Issuu on Google+

24 L JU

08 0 02 3 L - JU

4 O0 N 13 L VO

HAEL C I M E GEORG OUT BUSI NESS N EWS • INTERVIEW:

S IEW V E MR • FIL


2 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY OWNERS AND PUBLISHERS Michael Daniels & Chris Hayes EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / ART DIRECTOR Chris Hayes hayes@outlookmedia.com

SNAPSHOT

CAMP EQUALITY is an intensive, 2-day interactive training program that combines lectures, discussions, and real-life simulations. Camp Equality™ teaches both advanced and fundamental skills to help strengthen the impact our community has on the 2008 elections.

ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR / PHOTOS Robert Trautman traut@outlookmedia.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mette Bach, Danielle Buckius, Wayne R Besen, Chris Crain, Jennifer Vanasco, Tom Moon, Regina Sewell, Leslie Robinson, Gregg Shapiro, Mick Weems, Julianne French, TF Barton, Romeo San Vicente, Jeff Fertig, Simon Sheppard, Tristan Taormino, Dennis Vanke, Mario Pinardi, Rick Kramer, Aaron Drake, Jennie Keplar, Scott Varner, Derrik Chinn, Dan Savage, Felice Newman, Tim Curran, Chris Hughes, Stephen J Fallon, Felice Newman, J. Eric Peters, Crystal Hawkins, Brent Wilder, Matthew Burlingame, Jacob Anderson-Minshall, Matthew Veritas Tsien, Cheri Meyers

MISS GAY OHIO AMERICA 2008 Was at Axis Nightclub this past weekend, here are some of the photos of contestants.

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Michael Daniels mdaniels@outlookmedia.com NATIONAL ADVERTISING Rivendell Media - 212.242.6863 ADVERTISING DEADLINE Each Wednesday 8 days prior to publication. Call us at 614.268.8525. HOW TO REACH US Outlook Media, Inc. 815 N High St, Suite ii Columbus, OH 43215 614.268.8525 phone 614.261.8200 fax www.outlookweekly.net web www.outlookmedia.com business www.myspace.com/outlookweekly friends www.flickr.com/outlookweekly photos SUBSCRIPTIONS Call 614.268.8525

READERSHIP: 210,000 PEOPLE / MONTH Outlook Weekly is published and distributed by Outlook Media, Inc. every Thursday throughout Ohio. Outlook Weekly is a free publication provided solely for the use of our readers. Any person who willfully or knowingly obtains or exerts unauthorized control over copies of Outlook Weekly with the intent to prevent other individuals from reading it shall be considered guilty of the crime of theft. Violators will be prosecuted. The views expressed in Outlook Weekly are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the views, policies, or personal, business, or professional practices of Outlook Media, Inc. or its staff, ownership, or management. Outlook Weekly does not guarantee the accuracy, completeness or reliability of any interpretation, advice, opinion, or view presented. Outlook Media, Inc. does not investigate or accept responsibility for claims made in any advertisement. Outlook Media, Inc. assumes no responsibility for claims arising in connection with products and services advertised herein, nor for the content of, or reply to, any advertisement. All material is copyrighted ©2008 by Outlook Media, Inc. All rights reserved.

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008 VOLUME 13 NUMBER 04

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

This week’s feature is about all the awesome stuff to do in Hocking Hills and surrounding areas. Team Outlook getting ready to go ziplining and some insane kids on the canoe trip jumping from a railroad bridge and a rope along the rivers edge.

SNAPSHOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........2 ABOUT TOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....3-30 COMMENTARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........4 COMMUNITY CORNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........6 SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........8 OUT BUSINESS NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......11 EXAMINED LIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......13 EARTHTALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......15 FEATURE: HOCKING HILLS . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .16-22 DEEP INSIDE HOLLYWOOD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......24 ARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......24 FILM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......25 MUSIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......26 CLASSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......27 PUCKER UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......28 SAVAGE LOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......29 THE LAST WORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......31 SCOPES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......31 NEXT WEEK: HOOKUP!


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 3

ABOUT TOWN by Chris Hayes THURSDAY, JULY 24 WANT TO WATCH A MOVIE, DAVE? Stanley Kubrick Retrospective @ Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St, 614.292.3535, wexarts.org: In July and August, the Wexner Center presents a 10-night, 13-film retrospective of acclaimed filmmaker Stanley Kubrick’s work. Tonight’s film is Lolita, Kubrick’s first film shot in England, Lolita is based on Vladimir Nabokov’s high-comic novel about the nymphet-chasing Humbert Humbert, which was widely assumed to be unfilmable at the time. The pitch-perfect casting of James Mason as Humbert and Shelley Winters as his alarming landlady, joined by Sue Lyon in the title role, is fully matched by Peter Sellars as Mason’s obsessed adversary. The British locations and roadscapes provide a disorienting counterpoint to the story’s insistently American setting. Although much of Nabokov’s own screenplay was not used, his deeply satiric viewpoint consistently pierces through. 7p; $7, $5 mem, student, senior. FRIDAY, JULY 25 NO FREE LUNCH…WHATEVER! Summer Fridays Free Lunch Concerts @ The Ohio Statehouse, High St (btw State & Broad), www.ohiostatehouse.org: Dublin Dance Centre and Gymnastics and Ohio Dance will present a performance as part of the performing arts series, Summer Fridays at the Statehouse. The FREE lunch-time outdoor performing arts series takes place on the West Plaza (High Street) of the historic Statehouse each Friday throughout the summer. Summer Fridays provide an opportunity for the public and downtown community to gather on Capitol Square to experience Columbus’ diverse arts groups and to visit the beautiful Capitol building. 12p; free. LOVE WILL CONQUER ALL A Jihad for Love @ Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St, 614.292.3535, wexarts.org: The film, produced by Trembling Before G-d‘s Sandi Dubowski, is a daring exploration of gay and lesbian Muslims struggling to negotiate a new relationship with their Islamic faith. In the words of director Parvez Sharma, this film, made secretly for six years in twelve countries (including Iran), succeeds in opening “a completely different discourse on Islam.” Tonight and tomorrow. 7p; $7, $5 mem, students, seniors. DON’T FORGET THE BOUNTY Jazz & Rib Fest @ Downtown Riverfront, www.musicintheair.org: Hungry for Jazz? Satisfy your craving! Now in its 29th year, Jazz & Rib Fest brings premier jazz musicians together with the finest ribs around. Rib burners from across North America - and one from Canada - come to downtown Columbus to serve up mouthwatering BBQ. Throughout the weekend, rib burners will compete for American Family Insurance Best Ribs Awards and vie for your votes to win the People’s Choice Award! This year’s jazz lineup includes: David Sanborn, Charles Tolliver Big Band, The Either/Orchestra with Ethiopian Special Guests, Randy Weston’s African Rhythms Sextet, Simone, The Curtis Fuller Super Band, Albino, The Motet, Dafnis Prieto Sextet, Will Bernard, The Maurice Brown Effect, and Eric Person’s Meta-Four. Fri & Sat 11a-10p; Sun 11a-8p; free. WHAT IS THE BRIGHT SIDE? Monty Python’s Life of Brian @ Ohio Theatre, 39 E State St, 614.469.0939, www.capa.com: As a Jew born on Christmas Day in a Bethlehem stable, Brian Cohen becomes the first case of mistaken identity

as he is assumed to be the long-awaited messiah. Features classic Python tunes including “Brian Song,” “Look on the Bright Side of Life,” and many, many more! 11p; $3.50. HMMM, MYSTERIOUS On the Other Hand, Death: A Donald Strachey Mystery @ here!, America’s premium gay television network, is premier in this third installment in the franchise. Once again stars Chad Allen as the gay private investigator and co-stars screen legend Margot Kidder (Superman. Check local listings. SINGERS OF A FEATHER Debe’ Wenig & Norwin Mergler @ Club Diversity, 863 S High St, 614.224.4050, clubdiversity.com: Jazz cabaret and all the boas you can handle. Enjoy the music, the patio and the best martinis in town. 9:30; free. TIGHTY WHITIES FOR EVERYONE Underwear Party @ Axis, 775 N High St, 614.291.4008, columbusnightlife.com: Ohio Leather Alliance presents the Underwear Party. The Kick off meet and greet for Back in Black weekend. 10p; $5 SATURDAY, JULY 26 GRILL MASTER & SERVANT Grill and Chill @ Exile, 893 N 4th St, 614.299.0069, exilebar.com: Ohio Leather Alliance presents this afternoon BBQ. How do you like your weiner? Plenty of buns to stick it in. 4p; free. WHO’S YOUR DADDY? Back in Black Leather Contest @ Axis, 775 N High St, 614.291.4008, columbusnightlife.com: Ohio Leather Alliance presents this contest for Leathermen. Do you have what it takes, Sir? Grab your boy and find out. 9p; cover. V IS FOR VICTORY, X IS FOR FUN Victory Party @ Exile, 893 N 4th St, 614.299.0069, exilebar.com: Ohio Leather Alliance presents the after party. Meet, congratulate, & worship the winners. Maybe lick something. 12a; free. SUNDAY, JULY 27 I’M GIVING IT ALL I CAN CAPTAIN Return To The Forbidden Planet @ Shadowbox Cabaret, Easton Towne Center, 614.416.7625, shadowboxcabaret.com: What do you get when you combine Shakespeare, Star Trek, Jym Ganahl, and 1950 / 1960s pop classics? You get Shadowbox’s summer musical: Return to the Forbidden Planet. Sundays through Aug 3. 3p & 7p; $20-$30. TUESDAY, JULY 29 LIFE OF THE PARTY Seasonal Gourmet @ Whole Foods, 3670 W. DublinGranville Rd, 614.760.5556: Bryan Loveless, “My Kitchen” Personal Chef Service presentation. Bryan is a master at making a great presentation while combining the fresh flavors of locally grown produce within a menu. He will share his knowledge of choosing the best values from produce while building a delicious yet budget minded menu. Please dress for a cooking experience by wearing closed-toe shoes; aprons provided! 6:30p, $30. I – 69…WHO DOESN’T Drag BINGO @ Score Bar, 145 N 5th St, 614.849.0099, scorebarcolumbus.com and @ Slammers 202 E Long St, 614.221.8880: Viva Velure and Anisa Love hosts this night of dropping balls and prizes. 10p; free. JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


4 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

The Reader Poll

COMMENTARY by Wayne Besen

Last week we asked:

In 2001, David Bianco was at the pinnacle of his career in GLBT journalism. He was the founder of Q Syndicate, a content provider for gay media, and wrote, “Past Out,” a widely distributed GLBT history column. He was also the author of, Gay Essentials: Facts for Your Queer Brain. With great irony, the man who made his living by revealing the glorious gay past was quietly reinventing his own personal history. He had allegedly given up sex with men and was rapidly moving towards Orthodox Judaism. In September 2003, Bianco went public with his conversion in an interview with The Washington Blade. He denounced, “having all kinds of Internet hook-ups and doing the urban gay male lifestyle thing,” and said he could no longer remain closeted about his metamorphose. “It was increasingly odd to be supervising content for the gay media on a day-to-day basis when in my own life I was moving away from gay identity,” Bianco said. Then he complained about the reaction he received from colleagues saying, “Nobody gets a parade for leaving the gay community...” While his exit elicited no parade, Bianco did create a media circus - changing his name to Benkof and appearing on the “Ricki Lake” show to oppose same-sex marriage. Basking in his beloved spotlight - it seemed that Benkof was poised to become the right wing’s latest star. Then, he just fell off the radar for nearly five years. Unfortunately, he could not bear anonymity in our celebrity culture and burst back on the scene this year - using the California marriage decision to catapult him to newfound notoriety.

