BETTER WORLD.


Te Pae Tawhiti

Our Vision

Kia whanake ngā tangata. Kia whanake ngā whānau. Kia whanake te ao. Better People. Better Communities. Better World.

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OUTWARD BOUND


Te Aronga

Ngā Uara

We empower people to make lifechanging journeys of self-discovery through shared adventures in te ao tūroa, the natural world.

Wana / Passion

Ngā Whainga

Haepapa / Responsibility

Our Mission

Objectives To Develop Mauri Ora / Best Self: ► Connection ► Compassion ► Resilience ► Responsibility

Our Values We are passionate about developing people and inspired to serve the needs of Aotearoa.

We act with respect, courage and integrity. Together we give our personal best. Aroha / Compassion We are all interconnected. We nurture a safe and supportive environment.

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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BOARD CHAIR REPORT GRANT FABER

Over the past 57 years Outward Bound New Zealand has had a positive and lasting impact on the lives of over 65,000 New Zealanders however, we only reach some 1800 each year. Sitting around a campfire under the Sharqiya desert night sky of Oman in January, I had the privilege of engaging with staff from 30 Outward Bound schools attending the global Outward Bound conference. The subject was - the relevance of Outward Bound in today’s society. Comments from around the world expressed a similar view: multiple generations that have been spared global adversity, the decreasing risk tolerance in everyday life, the ever increasing intrusion of technology and effect of social media have all impacted on our younger citizens in particular. A general loss of self esteem, lowered resistance to adversity, increasing self focus, and resultant growing mental health challenges are increasingly the norm. At a time when opportunities abound, weakness in these fundamental life skills hold back individual potential, and that of our society as a whole. We all know that this is an area where Outward Bound can have a significant and lifelong positive impact. Therefore the relevance of Outward Bound is greater today than any time before. This past year was the third in our three year planning cycle and another of solid achievement. Outstanding course outcomes continued to be delivered while the Wellington and Anakiwa teams implemented strategies to optimise our delivery and operational model. The gains made over the past three years of the current planning cycle are notable. While revenue has increased by 24 percent, cost growth has been contained to 12 percent over the same period. We have made real gains in operating efficiency but will still report an operating deficit this year. The outdoor education sector continues to face headwinds with the ever increasing costs of compliance and the impact of new legislation driving up costs. Funding support remains essential to our delivery. 4

OUTWARD BOUND

Of particular note, this past year 36 percent of our student fees were paid by the Outward Bound Foundation and our valuable funder network. This support allowed many young New Zealanders, who would otherwise not be able to afford to, to benefit from the Outward Bound experience. This substantial social contribution underscores the need to continue to expand our Foundation. The above achievements are all due to a dedicated instructor and management team, the passion and commitment of our Boards, both Trust and Foundation, the wonderful supporter network of our alumni, and our generous funders, without whom we could not operate. My thanks and acknowledgement goes out to you all.

We also acknowledge the work of Glenys Coughlan as Chairperson. Glenys stood down from the Board in February to focus on her health recovery and our thoughts are with her at this time.

The need and relevance of Outward Bound is stronger than ever and we must do more. We are currently finalising work on the More New Zealanders’ project. As this name suggests, this strategy aims to lift the number of New Zealanders who experience Outward Bound each year. I look forward to sharing more details with you soon. Grant Faber Board Chair


CEO REPORT VICTOR KLAP

Kia ora koutou, we have enjoyed another strong year at Outward Bound. We have continued to deliver highly impactful courses, grown student numbers, increased our focus on workplace and student safety/wellbeing, and have invested significantly to future-proof our infrastructure at Anakiwa. These successes are made possible thanks to our donors, our sponsors, our alumni, the team at Outward Bound, and a multitude of other partners and supporters. A sincere thanks to you all. You will immediately feel that this year’s Annual Report is a more substantial document than in previous years. The reason for this is it is both an Annual Report and an impact report. There are 3 compelling reasons for the focus on impact: 1. Increasing importance to share impact evidence with our generous supporters and stakeholders. 2. Our commitment to being transparent about our work. 3. Compliance with new accounting standards for charities. This year’s impact report focuses on the powerful and positive effect of our regional schools programme. I hope you enjoy the additional content. I would also like to comment on two topics with a focus on our future. Firstly, our strategic plan. Over the past 12 months the Board and management team have undertaken a thorough review of our current business and our longer-term aspirations. Alongside this work we have reviewed our Kaupapa, specifically the values that underpin everything we do. From this process it is clear we are close to capacity at Anakiwa. If we want to future proof the organisation and reach more New Zealanders, we need to make our programmes more widely available.

To that end, we have initiated a process to explore delivery of OB programmes elsewhere in New Zealand. Exciting times! Secondly, as an organisation we are committed to our vision of ‘Better People. Better Communities. Better World.’ Looking long term it would be negligent of us not to address the biggest issue confronting the world, namely climate change. Closely related to this is the threat to the natural environment and rapidly reducing biodiversity. These challenges place a clear obligation to consider how we support New Zealand’s long term climate change goals and ‘how do we contribute to the restoration of the natural environment in a meaningful way’. Big questions we need to consider. At a more operational level some early questions include: 1. How will rising sea levels affect Anakiwa? When and at what cost? 2.

If people become unwilling to travel because this increases their carbon footprint, could this manifest as fewer students choosing to travel to Anakiwa?

3. How do we build consideration of these and other possible effects into our current strategy? We are committed to working on solutions to these and related questions so that we can continue to provide life changing courses to New Zealanders for years to come. And as I said last year, my thanks to the whole OB team who work tirelessly for the cause: your dedication is very much valued. Like any organisation we have our challenges but it is immensely motivating for us all to work for an organisation whose key focus is to build a better Aotearoa. Lastly, I would like to acknowledge both Dick Hubbard and Glenys Coughlan who have recently stepped down from the Board. Thank you Dick and thank you Glenys - your contributions have been invaluable, and it has been a pleasure working with you both. Victor Klap CEO

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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2018 / 19 TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS

THE YEAR IN SNAPSHOT AGE OF STUDENTS

1680 ORIGIN OF STUDENTS

36%

7%

2%

18-26yrs

WAIKATO

NORTHLAND

7%

24%

BAY OF PLENTY

AUCKLAND

1%

3%

GISBORNE

TARANAKI

4%

HAWKE'S BAY

3%

2%

MANAWATU-WHANGANUI

NELSON-TASMAN

18%

1%

16%

WELLINGTON

WEST COAST

27- 40yrs

29%

16-17yrs

1%

8%

MARLBOROUGH

OTAGO

12%

CANTERBURY

9%

41- 50yrs

5%

51- 60yrs

1%

61- 80yrs

2%

4%

SOUTHLAND

13-15yrs

2%

1% UNKNOWN

4%

UNKNOWN

INTERNATIONAL

1205

ETHNICITY OF STUDENTS

60

77

242

50 NZ EUROPEAN / PĀKEHĀ

MĀORI

OTHER EUROPEAN

PACIFIC ISLANDER

ASIAN

AFRICAN

25 OTHER ETHNICITY

3 MIDDLE EASTERN

3 LATIN AMERICAN

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PREFER NOT TO SAY

23

“Before Outward Bound I wanted to change. I lacked direction and was in a stressful place. During Outward Bound, I flourished and discovered the ways I wanted to grow. The challenging outdoor moments, when my lungs were full of fresh air and soul was brimming with life, seeded the growth areas I pursued after Outward Bound.” Helen Cook 645

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OUTWARD BOUND


PERSONAL IMPACT 9 OUT OF 10 REPORTED THAT OUTWARD BOUND HAS HAD A POSITIVE IMPACT ON THEIR LIFE IN THE 6 MONTHS SINCE THEY LEFT.

