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COMPLIMENTARY

JUNE 2018 | VOL. 9, ISSUE 6

Homegrown

NC

Serving the Sandhills & Southern Piedmont |

JUNE 2018 |

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OUTREACHNC.COM


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features Homegrown NC Issue

JUNE 2018

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41

A Fishy State

Homegrown in North Carolina

by James J. Hatfield

by Meagan Burgad with intro by Corbie Hill

26 From the Navy to the Green by Meagan Burgad

30 Birding in NC: Uwharrie National Forest by Ray Linville

34 Where The Future Grows by Corbie Hill

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48 Carolina Conversations with Author Patsy Ann Odom by Michelle Goetzl

55 Cancer Immunotherapy Ins and Outs by Jennifer Webster


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departments June 2018

“NC State University graduates are out standing in their fields.”

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—CLASSIC NORTH CAROLINA JOKE, SOURCE UNKNOWN

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19

advice & health

life

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Ask the Expert by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA

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12

Brain Health by Karen D. Sullivan, PhD, ABPP

19

Reader’s Nook by Michelle Goetzl

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Planning Ahead by Tim Hicks, RICP®, APMA®

20

Cooking Simple by Andy Fradenburgh

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Home Staging by Kasia McDaniel

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Grey Matter Games Sudoku, Word Search & Crossword Puzzles

54

Resource Marketplace Find the resources you need.

Over My Shoulder by Ann Robson

62

Role Reversal by David Hibbard

64 66

Genealogy by Ashley Eder

Generations by Corbie Hill & Michelle Goetzl

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from the editor

For probably two years, I woke up to the same music every single morning. It started out bold, with the brassy wash of a gong and a lone saxophone’s rich and enigmatic invocation, before sinking into an understated groove. I’ve always had this habit of half-sleeping through the alarm (in this, I’m my wife’s polar opposite), which was especially pleasant for those years I started every morning with John Coltrane’s A Love Supreme. From the refined and meditative “Acknowledgement” to the desperately, deeply plaintive “Psalm,” it is a perfect half-hour of music. And its creator, the mercurial and prolific Coltrane, was born in Hamlet.

You hold in your hands our “Homegrown NC” issue, and what sticks in my head as an NC native (and lifelong resident) is that “Homegrown NC” can mean any number of things. It can mean the genre-busting musical somersaults of Coltrane or Thelonious Monk, or it can mean the pop genius of Duke Ellington’s composer, bandleader and close friend Billy Strayhorn. It can mean Elizabeth Cotten, Emmylou Harris or The Avett Brothers. It can mean the advanced meds and technology that come out of RTP, or it can mean Thomasville furniture. It can mean an urban childhood in Charlotte or Durham or it can mean a barefoot-inthe-sticks upbringing hours from any interstate. It can mean hang gliding on Jockey’s Ridge or it can mean rock climbing at Devil’s Courthouse. It can mean time-tested heirloom varieties of tomato, green bean and persimmon or as-yet unpatented redbud hybrids currently in development at the Sandhills Research Station in rural Montgomery County. It can mean Pepsi, Cheerwine or Krispy Kreme. It can mean anything. To that end, we’d like you to enjoy the following stories about a few people, places and innovations that help make North Carolina what it is. This is not the complete picture of our fair state – not by a long shot – but it doesn’t pretend to be. This is a sampler, rather, designed to whet your curiosity and your appetite. We hope you find your own North Carolina, and please share it with us when you do. Thank you for picking up OutreachNC, and I’ll see you in July.

- Corbie Hill

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Editor-in-Chief Corbie Hill | Editor@OutreachNC.com Creative Director Kim Gilley | The Village Printers Creative & Graphic Designer Sarah McElroy | The Village Printers Ad Designers Stephanie Budd, Cyndi Fifield, Nikki Lienhard, Sarah McElroy Proofreaders Ashley Eder, Kate Pomplun Photography Brady Beck, Diana Matthews, Mollie Tobias Contributors Meagan Burgad, Ashley Eder, Andy Fradenburgh, Michelle Goetzl, James Hatfield, David Hibbard, Tim Hicks, Corbie Hill, Ray Linville, Kasia McDaniel, Amy Natt, Ann Robson, Karen Sullivan, Jennifer Webster

Y Publisher Amy Natt | AmyN@AgingOutreachServices.com Marketing & Public Relations Director Susan McKenzie | SusanM@AgingOutreachServices.com Advertising Sales Executive Ashley Haddock | AshleyH@OutreachNC.com 910-690-9102 Circulation 910-692-0683 | info@OutreachNC.com

READER INPUT

OutreachNC appreciates all kinds of reader comments. Many readers, for instance, thank us for publisher Amy Natt’s “Ask the Expert” column, which provides level-headed, practical advice to tough or unexpected questions. Some readers try every “Cooking Simple” recipe, while others get a kick out of the kids’ responses to our “Generations” questions. And sometimes feedback comes in the form of tough questions, and the toughest one is “Where’s Jeeves?” First off, don’t worry: Jeeves, our office cat (and previously the magazine’s assistant editor), is perfectly happy and healthy. He hasn’t completely warmed to our most recent editor just yet. Maybe he doesn’t like Corbie’s tattoos – who knows? What we do know is that Jeeves is still keeping busy and is still pulling his weight around Aging Outreach Services. Last we saw, he was supervising the finishing touches on our new annex building. Our readers are important to us – without them, there’s no magazine – and Jeeves, intrepid gentleman that he is, is important to our readers. As such, we’ll check in with him from time to time.

OutreachNC PO Box 2478 | 676 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28388 910-692-9609 Office | 910-695-0766 Fax info@OutreachNC.com

www.OutreachNC.com

OutreachNC is a publication of The entire contents of OutreachNC are copyrighted by Aging Outreach Services. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial, photographic or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. OutreachNC is published monthly on the first of each month.

JUNE 2018 |

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advice

Our Aging Life Care ProfessionalsTM will answer any aging questions you may have.

Email us your questions! info@OutreachNC.com

ASK THE EXPERT

Thinking Through Pet Ownership by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA

My mom is 82 years old and lives alone in her home of 30 years. My dad passed away two years ago, and mom has been talking about getting a pet to keep her company. She had dogs growing up and likes the idea of having a companion. I am just not sure she will be able to take care of a pet. Any suggestions?

Pets can indeed make excellent companions; however, with pet ownership comes a great deal of responsibility. It is understandable that your mom feels a void in the home and would be looking to fill that gap. You are in a great position to help her logically think through her decision. On the positive side, pets have been shown to be a source of joy and companionship to older adults. Emotionally, research has shown benefits to having these furry companions, including less depression and loneliness. Some studies have shown physical benefits as well, such as increased physical exercise (walking the dog) and lowered blood pressure (stress relief). However, there are some potential negatives to be aware of. Animals tend to get underfoot, and thus there is an increased fall risk. Leashes can easily get tangled around feet and ankles. Some pets tend to run, and chasing after that pet can potentially lead to falls as well. It is important to consider your mom’s mobility when thinking about pet ownership.

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The National Council for Aging (AginginPlace. org), promotes pet adoption for seniors. They list the top six reasons as: Calmness: A pet can relieve stress and anxiety. Companionship: A person will not be alone. Daily Exercise: Establishing a healthy routine. Purpose: A pet can add meaning to life and make a person feel needed. Security: Thieves are less likely to rob a house with a barking dog. Staying Social: Taking a pet on walks or to public places including the vet, groomer, pet store and dog park promotes socialization.

There are adoption programs that will help match seniors to the ideal pet. Many times, these are older pets. If the pet is not a good fit, many organizations will take them back. This would be key if she chose to go this route. It is important to have a backup plan for the potential pet. If your mom’s health or living situation changes, who will care for it? If your mom has a disability, a service dog might also be an option. Many facilities and community centers have pet therapy programs that might be beneficial as well.


Here are some other points of discussion to consider: 1. Is the environment conducive to the pet? Is a fenced yard (or another special accommodation) needed? 2. What will the related expense for pet care be? Is this realistic for your mom’s budget? 3. As mom gets older, who will care for the pet? What is your succession plan? 4. Who will the vet be? How will the animal get there if mom no longer drives? Ultimately, to work it needs to be a good fit for mom and the pet. If this is not the case, then maybe one of these alternatives would be better: 1. Consider a robo-pet for companionship: robotshop.com/en/hasbro-golden-pup-interactiverobot-toy-dog.html

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2. Have your mom volunteer at a local animal shelter or pet boarding facility. 3. Set up visits with a local therapy dog owner who can provide home visits. 4. Inquire about a neighbor or friend who might need some help pet-sitting from time to time. There are many emerging programs that involve pets and older adults. Talk to your local senior center, community center, or area agency on aging to find out what might be available in your mom’s area. You might find that there is a solution to get your mom the companionship she desires from a pet without having to tackle the full responsibilities of becoming a pet owner.

Readers may send questions to Amy Natt, an Aging Life Care ProfessionalTM, certified senior advisor and CEO of Aging Outreach Services. She can be reached at amyn@agingoutreachservices.com .

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health

B R A I N H E A LT H

Better Coping after a Medical Crisis

M

by Karen D. Sullivan, PhD, ABPP Pinehurst Neuropsychology and the I CARE FOR YOUR BRAIN with Dr. Sullivan Program

edical crises can be emotionally traumatic experiences. Historically, traumatic stress related mood disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been thought of as occurring after an external event, such as war, sexual assault, natural disaster or car accident. However, in the past 10 to 15 years, these stress conditions have been increasingly recognized by psychologists as occurring following any event, including those that happen within us. It is now understood that a range of medical diagnoses, including cancer, cardiac arrest, traumatic fall and stroke are emotionally traumatic. A highly traumatic event is defined as any experience that involves the threat of death or serious injury, particularly when sudden or unexpected, that results in intense fear or feelings of helplessness. If we do not acknowledge traumatic stress symptoms as an aspect of a medical crisis, we miss an opportunity to provide complete care and optimize recovery. Following a medical crisis, there is a range of “normal” emotional reactions. Most commonly, these include shock (“I can’t believe this has happened”), fear (feeling more vulnerable naturally leads to fear), self-

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blame (“Why didn’t I do more to prevent this?”) and guilt (remorse that the person in crisis is burdening his or her loved ones with caregiving needs). The time to get concerned is when these emotions are very high in intensity, worsen over time (particularly three months following the event) or interfere with recovery (refusing to do physical therapy). Four main symptom clusters characterize traumatic stress disorders: re-experiencing (re-living the event in your waking mind or in nightmares; Feeling as though the event is happening again), avoidance (avoiding situations, people or thoughts that remind you of the traumatic event), emotional numbness (feeling cut off from others, reluctance to discuss the event, avoiding reminders of the event) and hyperarousal (feeling “wound up” and “on alert”). Serious mood symptoms that don’t go away over time following a medical crisis are associated with poorer outcomes (less physical recovery and less return of independence) and reduced quality of life for both the person directly affected and his or her loved ones, especially caregivers.


Five Tips to Support Emotional Processing Following a Medical Crisis Encourage your loved ones to talk about their feelings as soon as they are able. Don’t

avoid talking about what has happened because you don’t want to stress the person. Ask them how they feel. Are they scared, worried or angry? Be mindful to not let talk about procedures and medications be the only conversation topics during a hospital stay or early recovery. Be particularly sensitive if the person has a history of trauma.

Emphasize safety and security. When unpredictable things happen, we naturally brace ourselves for another blow. This tension can make us feel vulnerable and afraid. During these times, we need reassurance and predictability. Remind the person that they are being well taken care of by experts. Keep a dependable schedule of daily events as best you can. Use as much reassuring touch as the person is comfortable with. Normalize tears even if that’s not “normal” for that person. Tears contain stress hormones and

their release can really help in emotional processing. Prioritize sleep. One of the functions of sleep

is to help us “make sense” of our daily experiences, especially those that are traumatic in nature. Think of it as free therapy! Don’t hesitate to call in a mental health professional, particularly if the person makes global negative statements about himself or herself and his or her future. People who strongly

endorse statements such as “I have permanently changed for the worse,” “I feel alone and different from other people now” or “The world now feels like a scary and unpredictable place” are significantly more likely to meet criteria for a mood disorder over the following weeks to months following a trauma. Mental health professionals can be essential in helping someone process a significant stressor, like a medical crisis, and their services are covered by most insurance policies.