Benkof opened shop with a deceptively titled blog, “Gays Defend Marriage,” and started a new column, “Fabulously Observant,” in which he posed as a pro-gay activist who just happened to give up sex for religious reasons. What the editors of GLBT publications who decided to run his column did not know was that Benkof had extreme beliefs. He says that his religion teaches him that, “when you engage in mishkav zachar (gay sex), you are inflicting harsh damage on your precious Jewish spirit. Mishkav zachar is such a horrible sin that you are commanded to submit to being killed (yehareg v’al yaavor) rather than committing it.” When his editors found out his nutty views and that he was moonlighting as a zealous opponent of GLBT rights, he was dropped like a BLT at a Seder. Benkof came to the attention of GLBT rights organizations last month after he began placing defamatory op-eds in mainstream news publications. His columns were notable because they would ostensibly be about a topic, such as President Bush’s record on AIDS, but the real intention was to smear gay people and make the GLBT community look perverse, untrustworthy, selfish and unworthy of basic human rights. It was really a disgusting display of bigotry and self-loathing on the part of Benkof. He seemed bitter that he gave up sex and appeared to take his frustrations out on all gay people. His tirades were punctuated with hateful and unfounded statements like, “I have tons of data that shows how a significant subset of the gay community in America has always supported adult-child sex.” The truth is, not a single mainstream GLBT rights organization supports adult-child sex,

or even mentions the topic, for that matter. Benkof flat our lied to slime the GLBT community. He seems to have an ax to grind and seethes with resentment that so many GLBT people have rich and satisfying lives. When defending his views, Benkof would often throw irrational tantrums in online forums. He called me a “self-hating Jew” who was “spitting in the eye of G-d,” and blasted blogger Pam Spaulding as a, “nasty bitch.” Still, Benkof was a difficult opponent because he’s smart, has a knack for getting published and knew enough about gay history to hijack it. His brain was like a large computer hard drive stuffed with faulty software that contained quirks and bugs. With his prodigious output of anti-gay propaganda, he promised to be a problem for years to come. But, again, in a blink, he was gone. Out of nowhere, he announced this week that he was closing down his blog and getting out of the anti-gay marriage business, saying, “I no longer feel comfortable being allied with the people running the Prop. 8 campaign (the group trying to ban same-sex marriage in California), and the same-sex marriage movement in America in general.” The capricious Benkof is like a supernova of nonsense, he flares up and then he flames out. We can only imagine where the spotlight will lead this walking human tragedy next. Perhaps, the enterprising chameleon will start a reality show called “Extremist Makeover,” where contestants with mutating morals change their names and search for new issues and identities to embrace. I can’t think of anyone more qualified for the job than Bianco/Benkof, or whomever he fancies himself today.

Where is your favorite place to do outdoor activities (camping, hiking, canoeing, etc) ? • My husband likes to go running at Atrum Lake while I play with our dog in the lake. Family fun for everyone. • Maine • Indoors. Where there is really cold air conditioning. • Hocking Hills • Maui • For hiking in Ohio, Hocking Hills and Yellow Springs; canoeing near Miamisburg • Mohican State Park • Buckeye Lake

NEXT WEEK’S QUESTION:

• How often do you meet dates from the Internet?

© 2008 Wayne Besen. All rights reserved. Anything But Straight, www.waynebesen.com

Log on to: www.outlookweekly.net to take this week’s poll.

28 SO U RC

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

E : WASHINGTO

ST

EXTREMIST MAKEOVER

O NP

CATEGORY

NOV 2 ’04

JUN 21 ’08

DIFFERENCE

AMERICAN DEAD

1,122

4,124

3,002

AMERICAN WOUNDED

8,124

30,409

22,285

IRAQI CIVILIAN DEAD

16,342

93,880

NATIONAL DEBT

$7,429,629,954,236

$9,518,251,647,355

DAYS ‘TIL 2008 ELECTION

1,463

136

77,538 $2,088,621,693,119 (1,327)


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 5

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


6 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

COMMUNITY CORNER

CHANGES AT

EQUALITY OHIO Change is afoot for Ohio’s only statewide proequality organization. During its July 19 meeting, the Equality Ohio Board of Directors welcomed a new board chair while saying a very fond farewell to one of the organization’s founders. The board changes come at the same time the organization welcomes its first Deputy Director. Effective at the end of the 7/19 meeting the previous chair, Tom Grote of Columbus, stepped off of Equality Ohio’s board. As one of EO’s founders, for nearly 4 years Grote lent his considerable talents to creating a strong, sustainable organization. He leaves the organization to focus more time on his growing family and exciting new business venture. “Although I will miss the day-to-day involvement with Equality Ohio, it is time for me to move on to the next phase of my life”, said Grote. “Equality Ohio has come so far in just three years and I am very proud of the work the staff, our boards and the statewide community are doing to create an Ohio where everyone can feel at home. Together we have created a strong organization for the future; Equality Ohio is in good hands.” “Tom has given so much of himself to Equality Ohio during his tenure. He has given the organiza-

Rev. Dr. Michael Castle

tion a strong foundation of leadership and sound business principles from which to operate. Fortunately, we have strong people who can fill those voids”, said Melanie Falls of Cleveland, Chair of Equality Ohio Education Fund. “What we will truly miss the most about Tom is the sense of passion and commitment he brought to the vision and mission of our organization.” With Grote’s departure, the board of Directors welcomed the Rev. Dr. Michael Castle as its new Chair. Castle, of Centerville near Dayton, is Pastor of Cross Creek Community Church, United Church of Christ, in Dayton. He has been involved with the organization since October 2005 and is excited about his new role. “As the founder of a progressive and justiceseeking church, I understand the power the grassroots voice brings to advocacy work “, said Castle. “My partner Dan and I look forward to the day when our relationship to each other and to our son will be fully recognized by the state of Ohio. I believe that giving my time to Equality Ohio as its Board Chair will help make the day we can all feel at home come faster.” Castle will join Falls in shared leadership of

BRAVO LAUNCHES STATEWIDE OUTREACH Cleveland and Cincinnati to have access to Anti-Violence Services The Buckeye Region Anti-Violence Organization announces the expansion of anti-violence services throughout the State of Ohio. BRAVO began to focus outreach activities in Cleveland and Cincinnati with Pride 2008. BRAVO was launched at Pride 1996 and has been providing quality community service to Columbus and Central Ohio ever since. BRAVO’s vision has always included state-wide outreach. Beginning with the 2008 Pride season BRAVO launched outreach efforts and services in both locations. BRAVO traveled to pride events in both cities. In addition to outreach and distributing safety whistles, BRAVO conducted needs assessment surveys to help focus efforts and learn more about the individual communities. “We have been taking calls from around Ohio for quite a while.” noted BRAVO Board President, Bill Hedrick “We are just making it official. “We are in the beginning stages of this effort and will be working to build collaborations with other groups over the next few months.” BRAVO is working with community leaders and organizations in both communities to ensure a smooth launch. BRAVO will work with existing resources to improve access to culturally appropriate services and to provide assistance to crime victims as they seek access to justice. According to Gloria McCauley, Executive Director “We are looking forward to becoming a part of, and an asset to, the LGBT Communities of Cleveland and Cincinnati.” JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

Peter Caborn

Equality Ohio and Equality Ohio Education Fund. “I am looking forward to the opportunity to partner with Mike to lead Equality Ohio forward, “said Falls. “This is an exciting time of growth and opportunity for our organizations as we expand our staff, grow our non-traditional outreach program, work to elect fair-minded officials and pass Ohio’s first proequality piece of legislation.” In other business, the Equality Ohio board welcomed Debra Anne Johnson of Cincinnati, as a new member. The Equality Ohio Education Fund board also welcomed Paul Feeney, immediate past President of Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus Board of Directors, to its board. The changes on the boards of Equality Ohio and the Education Fund occur at a time when the staff of the organization is growing as well. On July 1, the team welcomed Peter Caborn as the organization’s first Deputy Director. Caborn, a native of Columbus, returns home to Ohio after most recently serving as Director of Major Gifts & Membership for GLAAD (the third largest national LGBT civil rights organization). His involvement with Equality Ohio dates back to November 2004, when the organization was just an idea shared by a small group of people.

“After having a hand in the beginnings of Equality Ohio just a few years ago, I am thrilled to return to Ohio to work professionally for this strong, strategic organization”, said Caborn. “There is so much opportunity in Ohio. I’m honored to be able to add my knowledge and experience to the great team of people who strive to make equality in Ohio a reality everyday.” In the role of Deputy Director, Caborn will assume responsibility for oversight of the administrative operations and fiscal development work of the organization. His addition will free up Executive Director Lynne Bowman to focus more on EO’s programmatic, legislative and political work. Statewide outreach will be a significant portion of Caborn’s job, though he will be based in the Central Ohio office. He joins the existing team of Equality Ohio as its sixth full-time member. “The addition of a Deputy Director brings Equality Ohio to an exciting new stage in our existence”, said Bowman. “Peter’s background truly makes him the right person to help us grow the organization in order to more fully do the work necessary across the state to create an Ohio where everyone can feel at home.”