92% 63%

AGREED THAT OUTWARD BOUND HELPED THEM REALISE THEY CAN DO ANYTHING THEY PUT THEIR MIND TO.

MADE CHANGES TO THEIR LIFESTYLE TO POSITIVELY IMPACT THE ENVIRONMENT SINCE ATTENDING OUTWARD BOUND.

85% 86%

AGREED THAT OUTWARD BOUND HAS TAUGHT THEM TO BE A BETTER TEAM PLAYER.

AGREED THAT OUTWARD BOUND HAS HELPED THEM BOUNCE BACK QUICKER AFTER A CHALLENGING EXPERIENCE.

CONSUMED THIS FOOD HELPED FUEL:

13,000 FLAPJACKS

378kg ROAST PORK

2,700kg POTATOES

THAT IS

2,100

HOMEMADE LOAVES OF BREAD

2,880 POTS OF TEA

20,000 STED COMPO S! G TE A B A

119 8,600,000 SERVICE DAYS

AND CONTRIBUTED TO

TOTAL VOLUME OF WASTEWATER BEING PUT THROUGH OUTWARD BOUND’S WASTEWATER PLANT AND DISCHARGED TO LAND.

“There’s only 86,400 seconds in a day. Across 21 days, that’s 1,814,400 seconds.  How can such a short amount of time have such an impact on life?  That’s exactly how long I spent at Outward Bound as part of a wonderful and crazy watch of people called Shackleton 653. I now challenge myself to live without regrets and push beyond the limits I had established for myself. There is literally nothing that I can’t do if I set my mind to it” Hilary Shackleton 653

Reference: Research New Zealand (2019). Outward Bound Long-Term Impact Research.

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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OUR STRATEGY 2020+

We believe Outward Bound today is as relevant to the needs of society as it has ever been. However, we also recognise the need to have a clear and compelling proposition that delivers to a world that is both changing and diversifying rapidly:

Evolving Society Our population, values, preferences and behaviours are changing. Aotearoa is more ethnically and socially diverse than ever before and our values, preferences and behaviours are very different to sixty years ago. How are we meeting evolving societal needs?

More New Zealanders Project

Remote Location Further to this, 77% of New Zealand’s population live on the North Island. Our remote location does present a barrier and we need to service this population more conveniently.

Attendance Barriers Youth today have more personal development options available to them than ever before. In this competitive environment the duration and cost of our courses can create barriers to attendance, almost regardless of impact.

Brand Understanding Our market research tells us that while the Outward Bound brand is well known there is a lack of understanding of what we do.

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OUTWARD BOUND

For the past 12 months, the Trust Board and management team have been developing our long-term strategy. Our constitution has as its purpose ‘to provide education and personal development training for all people in New Zealand’. ‘All people’ is bold and possibly unachievable, but it is aspirational. An aspiration we want to embrace. To that end, the first key strategic project we have established is the ‘More New Zealanders’ project: an initiative to significantly increase participation by New Zealanders in our experiential education programmes. Importantly the scope of this project is to focus on new programmes which will be independent to Anakiwa. The work of the team is well under way and we aim to have 1-3 pilot courses trialling before year end. We look forward to updating you further on this project over the next 12 months.


REVIEWING OUR KAUPAPA Over the past year OB Research & Development Manager Kelly Hamilton has led the 2018/19 review of Our Kaupapa. Kelly shares how she approached the process and ensured that the entire organisation were consulted. The new Kaupapa is reflected in this report and is now incorporated as a key tool in course delivery. Our Kaupapa serves as a document to align and inspire us as an organisation and it supports the delivery of quality courses. With the last update taking place over five years ago, it was time to check whether our Kaupapa was still relevant before moving forward with our strategic plan. In December the process started with the creation of a Kaupapa review team. This team of six was equally balanced with Anakiwa and Wellington managers.

“We started by exploring the framework of the current document and asking ourselves questions such as “Was anything missing?” From this process we all agreed that our vision ‘Better People. Better Communities. Better World.’ was a strong driving force and would remain. However, we identified the importance of including our mission statement in the Kaupapa.”

Kelly Hamilton, Outward Bound Research & Development Manager.

We then followed a process suggested for not for profits by Ima Ibrisevic. Using the wealth of information collected from staff, students and current social needs literature, and considering our history and future direction, we spent a day as a review team before presenting several drafts to the combined management team. Our team follow a busy schedule, so it was important to allow at least a month for them to offer feedback. We are very privileged to have Nick Johnston work his design magic and would like to thank Ariana Stevens for her support with our use of Te Reo. We are proud to say the new updated version is a great reflection of OBNZ in 2019.

OUR KAUPAPA TE PAE TAWHITI OUR VISION Kia whanake nga tangata. Kia whanake nga whanau. Kia whanake te ao.

Through workshops, surveys and questioning current students, we consulted the whole team and gave them the opportunity to actively feedback. We enlisted the expertise of Michael Henderson, Cultural Anthropologist, to guide us with our values. After spending a day with the combined management team and meeting with wider staff team during our annual organisational day, we felt confident to clearly identify our values. James Neill, Canberra University Psychology professor, who has been associated with Outward Bound for many years, worked with us to consider our objectives and update our evaluation tool.

Better People. Better Communities. Better World.

TE ARONGA OUR MISSION We empower people to make life-changing journeys of self-discovery through shared adventure in te ao turoa, the natural world.

NGA UARA OUR VALUES WANA - PASSION We are passionate about developing people and are inspired to serve the needs of Aotearoa. HAEPAPA - RESPONSIBILITY We act with respect, courage and integrity. Together we give our personal best. AROHA - COMPASSION We are all interconnected. We nurture a safe and supportive environment.