Dr. Karen Sullivan, a clinical neuropsychologist at Pinehurst Neuropsychology, can be reached at 910-420-8041 or by visiting www.pinehurstneuropsychology.com .

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life GENEALOGY

North Carolina Roots by Ashley Eder

A

s a transplant to the Sandhills from Buffalo, NY, I had never considered the prospect of uncovering North Carolina ancestors while researching my roots. I was firmly under the impression that all of my ancestors had arrived and settled in New York after emigrating from Europe, so I was pleasantly surprised to discover my maternal grandmother’s five-times great-grandfather settled in New Hanover County, NC, in the early 1700s. Not only did I have NC roots, but one of my ancestors was a captain in the NC militia during the American Revolution and another was a 6th Regiment, North Carolina cavalry sergeant in the Civil War. This ancestral line stayed in the Wilmington, NC area until my great-grandfather assumed an alias and suddenly moved to New York. It wasn’t until he was on his deathbed that he finally told his children his real last name and where he originated. I was able to confirm that the information my great-grandfather provided was accurate through DNA analysis and the use of DNA Circles by Ancestry.com, and as a result I was also able to connect with a fifth cousin who lives locally in Aberdeen, NC! While it is entertaining to gather family histories and ponder their authenticity, the real magic of genealogy is in substantiating those claims. If you have North Carolina roots and would like to confirm them, I highly recommend starting with a basic DNA analysis from any popular provider such as Ancestry.com, 23andme.com or FamilyTreeDNA.com. Also, complete your family tree to the best of your ability using the same provider you purchased the DNA analysis

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through and begin researching the validity of any hints or new leads that are automatically matched to your family tree members. For more tips on researching and proving your NC roots, here are my suggestions. 1. If you have already taken a DNA test, begin by reaching out to your DNA matches to learn more about your most recent common ancestor. You may learn interesting facts about your ancestor that can be easily validated, such as my claim to a NC militia captain during the Revolutionary War. One of my DNA matches informed me of the claim and I found the pension application and enlistment records to prove its accuracy. 2. Consider joining the North Carolina Genealogical Society which will give you access to all past and current issues of the NCGS Journal published quarterly, unlimited viewing of recorded webinars and access to discounted workshops held throughout the state. In particular, The North Carolina Series Webinars that start with “Tarheels in Your Family Tree?” will give you a great starting point to begin your NC family history research. Visit ncgenealogy.org/webinars/ for more information. 3. If you have Moore County roots in particular, consider joining the Moore County Genealogical Society (MCGC) which meets bimonthly at the Moore County Library in Carthage, NC. There are limited documents prior to 1889, when a courthouse fire destroyed almost everything. However, this group can help you get started. Join Moore County NC Genealogy’s Facebook page or email mooreco. genealogy@gmail.com for more information.


We are enmeshed in a lineage that came from somewhere and is going to make way for the next generation. -Leon Kass

4. Since my husband and I are expecting our firstborn this August, I decided to begin researching my husband’s heritage as well. We jokingly tell people that we met in the middle here in North Carolina because I am from New York and he was born in Florida, but as it turns out he has ties to the original settlers of the Blue Ridge Mountains. My husband’s DNA story on Ancestry.com provided the migration patterns and DNA matches to substantiate the claim. Once we realized we both had North Carolina roots, we decided to delve deeper in our research in hopes that our son would one day pick up where we left off. In doing so, we found the NCGenWeb Project (ncgenweb.us) which is a local resource that is part of the larger USGenWeb Project. The project is comprised of a network of volunteers working to provide genealogical and historical content for each of North Carolina’s 100 counties. Check out their NC Genealogy 2.0 (ncgenweb.us/nc-genealogy-2-0/) page which lists the RSS feeds, websites, blogs and Facebook links associated with each county for more information.

Ashley Eder developed a passion for genealogy while researching her own family tree and is always happy to discuss and help others delve into the process. Email her at ashleye@ agingoutreachservices.com .

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advice

PLANNING AHEAD

Three Steps to Handle Market Volatility as You Approach Retirement

by Tim Hicks, RICP®, APMA® wings in the stock market can cause emotions to run high, particularly for investors who are approaching retirement — and for good reason. Recent research from Ameriprise Financial uncovered that the biggest financial setbacks American investors experience in their 50s through their 70s is market losses. Though most respondents – 62 percent – have fully recovered from these events, they’re still afraid of potential bumps down the road1.

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If you share this anxiety as you approach retirement, remember that market volatility does not always mean you need to make changes to your portfolio. The following tips can help you prevent fear from getting the best of you: 1. Concentrate on your financial goals. No one can say with certainty what will happen to stocks over the next week, month, year or decade. But what may be more certain are your financial goals for those timeframes. Ensure your portfolio is designed to help you achieve those goals, rather than to achieve a specific market outcome. Remember that timing the markets is rarely successful because there are so many unknown factors influencing how stocks move. 2. Keep your emotions in check. Market corrections, dips and swings are inevitable for investors in the short term, so it’s important to look beyond the daily hype and headlines. Instead, watch for broad, persistent trends that could provide opportunities or challenges for your overall

financial situation. As you ponder adjustments to your portfolio, remember that while you can’t control the market, you can control your reaction to it. 3. Reassess your portfolio according to your retirement date and risk tolerance. Two items that are more in your control are your risk tolerance and retirement date. Keep in mind that each person has an individual comfort level with taking risks. You may find that your ability to handle market swings varies over time, particularly if you’ve experienced volatility in the past or are planning your retirement. Big market moves or dips may be a good time to step back and evaluate your portfolio according to when you anticipate needing to generate income from your investments:

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• If you have a decade or more before retirement, prioritize building your investments using a diversified asset mix. Investing regularly in the market could help volatility work to your benefit, as you have more time to ride out short-term turbulence and overcome potential losses. As you refine your retirement plans, calculate how much money you need to live the lifestyle you want, while also preparing for unexpected expenses such as healthcare. Knowing how much you need to retire can help you stay confident in your financial strategy amid market uncertainty. • If you are within a few years of retirement, you likely are more sensitive to short-term market moves. At this point, you may consider gradually adjusting your portfolio to reduce your level of risk. If you wait until retirement to adjust your investment mix, you could be surprised by untimely market volatility or a downturn. If this happens, it could leave you with less money in retirement compared to your plans, forcing you to modify your goals or lifestyle. If the market is experiencing a correction, you may want to wait for it to rebound (as it historically has) before making adjustments. Making changes immediately amid volatility could lock in possible losses. • If you are retired, be patient and maintain your diversified investment strategy. If the potential for a downturn or increased volatility makes you nervous, consider reallocating your portfolio accordingly. Keep in mind that even in retirement it may make sense to have part of your investment mix focused on growth. Today’s long life expectancies mean that you need to be prepared for the likelihood that living costs, particularly healthcare, will be higher in the later decades of your retirement.

If you have concerns about the effect of market volatility on your investments, you are not alone. If you want additional support, consider consulting a financial advisor who can review the details of your unique financial situation. Together you can determine if your portfolio is on track to reach your goals. – The Ages, Stages & Money study was created by Ameriprise Financial, Inc. and conducted online by Artemis Strategy Group December 8-21, 2017 among 3,019 U.S. adults between the ages of 30-79 with at least $100,000 in investable assets. For further information and details about the study, including verification of data that may not be published as part of this report, please contact Ameriprise Financial or go to Ameriprise.com/ages. 1

Tim Hicks, CFP® , RICP®, APMA® is a Financial Advisor with Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. in Southern Pines, NC. He specializes in fee-based financial planning and asset management strategies and has been in practice for 6 years. To contact him, please visit www.hicks-associates.com or call 910692-5917. The Southern Pines address is 510 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28387. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Asset allocation and diversification do not assure a profit or protect against loss. Ameriprise Financial Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2018 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.

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H O M E S TA G I N G

Don’t Let Smells Ruin the Sale of Your Home by Kasia McDaniel

Ahh, the sweet smell of summer! With school almost over and Father’s Day around the corner, you can’t help but look forward to summer. BBQ cookouts, suntan lotion, fresh seafood, watermelon – all of these smells remind me of summer. But when it comes time to sell your home, these kinds of smells (and others) can turn home buyers away. Your home should not have any smells – good or bad – when it is on the market. Below are a few common smells you should avoid in your home.

HEAVY PERFUMES Many people have developed allergic reactions to a certain smell. They might be allergic to your perfume, household cleaners or flowers. You don’t want to trigger a potenial buyer’s allergies because you thought it might help sell the house. When you do use these types of air fresheners, buyers will wonder if you are trying to hide a smell because of the heavily perfumed air.

walls to remove the cigarette smell. You never know if the buyer is a smoker, but it is best to remove the smell to avoid issues.

FOOD/COOKING SMELLS While your home is on the market, make sure the food you cook does not leave a strong smell behind. You want to avoid frying things like fish or chicken in the home especially before an open house. Plus, you never know who will come into your home for a showing. During this time, you might want to consider eating out if you really want that fried fish or chicken curry. NEUTRAL SMELL So what smell should you have in your home? There should not be any smell at all. When a potential buyer comes into a home, their first comment should not be, “Eww, the house smells like…” You want them to say, “What a nice living room! I wonder where they got that pretty painting.” They should not be distracted with a smell they cannot find. They should want to stay and walk around the home so they can imagine themselves living in there.

PET SMELLS Our four-legged friends are part of the family, but they can sometimes leave odors behind. Make sure the litter box is cleaned out every day. If there are any stains left If you are not sure if your house smells, ask a trusted by them, have the carpets professionally cleaned. friend to come into your home and do the sniff test. If your listing online shows pictures of the doggy bed or Since you live in your home every day you may not pick litter box, people are going to automatically assume the up on it. Once you find the source of the smell, there house smells bad. Remove those doubts and put away are many different ways to remove the offending odor. as many traces of your animal friends as possible while As you prepare your home to sell, be aware of the smell your house is on the market. in your home. If there is a mold issue, don’t cover up SMOKE If the homeowner was a heavy smoker, those smells can linger for a long time. If this is your issue, you will have to (at the very least) remove the carpeting and paint

the smell with fresheners. Fix the problem. Buyers will wonder what else you are trying to hide if they smell something off.