GAY COMMUNITY ENDOWMENT FUND SEEKS GRANT PROPOSALS, WELCOMES QUESTIONS FROM NONPROFITS The Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation is currently accepting grant applications for both existing and new programs that will positively impact local gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (GLBT) communities and greater Akron as a whole. To coincide with the call for proposals, fund representatives will answer grant seekers’ questions during an informational session. It will take place Thursday, August 14 at 4:30p at Akron Community Foundation’s office, located at 345 West Cedar St. To RSVP for the informational meeting, call 330.376.8522. The Gay Community Endowment Fund accepts operational, programmatic and capital requests from 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations and encourages collaborations between applicants. To be considered for a grant, return 10 copies of the completed application to Akron Community Foundation by Monday, September 15, 2008. Applications are available at www.akroncommunityfdn.org/glbt or by calling 330.376.8522. About the Gay Community Endowment Fund.

THE SNBA IS CALLING FOR NOMINATIONS FOR ITS 2008 UNSUNG HERO AWARDS. Awards are bestowed to individuals who enrich the Quality of Life in the Short North and Columbus through their volunteer efforts and contributions behind the scenes to advance Art, Community, Diversity and the Short North Spirit. Recipients receive grants ranging from $500 to $1,500. Grants are made to the organization or project the individual represents. Nominations must be made by an active Short North Business Association member, but the nominee does not have to be an SNBA member. Nomination form is attached to this email. Nomination deadline is August 15. Honorees will be announced the week of September 1. Recipients will be recognized at the Short North Arts District Gala on October 12 In 2007, four Unsung Heroes were honored: Diana Lessner, Community Volunteer, Bruce Dooley, Owner of Dooley + Company Realtors, Suzie Simpson, member of Stonewall Columbus and founder of the Girlz Rhythm and Rock Camp, and Kent Rigsby. chef and co-owner (along with wife Tasi) of Rigsby’s Kitchen.


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 7

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


SPORT SHOOTING ADDED TO GAY GAMES VIII COLOGNE 2010

8 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

SPORTS GLTA Tennis Tourny in Detroit The Motor City Tennis Alliance (MCTA) hosts the 5th Annual Motor City Tennis Classic (MCTC) Thursday, August 14 - Sunday, August 17. Played indoors at the beautiful Franklin Fitness & Racquet Club and Bloomfield Tennis & Fitness Club. All levels of players participate from across the world! Register online by pressing the MCTC-08 logo or download and mail an entry form with your payment.Draw sizes are limited. Find out more at MotorCityTennis.net

Gay Games VIII organizers in Cologne, Germany, announced today that Sport Shooting has been added to the official Sports Program for Gay Games VIII Sports & Cultural Festival. Extremely popular in the host country of Germany, this will mark the first time that any shooting sport has been offered in the history of the Gay Games. Air Rifle (10 meter) and Air Pistol (10 meter), both sport shooting disciplines offered in the Olympic Games, will be fired at the Cologne Gay Games in 2010. Air Rifle and Air Pistol disciplines will be offered for both men and women. Consistent with international rules, women will fire 40 rating shots in a period of 75 minutes while men will fire 60 shots within 105 minutes. Shots are

fired standing free-hand, with the athletes standing without leaning and artificial support. Official rules and schedule will be posted at www.GamesCologne.com prior to September 2008. “We received many requests to add Sport Shooting,” said Games Cologne Sports Director KarlHeinz Schmitz. “We were surprised at how many lesbian and gay athletes, especially in Germany, wanted us to include the sport at Gay Games VIII. Assured of demand, we have added the sport.” The German Shooters Federation (Deutscher Schützenbund/DSB) is the fourth largest German sports association with 1.6 million members and almost 15,000 local shooting clubs. Sport Shooting is extremely popular in other parts of Europe.

Sports Shooting completes the sports program for Gay Games VIII, now to include 34 sports: Badminton, Basketball, Beach Volleyball, Billiards, Bodybuilding, Bowling, Chess, Cycling, Dance Sport, Diving, Field Hockey, Figure Skating, Golf, Handball, Ice Hockey, Inline Speed Skating, Martial Arts, Powerlifting, Road Races including Marathon, Sailing, Soccer (Football), Softball, Sport Climbing, Sport Shooting, Squash, Swimming, Synchronized Swimming, Table Tennis, Tennis, Track and Field, Triathlon, Volleyball, Water Polo, Wrestling. The Gay Games VIII Sports & Cultural Festival is July 31 - August 7, 2010. Pre-registration for Gay Games VIII is now open at www.gamescologne.com.

An astounding 152 swimming records were broken during the International Gay and Lesbian Aquatics Championships (IGLA) in the greater Washington, DC area from June 19-22. Karlyn Pipes-Neilsen and former Olympian Glenn Mills were particularly impressive, breaking six International Amateur Swimming Federation (FINA) masters world records. This year’s IGLA Championships set more United States Master Swimming (USMS) and FINA world records than in any previous IGLA Championship. In the men’s 45 – 49 age group, Glenn Mills from the Arizona Masters club set short course world records in the 200 meter Individual Medley (2:13.42), 100m Breaststroke (1:05.74) and the 200m Breaststroke (2:22.68). In the women’s 45 – 49 age group, Karlyn Pipes-Neilsen of San Diego Swim Masters set records in the 800m Freestyle (9:20.08), 100m Individual Medley (1:06.80) and 100m Backstroke (1:05.55). Pipes-Neilsen has set almost 200 Masters World Records. A straight woman competing at a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) swim meet, she approaches it with the same intensity as other swim meets. “I don’t look at this meet as a gay and

lesbian championships meet,” said Pipes-Neilsen. “I look at this as a great championship meet. What I love about it is that it is so inclusive. [LGBT people] and even straight people like me all feel welcomed at this event, and it really is special to be a part of.” Additionally, 16 short course USMS and 130 IGLA records were broken at the Eppley Recreation Natatorium on the campus of the University of Maryland, College Park. But the most memorable performance came from an unlikely athlete. Margaret Camp (of the District of Columbia), an 88-year old swimmer (and oldest athlete competing), set a new IGLA record in the 50m freestyle at 1:48.20. “As Margaret approached the finish, everyone in the entire natatorium stood and cheered her on - it was an electrifying moment and extremely inspirational,” said WonKee Moon, 2008 IGLA Tournament Director. “Both her grandsons and daughter (also participating in the swim meet) were at the end of the pool to congratulate her as she touched the wall.” In the large team division, the District of Columbia Aquatics Club (DCAC) won its 9th IGLA championship title with 2,736 points, followed by the 2007 winner, Team Florida with 1,794 points and Team

New York Aquatics (1,419) coming in third. The Long Beach Grunions (CA) defended their medium team title with 815 points, followed by West Hollywood Aquatics (CA) (713) and Different Strokes San Diego (CA) placing third with 519 points. The small team division saw Fort Lauderdale Aquatics (FL) claim its first title with 350 points, followed by Red Tide of New York City with 226 points and Sacramento Masters (CA) placing third with 207 points. This year’s tournament was organized by the District of Columbia Aquatics Club and Washington Wetskins and included over 840 competitors in the sports of swimming, diving, synchronized swimming and water polo. The men’s and women’s water polo competition took place at the Takoma Community Center in Washington, DC with the men from West Hollywood (CA) claiming its 11th IGLA championship title by defeating Queer Utah Aquatic Club. The Washington Capital Area Polo won the women’s water polo championship, but the trophy went to the Toronto Triggerfish because only IGLA-member teams are awarded the trophy. To learn more about the competition and view results, visit www.igla2008.org.

WORLD and NATIONAL MASTERS SWIMMING RECORDS FALL AT 2008 INTERNATIONAL GAy/LESBIAN AQUATICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

Annual CMTO Tournament in Cbus Columbus Metropolitan Tennis Organization Annual (CMTO) Tournament will be at Wickertree Tennis Club again this year August 22-24. For more info www.cmto1.org

GLTA Tennis Tourny in Indy The IndyTennis Classic 5 will be held September 19-21. This is a Gay and Lesbitan Tennis Alliance (GLTA) sanctioned event, with singles and doubles comptetion for levels A, B, C, D and Open. This will be an indoor/outdoor tournament utilizing the 14 superb outdoor courts and the six indoor hard courts of the Indianapolis Tennis Center. Find out more at IndyTennis.com

WEEKLY STANDINGS

Columbus Lesbian & Gay Softball Association (Week 6) www.clgsa.net Team Division Win Loss Tie PCT RS RA PTS 2 0 0.875 215 113 28 Score Roberts 14 Tradewinds Grizzlies 5 1 0.656 162 141 21 Roberts 10 7 7 2 0.500 171 169 16 Switch Hitters (Edward Jones) Roberts Q-Bar

Roberts

6

9

1

0.406 118 164 13

Otero's

Roberts

4

11

1

0.281 103 157

9

Axis

Roberts

4

11

1

0.281 149 184

9

Homewreckers (Q-Bar)

Akers 2

12

2

2

0.813 196 118 26

Village Pet Supply

Akers 2

12

4

0

0.750 217 115 24

Team X (La Forgata)

Akers 2

7

7

2

0.500 179 271 16

Union / Hard Times

Akers 2

6

9

1

0.406 173 156 13

Molly Woo's Akers 2 Planet Score (Planet Smoothie Akers 2 / Score) Stix-n-Chix (Carriage Trade Reality) Somewhere Else / Oz

Akers 1 Akers 1

5

10

1

2

14

0

8

0

0

6

2

0

0.344 183 197 11 0.125

89

180

4

1.000 153

40

16

0.750 107

71

12

Red Devils (Pierceology)

Akers 1

5

2

0

0.714

89

75

10

Plugged Nickel

Akers 1

5

3

0

0.625

87

79

10

Renegades (Tradewinds) Akers 1 Cutters (Creative Foundations) Akers 1 Bottom's of the 9th (Q-Bar) Akers 1