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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CHANGING LIVES WITH THE OUTWARD BOUND REGIONAL SCHOOLS PROGRAMME

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OUTWARD BOUND


OUR IMPACT

We live in a world that is changing rapidly. Our youth are exposed to challenges that we could never have imagined and the road to health, happiness and success is far from straight forward. New Zealand is experiencing significant societal problems including rising mental health issues, obesity, cyber-bullying and environmental degradation to name a few. Our health providers are seeing record numbers of people accessing specialist mental health and addiction services and these services are under increasing pressure1. Numerous studies indicate the value of developing emotional skills at a young age. A recent study2 directly linked self-control, selfawareness, social skills and resilience in youth to mental and physical health, qualifications, income and mortality in adulthood. The recent Ministry of Education commissioned online survey Kōrero Mātauranga reached out to almost 2000 young Kiwis aged 5-18 years. Resilience and adaptability were identified by those surveyed as being crucial to responding and coping with a rapidly changing world3.

The OB Regional Schools Programme provides youth the invaluable opportunity to develop their own personal toolbox to guide them through life: ►

The inner strength to face difficult times, determination to achieve goals and a strong understanding of their personal values to guide decision making. Students learn how to respect and protect our natural environment and become a contributing member of their communities through service and teamwork.

Students are selected because they show potential and commitment at school, but they are not yet living the life they are fully capable of. These students do not have the financial resources to benefit from an opportunity like Outward Bound. The aim is to create future leaders who then return to their schools to share what they have learned with their school and wider community.

References: Regional Schools Programme Alumni, 2017-2018, Research New Zealand (2019). Outward Bound Long-Term Impact Research. Footnote 1: New Zealand Office of the Director of Mental Health Annual Report 2016. Footnote 2: Goodman, A, Joshi, H, Nasim, B, & Tyler C (2015) Social and emotional skills in childhood and their long-term effects on adult life. Institute of Education, University of London. Footnote 3: Education Conversation | Kōrero Mātauranga Online Survey, May 2019. OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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OUTWARD BOUND

REGIONAL SCHOOLS PROGRAMME Since its inception in 2005 the OB regional schools programme has been fostering genuine life skills for youth, and in 2017 we enlisted Research New Zealand to externally measure the programme’s long-term impact. Six months after the course all students, teachers and significant others are invited to complete an impact questionnaire. We are delighted to share with you an overview of these impact results and testimonials told through the eyes of our students, teachers and donors. We think it’s a compelling read, we hope you do too.

658

80

TOTAL STUDENTS TO DATE

SCHOOL COURSES BY REGIONS

TOTAL SCHOOLS INVOLVED

FAMILY FEEDBACK

KOTAHITANGA NORTHLAND

TANGAROA

HIRINGA

BAY OF PLENTY

AUCKLAND

KAWEKA HAWKE’S BAY

KOROWAI

HARAKEKE

“Since OB their child or family member has encouraged or motivated others to change their behaviour or attitude.”

WAIRARAPA

MANAWATU

PŌNEKE

TAU IHU

WELLINGTON

NELSON/MARLBOROUGH

TAKERE

CHRISTCHURCH OTAGO*

77

%

OF FAMILY SAY:

TAURAPA SOUTHLAND

* All Otago schools are supported through a separate programme funded by the Otago Community Trust.

“Rachel is now great at telling us she loves us. This comes from her without us prompting her.” Anon

ETHNICITY OF STUDENTS

AFRICAN

7

ASIAN

19

OTHER ETHNICITY MĀORI PACIFIC ISLANDER NZ EUROPEAN / PĀKEHĀ

12

OUTWARD BOUND

45 183 193 233


OUR IMPACT

IMPACT 6 MONTHS ON

96

%

OF STUDENTS AGREE: “The course has given me greater confidence in general.”

“We all learnt strategies to feed our minds with positivity, how to deal with challenges and find solutions to our personal problems. This knowledge served me well on course, but I have got the most from it now I’m home.” Tiana Edwards 2019 Kaweka course (Hawke’s Bay)

83%

OF STUDENTS AGREE: “The course helped me to bounce back quicker after a challenging experience.”

OF STUDENTS AGREE:

92

%

87%

“The course helped me to develop a more positive attitude and outlook on life - to live in the moment.”

OF STUDENTS AGREE: “The course encouraged me to improve my relationships with others.”

OF STUDENTS AGREE:

83%

“The course made me realise how important it is to help other people in my community.”

POSITIVE CHANGE

SELF CONFIDENCE

84%

SOCIAL COMPETENCE

82%

ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION

69%

SELF ESTEEM

88%

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

58%

VALUES AWARENESS

84%

SOCIAL SERVICE

75%

ENVIRONMENTAL ETHIC

79%

Regional Schools Programme Students 2008-2019, Personal Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ), Day 1 - 21 % Positive Change. N=446.

TEACHER FEEDBACK

“Our school is delighted with the programme and is very appreciative that generous sponsorship enables two students to have an opportunity of a lifetime. Thank you to all parties involved. The benefits to students who attend Outward Bound are huge and often life changing.” Teacher from Auckland Hiringa programme

92

%

50%

80%

OF TEACHERS SAY:

OF TEACHERS SAY:

OF TEACHERS SAY:

“Their student has more selfconfidence since completing their course.”

“Their student is better at communicating with a diverse range of people.”

“Their student is more physically active since completing their course.”

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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STUDENT STORY

PAIGE’S JOURNEY *Name has been changed to protect identity.

My name is Paige* I was always getting into trouble at school, so I was so surprised when my counsellor told me I’d been chosen to represent our school at Outward Bound. I thought there were so many others much better than me, but they chose me! My teachers said they could see I had potential - I just needed help to figure it out. They thought OB could build up my confidence and teach me some life skills. “ I was so excited. My only challenge would be convincing Mum to let me go. ” I live with my mum and my younger half-brother. I’m the one responsible for looking after him before and after school, and most weekends - whenever Mum wants to go out. When I told her, I wasn’t going to be there for three weeks we had a huge argument. She told me that Outward Bound would be too much for me and that I’d never be able to go because I just wasn’t up to it physically or mentally. She also asked how she was meant to cope without me there to look after my brother. She said I wasn’t allowed to go three weeks was too long away. But I was determined to go and not let the amazing opportunity pass by.

“I feel like I’ve raised myself, I don’t feel like my parents have been parents. My Mum was a wild teenager - she was into drugs and alcohol from an early age. When she was seventeen, she fell pregnant with me. My Dad was 20 years older than her.” “While I was growing up Mum was always doing drugs and alcohol. All I remember from my childhood was lying on my bed crying and asking Mum to stop arguing and drinking and being so loud. ” She would put me in my bed and tell me to stay there. I knew not to come out. There would always be lots of other people there - drunk and being noisy. There was no one else - Mum had moved away from her family when I was born. She had a falling out with her parents and siblings and I’ve never had anything to do with them.