Kasia McDaniel, a Home Stager and Certified Interior Decorator at Blue Diamond Staging can be reached at 910-745-0608 or by visiting www.bluediamondstaging.com

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THE READER’S NOOK

Stained Glass by Patsy Ann Odom Book Review by Michelle Goetzl “People are like stained-glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light from within.” - Elisabeth Kübler-Ross Patsy Ann Odom’s novel, Stained Glass, was born from the memory of a stained glass window in the unfinished third floor of her childhood home. It is the theme of light and dark that carries protagonist Erin Rose from childhood through adulthood. To see the true beauty of the stained glass window, Erin must have lightness in her heart. While the window only appears a few times in the story, it is the guiding principle of Erin’s journey to find her own bright light. Stained Glass is a Southern Gothic story that takes place in more modern times. Set in fictional Oak Glen, North Carolina, the setting is just as much a character as the people are. The story spans the years between the 1940s and the 1970s, a time of strict moral values, social classes and ideas about women’s roles in the world. While the story itself follows Erin Rose and her life, the situations are impacted by the time and place. Odom shocks readers by starting the book with the suicide of Erin Rose’s mother. Her death is an introduction to Erin’s life in current times and we are immediately taken into a world that holds a great deal of sadness, even if the reasons are not instantly illuminated. “Mama” struggled with alcoholism and addiction, and from Erin Rose’s reactions to her death, she wasn’t the only one with deep emotional scars. From the pain of the suicide we are whisked back in time to Erin’s happiest days – when her father was alive. Erin’s father is the embodiment of love for her, and Erin’s “childhood dies when Daddy dies.” He was the one who encouraged her to ask questions of everything around her, to read books and gain knowledge and to be kind. Unfortunately, Erin’s mother was the darkness to his light. She feared the world around her, told Erin to never question anything in the Bible and was never quite satisfied

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with her own life. Understanding Erin’s parents gives the reader insight into Erin Rose’s life. The story spun for the reader is of Erin Rose always striving to find light even when the harsh realities of her world create darkness. Her first taste of darkness comes when her favorite uncle dies, and for the first time she suffers from a deep sense of grief. Less than a year later, her world tumbles down when her father dies. Erin finds solace and escape through books and a vivid imagination. She gets more comfort from make-believe worlds than her own reality. A life lived through books, however, also gives her a sense of naiveté. The excitement that Luke McLeod brings to her life supersedes any doubts that he might not be as kind as she thinks he is. But marriage to Luke isn’t all that Erin expected, and instead it is filled with adultery, deceit, violence and betrayal. Erin learns over the years that you never really know the ones that you love. But through it all, Erin manages to keep moving forward and ultimately find her own freedom. As with most Southern Gothic stories, the characters that fill Erin’s life are flawed, damaged and sometimes downright cruel. Erin struggles with a deep sense of alienation while trying to find her place in the world, a world that she doesn’t quite feel like she fits into. Those that enjoy this genre and writers such as Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams and Truman Capote might want to give Stained Glass a try. To read Michelle Goetzl’s conversation with Patsy Ann Odom, turn to page 48. Michelle Goetzl writes an online blog—“Books My Kids Read.” She loves books and sharing that love of reading with children. She can be reached at booksmykidsread@gmail.com . JUNE 2018 |

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COOKING SIMPLE

Fried Green Tomatoes with Goat Cheese by Andy Fradenburgh

Ingredients

Makes Two Servings

• 1 large green tomato, cored and sliced in quarter-inch slices • 2 cups of seasoned bread crumbs • 2 cups of seasoned flour • 1 egg beaten and thinned with milk • Clarified butter • 4 oz unflavored goat cheese Green Scallion Oil: • 8 scallions (use the green tops only) • 2 cups of extra virgin olive oil • Salt and pepper to taste • Squeeze of lemon juice Balsamic Vinegar Syrup: • 4 cups of balsamic vinegar

Directions

Syrup: In a medium saucepan, bring the 4 cups of vinegar to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer until reduced by three quarters or to a syrupy consistency, then cool. Oil: Place scallion tops in a food processor and pulse until chopped fine. Add salt and pepper and olive oil slowly to form an emulsion. Set aside.

Tomatoes: Preheat oven to 400°. Dredge tomato slice in seasoned flour, then egg mixture and bread crumbs. Repeat for each slice. Heat a medium sauté pan on medium heat. When pan is hot add two tablespoons of clarified butter, brown each slice until golden brown, flip and repeat (about two minutes each side). Place tomatoes on an ungreased cookie sheet in a 400° oven for five minutes. Remove from oven and flip each slice. Slice goat cheese in 10 slices (Chef’s tip: use fishing line) place back in oven approximately five minutes until cheese softens. Place 2 heavy tablespoons of scallion oil on plate, layer three slices of tomatoes on oil and drizzle with the syrup.

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Andy Fradenburgh is chef and owner of Nina’s Classic Cuisine. You can find Nina’s Classic Cuisine at 111 L. Central Park Ave. in Pinehurst. Call 910-235-4600 or visit ninasinpinehurst.com


ADT® Helps Save Ohio Woman Stung by a Hornet When Ray and Julie Kissel purchased their ADT monitored security system in January, they never imagined it would help save Julie’s life in July. The couple wanted monitored protection for their Mansfield, Ohio home so they called Defenders, an ADT Premier Provider which sold and installed the system. Six months later, Julie was pulling a weed in her front yard when a hornet suddenly stung her in the back, triggering a severe allergic reaction. A former nurse, Julie knew she was in trouble when her face turned fiery red, her breathing became difficult and she started drooling. “I was woozy and weak,” Julie said. Unable to drive, Julie stumbled inside the home. She collapsed on the floor, far from the phone. Julie’s life line for help was the ADT key fob in her hand. She pushed it, activating the panic alarm which immediately signaled ADT Dispatcher Sally Boutwell at ADT’s monitoring center in Rochester, New York. Following ADT procedures, Sally first called the home. Julie heard the ringing but couldn’t pick up. Sensing something was wrong, Sally then contacted local authorities. At the 911 Dispatch Call Center in Richland County, OH, Jolene Zehner answered Sally’s call and immediately dispatched Sheriff’s Deputies Jeff Myers and Reggie Ganzhorn. “We arrived and looked around to see if there were any signs of criminal

activity,” Deputy Ganzhorn said. “We saw a car in the garage so we suspected someone was inside the house.” After knocking on the door and not receiving an answer, the deputy went next door where a neighbor provided a cell phone number for Ray Kissel who rushed home from work when called. As Ray and the deputy entered the house, they heard a faint cry from Julie, “Please help.” They saw Julie on the floor in need of emergency care so they called an ambulance and Julie was taken to the hospital where she was treated and released. Without ADT, Julie doubts she would have survived being home alone for hours. “ADT saved my life,” she said. To celebrate the happy ending, Julie was given an opportunity to meet Sally at the annual ADT Authorized Dealer convention. Several hundred people watched as Julie embraced Sally for the first time and thanked her for saving her life. Two Defenders employees received LifeSaver Awards for selling and installing the Kissel’s system. And Sally was presented a LifeSaver Award, the

*BASIC SYSTEM: $99 Customer Installation Charge. 36-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $27.99 per month ($1,007.64). 24-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $27.99 per month ($671.76) for California. Offer applies to homeowners only. Offer valid for new ADT Authorized Premier Provider customers only and not on purchases from ADT LLC. Cannot be combined with any other offer. The $27.99 Offer does not include Quality Service Plan (QSP), ADT’s Extended Limited Warranty. Equipment shown may require additional fees. Form of payment must be by credit card or electronic charge to your checking or savings account. Offer applies to homeowners only. Certain packages require approved landline phone. Local permit fees may be required. Satisfactory credit history required. Termination Fee applies. Certain restrictions may apply. Offer valid for new ADT Authorized Premier Provider customers only and not on purchases from ADT LLC. Other rate plans available. Cannot be combined with any other offer. ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services, which help you manage your home environment and family lifestyle, requires the purchase and/or activation of an ADT alarm system with monitored burglary service and a compatible computer, cell phone or PDA with Internet and email access. These ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services do not cover the operation or maintenance of any household equipment/systems that are connected to the ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services/Equipment. All ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services are not available with the various levels of ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services. All ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services may not be available in all geographic areas. You may be required to pay additional charges to purchase equipment required to utilize the ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services features you desire.

second time she has won it during her nine-year career at ADT. “Winning the LifeSaver Award is the ultimate honor at ADT,” Sally said. “I love how all of us at ADT work together to help our customers when they need us most.” Also recognized was the Richland County Sheriff’s Department which received a $5,000 check from ADT. “It will be used for equipment in our department,” said Sheriff Steve Sheldon. “I’m proud of the fine work of our office and for the quick transport of Mrs. Kissel.” As for the hornet nest, it was removed from the Kissel’s front yard when the tree it was hanging from, was cut down.

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A Fishy State In Carolina Catch, Debbie Moose has written a cookbook for conservationists by James J. Hatfield In terms of multitasking, author Debbie Moose has found a way to do many things at once via an unlikely source: food. Moose’s seventh and latest cookbook, Carolina Catch: Cooking North Carolina Fish and Shellfish from Mountains to Coast, takes an aquatic perspective on the currently explosive farm-to-table movement.

find the simple task of shopping daunting, simply because most people have never been shown what seafood is good and what isn’t. Moose includes comprehensible descriptions and characteristics of what fresh really looks like and what is safe to eat, ensuring that shoppers purchase the best and most local product possible.

“We’re a very fishy state, and I’m not just talking politics,” Moose says.

Carolina Catch addresses that the issue of overfishing has risen to an alarming degree with the popular varieties of fish being sought out at a much higher rate than others. Moose shows all the aspects of how overfishing our shores for the popular species (grouper, flounder, salmon, etc.) and how this effects even the fishermen themselves. This is why Moose draws from her library of incredibly delicious recipes that use types of fish one might not pick as first choice for eating.

The eat local movement is very common in our country today, or at least in the larger cities. This movement mostly pertains to beef, chicken and pork, but not fish. Moose believes this is because we have simply not asked for it. “I think it’s a lot like the eat local movement,” Moose says, “That [movement] started from a small group of people who were aware, and it’s grown. Same thing can happen for eat local with seafood.” Her most recent cookbook contains a whopping 92 different recipes that showcase the many fish and shellfish commonly found in North Carolina waters. Many were once referred to as “trash fish,” a nickname which the author despises. She suggests substitutions such as North Carolina black drum in place of grouper, dogfish for cod, sea mullet for flounder, amberjack for salmon, and so on. All these fish have been commonly seen as unusable in the eyes of most North Carolinian households. The book also has a strong educational element to it. Anyone new to the seafood world might

“They’ll provide fisherman with more income if we eat those fish,” says Moose “There’s a pretty well documented issue with overseas fish farming. About 90% of the United States seafood is imported.” With the majority of our fish and shellfish coming from Asia, it would make sense that anybody who may take issue with the loss of American jobs would find a way to convince their local Whole Foods to stock fish from our coasts. This all comes from someone who until she was in college had only seen fish in the form of frozen rectangles. She’s very upfront in sharing this embarrassing fact in hopes that she can be an example that if someone wants to learn more about fish, they can. JUNE 2018 |

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“This is a cookbook. I couldn’t go into a tremendous amount of detail about the issue of fish politics and how government regulations play in because it gets very complicated,” Moose says. “It changes all the time. But what I did want to do was encourage people, and say ‘These factors are at play.’ Go find out how it’s effecting what you can get on your plate. And here are some resources to help you go do that. Rather than deal with so much of it in the book, I offer the means for people to go educate themselves.” One thing emphasized and explained is seasonality. This is second nature to most of us when it comes to our produce, but we seem to forget is also true of seafood: certain fish aren’t going to be in season. “A criticism I hear is local-caught fish costs more, or it costs more than at the mega mart ... which is why I stress seasonality in [the cookbook]. There is a season for fish like there is a season for peaches and tomatoes. If you want to buy a tomato in January, yeah, it’s going to cost more. But if you buy tomatoes in July, they’re practically giving them away at the farmers’ market because they’re overloaded with them. Find out when the season is.”

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Although Moose personally believes flounder has as much flavor as the cover of her book, she understands that its widespread popularity is due to its mildness. And with such a foodie type community found in grabbing distance of wherever the eat local movement is present, hopefully changing up the types of fish available can add some variety. “I was shocked you couldn’t find fish caught off our coast in Raleigh. We have fish, we have a coast, why do we not have that here? It’s because the supply lines have not developed ... but a lot of it has to do with consumer demand.” Carolina Catch feels more like a tool than a cookbook. With it, the reader will be equipped with confidence to request the fish needed in the recipes. All that’s left is to start asking local shops and vendors to sell North Carolina fish of all types, popular or not. “[Whole Foods] did that because there was money to be made,” says Moose. “They did that because consumers demanded it. Consumer demand makes a difference. Ask for it.”


Smoked Trout Cheese Spread Smoked trout tastes milder than some smoked fish, which makes it a crowd pleaser. Briny capers and sharp red onions, along with a generous amount of black pepper, balance the rich cream cheese. The spread can be made up to 2 days before serving. Alternatives: smoked bluefish (stronger flavor) Makes 10 to 12 servings 16 ounces cream cheese, at room temp. 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 3 ⁄4 cup coarsely chopped smoked trout 1 ⁄4 cup coarsely chopped red onion

Black pepper, to taste 2 tablespoons capers 1 ⁄ 2 cup chopped fresh parsley Crackers for serving

Put the cream cheese, mayonnaise, and smoked trout in the bowl of a food processor. Process until combined. Add the red onions, pepper, and capers, and pulse a few times until they are just mixed in. Scrape the mixture into a container and sprinkle with the parsley. Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or overnight. Serve with crackers.