3

5

0

0.375

84

101

6

2

6

0

0.250

54

73

4

1

6

0

0.143

49

86

2

Akers 1

1

7

0

0.125

39

137

2

Club Diversity St. Clair River Rats (Franklinton CTC) St. Clair Exile Pirates St. Clair

6

2

0

0.750

73

35

12

5

2

1

0.688

86

63

11

5

2

1

0.688

74

63

11

5

3

0

0.625 105

55

10

Orange Crush

Pyramid II

St. Clair

Chase

St. Clair

4

3

0

0.571

91

69

8

Ford's Fielders

St. Clair

2

5

0

0.286

62

88

4

Mo Money (5/3 Bank)

St. Clair

2

6

0

0.250

53

104

4

New Creation / MCC Metz

St. Clair

1

7

0

0.125

53

120

2

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

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

Want your teams stats in? Email hayes@outlookmedia.com !"#$"%#&'($)*+,(-"."/(01!2)$*(2"&*3" %4567869:(5:(;<(=>?=@?A==B !"#$% &'() *'+, - R;,)S)H'> ./ 0 1 23%)4"56(7)8'(9%5+ 10 -/ . :#6;58#;5<$#;54#6;5 1=>= -/>= / 4'?;)<,''7%+ 1= -= = 23%)@?A)<6+,%;+ 1-B 0 23%)4'?;)C?%%(+ 1D 1D E <?FF%;)<?$9%;+ -G 11 G H3%$9%;I'#;J)H36$9+ -0 1/ B *6A"%)8#()<,;#673, -= 1= -D *%K)L()M#5 -= 1= -- @#""+)N()C?%+O'( -/ 10 -1 23%)!6()P;'QQ%;+ -D>= 1B>=


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 9

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


10 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 11

OUT BUSINESS NEWS by Chris Hayes

AS ECONOMY LAGS, LESBIANS & GAYS PLAN TO TRAVEL MORE THAN HETEROSEXUALS New online study on travel spending reveals different impacts on gay vs. non-gay consumers According to a recent national survey conducted by Harris Interactive®, 38 percent of gay and lesbian adults report they are absolutely certain or very likely to take their vacations as planned this year, compared with 34 percent of their heterosexual counterparts. However when asked whether they might decide to shorten their vacation, a slightly larger proportion of gays and lesbians – 18 percent — were absolutely certain or very likely to do so while 15% of heterosexual adults similarly said they would do so. In addition, one quarter (25%) of gays and lesbians said they were absolutely certain or very likely to take a vacation by air this year, while only 19 percent of heterosexuals would do so. Given the backdrop of record high gaso-

line prices this summer, when the question was asked whether this year’s vacation might be taken by car, nearly a third (32%) of gay and lesbian respondents were absolutely certain or very likely to take a car, while 28 percent of heterosexuals were absolutely certain or very likely to do so. The new nationwide survey of 2,772 U.S. adults, (ages 18 and over), of whom 275 self identified as gay or lesbian (which includes an oversample of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender adults), was conducted online between May 5 and 12, 2008, by Harris Interactive, a global market research and consulting firm, in conjunction with Witeck-Combs Communications, Inc., a strategic public relations and marketing communications firm with spe-

TABLE 1 TAKING A VACATION “How likely is it that you will do the following within the next 6 months – Take a vacation as planned?” (Base for all tables: All adults) %Gays and Lesbians %Heterosexuals Absolutely Certain/Very Likely (NET) 38 34 Absolutely Certain 20 21 Very Likely 18 14 Likely 12 17 Somewhat/Not at all Likely (NET) 50 49 Somewhat Likely 21 18 Not at all Likely 29 31

cial expertise in the GLBT market. “The strong appetite for travel often is highlighted among gays and lesbians,” said Bob Witeck, CEO of Witeck-Combs Communications. “Though gay consumers are not more affluent than others, they appear to consistently budget more discretionary dollars towards travel, even during downturns in the economy such as we face now.” Witeck added that similar research conducted seven years ago also indicated that gays and lesbians had higher propensity than heterosexuals to begin traveling again after the tragic events of September 11, 2001. Jim Quilty, Vice President and Sr. Consultant for Travel & Tourism Research at Harris Interactive, noted that given this snapshot, “There

are clear differentiators and market trends in gay travel that are especially important for destinations and travel suppliers to understand in the current economic cycle. This survey reinforces the resilience of lesbian and gay consumers when other travel spending is curtailed among other demographics.” Quilty added that Harris Interactive and Witeck-Combs Communications are preparing to launch their second annual Gay and Lesbian Travel Survey, to build on their previous comparative findings in the first GLBT-heterosexual benchmark of leisure travel. More details on the upcoming survey may be found at www.harrisinteractive.com/services/glbt_trave l.asp

TABLE 3 TAKING A VACATION BY AIR “How likely is it that you will do the following within the next 6 months – Take a vacation by air?” %Gays and Lesbians %Heterosexuals Absolutely Certain/Very Likely (NET) 25 19 Absolutely Certain 17 12 Very Likely 9 7 Likely 12 10 Somewhat/Not at all Likely (NET) 62 71 Somewhat Likely 13 16 Not at all Likely 49 55 Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding.

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding.

TABLE 2 TAKING A VACATION BY CAR “How likely is it that you will do the following within the next 6 months – Take a vacation by car?” Base: All adults %Gays and Lesbians %Heterosexuals Absolutely Certain/Very Likely (NET) 32 28 Absolutely Certain 13 14 Very Likely 19 14 Likely 18 20 Somewhat/Not at all Likely (NET) 51 52 Somewhat Likely 20 20 Not at all Likely 31 32

TABLE 4 TAKING A SHORTER VACATION “How likely is it that you will do the following within the next 6 months – Take a shorter vacation than planned?” %Gays and Lesbians %Heterosexuals Absolutely Certain/Very Likely (NET) 18 15 Absolutely Certain 4 7 Very Likely 14 8 Likely 11 13 Somewhat/Not at all Likely (NET) 71 72 Somewhat Likely 16 20 Not at all Likely 55 52 Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding.

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding.

MAYOR ESTABLISHES INSTITUTE FOR ACTIVE LIVING Health Commissioner appoints Barb Seckler as Director Following up on his 2008 State of the City announcement to promote healthy living, Mayor Michael B. Coleman today announced the creation of the Institute for Active Living. The Institute will work to reduce childhood obesity by increasing our residents’ access to physical activity and fresh food, and by implementing strategies to make Columbus a more active, vibrant place to live. Also today, Public Health Commissioner, Dr. Teresa Long, has named Barb Seckler as the new Director of the Institute. “We need to protect our children by fighting their enemies obesity and diabetes,” said Mayor Coleman. “From walking and biking to farmers markets and grocery stores, this new initiative will focus on increasing our residents’ access to fresh fruits and vegetables and physical activity.” The Institute will be connected to The Foundation for Active Living, a fund to be established at the Columbus Foundation by the Columbus Board of Health to accept corporate and private donations to support the work of the Institute. On July 14, Columbus City Council unanimously approved ordi-

nance 1210-2008 to help establish the fund. In the short term, the Institute will support the development of farmer’s markets, community gardens, and policy-making that support active living. The Institute will bring together all city departments and dozens of stakeholders and partners to consider Active Living in city policy decisions from recreation centers and green space to sidewalks and bike ways. “Columbus has among the nation’s highest incidence of obesity and diabetes, said Public Health Commissioner Dr. Teresa Long. “By building a more active, vibrant city – we in turn will be building a healthier Columbus.” Seckler previously served as Assistant Director and Deputy Director at the Department of Public Safety since 2000. Columbus Public Health will hold Farmers’ Markets at 240 Parsons Avenue from 10a-1p on July 31, August 7 and August 14. Locally grown fresh fruits and vegetable will be available for sale and there will be food stamp access. For more information, call 645.3111 or www.publichealth.columbus.gov. JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


12 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 13

THE EXAMINED LIFE by Tom Moon, MFT

Nonviolent Communication 3: Connecting Compassionately with Ourselves “In our language there is a word with enormous power to create shame and guilt. This violent word, which we commonly use to evaluate ourselves, is so deeply ingrained in our consciousness that many of us would have trouble imagining how to live without it. It is the word ‘should,’ as in ‘I should have known better’ or ‘I shouldn’t have done that.’ Most of the time when we use this word with ourselves, we resist learning because ‘should’ implies that there is no choice. Human beings, when hearing any kind of demand, tend to resist because it threatens our autonomy – our strong need for choice. We have this reaction to tyranny even when it’s internal tyranny…” With these words, in his book Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, Marshall Rosenberg challenges us to imagine what life would be like if we stopped “shoulding” ourselves. For most of us, this is almost impossible to picture because we live with a tyrannical “inner critic” which vigilantly watches every step we take and criticizes us relentlessly if our behavior falls short of its standards. And even when the inner critic makes life miserable for us, most of us can’t imagine living without it because we believe that if it went away all motivation and self-discipline would go, too. We’d stop going to work; we’d never go to the gym again; and we might even give up

brushing our teeth! NVC challenges this widespread notion that blame, judgment and guilt are skillful ways to motivate ourselves. Rosenberg again: “A basic premise of NVC is that whenever we imply that someone is wrong or bad, what we are really saying is the he or she is not acting in harmony with our needs. If the person we are judging happens to be ourselves, what we are saying is ‘I myself am not behaving in harmony with my own needs.’…Our challenge, then, when we are doing something that is not enriching life, is to evaluate ourselves moment by moment in a way that inspires change both: 1. in the direction of where we would like to go, and 2. out of respect and compassion for ourselves, rather than out of self-hatred, guilt or shame. How do we do this? An important first step, when we find ourselves judging ourselves, is to ask “What unmet need of mine is being expressed through this moralistic judgment?” Asking this question encourages us to listen empathically to ourselves, and when we do that, we’re more likely to hear the underlying need or layers of needs. Rosenberg finds that when people connect with these needs, a remarkable shift occurs in their bodies. Instead of the deadening shame, guilt, and depression