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OUTWARD BOUND

I don’t see my Dad too often. He doesn’t do too much in the way of ‘feelings’ and doesn’t want to make problems - he likes an easy life. My Dad’s partner is really kind, she doesn’t like me living with Mum, she doesn’t think it’s safe. She’s asked my Dad about me living with them - but he’s never come to get me. I have no memories of Mum doing any routine things like giving me a bath or reading me a story. I started drinking and smoking at 11. I continued until I was 16, only stopping when I knew I’d been selected for OB. A friend of mine had a similar family experience to me so we hung out a lot and it was mostly her grandad who would buy the smokes and alcohol for us. I started seeing a guy when I was only 14 - he wasn’t good to me. It took me two years, time in hospital, and a counsellor to get away from him. I gathered up all my courage and told Mum she couldn’t stop me going to Outward Bound and she would have to sort out someone else to look after my brother while I was away. She knew she couldn’t stop me - nothing was going to stop me!


OUR IMPACT

“A highlight for me was the solo. I loved just chilling with the most beautiful view over bush and water. I could see the ferry go past and the stars at night. I had time to reflect on what had been happening to me at OB and where I wanted to go.” I just loved my instructors. I was able to open up to them about everything in my life and they were so supportive. I bawled my eyes out saying goodbye to everyone. I was so sad. I felt like I’d just met my own wee family and they were a happy stable family. Since returning, I’ve been keeping in regular contact with my new family through a group chat. We’re hoping to meet up again soon. We have such a strong bond; we’ve been through the hardest experiences together - we’ve seen each other at our best and worst. Being at Outward Bound showed me how happy I can be. I came back a lot more confident, I feel like I found out who I am and what I’m capable of. My Mum, school and friends are surprised to see the difference in me. I can’t stand being around smoking and drinking now. Since I returned my Mum treats me more like a flatmate. I’m in my final year of school and I really need her support, but she still just wants to party. My social worker is looking for alternative accommodation for me. It’s hard to believe she had me at the same age I am now. At school I’ve been given a student leadership role. I’m Peer Support Coordinator - responsible for student wellbeing. I love the role. I can relate to a lot of teenage problems. I’m like a mentor for younger students. Before OB I was ready to just stop and drop out of school and give up. I had no plans for a job.

Now I can see a pathway ahead of me. I’m going to finish Year 13 and then do a Diploma in Sustainable Outdoor Education. I’m also thinking that maybe I should get a teaching degree. I had the most amazing time at Outward Bound. My watch were all Year 12 students from schools in the same city I’m from. I quickly learnt not to judge someone by which school they’re at. We were all different yet had so much in common.

“ It’s just been amazing to do Outward Bound and I want to thank all the donors SO much for giving me this opportunity. I’ve been able to see my potential, know happiness, and feel like I belong. ”

We were all given the opportunity to develop our leadership skills. I got a bit carried away and became watch mother. Eventually our instructors told me to step back and let others have a go - well the very next morning we were late to PT, and yes, we paid for it - 100 press-ups!

I wish everyone could go to Outward Bound - I think the world truly would be a better place. Yours in adventure, Paige

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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A TEACHER’S PERSPECTIVE

HIRINGA Outward Bound’s Auckland schools course. Kathy Miln is the Gateway/Student Incentives Co-ordinator at Tamaki College in Glen Innes. She’s been sending students to Outward Bound for the past 17 years, and specifically on the Hiringa course since 2013. “We are a decile one school and have challenges and barriers with many of our students but if we can make them more rounded by giving them opportunities they wouldn’t necessarily be offered, then that’s brilliant. Every student is deserving.” Kathy says the impact of Hiringa on the students is enormous.

“Their self belief goes through the ceiling. Overcoming their fears and meeting challenges gives them confidence. They’re more driven and more focused.” Kathy says Outward Bound gives students a broader perspective on life. “Many realise there is a bigger world outside of Glen Innes. Meeting people and learning to trust them is definitely a learning curve. Pushing themselves outside their comfort zone mentally and physically with strangers are challenges, as is getting on a plane and leaving family for three weeks. But getting to know other people and facing challenges together is invaluable.” As well as being more focussed in the classroom, the students’ families also notice newly acquired independence and confidence at home. “They tell us their children are more motivated and help out more. I see them stepping up and taking leadership roles. Not all of them are superstars but they have all come a long way in their own right.”

“Outward Bound teaches our young people that anything is possible. We will send our students to Hiringa for as long as we are fortunate enough to have funding - it is definitely making a difference in their lives.” 16

OUTWARD BOUND

IMPACT 6 MONTHS ON

OF TEACHERS AGREE:

92

%

77%

“Their student has more self-confidence.” OF TEACHERS AGREE: “Their student is more motivated towards learning since their OB course. OF TEACHERS AGREE:

82%

“That Outward Bound had ‘a very positive impact’ on their student.

“Both our students volunteered for and were selected to be prefects for 2018. They have more confidence in what they can contribute. I don’t think they would have had the confidence to apply for the prefect positions prior to completing Outward Bound” Teacher from Christchurch

Takere programme


OUR IMPACT

A TEACHER’S PERSPECTIVE

KAWEKA Outward Bound’s Hawke’s Bay schools course. Hastings Girls’ High School deputy principal Phil Carmine has been at the school for 19 years, but it was only four years ago that the first of his students travelled to Anakiwa for the Kaweka course.

Hastings Girls’ High Deputy Principal Phil Carmine with students from the Kaweka course.

“We got lucky,” says Phil. “Outward Bound approached us and offered us the opportunity to be involved. Affordability for our students was a major barrier, but thanks to the course being funded by generous donors, this wonderful opportunity comes at very little, or no cost to our school.” Phil says selecting who goes is difficult, with many students vying for the chance. He has a “rigorous” selection policy, including a pre-requisite that prospective students demonstrate contributions they are making to their communities. “I am interested in them showing me what they’ve done already, not what they might do in the future. It shows integrity and commitment,” he says. The impact Phil sees when the students return is significant. “They have literally transformed. They are super-confident with heightened self-belief. In the three weeks they’ve been away, they’ve grown up.” “Every one of our students becomes a passionate advocate of Outward Bound. We’ve never had a student reluctant to endorse the benefits of the course.” Not only is Phil seeing positive transformations at school, parents are reporting to him that their children have also changed at home, for the better. “For most of our students this is a chance of a lifetime. We will definitely keep sending our young women to Kaweka as long as we are able.”

| 2019REPORT OUTWARD OUTWARD BOUND |BOUND 2019 ANNUAL ANNUAL REPORT 17

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A DONOR’S PERSPECTIVE

BEN GOUGH FAMILY FOUNDATION The Ben Gough Family Foundation (BGFF) has been supporting scholarships to Outward Bound for the past 11 years. This year, for the first time, BGFF trustees Ben and Pen Gough extended their support to fully funding ‘Takere’, an annual 21-day course available to fourteen Year 12 students from Canterbury schools. The Foundation sits within Ben and Pen’s business, family and philanthropic interests, fulfilling the family’s commitment to help communities flourish. For Ben, the drive to partner with Outward Bound came after his own personal encounter with experiential learning. “When I was 32 I sailed around the world and experienced a transformational “life moment”. When I returned to NZ, I looked for a way to allow others to learn in a similar way. Outward Bound is perfect as it takes young adults into challenging outdoor environments and teaches them lessons around teamwork, leadership and personal growth.” Ben says that in all aspects of the family’s endeavours they talk about “investing in courage” and unleashing potential. The same approach is applied to their business interests. “Our ambition is to see talented Kiwis achieve their potential in all areas of life. We see Outward Bound giving people courage and confidence. If every student has a moment of wonder or awe at their achievements both individually and collectively, if they can take a newfound sense of confidence to meet life’s challenges – then the course has been a success,” says Ben. “Through associations with organisations like Outward Bound, we aim to shape the lives of the next generation of leaders and grow the future of the Canterbury region - and New Zealand.”