Greek Baked Sea Trout This recipe is a favorite at my house and is a great way to serve any flaky, medium-thick fish fillets. Cover the fillets completely with the sauce to keep them moist. You can find good cherry or grape tomatoes year-round, making them a nice choice for the sauce. Of course, the sauce will taste best with summer tomatoes. Alternatives: sheepshead, grunt, flounder, snapper Makes 6 servings 2 cups cherry tomatoes 1 ⁄ 2 cup chopped white or yellow onion 2 medium cloves garlic, chopped 1 ⁄ 3 cup olive oil, plus more for the baking pan 1 tablespoon dried oregano or marjoram 1 ⁄4 teaspoon salt, or to taste

1 ⁄4 teaspoon black pepper 1 ⁄4 cup chopped fresh parsley 2 teaspoons capers or chopped black olives 2 large sea trout fillets (about 2 pounds) Italian bread (optional)

Place the tomatoes in a food processor and pulse to chop coarsely. Do not purée. Heat 1/3 cup olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the tomatoes, onions, and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes begin to give up their juice and the onions are soft. Add the oregano or marjoram, salt, and pepper. Reduce the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes or until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the heat and stir in the parsley and capers or black olives. Taste and add salt if needed. Preheat the oven to 350°. Coat the bottom of a baking dish with a little olive oil. Place the fish in the dish, skin-side down. Spoon the tomato sauce over the fish, making sure to cover it completely. Bake for about 20 minutes or until the fish flakes and is done. Serve with Italian bread for sopping up the sauce, if desired.

From Carolina Catch: Cooking North Carolina Fish and Shellfish from Mountains to Coast. 2018Leonard. | OutreachNC.com 25 Text © 2018 by Debbie Moose. Food photography copyright © 2018JUNE by Juli Used by permission of the University of North Carolina Press. www.uncpress.org


From the Navy to the Green The life and times (so far) of Pinehurst author and historian Paul Dunn By Meagan Burgad Walk into the Given Book Shop in Pinehurst on a Friday morning and chances are you’ll see a dapper gentleman (89 years young) shelving books in his trademark red Converse. While it’s not out of the ordinary to see a volunteer methodically making their way through the stacks of historical fiction and true crime, it is unique for one of them to find their own name on the books they shelve. For Paul Dunn it’s a regular occurrence. In the years since Dunn and his late wife B.J. moved to Pinehurst in the 1990s, the amateur historian has written two books – Great Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play, now in its second edition, and The Secret War Diaries of Abraham Lincoln - Including His Recurring Dreams: Volume I. You could say Dunn’s journey — from Navy yeoman to marketing director and advertising manager of Good Housekeeping Magazine, to president of GRI Marketing Services (a $100 million direct marketing

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company) to his job as a full-time author – started before he was born. Many a family historian can trace their lineage back to a semi-famous greatgrandfather or third cousin twice removed who experienced fifteen minutes of fame. Paul Dunn has not one, but two acclaimed grandfathers who he can credit for passing on a solid work ethic and maybe, just maybe, a little bit of luck. On his father’s side is Leo Dunn, a tenacious young man who worked his way up from a messenger boy for Western Union to the vice-president of the Graybar Electric Company. But it may be Charles Hanser, his maternal grandfather, with whom Dunn shares the most similarities. While working at his mother’s fish market in New Jersey, young Hanser found himself walking past a phrenologist. After scraping together 25 cents for the examination, the phrenologist felt the bumps and lumps on Hanser’s head and told the young boy to find a career in


advertising. To say Hanser found success would be putting it mildly. An introduction to the young William M. Scholl (the namesake of Dr. Scholl’s) set Hanser’s advertising career rocketing. When he wasn’t traveling the world with his friend Dr. Scholl (their adventures included flights on the Hindenburg and Graf Zeppelin), Hanser was working on advertising accounts like MGM and Columbia Pictures. “He was a very inspiring man,” says Dunn. Because Dunn had such successful, businessminded grandfathers, it must have been a shock to his family when he decided to join the Navy. But as a kid growing up in the public schools of Long Island, the lure of the G.I. Bill and the Navy’s promise to pay for his college was too great. In 1946, Dunn joined the Navy and became a yeoman. “Becoming a yeoman was actually a good thing because I learned shorthand and typing,” says Dunn. These are skills that he would later be grateful for not only in his business career but as an author as well. By 1947, Dunn was married with a baby on the way. He left the Navy around 1950 and started school at St. John’s University in Brooklyn, and later St. John’s School of Law. While Dunn may have started school with the purpose of becoming a lawyer, the practicality of advertising called to him. “I started having children, and I decided that instead of practicing law, maybe I should join the ad business. I had too many mouths to feed,” recalls Dunn. It was this decision that would shape the rest of Dunn’s career. From a lowly ad executive working his first account at Radio City Music Hall all the way to president of GRI Marketing Services, Dunn’s family was always in the forefront of his mind. “I have ten kids! I have a lot of kids. Ten kids and eight births, because I have two sets of twins,” Dunn says smiling. “With ten kids I needed to get rich. I had a lot of college coming up.” Ten kids and 56-ish grandkids later (When asked how many grandchildren he has Dunn gets a big smile on his face, pauses, then says “I have, I think, 56 grandkids. I have grandchildren, greatgrandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.”),

he was ready to retire. Dunn and his second wife, Betty Jane “B.J.,” were lured to the Sandhills by one of B.J.’s childhood friends who resided in Pinehurst. After finding a home, the couple became members of Newcomers of the Pinehurst Area, where Dunn volunteered to run the History Club. It was through the History Club that he became interested in Donald Ross. “I had never heard of Donald Ross. I had never heard about this man,” says Dunn. “So I started going over to the Tufts Archives and I realized that nobody knows where his courses were. So I thought, well, maybe people would be interested in a book that told them where the hell these courses are.” Starting in 1998, Dunn researched 325 golf courses. To prove a course was designed by Donald Ross, Dunn carefully researched each location as well as visiting many of the courses. He also required the signature (from a golf professional/historian/ manager) of a two-page affidavit including information on the name of the course, the year it was built, how many of the original holes were intact and how much the course cost to be designed. When Dunn first started writing the book he had lofty aspirations of including every Donald Ross course still in existence. His publisher convinced him to focus instead on Donald Ross courses everyone could enjoy. “The book only offers courses you can play,” says Dunn. “So if you go to any of these clubs you’re allowed to just go in and play. You just pay the price [of a round of golf]. The book has resorts, public courses and semi-private clubs. The advantage of the book was that if you were interested in Ross, you could actually know where to go, know the history, have beautiful pictures and have the pro explain how that hole should be played. So it’s actually like a guidebook.” The first edition of Great Donald Ross Golf Courses You Can Play written by Dunn and his wife B.J. was published in 2001. In 2013, while Dunn was the historian of the Pinehurst Country Club, the couple began research on the second edition of the book renamed Great Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone

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SUMMERTIME AND THE LIVIN’ IS EASY!

Can Play. The second edition, published in 2017, contains a forward documenting the current status of the courses mentioned in the first book, including closures or new management. After the passing of B.J. in 2015, Dunn wanted to continue writing but wasn’t sure what to focus on next. On top of writing a bi-monthly column for The Pilot – “It’s sort of fun. I like to offend the local Republicans,” says Dunn with a smile and a twinkle in his eye – Dunn began writing a fictional account of Lincoln’s diary titled, The Secret War Diaries of Abraham Lincoln - Including His Recurring Dreams.

190 Fox Hollow Road • Pinehurst, NC 28374

910-695-0011

With the help of hundreds of resources, Dunn began writing his novel from the perspective of someone who had found Lincoln’s lost diaries. Relying heavily on Lincoln Day By Day - A Chronology 1809 - 1865 by Earl S. Miers, Dunn meticulously researched each day in Lincoln’s life starting in 1860. Each diary entry gives Dunn’s fictional account of what he believes Lincoln could have written in his diary as well as author notes detailing the factual events of each day. “I feel like he’s a member of my family,” says Dunn of his relationship with the iconic president. Dunn hopes to create a four-volume collection, with the first self-published volume available now, and the second volume ready later this year. When he’s not writing or volunteering at the Given Book Shop, you can find Dunn and his golf group playing local courses in the area. Just don’t expect to find him on Pinehurst No. 2. “I don’t play Pinehurst anymore. I’m a member, but I never play. It offends my Scots blood. They’re very expensive,” says Dunn with a laugh.

With friendship, family and the feeling of home, every day is a chance to refresh your lifestyle at Fox Hollow Senior Living. WE ARE PROUD TO OFFER: • Five Star Dining Experience, offering flavor and flexibility • Lifestyle360 programming for wellrounded days • Exceptional senior living experiences

The Secret War Diaries of Abraham Lincoln Including His Recurring Dreams and Great Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play are available on Amazon in print as well as Kindle editions. Great Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play is also available at local booksellers.

Call 910-695-0011 today to schedule your visit and see why you’ll love Fox Hollow Senior Living. www.FoxHollowSeniorLiving.com ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE RESPITE/SHORT-TERM STAYS ©2018 Five Star Senior Living

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◆ Close to Downtown Shops, Dining & Golf ◆ Sleeps 4 Comfortably ◆ Pets Welcome with Deposit

info@aosvc.com | 910.692.0683 | AOSVC.com

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Linda D. Mabe, Agent jason.burgin@ncfbins.com linda.mabe@ncfbins.com www.ncfbins.com/moore-burgin/moorecountyoffice.html

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Birding in N.C.

Uwharrie National Forest by Ray Linville

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Summer Tanager (Male)

Credit: Brady Beck OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2018


Spotting Red Flashes Under a Green Canopy Want to hike on a nature trail in a national forest as you look and listen for songbirds? Go no farther than Uwharrie National Forest, where Densons Creek Nature Trail in Montgomery County winds through mixed hardwoods and pine forest. The forest, first purchased by the federal government in 1931 during the Great Depression, contains very diverse vegetation and is a scenic wildlife habitat. By national standards, it is small; the forest covers only about 50,000 acres. However, the variety of birds in the forest makes it a vital part of the N.C. Birding Trail, which links educational and historical attractions with communities and businesses across the state. The trail offers two options for hiking. One is a 2.2-mile loop that takes you to an excellent view of Densons Creek, a beautiful stream with large rocks and fastmoving water. The shorter choice is a one-mile loop.

Both options are marked with white painted blazes. When I was there, the blazes were easy to notice although road noise from nearby NC Hwy 24/27 was initially distracting until I was deeper into the forest. Be alert to see a summer tanager even before you hear it, and don’t mistake it for a cardinal. The strawberrycolored male is the only completely red bird in North America and makes a beautiful sight as it flits under the greenery of the forest canopy. In the oaks, it is usually in the mid-canopy and above. In contrast, the mustard-yellow female is more difficult to spot, but both sexes have a distinctive call that sounds like pit-ti-tuck. The male is also noted for making a series of whistles that can last up to four seconds. Both sexes like to dine on bees, wasps and other flying insects that they capture during short sallies from a perch.