people typically feel when they are criticizing themselves we “experience any number of feelings. Whether it’s sadness, frustration, disappointment, fear, grief, or some other feeling, we have been endowed by nature with these feelings for a purpose: they mobilize us for action in pursuing and fulfilling what we need or value. Their impact on our spirit and bodies is substantially different from the disconnection that is brought on by guilt, shame, and depression.” What we typically experience first when we do this is mourning, which in NVC is the process of fully connecting with the regret we feel when we see that we haven’t been acting in our own best interests. But when our consciousness is focused on what we need, a deep self-forgiveness follows almost automatically, and we are naturally stimulated to pursue the creative possibilities for meeting our needs. In contrast, the moralistic judgments we use when blaming ourselves tend to obscure such possibilities and to perpetuate a state of self-punishment. So we cultivate self-compassion “by consciously choosing in daily life to act only in service to our own needs and values rather than out of duty, for extrinsic rewards, or to avoid guilt, shame, and punishment.” A more psychologically radical approach to

life would be hard to imagine. Many will simply dismiss the idea out of hand on the grounds that it is a completely “selfish” way to live. That criticism reminds me of something Alan Watts once said: “Sometimes we owe to others to be selfish.” Every human being on the planet wants to be respected and valued. All of us want our needs met, and none of us want to be dismissed, thwarted, judged, or blamed. But we can never hope to respect others in these ways if we leave ourselves out of the equation, because if we’re harsh and lacking in compassion toward ourselves, we’ll inevitably treat others with the same level of contempt when they exhibit the feelings or behaviors which we’ve learned to judge in ourselves. That’s why the first step in learning to communicate nonviolently with others is to understand that self-compassion is indispensable to the process. We will all treat others better to the degree that we can take to heart these ancient words of the Buddha: “You can search all the realms of existence and you will never find a being more worthy of your love and compassion than yourself.” Tom Moon is a psychotherapist in San Francisco. His website is tommoon.net.

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


14 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 15

EARTH TALK From the Editors of E

Dear EarthTalk:

Dear EarthTalk:

I need to replace my old TV. Can you tell me which of the latest models is the greenest? I was told that the flat-screen/plasmas are real energy hogs. What do you recommend?

I heard that children are reaching puberty at earlier ages now and that it may have to do with environmental toxins and even their TV viewing habits. Can you enlighten?

Angela Montague

Mark Abbot

According to The Wall Street Journal’s Rebecca Smith, a 42-inch plasma TV set can draw more power than a large refrigerator, even if the TV is only used a few hours a day. This is partly because many newer models don’t turn off but go into “standby” mode so they can start up fast later with no warm-up period. “Powering a fancy TV and full-on entertainment system - with set-top boxes, game consoles, speakers, DVDs and digital video recorders - can add nearly $200 to a family’s annual energy bill,” she adds. Smith recommends green consumers consider the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) models, which typically uses less energy than comparable plasma sets. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a 28-inch conventional cathode-ray tube (CRT) set uses about 100 watts of electricity. A 42-inch LCD set might consume twice that amount, while plasma could use five times as much, depending on the model and the programming. For the largest screen sizes (60 inches and up), projection TVs are the most energy efficient, clocking in at 150-200 watts - significantly less than the energy a plasma set would use. “What scares us is that prices for plasma sets are dropping so fast that people are saying, why get a 42-inch plasma set when you can get a 60-inch or 64-inch one,” says Tom Reddoch of the non-profit Electric Power Research Institute. “They have no idea how much electricity these things consume.” For its part, the industry is taking some steps to make its products more efficient, and to improve disclosure of energy usage. In June 2008 Sony pronounced its new 32-inch Bravia KDL-32JE1 LCD model “the world’s most en-

ergy efficient television.” Slated for sale in Japan in August 2008 for around $1,400, the new set utilizes fluorescent tubes to create higher levels of brightness with less energy consumption, but still delivers large resolution, a high contrast ratio and a wide viewing angle. Beginning in November 2008, forwardthinking manufacturers will get a little boost from the U.S. government, which will start awarding the most energy efficient new TV sets “Energy Star” labels to help consumers identify greener choices. TVs bearing the Energy Star label must operate at least 30 percent more efficiently than standard models in both stand-by and active modes. Consumers can see which models qualify by visiting the televisions section of the EnergyStar.gov home electronics page. According to the EPA, if all TVs sold in the U.S. met Energy Star requirements, yearly energy savings would top $1 billion and greenhouse gas emissions would drop by the equivalent of taking a million cars off the road. Of course, the greenest option of all (aside from getting out from in front of that tube and spending more time outdoors) is to keep or repair your existing CRT unit (a digital-to-analog converter will be needed after February 2009 when new signal specifications go into effect). Most CRT sets use less energy than any of the LCD or plasma models, and if it ain’t broke, why fix it? Buying a new TV, even a greener one, only generates more pollution in production and transport, and creates waste in junking the old model.

To say that kids are growing up faster than ever these days may be more than just cliché. Recent studies have shown that children are reaching puberty at younger and younger ages, and researchers are starting to see links between this trend and other societal ills such as ubiquitous pollution and sedentary lifestyles. In a 2007 report for the Breast Cancer Fund entitled “The Falling Age of Puberty in U.S. Girls: What We Know, What We Need to Know,” ecologist Sandra Steingraber argues that unfettered access to computers and TVs over the last 30 years has led to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle among kids in the U.S. and beyond. Active kids produce more melatonin, a natural hormone that serves as the body’s internal clock and calendar. This could explain why sedentary kids are likely to go through puberty sooner: Their bodies think their decreased melatonin production is a trigger to move into puberty. “[Melatonin is] an inhibitory signal for puberty,” says Steingraber. “The more melatonin you have, the later you go into puberty.” Of course, sedentary lifestyles are also linked to childhood obesity, a condition that often continues - along with the many health problems that can accompany it - into adulthood. A recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) found that, between 2001 and 2004, 17.5 percent of children ages six to 11 were overweight - an effective doubling of obesity rates three decades ago. A study by the non-profit Obesity Society came up with a slightly higher figure - 20 percent - with the percentages higher for Hispanic, African-American and

Native American children. Obesity is certainly one factor in the surge in so-called “precocious” adolescence, but chemicals are also thought to play a role. According to Erin Barnes, writing in E – The Environmental Magazine, a study comparing the body mass index of Danish and American girls found that the former group hit puberty a full year later than the latter even though their weights were in the same range. Another study found that wealthy girls in South Africa reach puberty a full year after their AfricanAmerican counterparts. “Many researchers,” writes Barnes, “are studying the relationship between chemical pollutants like PCBs (polychlorinated bphenyls) and phthalates (commonly used plasticizers) and premature development.” Some researchers believe that the preponderance of synthetic chemicals in more developed societies are interfering with human endocrine development and essentially “tricking” kids’ bodies into going through puberty prematurely. Also, precocious puberty in girls has been linked to breast cancer, as well as higher rates of drug abuse, violence, unintended pregnancies, problems in school and mental health issues. “Shortening childhood means a shortening of the time before the brain’s complete resculpting occurs,” says Steingraber. “Once that happens, the brain doesn’t allow for complex learning.” She adds that the brain can only build the connections used to learn a language, play a musical instrument or ride a bike before it gets flooded with the sex hormones that come with the onset of puberty.

CONTACTS: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, www.epa.gov; Energy Star, www.energystar.gov; Electric Power Research Institute, www.epri.com; Sony Corp., www.sony.com. Breast Cancer Fund, www.breastcancerfund.org; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm; Obesity Society, www.obesity.org. GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? E-mail: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php.

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


16 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

FEATURE STORY by Chris Hayes

Hocking Hills Extravaganza! Camping, Canoes, Ziplines and more... oh my! The Hocking Hills region is home to 9 state parks, over 9,000 acres of state forest land, part of the Wayne National Forest, 4 nature preserves and one of the largest metro parks in the state. Hiking, fishing, camping, horseback riding, canoeing, rappelling, and bird watching are just a few of the activities visitors to the area enjoy. We love it there. Being that the three of us have different tastes when it comes to getting back to Nature, Hocking Hills provides ample choices to make everyone happy. Michael, Traut and I all made our way down to the Hills this year for different adventures of our own and we wanted to share them with you. This past January, I gathered a gaggle of my friends and got one of the lodge cabins from Old Man’s Cave Chalet to celebrate my birthday and to take part in the annual Winter Hike. Michael and his husband Robbie took a romantic getaway this Spring at Ravenwood Castle and Traut just got back from a camping/canoeing weekend with his “digestive” posse. All three us had a blast relaxing and enjoying the outdoors. There is something so therapeutic about getting back to nature, taking the time to unplug, disconnect and unwind. We feel so lucky to have such a gem so close to us here in Columbus, and we wanted to take this issue and remind you all to take advantage of what Ohio has to offer. As summer is in full swing, and the fall is not but a clip away, we suggest you plan sometime to get away. Less than a quarter tank away, here’s but a glimpse at the perfect place to vaca…

Your Concierge:

1.800. HOCKING WWW.1800HOCKING.COM JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

The Hocking Hills Tourism Association is your one-stop shop for complete Hocking Hills, Ohio travel and tourism information. Browse around this site to find out about exciting events in Hocking County, Ohio; the Hocking Hills cabin or lodging perfect for you; even history, weather forecasts, Ohio travel information and maps. Plus, you can access the latest Hocking Hills, Ohio vacation information on everything from where to eat and what to do, to the best spots for hiking and shopping for fine arts, antiques and lots more. While visiting www.1800Hocking.com make sure to request a free Hocking Hills Visitors Guide to bring along on your trip. Need more Hocking Hills, Ohio travel advice? Call our visitor hotline at 1-800-Hock-

ing to talk to a travel counselor and get the latest Hocking Hills, Ohio travel and tourism information. One piece of advice any travel counselor would start you off with is this: "make a reservation plenty ahead of time." There are plenty of unique Hocking Hills cabins, inns, B&Bs and hotels, but for the best selection, make a reservation and get good directions before you leave home to visit the Hocking Hills in Hocking County, Ohio. The Hocking Hills Regional Welcome Center in Logan, Ohio and Hocking Hills Visitor Center in Laurelville are must stops for anyone coming to the Hills for a one of a kind Ohio vacation. The Centers are jam-packed with brochures, maps and new ideas for an unforgettable Hocking Hills, Ohio travel ex-

perience. A team of seasoned volunteers are on hand who know the area like no one else and eager to help you find everything you need on your Hocking Hills, Ohio vacation. In Logan, the Hocking Hills Regional Welcome Center is located at US 33 and State Route 664. It is open 9 - 5 Monday through Thursday and Saturdays, 9 - 7 on Fridays and 11 - 5 on Sundays, and can be reached by calling 1-800-HOCKING. In Laurelville, the Visitor Center is located in a quaint log cabin at the renowned Bowers & Daughters' Laurelville Fruit Farm "Apple House" on State Route 56 in western Hocking County. It is open from Thursday through Monday with the following hours: 2 - 5 Thursdays, 10 - 5 Fridays & Saturdays, 11 - 5 Sundays and 10 - 3 Mondays.