18

2019 Takare students with their instructor Watson Green (left).

OUTWARD BOUND

Ben & Penny Gough of the Ben Gough Family Foundation who fund our Christchurch course Takare.


OUR IMPACT

A DONOR’S PERSPECTIVE

ACORN FOUNDATION Since 2003, the Acorn Foundation has been working in the Bay of Plenty region, connecting local people with causes they are passionate about, and who want to support people and projects in the area they live. Acorn has been supporting Outward Bound for over 10 years. Since the inception of the Tangaroa course in 2017, 42 students have attended Outward Bound on scholarships provided by a dedicated collective of donors. Acorn Foundation general manager Lori Luke says helping people to succeed in life is important to donors, as it is to the Foundation.

“Our donors are giving young people a hand up. They have a genuine desire to see these kids succeed and Outward Bound plays a vital role in that, giving them skills they’ll be able to use throughout their lives.”

Acorn Foundation donors with Tangaroa students, June 2019.

While the physical challenges on the course are one thing, Lori says the students talk most about the mental and emotional challenges they faced. “They push themselves to their limits on the course and the rewards are huge. They learn resilience and the value of their watch members and how to work together. They learn to dig deep during difficult times and discover their personal values. All of them come home motivated and focused. “Our partnership with Outward Bound is very important to us because our donors believe in the value of the programme. They know they are supporting a cause that sees real results”.

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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STUDENT TESTIMONIALS

LETTERS FROM OUR STUDENTS Over the past 10 years we have received hundreds of heart-warming thank you letters to our donors from the schools programme students. Often they are written while the student is on their solo where they have time to reflect on the special opportunity they have been gifted thanks to their sponsors. We feel privileged to share these with you.

“Without your kindness in providing the money to allow me to go on this course, I would not have been involved in this amazing opportunity and I would not have had the chance to discover myself.” Thank you so much for getting me to this Outward Bound course. This course has helped me to find myself again. I lost my dad in 2017 and ever t been able to find out since then I haven’ t known what to do with who I am. I haven’ doing what needs to be been have I myself, done and never anything more. This course has helped me to realise how lost I have been and helped me to work out the true me. While being away I have been shown my true potential.

“Thank you so much for allowing me to go on the incredible mental and physical journey that is Outward Bound.”

As I’m writing this I’m already halfway through my course, sitting in a forest by myself for the solo aspect of OB. During the solo I’ve come to realise a few things that I potentially would have never realised without OB.

Firstly, I’ve realised that I’m capable. Capable for the physical (PT, hiking, rowing), capable for the mental (solo, frustration, homesick), and capable to do things I would never considered (head girl, house captain, public things). I have realised that because I am capable, I can live, and be how I want to live. Whether that’s at school or home. I know I am capable to do better. Secondly, I have realised I’m confident. In speaking, in leading, and in completing the challenges set before me. Previously I would never have considered becoming the confident girl who isn’t afraid to take charge, be a good role model, or complete difficult challenges, mental or physical. So again, I would just like to thank you for allowing me to discover who I am, as well as realise the potential I have to be whoever I want to be. With much appreciation, Dargaville High School student

Without your kindness in the money to allow me to go on this course, I would not have been involved in this amazing opportunity and I would not have had the chance to discover myself. During my time at Outward Bound I have done some great activities and met some amazing people. I have been able to spend 3 weeks away from social media to help me to discover myself. Rosehill College student

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OUTWARD BOUND

, “I had a sense of strength and confidednce to, knowing that whatever I put my mins and I will accomplish it. Many thank you t.” I am truly grateful for your suppor


OUR IMPACT

To the people that made it possible for me to be here, I would like to say thank you. Not only have you given me the opportunity to be here, but the opportunity to meet new people, try new things, create new bonds, take risks, appreciate failure and celebrate success.

“All these adventures were made possible thanks to you and I could not thank you enough.”

Some highlights from this course is that I got to captain a sailboat through a storm. Without Outward Bound and your sponsorship, I would never have been given the chance to do something like that. I’ve learnt to appreciate the little things in life by being here. Like warm showers. They are only ever given out sparingly and I was grateful for every second I spent standing under warm/ hot water. It’s these little things I have learnt to appreciate and it all combined to make my experience here at Outward Bound just a tad bit better. All these adventures were made possible thanks to you and I could not thank you enough. The life lessons I have made on this course will forever stick to me and I am glad that you were able to make it possible. Thank you, Catholic Cathedral College student

amazing I would just like to thank you for this donation/ ed eciat appr much your experience. Without t so learn have I . today here be sponsor I would not for others and much such as self respect, respect onment. envir the of care how to take and The people in my group are amazing our g hopin am I BOP in as all being based ing. grow keep will friendships

as since Once again I would like to thank you a little bit my parents divorced we have been with low on money. My dad has been living ut your friends, family or in his car. So witho able to come generosity, I would never have been NZ. and experience this amazing part of Cheers, Otumoetai College student

Course highlight!

Dear Kaweka Funding Group I want to thank you for giving me the opportunity to attend an Outward Bound course!! Currently I am on my third to last day and I have learnt and experienced so much in such little time. One of the many things I have learnt is that there really is more in me than what I thought there was. An example of this is shown when one of our schemes came to the rock climbing. My worst fear apart from spiders is heights. My first goal when I was asked “what do I want to achieve in this scheme” by my watchmate Rob, I replied with “halfway is my goal.” Little did I know I would be challenged by another challenge of climbing all the way to the top of the cliff blindfolded! With little faith I took one step at a time and slowly my confidence began to build. I remember the feeling of touching the metal beam at the top and removing the blindfold. I had a sense of strength and confidence, knowing that whatever I put my mind to, I will accomplish it. Many thank yous and I am truly grateful for your support. Karamu High School student

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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SOUTHERN CROSS FOSTERING INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING First year university student Dima Alsheikh recently completed an Outward Bound ‘Southern Cross’ course; her experience was so profound she is passing the baton on to her younger siblings in the hope they too will discover there is ‘more in them’. The Baghdad-born student and her family emigrated to New Zealand three years ago, when Dima was 18. “Iraq was experiencing many conflicts and wars, it was 2006 and I was seven when my parents decided to move to Syria, which was a beautiful and safe place to live for a while, but quickly became dangerous because it was so close to Iraq and we needed to leave. The decision was made to come to New Zealand,” explains Dima. While her family remains in Auckland, Dima relocated earlier this year to Dunedin to study Health Science at Otago University. She enrolled in the Outward Bound course to learn and explore aspects of her “new home”. “A family friend told me everyone in New Zealand wants to do an Outward Bound course. She also told me it is physically demanding and that my phone will be taken away for 21 days! But I wanted to push myself physically as well as mentally. I have lived most of my life in a third world country where it is dangerous and basics like water and electricity are not readily available. While you also go without similar things at Outward Bound, feeling secure and being in a safe environment meant I could enjoy the experience and all the challenges.”