JUNE 2018 | OutreachNC.com 31 Summer Tanager (Female)

Credit: Brady Beck


American Redstart

32 OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2018 Scarlet Tanager


Another tanager to be on the lookout for is the scarlet tanager, which is equally brilliantly colored. The male has a blood-red body that contrasts with its jet-black wings and tail. Because he stays high in the forest canopy, he can be difficult to find. Even harder to spot is the yellowish-green, dark-winged female. After breeding, the male molts to a female-like plumage but retains his black wings and tail. Before the fall migration to South America begins, his feathers will also be yellow-green. The scarlet tanager’s calls – energetic and distinctive chick-burr sounds — provide clues when it is nearby. Its song is also distinguishing. The male sings a series of up to five chirruping phrases very hurriedly. The female sings a similar pattern more softly with fewer syllables. When foraging, mates (these tanagers are monogamous during a breeding season) often sing together. These tanagers, whose males sport red frames, are joined in the forest by another songbird, the American Redstart, named for another striking red feature. The name “redstart” refers to the orange-red patches on a breeding male’s wings and tail (“start” is an old word for tail); otherwise, an adult male is mostly black with bright orange patches on his wings, sides and tail. A female, which has an olive back and a gray head and underparts, also has bright patches on her wings, side and tail but these marks are yellow. The calls of a redstart are also distinct. Both male and female use several calls, including sharp, sweet-sounding chip notes as well as high-pitched alarm calls. During spring and early summer, a male also sings sweet, explosive songs that stop abruptly with an accented ending.

A small but lively warbler, the redstart hops among tree branches in search of insects. To catch them easily, it startles its prey by flashing the bright patches in its wings and tails. Because the redstart prefers large tracts of interior woodlands that measure at least 1,000 acres, the Uwharrie National Forest is an ideal habitat for it. As you walk the trail, also listen for woodpeckers that are so prominent in our area. The forest abounds with them. In addition, be alert to see and hear a hooded warbler (described in the May issue about Raft Swamp Farms) and a prothonotary warbler (February issue about Hinson Lake). Theresa Savery, ranger at the forest, views the trail as “easy to moderate in difficulty.” The elevation gain of the longer loop is 135 feet. One hiker commented that the trail has “lots of ups and downs, roots and rocks.” However, it is dog-friendly if you want a canine companion with you on a hike. The Densons Creek Nature Trail, open daily, leaves from the National Forest headquarters near Troy, which is open on only weekdays. A trail map with a key to the numbered nature stops, including where gold was once sought, is available at the information board by the parking lot. Because gold was discovered in the Uwharrie Mountains in the 19th century, don’t be surprised to find someone panning for gold in the creek. If you think you can be lucky when you visit, in addition to a camera, bring a pan. OutreachNC has embarked on a yearlong series that highlights regional sites of the N.C. Birding Trail. Enjoy the series as contributor Ray Linville explores beautiful landscapes and birds of our home state. He can be reached at linville910@gmail.com.

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Where the Future Grows Bold new cultivars of familiar plants are born at Sandhills Research Station and other testbed fields and gardens statewide. by Corbie Hill Photography by Mollie Tobias A tiny tree stands in a row with its larger brothers and sisters. It’s shorter than most toddlers, but perfectly formed. Its twig-thick branches zig and zag geometrically, and it boasts the mature, fleshedout architecture of a tree ten times its height. If anything, it looks like a carefully trained bonsai, but it is not. This is a dwarf redbud, and it’s three years old. Denny Werner pauses to admire this tiny tree. He knows a great deal about this specimen – its hardiness, its bloom characteristics and leaf shape, its genetics — yet he marvels at its size and form, its color and geometry, as if seeing it for the first time. “That’s a very special tree, right there. That’s a real winner,” Werner says. “He’s going to get selected.” If that happens, within a few years descendants of this patio-sized redbud will join Werner’s other hybrids that have entered the commercial gardening world. He can walk into plant nurseries or even the garden sections of big box retailers and spot plants he’s bred. In Werner’s four decades with NC State University, where he is a distinguished professor in the Department of Horticultural Science, he has bred peaches and butterfly bushes. His main focus nowadays is redbuds. Yet Werner is only one of many plant breeders in North Carolina, a historically agrarian state which continues to be at the forefront of crop science, ornamental plant breeding and a constellation of horticultural subfields. To provide a little perspective, the patio-sized redbud that has so

captured his attention is only one plant on the 500-plus acre Sandhills Research Station in rural Montgomery County. Elsewhere on this enormous experimental farm grow yet-unpatented varieties of soybeans, blueberries, cotton, peanuts – you name it – and that’s only the beginning. NC State operates other research stations statewide, including one not far from Asheville. Elsewhere and separately, entrepreneurial breeders like Tony Avent of Raleigh’s Plant Delights Nursery regularly introduce bold new hybrids to the ornamental plant industry. Indeed, horticulture has a deep history in North Carolina, and a vibrant present and future as well. As a horticulturalist and breeder with NC State University, Werner is at the cutting edge. And even though he’ll formally retire only a few weeks after this story prints, he’s nowhere near quitting. “You get momentum in an area and a body wants to keep on moving,” Werner says. He’s talking about plant breeding in North Carolina, but he could just as easily be talking about his own inertia. He has redbuds with pink pompom flowers growing next to experimental lines with double flowers that bloom white (“There’s no such thing as a double white redbud anywhere except right here in this row,” he says). He’s worked on a purple leaf weeping form called Ruby Falls, which has been a commercial success, and he’s currently working to bring gold leaves into a weeping redbud. He’s creating drought-tolerant dwarf varieties, purple dwarfs, purple weeping dwarfs – the list goes on and on. Werner is even working on a redbud that actually blooms red. JUNE 2018 |

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Upon his retirement this summer, Werner will simply move his base of operations from the Sandhills Research Station to the JC Raulston Arboretum (JCRA) in Raleigh, which also operates under the aegis of NC State University. “It would be nice to have a place I can call home,” says Werner. “One of the reasons I initially began working with redbuds is because of the great collection the arboretum had when J.C. Raulston was director.” Raulston, an influential and beloved NCSU professor and horticulturalist, founded the arboretum as the N.C. State University Arboretum in 1976, and Werner arrived in 1979. After Raulston’s 1996 death, the arboretum’s name was changed in his honor. “I didn’t get to see the arboretum get born, but I saw it in diapers,” Werner says. “I remember walking through the arboretum with J.C. and talking about redbuds, and it got me to breeding things. Full circle, I’d like to get redbud breeding back into the arboretum umbrella.” Werner was even JCRA director for three years, and during this tenure he hired Mark Weathington as assistant director. Today, Weathington is arboretum director, and he’s thrilled to have Werner back. “We really hope this will be the start of a longterm formal breeding program at the arboretum,” Weathington says, sitting in his airy office at the Raleigh arboretum. “We’re surrounded by so many plants. We have this great repository of germplasm, of different genetics from plants. That gives us a lot of opportunity to do exciting things.” JCRA has not traditionally had an active breeding program, Weathington explains. Sure, the arboretum has introduced a number of plants, but mostly these were varieties it evaluated rather than developed. Sometimes, too, something unusual grew from seeds sown on JCRA grounds, so the arboretum named and distributed it, but none of this constitutes the kind of diligent, formal breeding program Werner oversees.

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“I thought it would be good for both entities, myself and the arboretum, to more or less weave my activities under the umbrella of the arboretum,” says Werner. “When we release new varieties, we can release them as JC Raulston Arboretum releases, which will give them somewhat of an identity in the marketplace and it’ll give the arboretum an identity as an entity that is developing new plants and is involved in research.” This will add to an already strong reputation, as breeders nationally and internationally already send plants to JCRA for evaluation. NCSU is one of the leading plant breeding institutions in the world, Weathington says, and the climate in North Carolina itself is amenable to growing a variety of plants. Anything that grows north of the subtropics will grow here and can be evaluated here, Weathington says – even if the soil isn’t amazing. But that can be fixed, Weathington adds. “Organic matter is the magic bullet. You add it to clay, it provides drainage. You add it to sand, it holds water,” he says. “If I had my choice of what to garden on, it would be sand. It’s pretty easy to amend that, to put organic matter in there and build up that soil. I’d rather have more drainage than less.” Avent of Plant Delights Nursery grows in sand, Weathington offers, and has been very successful. Avent breeds elephant ears with a colleague in Hawaii and also develops lilies, Baptisia, epidemiums, woody plants and even ferns. (“He has explained to me how he does it and I am not sure I understand it,” Weathington says of the fern hybrids.) Like many of the breeders Weathington mentions, Avent has very high standards. “If it isn’t superior to everything that’s out there, even if it’s different, it doesn’t make its way into the market,” Weathington says. At NCSU, breeders develop new varieties of cucumbers, but only a minority of these cultivars are destined to be eaten raw. Rather, they’re bred to fit in pickle jars. They must mature to a small size and have thin skin and the proper texture.

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Melon breeders from the university travel the world to collect the original species that were crossed to create now-familiar food crops. Their aim to bring these wild species’ disease resistance to their cultivated cousins.

new cultivar – when he comes across a skinny, leafless tree and stops. Analytically, but also with unmistakable tenderness, he reaches out. He takes the end of a branch in between his fingers and snaps it.

Just south of Asheville, the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center in Mills River has responded to North Carolina’s brewery boom by breeding new varieties of hops, Weathington says, and also trees, shrubs and biofuel grasses under the direction of NCSU’s Tom Ranney.

“They’ve had a rough winter down here,” he says. “Rough, rough year.”

“To do a list of the plants from him would be almost exhaustive,” Weathington says of the award-winning breeder. Ranney and Werner’s approaches are almost diametrically opposite, Weathington says with a smile. Werner is laser-focused on a few varieties at once, while Ranney is extremely prolific and works on dozens of genera at a time. “I always try to stump [Ranney],” Weathington says. “I say, ‘You know, you should breed these obscure plants.’ And he’ll go, ‘Oh! I think two rows over we have third generation of crosses from that.’ “It’s amazing working with both of them,” he continues. “They’re both very effective.” Back at the Sandhills Research Station, Werner walks his rows. True to Weathington’s description, he’s looking for one thing – for that one perfect dwarf purple redbud, say, or that one perfect double white redbud that will spawn an entirely

Of all the trees on this row, this one couldn’t handle the additional below-freezing days this winter brought to bear. That’s the bad news and the good news, Werner explains. If we hadn’t had such a harsh winter, he wouldn’t have known that this one specific plant was less cold-resistant than its brothers and sisters – and he could have inadvertently released a plant that wouldn’t thrive in the Midwest. And it’s too quiet, Werner observes a little later. There are some bees out, but not as many as he would have seen 10 or 15 years ago. Redbuds are dependent on bumblebees and carpenter bees, as well as other native pollinators. Bumblebees nest in the ground and there is a forest nearby – prime habitat – yet their numbers have simply crashed. It’s an ecological problem for sure, and it also means that Werner must do the bees’ job. So he digs the trees up every winter, moves them into a greenhouse and pollinates them manually. Once a body has momentum, as he says, it wants to keep moving. “In this business, if you’re unsuccessful, you have to wait another year to try again,” Werner says. “And I’m not getting any younger.”

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Homegrown in North Carolina Brief histories of Cheerwine, Krispy Kreme and Pepsi

B

Intro by Corbie Hill Stories (p. 42-47) by Meagan Burgad

ellywashers. Papa called soda bellywashers. Of course, he didn’t say it like that. He pronounced it “bellywarsher.” The important thing to do is to overpronounce the “warsh” sound, which can involve stretching your cheeks a bit if you’re not accustomed to the dialect. Papa was my mom’s dad, and he was born in rural Oxford, NC, during the Great Depression. He was barely old enough to fight in World War II, but he got drafted anyway. Afterward, he worked in scouting until retirement. He had three sons and a daughter. He played the cornet. He grew a red beard for the Bicentennial. If we’re being honest (and we are), he was an irritable dude. Retirement took him to Oriental, in Eastern NC. But the important thing here is that he would give you a hard time for drinking bellywashers. Then again, he would give you a hard time for just about anything. And I think he knew as well as anyone that bellywashers taste good. He knew, too, that two particularly delicious bellywashers – Pepsi and Cheerwine – were, like him, native to North Carolina. And I think he knew that a third sugary treat – the Krispy Kreme doughnut – was a native of North Carolina as well. So he would give you a hard time, sure, but that was his thing. And his irascibility certainly didn’t stop Pepsi, Cheerwine or Krispy Kreme from being three of our state’s most celebrated native treats. So here’s another treat: On the next few pages, enjoy Meagan Burgad’s snapshot histories of these three products (and thanks go to Cheerwine, Pepsi and Krispy Kreme for providing images to go along with her excellent writing). As for Papa, I’ll bet you a Cheerwine he drank his share of bellywashers and ate his share of donuts. He was human. Of course he did.