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 17

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


18 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

? Y A T S O T E R E E V H A W MAN’S C OLDCHALETS! FEATURE STORY

by Chris Hayes

Natures Attractions Old Man’s Cave: The most popular of all the Hocking Hills areas is Old Man’s Cave, located on State Route 664. Here at the Upper Falls, the Grandma Gatewood Trail begins its six-mile course connecting three of the park’s areas: Old Man’s Cave to Cedar Falls to Ash Cave. This same trail has been designated as part of Ohio’s Buckeye Trail as well as part of two national systems - the North Country Scenic Trail and America’s Discovery Trail. Ash Cave: In the southernmost reaches of Hocking Hills is Ash Cave - beyond doubt the most spectacular feature of the entire park. Ash Cave is the largest, most impressive recess cave in the state. Conkle’s Hollow: Conkle’s Hollow, situated off S.R. 374 on Big Pine Road is a rugged, rocky gorge - considered one of the deepest in Ohio. The valley floor is a veritable wilderness covered by a profusion of ferns and wildflowers while hemlock, birch and other hardwood tower overhead. Cantwell Cliffs: Cantwell Cliffs is located in the northern reaches of Hocking Hills - 17 miles from Old Man’s Cave on S.R. 374. Its remote location discourages visitation, but those who travel the extra distance will not be disappointed. Many visitors proclaim the Cantwell area as the most picturesque in Hocking County. Rock House: Rock House State Park is unique in the Hocking Hills’ region, as it is the only true cave in the park. It is a tunnel-like corridor situated midway up a 150-foot cliff of Blackhand sandstone.

I love group getaways. Any time I can have 10 - 20 friends road trip for a weekend, I’m in heaven. One of my favorite places for such and adventure is Hocking Hills. The land of cabins – there are literally hundreds of lodges to rent for you and your friends to getaway and just have fun. And of the many choices you have for rentals, no one does it better than Old Man’s Cave Chalets. Every January there is tradition in southern Ohio know as Winter Hike. The largest hike of the season, some 5,600 people converge on the Hocking Hills area for the 6-mile trek through Hocking Hills State Park and Old Man’s Cave. I’ve heard about it for years and always wondered how miserable hiking in the dead of winter would be. So this year I decided to take my friends to suffer with me under the guise of celebrating my birthday. But as it turns out, it isn’t miserable at all. It’s incredible. Hiking in the winter is beautiful. It’s a completely different landscape than you are used to. The falls are frozen, the ground is slick, and you can see for miles through the trees. You might think you’d get cold, but dressing in layers, continually moving and a mid-way stop for bean soup keeps you nice and toasty. If you like hiking at all, you should definitely check it out. But even more awesome than making it the whole 6 miles is coming home to a warm cabin, a hot dinner and a hot tub. It’s not necessarily easy to coordinate a group of 10 people for a weekend retreat. It’s even less easy to find a place for you all to stay, but luckily there’s OMCC. Old Man’s Cave Chalets in Hocking Hills offers you lodging in the most beautiful area of the region. With more than 50 rentals for you to choose from during your stay, they have something for everyone! Private cabins. Spacious lodges. Rustic log homes. Romantic woodland suites. Pet-friendly cabins. Secluded cottages. All with affordable rates! JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

We stayed in a cabin named Dogwood. A log home with a full kitchen, hot tub and room to spread out. It was perfect. The Dogwood was comfortably furnished with massive handmade local artisan log furniture. It included all the amenities and seclusion of their other log homes plus is located on Blosser Road which is only a few miles from US-33 and the City of Logan and State Parks, which made it convenient for hiking. And it was secluded enough you didn’t have to worry about neighbors. We could just be. Old Man’s Cave Chalets is the original cabin rental operation of the Hocking Hills, established in 1989 by a native Hocking County resident. Starting

with 16 Woodland Suites and the Fallswood Lodge, they have grown to 50 premier cabins those still being the number one preferred and referred lodging establishment of the Hocking Hills. There are no surprises as to the quality, cleanliness and friendliness you will receive from this establishment. Our cabin was immaculate and we found the staff super friendly and helpful. They not only originally assisted in finding a cabin and rate that fits our budget and style, they when we got there, they gave you the 411 on the area and all the happenings around Winter Hike. OMCC supply the bed, bath and kitchen

linens, dishes, dish soap, bath soap, glassware, silverware, pots and pans and trash bags. All facilities have central air conditioning and heat, a TV, DVD player, coffee maker, toaster, microwave, outdoor charcoal grill, a fireplace and private hot tub. You may want to bring additional beach towels for the hot tub and, if your lodge has it, swimming pool. The Guest and Lodge swimming pools are outdoors and are open Memorial Day weekend through the Labor Day weekend. You should plan to bring food items, salt and pepper, charcoal, foil, paper towels and/or napkins, beach towels, alarm clock, flashlight, wood and/or starter logs - if you have wood burning fireplace, movies, books, prepaid calling card and booze if you’re so inclined. You must be 21 or older to rent. As the responsible member of your group you will be responsible for any occurrences during the stay. A photocopy of your driver’s license will be taken at the time of check in. Check in might is centrally located to most cabins, but still could be miles away from where you actually stay. You don’t have to return to the check in cabin to check out, though. You just leave the keys and leave! Every season is a different adventure and scenery sensation, and Old Man’s Cave Chalets is the best way to experience them. Rates range from $99-$989 a night depending on season, size and headcount. You can get better deals in their off seasons - December-February and May. Regular season runs March, April, September and November. And Prime Season is June-August and October. I recommend going at least once a season... and inviting me along. Check out the wide variety of lodging options they have at www.oldmanscavechalets.com or call 800.762.9396 or email stay@oldmanscavechalets.com.

Cedar Falls: Cedar Falls itself is the greatest waterfall in terms of volume in the Hocking Hills region. Queer Creek tumbles over the face of the Blackhand displaying the awesome force of water power. Clear Creek (Metro Park): Over 1200 plant species have been identified in Clear Creek. Among the standouts are mountain laurel, little gray polypody, maidenhair ferns, horsetail, pink ladyslipper, skunk cabbage, witch hazel, American chestnut, and persimmon trees. Rock Bridge: Hocking County’s natural rock bridge is the largest of three such formations in Ohio. The 100-foot-long span, formed from Blackhand sandstone, looms 45 feet above the bottom of the gorge below. Tar Hollow: Twisting park and forest roads pass through deep ravines and dense woodlands. Scattered shortleaf and pitch pines growing on the ridges were once a source of pine tar for early settlers, hence the name Tar Hollow. Dogwoods, redbuds and a variety of wildflowers color the hillsides in the springtime. Fall’s pageant of color is spectacular. Lake Hope: Just over the Hocking-Vinton County line near the junction of State Route 56 and 278. Rich in natural scenic beauty and recreational opportunities. The park offers camping, cabins, swimming, and canoeing. The Stone Terrace Restaurant, located in the park’s lodge, was rated as the ODNR Division of Parks and Recreation’s number one dining facility in the state. Lake Logan: The lake has abundant populations of large mouth bass, bluegill, crappie, northern pike and saugeye, plus channel, flathead and bullhead catfish. 400 acre lake. 530 foot beach for sunbathers and swimmers. Hocking Hills State Forest: Today, Hocking State Forest is managed for a variety of objectives including examples or demonstration areas of sound scientific sustained multiple-use management. Timber harvesting is closely monitored so it does not exceed the rate of tree growth. Erosion is actively controlled. Courtesy of www.HockingHills.com


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 19

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


20 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

FEATURE STORY

Inn & Spa at Cedar Falls Introduces New “Taste Of Ohio” Culinary, Artist Offerings

Ravenwood Castle More Than An Inn A Getaway For The Queen – or Knight – or Fairy Princess – In All Of Us by Michael Daniels Created by Anglophiles and owners Sue and Jim Maxwell with just the right amount of authenticity, Ravenwood Castle proved to be a splendid overnight getaway for Robbie and me. We have to admit to being a bit worried that the castle, the medieval village, and all the rest would be done “over the top” and we’d feel like we were staying in some horrible Dungeons and Dragons movie set. Nothing could be less true. Ravenwood offers accommodations to suit anyone’s tastes and needs. If living like a king – or queen – is your preference, we recommend the castle rooms. Castle rooms are suitable for couples, and offer such amenities as a private bathroom, fireplace, king or queen bed and a balcony or deck. Each room is uniquely decorated, and named for a former ruler of England or a famous English legend – choose from King Arthur, King Alfred, Queen Victoria, Queen Elizabeth, the Duke & Duchess, Sherwood Forest, Repunzel’s Tower, or the Duke’s Dungeon. All castle rooms have private bathrooms and plenty of room to relax. Ravenwood Castle’s entire first floor, including four sleeping rooms, has no stairs to climb. There are no steps into the building; instead, a “drawbridge” leads to the front door. The other castle rooms are housed within the twelfth-century Norman-style crenellated towers. All guests, including those not staying in the castle itself, have full access to the castle’s common areas, including the Great Hall with a roaring stone fireplace at one end and three large stained glass windows from an old church at the other. Beautiful, heavily carved tables and chairs furnish the Great Hall with a Gothic flair. Guests may also play games in the terrace-level pub, watch a vintage video or read in the library. Note: Ravenwood has no television reception, and our cell phones did not have signal. The rooms do not have radios, phones, or alarm clocks. Take this as a blessing – read a book, watch a movie on VCR (yes, I said VCR), take a bath, go bird watching … just relax! All guests also receive complimentary full breakfast - lunch and dinner are available for an additional fee. JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