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“I gained lots of confidence, being social and making new friends. I also learned how to be more patient, both with others and myself.” The annual 21-day Southern Cross course is hosted in conjunction with the Human Rights Commission to connect students and to build a network of emerging young leaders from diverse backgrounds. The students take on a range of activities, both as teams and individuals, to push their boundaries and discover who they are and what they stand for. The students represented different ethnicities, genders, ideologies, sexual orientation and socio-economic status. Dima was put forward for the course by Refugees As Survivors, who also sponsored her travel to Anakiwa. Dima says while all of her watch members were from different religious backgrounds and cultures, there were many similarities between them. “My Outward Bound journey taught me that there will always be people who will accept you as you are. All my watch members were from different religious backgrounds and cultures, and held different beliefs, but we still cooked together, slept in the same room and laughed together. We chose to focus on the similarities between us, not our differences. Through them I learned many things about New Zealand culture and also learned how to count from one to ten in other languages. Each person taught me something special about their culture.” The Southern Cross watch mates all still keep in touch through a Facebook group and recently Dima went to Auckland for a catch-up dinner in the city. “It was very uplifting to talk to them and remember the crazy days we lived through!”


In the month following Dima’s return from Outward Bound the devastating terrorist event occurred in Christchurch, the effects of which are still being felt by her and her family.

“The Human Rights Commission is committed to protecting and promoting human rights and harmonious relations in New Zealand. The Southern Cross course brings together a melting pot of people, cultures and languages for 21 days and reflects the diversity we need to embrace as we continue the work of building a harmonious society in New Zealand. The experience epitomises the hope that can come from a small group of committed people embracing and operationalising harmonious relations in New Zealand.” ►

Rebekah Armstrong

Advisory and Research Manager, NZ Human Rights Commission

“My mother still feels scared walking down the street with her headscarf on, which makes me so sad. As a family we felt scared, shocked and unsafe. My parents know some of the families who lost loved ones. However, I know that the majority of New Zealanders are not racist nor Islam-phobic and we have received lots of support and love from our friends, neighbours and people in the community. Dima also says that her time at Outward Bound has definitely made her more resilient. “Every time something bad happens at university or in my new life in Otago, I remember how resilient I was in Anakiwa. I keep reminding myself that I can do it!” At Outward Bound, Dima says she also learned some valuable life lessons about cultural differences.

“We are all humans and are essentially all the same. We helped each other without thinking about any differences in our backgrounds. I remember those moments and they gave me hope after the terrorist attack.” Dima wants to pass on the positive influence and learnings from her time at Outward Bound to her younger brothers and is helping them to fundraise. “I really want them to learn what I learned and the importance and value of many things in life that we barely appreciate.” Dima’s hope for the future is simple; “That New Zealand will continue to combine all cultures and religions and make a beautiful place to live together with supportive people, just as my group did at Outward Bound.”

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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OB ADAPTED COURSE

GRETCHEN MAWSON’S STORY For Gretchen Mawson, signing up for an eight-day Outward Bound course was a leap of faith. Only seven months earlier she had received a devastating Parkinson’s diagnosis, and in March this year, she found herself scaling rock faces and launching herself off a jetty into the ocean. The Auckland mother of two and full time florist was diagnosed in 2018 with Parkinson’s, just before her 42nd birthday. It was through joining Upbeat, a support group for people with early-onset Parkinson’s, that Gretchen learned about the adapted course Outward Bound had specially designed for people living with the disease. “While I’m still coming to grips with the impact the disease is going to have on my life, Outward Bound was a silver lining in a very grey cloud,” says Gretchen. Gretchen first realised something was amiss in early 2018, when she developed stiffness and pain on her right side and a tremor in her hand, but put it down to her stressful and physically demanding job. After acupuncture, physiotherapy and chiropractor treatments didn’t help, she sought the advice of specialists, who confirmed a Parkinson’s diagnosis. “I was devastated and cried for a whole weekend - I thought my life was over. Being diagnosed at 41 really knocked me. Some days I’m so busy with work and family I don’t think about the disease but other days it really affects me.” On the Outward Bound course Gretchen was the youngest in her watch, with the eldest aged 71. “Meeting people with Parkinson’s and getting to know their stories and about their lives was amazing,” she says. “You realise that we are not simply defined by our symptoms. “At Outward Bound I learned I can achieve anything I put my mind to. The biggest challenge for me was the high ropes course, but it was also the most rewarding once I’d successfully completed it. I’d never done anything like that before. I have belief in myself and while my diagnosis really knocked my confidence, the course gave it back in spades,” she says.

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OUTWARD BOUND

Since returning from Anakiwa, Gretchen has left her high-stress job and now works in a local floral boutique. She’s also joined a gym and regularly cycles and attends Pilates classes. The friends she made on the course have set up a Facebook page so they can all keep in touch.

“After Outward Bound, I realised life is for living and I still need to live mine. Parkinson’s can just come along for the ride.”

The annual ‘UpBeat’ course for people with early-onset Parkinson’s has been running since 2007, with 174 people taking up the challenge over the past 12 years. ►

Outward Bound’s Research & Development Manager Kelly Hamilton says it is no different to other courses - the activities and challenges are largely the same - except for the fact the group share a diagnosis although she’s quick to point out that Parkinson’s is not the focus.

“It is our aim that every New Zealander can do a course, no matter their ability. Building confidence, resilience and trust, and being able to understand yourself is what makes it really special,” she says.


OB PROFESSIONAL COURSE

SARAH SCOTT’S STORY How Outward Bound Professional inspired a lawyer to partnership. Sarah Scott, a partner at Simpson Grierson in Christchurch, has been practising law since being admitted in 2007. Before she made partner, Sarah completed an OB Professional, 8 day experience which combines the aspects of a traditional course with leadership theory and facilitation. As she explains, her experience in 2014 has filtered into and influenced many aspects of her professional life. “The course was certainly designed to challenge our thinking on leadership: how to lead, how others respond to different leadership styles, and also how you conduct yourself in a team,” she says. She wasn’t intimidated by the physical demands of the outdoor side of the course as that’s an environment she is confident in. But there were plenty of mental challenges to overcome.