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A SALISBURY

nyone anywhere can reach for a Pepsi on a hot and humid summer day, but only a real North Carolinian will appreciate the syrupy sweetness of a bottle of Cheerwine. Born in 1866, L.D. Peeler got his start in the soda business much later in life compared to Pepsi-Cola creator Caleb Bradham. After trying his hand at a few different ventures Peeler began to focus on the soda business in 1913. It was around this time that the Maysville Syrup Company of Kentucky went bankrupt. Peeler bought the company and brought it back to Salisbury, North Carolina. He then changed the name of the company to the Carolina Beverage Corporation and continued to make its trademark mintflavored cola – which may have been a clue as to why the Kentucky-based company went bankrupt in the first place. After meeting a traveling salesman in 1917, Peeler decided to create a cherry-flavored drink. The hint of sweetness from the black cherry flavor was helpful during WWI when other sodas, like Pepsi-Cola, struggled to keep their product recipe unchanged despite sugar rationing. It may have taken awhile, but in 1926 Cheerwine was trademarked. Cheerwine continues to be the oldest bottled cherry flavored soda, outdating Wild Cherry Pepsi and Cherry Coke by more than 60 years. While its name may hint otherwise, Cheerwine contains no alcohol, only delicious, burgundy-colored, cherry-flavored soda with an extra dose of carbonated fizz. The Carolina Beverage Corporation continues to produce Cheerwine, so not only does the same North Carolina company produce Cheerwine, but the same family has owned the company since L.D. Wheeler concocted the first cherry flavored drink over 100 years ago. Today the Carolina Beverage Corporation is run by L.D. Peeler’s great-grandson Charles Clifford “Cliff ” Ritchie, making the company the oldest continuously family-owned soft drink company in the United States. For diehard Cheerwine fans, a trip to the local Food Lion (a Salisbury, North Carolina based grocery store chain) means not only soda but Cheerwine ice cream treats. Still can’t get enough of your favorite beverage? Head to Amazon and buy the unofficial Cheerwine Recipe Book by Sandy Sider, a longtime fan and Cheerwine enthusiast. If that’s still not enough, cross your fingers and pray to the Cheerwine gods that Krispy Kreme brings back its fabled Cheerwine donuts.

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I

f you’ve ever licked your fingers clean after eating an Original Glazed Krispy Kreme doughnut, you may have a pack of cigarettes to thank. Long before a cigarette changed his life’s trajectory, Vernon Rudolph was born in Kentucky in 1915. After graduating high school, he began working for his uncle, Ishmael Armstrong, who owned a doughnut shop. Depending on who you ask, Armstrong bought his doughnut recipe from a Frenchman in New Orleans named Joe LeBeau or maybe he was given the recipe for free from a cook on the Ohio river named Joseph G. LeBoeuf who loved baking. But no matter which story you like best the outcome is still the same – delicious. Following the mild success the family doughnut company saw in Tennessee, West Virginia and Georgia, Rudolph decided to branch out on his own. Rumor has it when he was trying to decide where to build his doughnut empire, Rudolph looked down at his pack of Camels, saw the label said “Made in Winston-Salem, NC,” and thought, “That’s where I should go.” After buying a storefront in Salem, Rudolph opened his Krispy Kreme store on Friday the 13th in July, 1937. While Rudolph imagined a business that would bake fresh doughnuts at his facility and then transport them to local grocery stores, it was the customers who consistently showed up on his doorstep to buy the freshly glazed doughnuts that changed the way Krispy Kreme would evolve. Instead of only making doughnuts for grocery and convenience stores, Rudolph began offering doughnuts to customers at a storefront as well. For most people, watching the workers make the doughnuts from scratch and fry them right before their eyes was nothing short of mesmerizing. Today Krispy Kreme has more than 1,300 stores in 31 countries. The company has approximately 45 flavors of doughnuts, not including seasonal varieties (or unicorns like the Cheerwine flavored doughnut). They also sell drinks as well as their own brand of coffee beans. While it’s true that many aspects of the doughnut-making process have changed since Rudolph passed away in 1973, the core values of the company continue to make Krispy Kreme as popular in North Carolina now as it was in 1937. It doesn’t matter if the doughnuts are created by hand or manufactured by machines, watching the doughnuts being made while standing behind the glass partition will always be an integral part of a Krispy Kreme visit – a visit that always ends with a sugary smile.

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I

New Bern

f you ask for Brad’s Drink the next time you go to lunch, you will more than likely be met with a blank stare. But chances are the restaurant has your caffeinated beverage on hand. They just may know it by its more common name: Pepsi. Caleb Bradham, the creator of Pepsi, was born in Chinquapin, NC in 1867. A graduate of the University of North Carolina, Bradham had aspirations to become a doctor, but returned home after his family’s business went bankrupt. After a short stint as a teacher, Bradham opened the Bradham Drug Company in New Bern, NC. In 1893 Bradham created a recipe for Brad’s Drink that he sold at the drug store’s soda fountain. As a pharmacist, Bradham sold his syrup, which was then mixed with effervescent water at the soda fountain, as a digestive treatment. In 1898 he renamed the drink Pepsi-Cola either after the pepsin enzyme or dyspepsia, depending on what story you believe. Either way, Bradham continued to sell Pepsi-Cola not just as a refreshing beverage but as a pharmaceutical aid. As demand for the drink continued to rise, Bradham created the Pepsi-Cola Company in 1902. He patented his bubbly beverage in 1903 and Pepsi-Cola became a trademark. With the demand for his syrup reaching record highs, Bradham decided he needed a new way to move his product. Sometime around the year 1905, Bradham switched his business model from exclusively selling Pepsi-Cola as syrup for soda fountains. Instead, Bradham began selling the syrup in containers complete with its own effervescence, creating a deliciously refreshing soda in its very own bottle. It was this change that would grow the Pepsi-Cola Company to approximately 240 franchises in 24 states. The Pepsi-Cola Company continued to grow until World War I, when sugar rationing slowed the production of the cola and forced Bradham to seek out sugar substitutes that never met the standards of the original Pepsi-Cola taste. After the war, in 1923, Bradham went bankrupt trying to keep his company afloat while dealing with wildly fluctuating sugar prices. The company assets were sold to the Craven Holding Corporation for roughly $30,000. Pepsi-Cola changed hands until it became PepsiCo, a multinational corporation that sells Pepsi as well as Mountain Dew, Lipton Tea and Cheetos. If you’d like to step back in time, you can still get an icecold Brad’s Drink, that’s Pepsi-Cola for you young’uns, in downtown New Bern at The Birthplace of Pepsi Cola 256 Middle St, New Bern, NC.

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CAROLINA CONVERSATIONS with author Patsy Ann Odom By Michelle Goetzl Photography by Diana Matthews Longtime Laurinburg resident Patsy Ann Odom recently completed an item on her bucket list that most of us will never get the chance to do – she had a novel published. From a very early age, Odom was taught a love of books and writing from her father. Her imagination never stopped working, and over the years she collected stories through journal writing and even assignments that she would give to her students. After retiring from teaching at Scotland High School and UNC-Pembroke, Odom finally got the chance to put her stories together to create the book Stained Glass. Elements of her life are present in the book. The main character’s father, for one, is written as a loving tribute to the author’s own father, who died when she was young. The book itself is a mixture of truth and imagination in one woman’s quest to live her best life. OutreachNC got the chance to sit down with Odom to understand her journey to publication and what the book means to her now. ONC: How did writing a book come about? Patsy Odom: Well, I’ve always written. As a child I was always telling stories and I guess the reading and writing both go together. My daddy was very influential. He always had stacks of books, those beautiful illustrated books, and if I couldn’t read or write at the time, I would just look at the pictures and make up stories. So I’ve always had something that I was writing. ONC: Did you always have a thought that you wanted to publish a book? PO: When I was young, I never thought about publishing. That’s a big word. And I never thought, later as a young adult, that I would ever get a chance to. That was like, “Oh, I’m going to win an Academy Award.” That was something an ordinary person just didn’t do.

ONC: You worked as an English teacher for some time. How did that influence your own writing? PO: Well, I taught creative writing for a while. I taught everything – literature, a lot of advanced classes, and I would assign something and I would write it along with them. I would write it first to see what instructions to give. If I gave the instructions and didn’t try it for myself, I thought, this is hard to do. And so I tried to write along with them. And then as I was doing it, I thought of simpler steps. ONC: What are the kind of steps you take when you are approaching writing? PO: Well, if I have no idea of what I’m going to write and that screen is just as blank as it can be, I always think of an image. I will start with something concrete – I’ll have a candle, and maybe light it, and then look at it with focus and just describe what it looks like, what it makes me think of. Then I find that that opens me up where I don’t know where I’m going. That I will go somewhere. I found that in teaching, I used to always go by the textbook. You have to do an outline, all that, but when you are writing creatively, to me that doesn’t work. If you are doing something creative, I just start with an image and a lot of times an image will pop up that will be important in the book. It may become a symbol. ONC: Speaking of symbols, how did the story of Stained Glass come about? PO: Well, I have in my book a story, and that part is true, [of] when we lived in an old Victorian house. I played upstairs a lot where there were trunks with different things to find. I discovered a panel that was loose one day and I crawled through it. There was a part of a third floor that was never finished, just rafters and beams. I would crawl up there and I would try to be a ballerina JUNE 2018 |

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and balance on the beams, and if you looked down in the darkness, you could easily fall. I discovered that high up there was a stained glass window, and in the mornings the sun would shine through that stained glass and there would be a shower of yellow gold that would light the beam. I found out that if I didn’t look at my feet, and didn’t look at the darkness, I could walk where the beam was lighted because it was like a golden light. That scene just kept coming back to me as I was writing, because I was using some parts of memory, and for some reason, it kept coming back and coming back. So I wrote the scene and thought, well, it must be important for some reason. And it really did, it became a motif all the way through – the light and dark. And what I wanted to try to illustrate is that we all go through some darkness, and if you just don’t focus on it and if there is some light somewhere, then you’re okay. ONC: The stained glass came from a memory. Were there other parts of this story that came from your own experiences? PO: I think all writers get the root of what they write from their own life experiences and their imagination. I had written so much all through the years, and I went back and picked up what I really liked and pulled bits and pieces of memory and enhanced them by adding or taking away and fitting it in. It’s just a blend of what is true and what is a blend or composite of things. Like people can be just a composite of many people, or they can be real. I was very close to my daddy, and so just about everything I have in the book that is Erin’s father, I gave him the characteristics of my father. And then there are other characters that may be completely imaginary and some a composite. ONC: How has the book been received to date? PO: The people who I know have really liked it, they’ve really enjoyed it. And also, people that I do not know. When I had the book signing in Southern Pines at the Country Bookshop, there was a couple that I had never seen before who came from Laurinburg, and she says, “I can’t get this book autographed because this is the library’s copy, but I liked it so well that I just had to come

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see you.” I was really touched. And then my daughter in Charlotte had a book signing for me and she brought lots of people and all of them, I had heard from her, liked it. ONC: How many kids do you have and what have they thought about you being published? PO: I have three kids and I kept them informed about what I was writing. They know some of the things that were true. I asked them: was there anything that they preferred I left out? They said, “No. Go with it. You know what to write.” ONC: Have you lived in Laurinburg your whole life? PO: No, but most of it. I was born here, went through high school, and once I went to college I went other places. When I was about 29 or 30 I came back home and that’s when I got a job teaching at Scotland High. After I retired from there, I went to UNC Pembroke and taught for 15 years, freshman and sophomore comp. I loved teaching college. ONC: How was teaching college different from high school kids? PO: Oh, night and day. They were serious. Either they were mature enough or else they knew they had to get the credit because they had paid for it and had to pass English. I just loved them because they were mature enough to understand the deeper levels. Because there were a lot of books we read in high school that you can understand on the surface, but for a close reader to really get down deep, I think they have to experience a little bit of life. I found that was also true in writing. Some of my honor students could really write on the surface, but their life had been so easy and they had not developed their compassion or their inner depths as you really have to when you are writing. ONC: Your book takes place in the past in this area, and so much has changed. How do you see the changes? PO: Well, one change is wonderful. At the very end when I say, “I am free,” and that is Erin speaking, but I felt free too. In the ‘50s, people were so traditional. I mean, if you didn’t experience the ‘50s, people were still so prejudiced and so class-conscious and so caring about what their neighbors thought. “You can’t do this,


what would people think?” I grew up with my mother saying that. Single women could not go out at night to eat unescorted, and you did not dare ask a question in church. ONC: So you weren’t allowed to have an opinion or a voice? PO: Yes. Women did not have jobs or a chance of having a job. All of that never bothered me, because I didn’t know any different, and I really thought that marriage was for life. So things like that were just so restricting. I grew up in a very restricted way. My mother got a hold of a journal I was writing in when I was in junior high and I had seen Gone with the Wind. When Rhett Butler said “damn” it was the first time ever. And so I was writing, and I put damn in it a couple of times – “Frankly, I don’t give a damn.” My mama found my journal and you would have thought I had committed a crime. I got in high school where I was not free to write because she would look and she would find every piece of paper I wrote, so I just kept it in my head. It was really like that for a long time, and it was like that for a lot of people. Also, you had to do what your husband said. But this freedom that women have now is just wonderful. There comes a time when you become a mother and if you are working and you’re a mother and housekeeper, you forget who you really are, you don’t have time. And if you are teaching in a public school, you have to watch your interpretation, so somebody’s not going to go home and tell their parents.