For those wanting a bit more privacy or a slightly different experience, we recommend the Medieval Village Cottages. These cottages are just right for two and most feature such amenities as a kitchenette, king or queen size bed, whirlpool or Jacuzzi bath and TV/VCR. Each cottage has a bathroom with shower stall, a kitchenette, heating and air conditioning, and many have other amenities such as Jacuzzi baths, balconies, or other special features. Each is done in a slightly different motif, allowing guests to stay in the cottage of a spinster, a woodcutter, a candlemaker, a merchant, a silversmith, or even Cinderella herself. Robbie and I stayed in the clock tower, a fantastic two-story cottage with a bedroom/balcony upstairs and futon, TV area, kitchenette, and huge two-person Jacuzzi downstairs. Heaven! And for those of you who, and I know you’re out there but don’t understand you at all, like to go roughing it, you must check out Ravenwood’s gypsy wagons! These cozy stationary wagons provide the perfect camping experience for friends and families. They include a set of bunks, a ceiling fan/light, a small refrigerator, microwave oven, electric outlets and lights. There is also a small food preparation area, a small table with two chairs, a door that locks, a front porch with two more chairs, and a picnic table. Outdoor bathrooms and shower facilities are a short walk away. Ravenwood Castle sits amidst 115 acres of heavily-forested hilltop, and provides over 2.5 miles of hiking along old logging roads and deer trails. Wildlife – both feathered and furred – abounds, and nearly all of the property is left in its natural state, with the exception of the well-manicured entrance garden, the courtyard gardens, and the boxwood parterre. Castle rooms at Ravenwood range from $115-$210 per night, and medieval cottages from $155-$235. Lunch and dinner are available at an extra fee, as are beer/wine in the study and for room/cottage use. All rooms and cottages are strictly smoke-free, though many do have balconies or porches where smoking is permitted. Pets are prohibited on the grounds (save for the castle’s own Labrador, Raven, and her feline ruler, Jane). Open fires are not allowed at any cottage or gypsy wagon. A gift shop is also on site. For more information, to see photographs of all rooms and cottages, and to make reservations, visit www.ravenwoodcastle.com, or call 800.477.1541.

Long known for a commitment to sustainable tourism, and for offering one of the Midwest’s most unique relaxing, scenic escapes, the Inn & Spa at Cedar Falls has just launched a new program featuring local and regional artists and food offerings. A new art gallery has been added to the renowned Inn & Spa at Cedar Falls gift shop, featuring a wide sampling of some of the region’s fine artists. In addition, The Inn will now offer a host of Ohio gourmet specialty foods in both the gift shop and at the table. For example, the roast beef Panini served at lunch features slow-roasted beef, Heine’s Amish Vidalia onion cheese and watercress greens topped with Coopers Mill Vidalia onion relish and served on whole wheat bread “We have a strong commitment to buying local and to introducing our guests to the very best the area has to offer,” said Innkeeper Ellen Grinsfelder. “We hope to not only share some of the treasures we’ve discovered with our Inn and Spa guests, but also to help our local economy by supporting the region’s finest artists and food purveyors.” Some of the fine foods that will be featured in The Inn & Spa at Cedar Falls Gift Shop and kitchen, as well as being available in special gift baskets, include: Ben’s Sweet & Hot Mustard; Coopers Mill jam, jelly, fruit butter, etc.; Tonn’s Apiaries Amish honey products; Herbal Sage Tea Company; Red Onion Kitchen; Heini’s Cheese Chalet Amish milk-based

artisan cheeses; Jose Madrid salsa and tortilla chips; Misty Mountain Estate herb blends; and Vino de milo pasta sauce. The Inn Gift Shop Gallery and dining room décor will feature a number of area artists, including: Photography: Eric Hoffman, Jeff Shaw and James Crotty; Pottery: Lisa Jollic, Carmen Schulz and Marietta Run Clay; Watercolor painting: Dennis McCann and Lisa Schorr; Acrylic painting, wood carving: Eric Murphy; Blown glass: Nick Delmatto; Stained Glass: Bonnie Proudfoot; Glassworks: Janet and Dave Gustafson Woodturning: James and Suzanne Hizer; Poetry Books: Stephen Emerick; Hand-made soaps: With Nature in Mind; and Glassworks by Janet & Dave Gustafson Perched on the edge of a craggy gorge in southeast Ohio’s spectacular Hocking Hills, The Inn & Spa at Cedar Falls offers visitors an unprecedented opportunity to turn off their cell phones and laptops and reboot their spirit. Crafted from several log cabins that date back to the 1800s, the inn and the spa are barren of phones, fax machines and data ports. Guests find only breathtaking scenery and miles and miles of trails for bird watching, hiking, horseback riding and more. The Inn’s Chef prepares wonderful meals using produce from The Inn & Spa at Cedar Falls garden. Even the herbs and flowers that decorate the place are rooted just outside the kitchen door.

$1,500 Weekend Getaway Competition Leave reviews, be automatically entered, and help your fellow gay and lesbian travelers. Pink Choice (www.pinkchoice.com), a trusted website for gay and lesbian travelers seeking information about accommodations worldwide, today announced the launch of the $1,500 Weekend Getaway Competition. Visitors to the site who leave a quality review of a gay or gay friendly hotel are automatically entered to win. Visitors receive additional entries for each review they leave. Get Away in Style The prize includes 2 free nights at any Kimpton hotel in the world as well as $1,000 in spending cash, to make the weekend as memorable as possible. Kimpton hotels, with 43 properties across North America, is highly regarded by the LGBT Community, having won the PlanetOut Hotel Group of the Year

Award in 2007 and 2008. Help Fellow Gay and Lesbian Travelers In addition to automatically entering the contest, every review left on Pink Choice helps a fellow gay or lesbian traveler find the right hotel, guest house, or inn. Pink Choice has already built a database of over 250 destinations and 1,500 gay and gay friendly hotels. “Our goal with this contest is to excite and motivate the gay and lesbian community to help build a travel resource that benefits everyone,” said Stephen Mascilo, founder of Pink Choice. For more information about the contest, visit the official contest page on Pink Choice (www.pinkchoice.com/sweepstakes.aspx).


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 21

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


22 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

High Adventure… Literally! i ii ii ii i

ii!

B o o o o n ns

sss s

aa a

aa

aii

i ii i iiii

a

by Chris Hayes I’ve been on several Hocking Hills outdoor adventures - horseback riding, kayaking, rock climbing, hiking - but nothing quite compares to the high adventure of Ohio’s first world-class Zipline Canopy Tour! Fast, fun, and exhilarating, this 3-hour spectacular adventure offers thrill seekers of all ages an actual bird’s-eye view of the Hocking Valley. You zip through the treetops on a network of cables and adventure skybridges suspended high above the forest floor overlooking caves, rock cliffs, the Hocking River, deer and nature flora. When Michael brought a brochure back after his trip to Ravenwood (see page 20), we knew an Outlook outing was inevitable. Traut, Michael and I headed down this past Monday to try out the fun. It’s a beautiful 45-55 minute drive depending on traffic and you should arrive at least 15 minutes before you time to fill out waivers. If you get there early, there’s corn hole to play while you wait. We were the first tour of the day, which typically begins between 9 and 9:30a.

Upon arrival, our super duper tour guides Ryan and Jeremiah gave us a detailed safety and equipment orientation and then fitted us with our personal gear for the tour - helmet, harness and gloves. (Guys would be wise to wear supportive underwear as the harness is snug). Geared up, we then did a practice training session on a low cable to get the techniques down that we needed on the tour. Mastering things like braking only takes a try or two and before we knew it, our group had “graduated” from ground school the real fun began. The nine of us climbed into a super golf cart and were transported down a 1.5-mile scenic nature trail to the beginning of the course where the Mighty Oak was waiting for our arrival. From there then we completed 10 ziplines, traversed 4 adventure skybridges and rappelled back to ground level at the finish line. Zipping is both exhilarating and fun. Though you’re hundreds of feet in the air, you’re 100% safe. From the time you start, until you finish, you are perpetually connected to rigging. Even while waiting between each zip from the view-tastic observation platforms. Our guides and group were awesome. It was just like hang-

Traut Don’t Swim Upstream by Robert Trautman I had not been camping since back in college, so a few friends and I decided to take a trip down to the Hocking Hills area. We packed up and left a bit after work on Friday and less than an hour later we were checked in and to our site. We chose a primitive campsite, located right next to the Hocking River. Within the campground there is a shower house and restrooms, but the primitive campsite area has only outhouse style restrooms nearby. We set up our site, gathered firewood and began cooking our dinner. Our first night we had cod, roasted diced potatoes and asparagus. We may be roughing it but we still like a good meal – no beans and wienies on this trip. We stayed up and played cards and enjoyed the outdoors. The next morning we woke to the many sounds of nature and restarted our fire for breakfast. Around noon we left the site to go on our canoe trip we booked through the same company. A short drive later, we checked in and waited to board a van to take us to the canoe drop. They were extremely busy and we waited about an hour and a half to board but with a few friends the time flew by. JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