Before everyone embarked on course, they have to do what is known as a ‘360’ where work colleagues who are professionally above, below, or at the same level, provide anonymous feedback on their experience with the Outward Bounder. A client’s perspective was also sought. Personality types were also assessed and Sarah came back as ‘a doer’, meaning that she liked to get things done.

“What you learn is that you need a mix of personalities to have a really effective working group. Outward Bound teaches you this.” Reflecting on those skills in relation to her work, Sarah says she learned that as a leader she needs to step back and allow the people in her team to put forward their view, so that they can have a healthy debate and collectively work out a way to solve a problem or create a project. Something Sarah Scott had been contemplating before the Outward Bound course was whether she might pursue joining the partnership at Simpson Grierson.

Sarah diving in Zanzibar, Tanzania.

“You’re working with team members, who are one or two dayold friends. They’re opening up on some pretty tough personal issues and sometimes seeking guidance on these issues,” she says. The unpredictability also took time to get used to, yet time wasn’t in abundance and she had to adapt quickly. Having no idea or input into what came next was very much outside of Sarah’s normal professional life at the law firm. “In my job, I have a team and clients who have expectations and deadlines. You need to be organised. Although very few days at work generally happen as planned as clients’ and team needs generally come first. But you do tend to have some control over it. So not knowing what was coming up next at Outward Bound was hard. But about halfway through the course I was loving it and the digital detox was just awesome,” she says.

“Outward Bound was a decisive moment. I’ve never been the best goal setter, instead grabbing opportunities and seeing where they take me. Outward Bound forced me to make some hard decisions on whether I wanted a partnership in a commercial firm. She says it was inspiring because it gave her courage, confidence and drive to go for it. “Some of my colleagues have 30 years’ experience as partners. You go through thoughts such as how could they want me in the room?” “But what I realised was that was not why they wanted me in the partnership. They wanted me because of who I am, my life experiences, my perspectives on things. They wanted me because I was Sarah Scott, not because I was someone else. That was probably the biggest thing I took away from going through the Outward Bound course,” she says.

Condensed version of Feb 2019 Lawtalk article by Nick Butcher. www.lawsociety.org.nz

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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DICK HUBBARD’S LASTING LEGACY Last year was a one of milestones for 70-year-old OB Alumni Dick Hubbard. He sold his famed Hubbards cereal business, started planning a motorbike journey from Japan to London via Russia with wife Diana, and stood down from the board of Outward Bound and chair of Project Refresh Anakiwa after twenty-two years of service.

“Anakiwa is a very special place where the soul of the Outward Bound experience resides. It is important that we are appropriate guardians of this special place and that includes looking after the very hard working physical assets on site. As we look to the future, we need to fund not only maintaining but appropriately future proofing the facilities at Anakiwa.” So what does Dick’s future look like? Well slowing down doesn’t play a part! In 2004 Dick’s wife Diana completed an Outward Bound course and together they now share a love of adventure. “Some six years ago we started riding around the world on our motorbike and we have now travelled about 180,000 km two-up - Diana as pillion passenger - visiting 63 countries. We believe we are the oldest couple in the world to have travelled two-up around the world on a motorbike. This year we travel by motorbike from Japan to London via Russia and the Silk Route countries. “You’re never too old to have adventures. Outward Bound does not guarantee or even promise eternal youth. But it certainly fosters it, encourages it and helps fulfil it. I have so many thanks to Outward Bound for what it has done for me and my life.”

Kia Kaha Dick. All thanks go to you.

Dick Hubbard, 22 Scott, 1964. (2nd from the right, front row).

As a then fresh faced 18-year-old from Paeroa, Dick attributes his Outward Bound experience in 1964, to much of his success and decision making throughout his career. “Outward Bound in my opinion saved Hubbard Foods in its fledgling years. The first two years were rough. We came close to losing the company not long after we started. It was the lessons I learned at Outward Bound about perseverance, mental toughness and pushing personal limits that got us through those first few years.” Not long after, Dick tentatively offered two Outward Bound Scholarships through the cereal box newsletter. At the time it went against all marketing norms. It was a huge success. The response was overwhelming with over 5000 entries received, many with moving stories attached. It was at that point that Dick realised how the Hubbard’s philosophy of conducting business with a social responsibility, very much linked to the values base of Outward Bound. To celebrate this alignment, Dick launched the Outward Bound breakfast cereal that is still available in supermarkets nationwide. “Sales from the OB cereal have raised about $2 million in sponsorship money from Hubbard’s to Outward Bound which is something I am personally very proud of,” says Dick. Another contribution to the organisation that Dick sees as a highlight is Project Refresh Anakiwa, the campaign that has raised $3 million to refurbish the school. 26

OUTWARD BOUND

Dick Hubbard with Andrew Smith, OBNZ Board and Vic Koller, Maintenance Manager in front of the new double watchhouse.

PROJECT REFRESH ANAKIWA UPDATE Project Refresh Anakiwa continues to future-proof our delivery in Anakiwa; ensuring Kiwis for years to come will take life-changing journeys at this special site. The past 12 months have seen the opening of the double watch house, refurbishment of the Tortuga launch, completion of an accessible floating jetty and pontoon at Te Kainga (TK) and the commencement of work on the Levene Lodge, (named after our patron Sir David Levene) the sustainably designed accommodation block for OB staff. We are deeply grateful to our donor community who continue to support the future of Outward Bound for years to come.


THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS

Andrew & Jenny Smith

Faber Family

Thanksgiving Trust

A N Matheson Trust Acorn Foundation Andrew Bowker Bernard Ferguson Adventure School Fund Bob & Liane Leeming Breadcraft Limited Chris Jillett Trust Clova Trust Colenso Charitable Trust Constellation Brands Constellation Trust Department of Conservation Diabetes NZ Dick & Diana Hubbard Drage Fund E W Johnson Scholarship Eastern and Central Community Trust Estate of E P Wilding Estate of Malcolm Sewell Estate of Marjorie Coombes Estate of Moana Wi-Neera Estate of Robert Granger Estate of Roger Hall Estate of Shona Spencer FINDEX Community Fund Frances Burdett Scholarship GFS (Girl’s Friendly Society) Garry Mooney Scholarships Gawith Deans Scholarships Geoff Simons Endowment

George Mason Charitable Trust H R Hornsby Memorial Scholarship Helen and Reginald Smith Hyundai Motors NZ Ltd ICIB I Have A Dream Foundation Invercargill Licensing Trust James Plummer Memorial Trust John Hebron Fund K E Reynolds Endowment K More Trust Kāpura Kingdom Foundation Kowhai Trust Kupe 254 Scholarship Les McGreevy Lion Foundation Lions Club of Akaroa and Bays Marlborough First Light Foundation Mike Abbott Trust Moore Markhams Morley Sutherland Fund Mount Riley Wineries Naomi Craig Napier Masonic District Trust Nat Craig Nigel & Jen Hughes NZRPG Management LTD Outward Bound Hawke’s Bay Fund Pip Duncalf