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ONC: Writing a book was an item on your bucket list. Now that you’ve got this done, what is next on your list? PO: Well, I would really like to be able to write something else, but my brain is absolutely exhausted. I had so many pieces that I went through from journals. When I finished, I had like 700 pages, and my editor said we had to cut and we got it down to 400. I rewrote everything, and that was really hard, how to pull it all together and still have a theme. So I stopped right there in the ‘70s. The first three chapters are true, and I just had to write it. My mother did commit suicide. I didn’t know if it would fit with the rest or not, so when I was putting the book together I talked with my editor and decided to start with that and just go back and let Erin tell whatever I wanted Erin to tell with truth and imagination. So, now I really don’t know. I really would like to write, but I don’t know where I want to go. ONC: What brought you back to North Carolina and what is it that you love? PO: Well, that’s sort of hard to say. I came back to Laurinburg because I was offered a job here and I needed

somewhere to go to get away from where I was, so when I was offered a job, I thought that was really what I needed. When you’re working and you have a job and children too, it is hard to take up and go anywhere. ONC: What keeps you going every day? PO: You need to have somebody to talk to. I have a little group, there are only three of us, and for 10 or more years we have been meeting every Friday morning and we read our work to each other. We talk, we’re critics. They both have taught before, so that is really good. Even when I was in high school we had a group of teachers and we would read our writing to each other. All of that, the support, just getting together and talking about all kinds of things, that frees you up. If you can vocalize what you are thinking, that helps. ONC: You said that you are free – how does it feel to be free? PO: Wonderful. For Michelle Goetzl’s review of Stained Glass, see page 19.

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by Jennifer Webster

Cancer Immunotherapy Ins and Outs

While it may not be a magic bullet, there’s still plenty of promise in activating the body’s immune system against cancer. Immunotherapy, just like it sounds, means using the body’s immune response to defeat a disease… like a measles shot! But when we read about immunotherapy in the grocery store checkout line or see an ad for an immunotherapy drug, the stories mostly concern a specific kind of immunotherapy -cancer immunotherapy, or using the immune system to fight cancer. This technique has been around for several years, and recently there have been impressive success stories. Immune checkpoint inhibitor drugs have been shown to cause some tumors to shrink, and in some cases, disappear altogether. How does immunotherapy work? How well does it work? Which cancers are susceptible? Buckle up, there’s a lot to learn.

JUNE 2018 |

OutreachNC.com 55


Many Mechanisms Sometimes known as biologic therapy, immunotherapy has several avenues of approach. The American Cancer Society lists the most common models as follows: • Vaccines prime the body to fight a cancer-causing virus by introducing a weakened or dead version of the virus to arouse an immune response. The vaccines act preventively to help the body kill the virus before it can cause cancer. Examples: HPV vaccine against cervical and related cancers.

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• Immune checkpoint inhibitors. These drugs target checkpoint proteins – proteins that keep the immune system from attacking things it shouldn’t. (Some varieties target the proteins’ “opposite number” that they bind to on cancer or other target cells.) This binding action disrupts the connection that inhibits immune cells from attacking. Example: Keytruda for non-small cell lung cancer. • Monoclonal antibodies. Not limited to cancer, these drugs attach to targeted cells, encouraging the body’s immune system to attack and destroy the target. Monoclonal antibodies may also be delivered in tandem with a chemotherapy drug. Example: Herceptin for HER2-positive breast cancer. • General or non-specific immunotherapies. These drugs boost the immune system generally in the hopes of helping it fight cancer. Example: interleukin-2 for kidney cancer and metastatic melanoma. Of these, the ones most commonly referred to as cancer immunotherapy are monoclonal antibodies and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Cancers treatable by immunotherapy so far include melanoma, lung cancer, head and neck cancers, breast cancer, kidney cancer, bladder cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma and gynecologic cancers, among others.

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Michael J. Sundborg, MD, FACOG, is a gynecologic oncologist with FirstHealth Gynecologic Oncology and FirstHealth Cancer Center. He’s familiar with immunotherapy for many cancers that affect older patients. “At FirstHealth, we participate in clinical trials, everything from advanced robotic surgeries to genetic testing and interpretation,” he says. “FirstHealth is very supportive of us as we care for women with cancer.” In his field, Dr. Sundborg has seen exciting advances using immunotherapy. He refers to Avastin (bevacizumab), an anti-angiogenic medication used to prevent cancers from developing blood vessels to support them. “Cancers travel from the site of origin, and they make their own blood vessels, their own life support systems,” he explains. “Anti-angiogenics target cancers and tell them to turn off [these systems]. One of the first targeted therapies with Avastin was using it to block those signals so the cancer starved. This was experimental ten years ago. Now, it’s in common use.” Another promising line of research has been PARP inhibitors, Dr. Sundborg says. “That immunotherapy targets the DNA repair mechanism of the cancer cell,” he says. “[We’ve seen] an increase in length of survival in patients with recurrent cancers. The FDA just approved all three commercially available ones for ovarian cancer.”

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This is particularly promising because ovarian cancer is often asymptomatic in the early stages and is frequently discovered late in the disease progression, when there is less hope for survival.


It’s important to note that these drugs don’t treat all forms of a cancer; they typically work best for cancers with a particular protein that renders them susceptible to immunotherapy intervention. For instance, only HER2positive breast cancer is susceptible to monoclonal antibody Herceptin (trastuzumab), and only about 20 percent of breast cancers are HER2positive. Therefore, only a fraction of breast cancer patients can benefit from this drug. Of that fraction, one large-scale, long-term study of 4,000 patients showed about 10 percent increase in 10-year survival in patients treated with chemotherapy plus Herceptin, as opposed to Herceptin alone (75.2 to 84 percent). Help or Hype? Drug ads on television promise miracle cures, especially when they portray people described as having late-stage cancer strolling, playing golf or tussling with grandchildren. Think about the “It’s TRU” Keytruda ads presently airing. In one ad, patient Donna was given just a few months to live after a diagnosis of late-stage non-small cell lung cancer that had metastasized to her brain. Her particular cancer was found to have high levels of PDL1, a protein that binds to immune cells and keeps them from attacking the cancer, meaning it was a potential target for intervention with the immune checkpoint inhibitor drug. A trial of immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) resulted in shrinking tumors and, as of the latest update on the drug maker’s website, Donna has been alive for two years, despite side effects such as disappearing thyroid function. Typically, five-year survival in patients with Donna’s diagnosis is less than 10 percent. More generally, patients with high PD-L1 non-small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab have been found to live about twice as long (or 30 months, compared to 14 months) as patients treated with standard chemotherapy. Is this a big-picture success or a “meh?” It depends on who you’re asking. A year is a lot of extra time for someone with a prognosis measured in months; it’s a small amount of time for someone who could easily have lived another 50 years had she not developed cancer. Clinical trials for all kinds of late-stage cancer treatments (not just immunotherapy) often present results in terms of weeks or months of cancer-free progression, or changes in overall survival measured in months. On the other hand, some statisticians criticize the hype around immunotherapy agents. Writing for medical journalism site STAT, hematologist/oncologists Nathan Gay and Vinay Prasad point out that only certain cancers present features amenable to many immunotherapy agents, so the improvements are measured as small changes in small populations. Restricting their argument to immune checkpoint inhibitor drugs, Gay and Prasad state that only about eight percent of people dying of cancer in the U.S. in a year have the potential to be saved by one of these drugs. Still, with close to 600,000 cancer deaths in the U.S. each year, that’s a lot of people with the potential to be saved. Dr. Sundborg sees the general trend as positive, even for older patients. “Clinical trials show even the elderly group, in their sixth decade and beyond, will do all right [with immunotherapy] if their health is good,” he says. “It’s an area [that’s] evolving right now, these therapies. I tell my patients, ‘You live in an exciting time. Patients ten years back asked to live ten years [when they were given a cancer diagnosis], but it was hard to do that with

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advanced cancer. Now we’ve crossed that frontier. Every day we’re learning new things. We are doing good research, and we are beginning to apply that in a regular clinical setting.”

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Ask Your Doctor Like other cancer-fighting modalities from surgery to radiation, immunotherapy has side effects of all kinds. Most common are flu-like symptoms, rashes, pain at the IV or injection site and intestinal problems. Since immunotherapy medications amplify immune reactions, patients may experience disorders such as inflammatory arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune thyroid failure. As with positive responses, there’s a wide range in type and intensity to negative effects to the drug — from mild reactions to extreme toxicity. Some clinical trials, such as one for an immunotherapy treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, have been halted due to patient deaths. But what will you or a loved one experience if you decide on immunotherapy? Will it be worth it? “Cancer can affect people in their 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond,” Dr. Sundborg says. “Cancer is a reflection of the success of our longevity. Many generations ago, patients didn’t live past 50. [Longevity] is why we’re seeing all these different cancers now. So when we talk [about cancer treatments], it’s patients in that age range we’re discussing.” Within that age range — people in middle life and older — Dr. Sundborg identifies two groups of patients. One group will do well with most cancer therapies. “Patients who are between 50 and 70, fairly robust and in good health, tolerate treatments well, whether surgery, chemotherapy or immunotherapy,” he says. “Most clinical trials are performed using healthier patients.” He notes that it’s important that clinical trials compare how patients within each group fare with the treatment. “When it comes to age, we should look at patient overall health and functional status,” he says, explaining that this gives an indicator of how they’ll do on any therapy. “Most toxicities [associated with immunotherapy] are very similar to those of chemotherapy. They are exciting treatments, but with the same risk factors — they can make you anemic, affect your bone marrow and, ironically, impact your immune system. But most people do well on them if they start out in good health.” Dr. Sundborg explains that physicians welcome patients to participate in clinical trials or avail themselves of a range of therapies, immunotherapy included. Many cancer centers, such as FirstHealth, offer clinical trial access. Age need not be a barrier to treatment. “We want patients, no matter their age, to participate in clinical trials,” he says. “It’s like the PARP inhibitor trials — they tend to be tolerated well, regardless of age.” By the same token, patients who are too frail to tolerate chemotherapy will likely not tolerate immunotherapy well, either. An unhealthy patient of 50 will do less well with treatments than a fit, active 90-year-old, in many cases. So, Dr. Sundborg says, immunotherapies are not to be thought of as a


substitute for chemotherapy.

activate against the cancer cell.

“They’re often the second- or third-line [treatment],” he says. “If you’re not well enough for conventional therapy, you will not be offered immunotherapy.”