Peter & David Picot Charitable Trust Paul O’Brien Trust Roy McKenzie Special Fund Rātā Foundation Robin & Bill Kermode Ronaki Scholarships Rotary Club of Auckland Rotary Club of Napier Rotary Club of Newmarket Rotary Club of Port Nicholson Rotary Club Rotorua Sunshine Round Table Tauranga St Matthew’s Collegiate Sutherland Self Help Trust Tai Shan Foundation T G Macarthy Trust TSB Community Trust The Colin Francis Children’s Charity The Douglas Charitable Trust The Trusts Community Foundation Timaru Boys’ High School Endowment Fund Trust House Foundation Trustlands Trust Greytown Wairarapa Endowment Fund Wallace Development Company Limited Wellington Community Trust West Coast Community Trust Whanganui Restorative Justice Trust Winton & Margaret Bear Charitable Trust Vogther Family Trust

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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FINANCIAL OVERVIEW OF

THE TRUST

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE Subsidised course fees and donations

4,576,099

Course fees and other income

2,793,847

Operating expenditure Surplus

(6,727,349)

642,597

FINANCIAL POSITION Current assets

2,170,835

Non current assets

7,118,867

Current liabilities Net assets

6,731,485

Accumulated funds

2,131,467

Equity reserves

4,600,018

Total equity

28

(2,558,217)

OUTWARD BOUND

6,731,485


FINANCIAL OVERVIEW OF

THE FOUNDATION THIS YEAR WE GRANTED $838,699 FOR STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS FROM THE OUTWARD BOUND FOUNDATION, HELPING ANAKIWA BECOME A REALITY FOR MORE NEW ZEALANDERS.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE Donations and bequests

139,916

Revenue from investments

1,445,717

Financial assistance to Trust

(838,699)

Other expenses

(119,944)

Surplus

626,990

FINANCIAL POSITION Current assets Non current assets Current liabilities Net assets Accumulated funds Endowment funds Specific funds Total equity

423,681 17,700,587 (5,692)

18,118,576 (53,012) 18,695,727 (524,139)

18,118,576 OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

29


OUR FINANCES Charities Registration The parent and subsidiary are both registered as charitable entities under the Charities Act 2005. Outward Bound Trust CC34682 Outward Bound Foundation CC22777

Purpose of entities Outward Bound Trust of New Zealand, incorporated in November 1997 under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957, is the operational arm of the Group and includes all revenue and expenditure associated with promoting, administering and running all courses. Outward Bound Trust of New Zealand Foundation, incorporated in October 2001 under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957, is the funding arm for the Trust. Income and capital from the Endowment and Special Funds held within the Foundation are available to the Trust for financial assistance of student scholarships, and for operational grants in support of running Outward Bound courses.

Notes There have been three sets of financial statements prepared and audited for the year ended 30 June 2019 - Outward Bound Trust of New Zealand (Trust), Outward Bound Trust of New Zealand Foundation (Foundation) and for the consolidated Group (Group). The information is applicable to all three entities. The full financial statements, which are presented in New Zealand dollars, have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand (NZ GAAP). They comply with Public Benefit Entity International Public Sector Accounting Standards (“PBE IPSAS”) and other applicable financial reporting standards as appropriate that have been authorised for use by the External Reporting Board for Not-For-Profit entities.

The financial information has been extracted from the full financial statements for the year ending 30 June 2019, as signed and approved by the Board on 21 August 2019. The Group’s auditors, Grant Thornton, have issued an unqualified opinion for all three entities. The financial information shown in the Annual Report is an extraction only. It is not intended that the information be classed as Summary Financial Accounts under PBE FRS43 of the Financial Reporting Act 2013. Further details of the financial position, performance and cash flows are provided in the full financial statements. Copies of these are available on request. Contact us at governance@outwardbound.co.nz

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OUTWARD BOUND


OUR WHÄ€NAU PATRON

GUARDIANS

Sir David Levene

Julie Jones Brien Mahoney

TRUST BOARD Grant Faber (President) Andrew Smith (Deputy)

Russell Moller Sir David Tompkins Marshall Wright

Glenys Coughlan (Resigned due to health Dec 18) Dick Hubbard (Retired Feb 19)

ADVISORS

Hilary Sumpter

Solicitor: Holland Beckett

Tim Watts

Auditor: Grant Thornton

Steve Cole

Insurance Broker: ICIB Insurance Brokers

Gavin Schiller (Appointed Dec 18)

FINANCE COMMITTEE

EXTERNAL SAFETY AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE (ESAC)

Tim Watts (Chair)

Gavin Schiller (Past ESAC Chair & Outward Bound Board Member)

Glenys Coughlan (Resigned due to health Dec 18)

Dick Hubbard (Past ESAC Chair & Outward Bound Board Member - retired Feb 19)

Andrew Smith

Mark Smith (AdventureMark Auditor, Ropes Specialist and Chairperson Register of

Grant Faber

Outdoor Safety Auditors)

Mark Lewis (Rock and Bush Specialist, Head of Talent, Leadership & Capability,

FOUNDATION BOARD Andrew Smith (Chair) Grant Faber Dynes Fulton Brien Mahoney John Patterson David Tibby Tim Watts Fiona Mackenzie

HONORARY VICE PRESIDENTS Ivan Emirali

Christchurch DHB)

John Patterson (Legal Advisor, Past President of Outward Bound) Dr Nick Binns (Screening and Emergency Medicine Specialist) Phil Bishop (Sea Operations Specialist)

COUNCILLORS Gerald Lanning (Co-Chair) Tracey Hancock (Co-Chair) Marina Adams Claire Anderson Anne Beex Howie Barnes Bonnie Bolton-Roger Rachel Cassaidy

KURT HAHN AWARD RECIPIENTS

William Day

Dick Hubbard (2013)

Grant Faber

Ron Faber (2014)

Brandon McCarthy

Sir David Levene (2018)

David Montgomerie

Dave Tibby (2018)

Tim Watts

OUTWARD BOUND | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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Kotahi te hoe, ka ĹŤ te waka ki uta. Paddling in unison, the waka will reach land.

Freephone 0800 688 927 | Phone +64 04 472 3440 | Email info@outwardbound.co.nz 3 Queens Wharf, PO Box 25274, Wellington 6146, New Zealand

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Profile for OutwardBoundNewZealand

Outward Bound New Zealand - 2019 Annual Report  

Our 2019 Annual Report celebrates the highlights of the past 12 months.

Outward Bound New Zealand - 2019 Annual Report  

Our 2019 Annual Report celebrates the highlights of the past 12 months.