“The first immunotherapy, against melanoma, was a success story. Now there’s research into [therapies for] breast cancer and gynecologic cancer coming out of it. As our clinical trials mature, we are going to help patients more.”

But he’s quick to reassure: “In my experience, very few patients are too ill to receive therapy. Those patients, no matter what their age, who were diagnosed with very advanced malignancy [may not benefit from treatment]. But if a patient can walk into the office, then they are not too far gone to consider treatment. “The general perception is that our immune system declines with age is simplistic. It does decline, but that doesn’t mean we can’t activate it against cancer. And as a side note, many immunotherapies are given in combination with chemotherapy, and people tolerate them well.” Hope for the Future The problem of cancer is a fascinating one. It’s not an alien invader to be killed off with an antibiotic; it’s intimately related to the sufferer. And therein lies both the difficulty and the promise of treatment. “The problem with cancer is your cancer cells are you,” Dr. Sundborg says bluntly. “They have your identity — they’re not a germ or a virus. The cancer cells carry the identity of the host. The immune system doesn’t recognize them. You can activate the immune system, but you could cause damage [doing that], just as with chemo. We are now trying to activate the immune system just to

Patients with cancer should ask for available clinical trials, he says. “They’re ethically constructed,” he adds. “Ask whether your doctor participates in clinical trials, or whether there are any available for the treatment of your disease. We [offer] them at FirstHealth.” He becomes more ardent as he speaks of the promise of expanding knowledge and better cancer treatments to come. “Ten or 20 years ago we performed ovarian and uterine cancer research [separately],” he says. “Now we know these cancers that don’t seem related share common pathways at the molecular level — common ways how they interact with their environment. We can develop precision medicine, which immunotherapies are; we can develop precise targets. Now we have clinical trials of very different disease systems, but all using the same type of therapies, because [the diseases] have common molecular similarities. This is an exciting part of the 21st century.” Questions? Find Dr. Sundborg at FirstHealth.org.

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GREY MATTER Puzzle 6 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.55)

See Grey Matter Puzzle Answers on Page 62

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OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2018

19. Appropriate 20. Altogether 21. Choppers, so to speak 23. Kind of rug 25. Indian turnover

Halls Haze Held Items Kite Leads Life Lion Lungs Mast Mind Odor Orbit Others Oval Peered Plot Pops Prey Rage Reins Residence Rice Rise Robots Robs Rope Rose

Sails Scale Shock Solo Staff Step Swept Talk Tame Turn Urgent Ways Wear Wipes Zero Zoo

8. Appear 9. Repeatable pattern 10. Cantina cooker 11. Onion relative 12. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto) 14. ___ Dee River 16. Sagging of an organ 18. Ado 22. Bug 24. Ancient 26. ___ probandi 27. “No problem!” 28. Crown 29. Remove, as a hat 30. City on the Yamuna River 31. Smudge 33. Attracted 36. Intensifies 38. Treeless plain 41. Follow 43. Close, as an envelope 46. Evergreen tree native to West Indies 48. Go places DOWN 50. Issue 1. Master 52. To anoint 2. Flax fabric 53. Crowded 3. Scottish Highland 54. Banana oil, e.g. town 55. Fill-in 4. Noisy festive 56. Apple spray celebration 57. Change 5. Officer ranking below 59. “___ moment” a Captain 61. Matterhorn, e.g. 6. Bind 7. Bryologists’ study


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advice

ROLE REVERSAL

Sharing Housework by David Hibbard

pad just perfectly, without any “bubbles” in the sheet or without stretching one of the corners so far that it rips, is a mystery I’ll never solve. Infrequently, she’ll take up my offer to help – and that’s just fine. I feel better for having asked, and I realize her preference for doing the job herself on most occasions reflects more on her proficiency at it than my considerable inability to do it well.

Did you ever earn your allowance as a kid by doing chores around the house? I don’t recall right off whether my parents rewarded taking the trash out with a shiny dime or quarter, but I do remember I was expected to handle my fair share as a youngster. Whether cleaning up my room, mowing the grass or helping my dad with his latest, greatest home improvement project, the message was clear: if you live here, you do your part to make the house run.

Another more serious concern is coming to an agreement about the household tasks neither of you should try your hand at. Until about five years ago, I was willing to climb two or three steps up a stepladder and clean the gutters that surround our back deck. But a few additional years and pounds, combined with a knee that I don’t entirely trust, put an end to my ladder-climbing days. And certainly, my mom wants no part of being on a ladder. Neither of us can help the other much with a broken extremity, so we’ve decided that’s one task we’ll gladly pay a younger, more nimble person to handle at our house.

Fast forward a number of years – maybe 30 or 40 – and that expectation may (should!) still be the same if you wind up living with one or both of your parents again. The difference this time is that you’re each a lot older than before! Regardless of what the calendar says, however, those daily household tasks won’t get done by themselves.

As the adult child, I believe it’s my responsibility to help my mom with those chores whenever and however I can. At the same time, I realize there are some things she enjoys doing, and can still handle with relative ease. Plus, Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54) ratingabout 0.49) to co-habitate Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.56) If you’re with your parents again, she’s almost always a lot better at them thanPuzzle me! 2I (Medium, give herdifficulty at the the room able 5 4 to8do9the3things 1 7she6is physically 2 2 to 9 do, 4 but 3 6 take 5 a8 few 1 minutes 7 8 outset 6 1 to 3ask9how 2 you 7 can 5 best 4 help them with their to-do list around the house. By offer9to 2help6 if she needs it. 8 5 7 4 3 1 6 5 7 1 8 9 2 3 4 2 4 5 1 7 8 6 3 9 shouldering your share of the burden, you’ll be making A prime 7 1example 3 6 of 4 this 2 is5 putting 9 8 fresh sheets 3 on 1 the 8 4 2 7 6 9 5 3 7 9 6 5 4 2 8 1 life easier for everyone – and the rewards will be much bed.3Personally, I’m terrible at it and I find fitted sheets a 6 7 5 1 8 2 4 9 8 2 9 7 5 greater 1 3 than 4 6that childhood 4 8allowance 7 9 6ever 5 was. 3 1 2 particularly difficult challenge (Seriously, has anyone ever 8

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In addition to the Memory Cafe, AOS & Friends Care offers Direct Care grants JUNE 2018 | OutreachNC.com 63 and programs, featuring Personalized Music Players and Robo Companion Pets.


life

OVER MY SHOULDER

Homegrown Literature Gives Sense of Place by Ann Robson

North Carolina has a proud collection of novelists, poets, columnists and writers in general. The seeds were sown early in the lives of its writers and nourished to blossom and bloom when the time was right. These creative minds have brought a forest of wondrous words to life and we are better for it. The first writer from North Carolina that I met was Jim Wayne Miller, who was born in Leicester in the mountains. I was privileged to get to know him in nearby Kentucky. He was a quiet, thoughtful man with a quick wit and enormous talent for poetry. Although he was a professor teaching German and Modern Languages at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green for 34 years, his claim to fame is his work on Appalachian studies where he quickly became a renowned advocate for Appalachia through his poetry. In Every Leaf a Mirror: A Jim Wayne Miller Reader, edited by his widow Mary Ellen and Morris Allen Grubbs, Jim is quoted about his inspiration for writing poetry: “People in their place – how they have coped, what they have come to be as a result of living in that place.” This collection of Jim’s work is a treasure gleaned from years of writing and publishing. Jaki Shelton Green is another North Carolina poet who is inspired by people and place. She is a strong voice for young writers with emphasis on African-Americans. However, she does not want to be misinterpreted as favoring one group of people over another. Rather, she is a humanist who cares for all of us and says so forcefully. I interviewed her for OutreachNC in December 2014 and asked what being named poet laureate for the NC Piedmont meant to her. She replied, “I’ve always been attracted to nontraditional writers – writers whom I’ve worked with in homeless shelters, in prisons, women on death row. I want to enhance the world of literature one person at a time. As the poet laureate, I get to roll around the area and meet with many writers. I don’t always get excited about the everydayness of poetry. People

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often ask me what inspires me. As a working class writer, I don’t have the privilege of saying I’m going to my cabin, or beach house, to write now. Writing is as natural as breath for me. Poetry is everywhere. You have to listen.” Green does not write on a computer. She loves paper and writes in her journals. “I feel connections between the paper and pen and my thoughts.” She says that “growing up in North Carolina was a blessing in all of its beauty and ugliness. Space and place influenced the stories I heard.” Green was born in Alamance County, grew up in Orange County, and now resides in Mebane. If you are not familiar with her work, check it out and prepare to be amazed. Mystery novelist Margaret Maron was born where the piedmont meets the sandhills of North Carolina. After living in Italy and Brooklyn, she returned to her NC roots and now lives on part of her family’s farm. Time and place have been important themes for her. In New York, she created NYPD Lt. Sigrid Harald as the lead character in her mysteries. In North Carolina, she has created District Court Judge Deborah Knott, the opinionated daughter of a crusty old ex-bootlegger. Her novels are set in various NC locations, and some characters may resemble local folk but she is quick to note that “No, I’m not writing about my own family.” These writers have earned many awards and prestigious accolades. They were born in different parts of North Carolina and have chosen different motifs for their writing. The early seeds have been well tended and the harvest from these and many other authors do our state proud.

Ann Robson is the author of “Over My Shoulder: Tales of Life and Death and Everything In Between.” She can be reached at overmyshoulder@charter.net .


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Generations

by Corbie Hill & Michelle Goetzl

OutreachNC asked adults and children our June question. Share your answer on our Facebook page.

What ’s your dream vacation? Two weeks in Maui. – Wiley, 88

To go to Rome. I have always wanted to see the Coliseum. – Sophia, 10

A big house on the beach with a boat and fishing gear. – Chris, 11

Traveling in my camper. – Melinda, 63

Going to the set of Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. I would also like to be on the set of Avengers and Justice League. – Carson, 10

I would like to go to Utah because there is a lot of horse riding there. – Mia, 10

Tokyo. – Brooke, 10

Going to London, so I could see the Premier League games. I would love to see a World Cup game, like England vs Spain. – Henry, 11

To visit every Disney resort in the world. – Joanna, 11

River cruising in Europe. – Carol, 74

Any time and place that grandchildren are present. – Ray, 72

My dream vacation would be to go to Greece and Rio. I would want to go to Greece because I like learning about Greek culture. – Aly, 11

Exploring space on the Starship Enterprise. I’m not sure I’d want to come back again, though. – Corbie, 36 Thailand, to enjoy the architecture, beautiful art and ecosystem. – Hope, 11

To go to a nice lake for a week. – Marilyn, 90 Hawaii, because I would like to go surfing. – Michaela, 10 Alaska [or] New England fall tour. – Hilda, 76 Home. – Belinda, 62

LOOKING AHEAD TO UPCOMING ISSUES JULY

“Booming Lifestyles: The Music Issue” ✴Not fade away: Sticking with the music industry into your 50s – and beyond. ✴Aberdeen’s own nonprofit music venue The Rooster’s Wife 66 OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2018 ✴Merlefest

AUGUST

“Living Healthy” ✴Cancer survival stories ✴The people behind The People’s Pharmacy ✴Sleep and aging

SEPTEMBER

“Generations” ✴The Robeson Planetarium and Science Center ✴Lessons from our grandparents


Don’t miss out on a vacation...

We understand the value of having caregivers you trust while you’re away.

Let us provide referrals to carefully screened private-duty caregivers who work according to your needs and schedule.

- Lindsey Simmons Registry Administrator

Caregiver Registry in North Carolina Call us today!

910-692-0683

www.AOSNC.com JUNE 2018 |

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OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2018

866.573.4909

Outreachnc 0618 issuu  

A Fishy State, From the Navy to the Green, Birding in NC, Uwharrie National Forest, Where The Future Grows, Homegrown in North Carolina, Car...

Outreachnc 0618 issuu  

A Fishy State, From the Navy to the Green, Birding in NC, Uwharrie National Forest, Where The Future Grows, Homegrown in North Carolina, Car...