Once to the canoe drop, they helped each group one by one into the river and set us on our way. We did the 3-hour trip, which is approx 8 miles. There are 4 trips to choose from, even one that you stop to camp overnight! We had 4 people on our trip in 2 canoes and it costs $46 per canoe. They also rent kayaks, rafts and tubes. Once on the water, we started on our water adventure. Most of the other groups or individuals went at a slow calm but steady pace. We started off at a fairly steady pace to get ahead of some of the other groups. But we soon found things that made us want to slow down and take it in, stopping a few times to take photos of the wonderful surroundings and a couple times to take a short swim. The trip went fairly quickly but we were glad we had taken a cooler of water and snack bars along the way. Once back we were ready for dinner, so we made the short drive back to our campsite. Back at the camp the others who did not go camping had kept our fire going so it was easy to start cooking dinner. While others prepared some food I went hunting for more firewood and then gathered a few friends for a quick pre-dinner swim. Back at the camp they were preparing the second evenings dinner, which was pork loin, roasted carrots and potatoes with black

beans as well as sweet corn. Finished with dinner, we got the fire roaring and started to cook some dessert items – we melted down some chocolate and had some other goodies for a camping fondue of sorts, which turned out fairly well. We kept the fire going late while just talking, goofing off and enjoying each other’s company ‘til early in the morning. Our last day began once again with rebuilding our fire that was still warm from the inferno I had built the night before. Everyone sort of made what they wanted for breakfast and then we started to tear down our tents. We had heard it was supposed to rain Sunday afternoon and none of us wanted to try and breakdown tents and pack up in the rain. We had everything packed up and torn down in an hour or so. Some of the group went on a final swim before leaving and taking the short drive back to Columbus. The entire trip was made very easy due to some pre-planned reservations and calls ahead. You can reserve campsites as well as canoe trips. But it’s best to plan ahead and be early for both just to get your prime spot at your site or in line for canoeing. And bring your bug spray – you’ll need it! For more info visit www.hockinghillscanoeing.com

ing out with our friends. Collectively risking your lives for adventure has a way of bonding people. Not just fun, Ryan and Jeremiah made the trip educational as well by pointing out interesting highlights of the area, including native vegetation, animals (we saw 3 deer and a groundhog), as well as local history. It was an awesome way to spend the day. For thrill-seekers and nature lovers alike, the Hocking Hills Canopy Tour is the perfect adventure for families, couples seeking to escape the fast-paced city, or adults looking for something new. Designed for guests who are in reasonably good health (weight restrictions have to do with fitting in the harnesses rather than with the strength of the lines), the zipline tour is sure to thrill first-time zippers, as well as, the most experienced zipline enthusiasts. We highly recommend it to everyone. Outlook will definitely be back! Hocking Hills Canopy Tours are $75 per person. Kids (ages 10-15) fly free with a paying adult on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Discount pricing is available for groups of 8 or more. For more information, visit www.hockinghillscanopytours.com or call 740.385.9477. Tell them the boys from Outlook sent you, and request Ryan and Jeremiah as your guides!


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 23

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


24 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

DEEP INSIDE HOLLYWOOD by Romeo San Vicente

NEIL PATRICK HARRIS JOINS HORRIBLE SERIES

THE SARAH JESSICA PARKER CHRONICLES

ALL SINGING, ALL DANCING, ALL SHAKESPEARE

NATHAN LANE IN OUTER SPACE

An actor can star in a movie or TV show and reach a certain number of people, even a lot of people. But that actor will never approach the level of exposure of the skateboarding bulldog or that guy who sang “Chocolate Rain.” Will Ferrell knows this, and that’s why FunnyorDie.com has become as popular, if not more so, than his recent movies. Now Neil Patrick Harris is going viral, too. The How I Met Your Mother funny man will soon team up with Buffy the Vampire Slayer alum Joss Whedon for an Internet series called Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along BlogWhat that title even means is still something of a mystery. But Romeo’s guessing that it’ll mean Mr. Harris plans to sing. Now just add co-star Alyson Hannigan to the formula, and the queer Buffy diehards will forward that link all day.

Sarah Jessica Parker to sell her Manolos! Okay, that’s not actually happening. But in her next film role, the Sex and the City diva will be seen sliding down the social status summit to something a little more realistic than regular trips to the 700-bucks-a-pair shoe boutique. Parker is in negotiations to star in The Ivy Chronicles, based on the novel by Karen Quinn. The book - similar in tone to other recent successes, like The Devil Wears Prada and The Nanny Diaries - concerns an upwardly mobile woman who loses her job and her moneyed husband and winds up living in a less-than-chic neighborhood. Of course, once there, her job is to pull herself back up to socio-economic satisfaction again. It promises to be a heartwarming love story that is, girl loves money, girl loses money, girl gets money back again. Expect Sex and the City-fueled goodwill box office to follow.

Got an old project that’s already exhausted its revenue stream possibilities? Then musical-ize it. It worked for The Producers, Hairspray, and almost every Disney animated feature of the 1990s. And if the Weinstein Company has anything to say about it, the musical car wash is going to work for them, as well. The vehicles in question the crossdressing romantic comedy Shakespeare in Love; the woman-as-Willy-Wonka fable Chocolat; and the movie-nostalgia-wallowing Cinema Paradiso - were all hit films for Miramax, the Weinsteins’ former movie releasing arm. Now they’re being eyed by the company for development into ongoing Broadway ATMs. Finding Neverland and Pink Floyd’s The Wall are already on track for the Weinsteins, but this latest batch could be just the tip of the iceberg if they produce songs people can hum as they exit the theater. Try to remain un-cynical, Broadway fans.

Legendary 1960s Japanese anime character Astro Boy has maintained a strong cult following in the United States, but the Pinocchio-like figure (a flying child robot seeking father-like acceptance from the man who created him in the image of his own deceased son) will soon get an English-language makeover that’s certain to increase his profile. The animated film Astro Boy will feature an all-star voice cast: Freddie Highmore as Astro Boy, with assistance from Nicolas Cage, Donald Sutherland, Bill Nighy, Eugene Levy, and Nathan Lane (most recently seen ogling the half-naked male stars of Broadways’s Xanadu in a muchpassed-around Internet clip). And longtime fan buzz seems to be cautiously hopeful for the moment. But will mass audiences care? Studios are clearly wishing upon a star for another huge animation franchise, so look to 2009’s release date to see if that dream comes true.

Romeo San Vicente is known for making dreams come true. Several this past weekend, in fact. He can be reached care of this publication or at DeepInsideHollywood@qsyndicate.com.

ARTS By Blair Stanley

Remember Who You Are The Lion King is coming to Columbus! The musical, based on the 1994 Disney animated classic made its Broadway debut in 1997 and was the 1998 Tony award winner for Best Musical. The play follows the journey of Simba, the young lion prince who loses and then reclaims his kingdom after learning from his mistakes and regaining his sense of self. Julie Taymor, director of films such as Frida and Across the Universe, became the first woman in Broadway history to win the Tony® Award for Best Director of a Musical. Taymor, along with Michael Curry, created hundreds of masks and puppets for The Lion King. They used elements of puppetry such as the Japanese “Bunraku” style and even shadow techniques in their innovative designs making the African savannah jump from the screen to the stage. Choreography is by Garth Fagan, scenic design is by Richard Hudson, and lighting design is by Donald Holder. The talented multi-cultural cast features Cincinnati-bred Tony Freeman in the role of Zazu the hornbill, Lexington, KY native Timothy JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

Carter as the villainous Scar, and Phindile Mkhize, hailing from South Africa, as the wise Rafiki. All the songs you loved from the film are there, such as “Hakuna Matata” and “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” as well as three

new songs by film composers Elton John and Tim Rice, and additional musical material by South African Lebo M, Mark Mancina, Jay

Rifkin, Julie Taymor and Hans Zimmer. The Lion King will play August 29 through September 28 at the Ohio Theatre (39 E. State Street) performances are Tuesday through Friday evenings at 8p, Saturdays at 2p and 8p and Sundays at 1p and 6:30p. An additional matinee performance is scheduled for Thursday, September 25, 2008 at 2p. Ticket prices range from $20 to $76.50. Special VIP tickets, priced at $127.50, are available for most performances, and include prime seat lo-

cations and vouchers for commemorative merchandise, redeemable at the show. Tickets are available at the Broadway Across AmericaColumbus or OhioTheatre box offices, at any Ticketmaster outlet, or can be charged by phone by calling 614.431.3600 or online at BroadwayAcrossAmerica.com. For groups of 20 or more, contact 614.224.7654 x226. Blair Stanley is with Broadway Across America-Columbus, a member organization of the Columbus Arts Marketing Association. CAMA’s mission is to promote awareness of and participation in the arts and cultural opportunities in Greater Columbus through collaborative marketing and public relations projects, and to provide professional development opportunities for members. For information visit www.camaonline.org.


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 25

FILM by Adam Lippe

HELLBOY II: THE GOLDEN ARMY Intending to write a full review based on copious notes, I sat in front of the monitor, thinking. Not because of writer’s block, but the realization that the movie had not been given a fair shake. By me, maybe it had, but certainly not by the theater. My experience was that Hellboy II was tiring, overplotted, underdeveloped, and killed off its best monster — something that looked like the inside of a greenhouse — within five minutes. The characters that I enjoyed in the first film had been reduced to the clichés normally attributed to a desperate sitcom nearing cancellation in its sixth season. I kept waiting for a monkey to be added to the cast. Then I wondered if I had been fooled by the television ads, which suggested something bright, colorful, and varied, but what I had seen was dark, dingy, and fuzzy. I scanned other reviews by respected critics to see if its unremarkable visual nature had been mentioned. Nothing. In fact, the look of the film was repeatedly praised. I realized something important had been missing from my reviews during the past few months. I hadn’t mentioned the poor state of Columbus theaters. And I’m just talking about what is screened for the press (and those who got early screening tickets). I was at a red carpet Sex and the City screening where the sound was muffled and only came out in mono, which was actually a relief because the pre-movie feature on the movie’s opening in New York was so loud that my entire row had their fingers in their ears. Mishaps continued when, in the middle of the movie, the frame suddenly dropped halfway down the screen, so half of the image was below what was viewable, and the top half of the screen was all letterboxing. And this went on for an entire reel (nearly 15 minutes), creating the biggest laugh of the movie. Because the frame was so low, the boom mike was visible in every shot, including a scene where all of the characters are talking to each other, except Charlotte’s (Kristin Davis) adopted daughter. The professionals are all ignoring the boom mike, they are used to it, but the girl keeps looking up at it, as if it were an alien. And again, the movie was dark and fuzzy, slightly out of focus. This hasn’t just happened the one time, it has happened virtually every time, especially at Lennox screenings. I figure it’s got to be happening to you during regular showings, too. I’m not one of those people who let things go. I complain vigorously about each and every problem, from the focus, to the fact that the projector bulbs aren’t on all the way, making the image hazy and dark, to the air and/or fans not being on. Unfortunately, because I’m the critic, I appear snooty and picky, and I don’t represent the masses. So while these things are usually fixed, it may take two or three visits to management to get it done. But why am I the only one saying anything? People trek all the way out to the theater to overpay for food and tickets and watch a movie that will actually look better on DVD? I know that Columbusites are non-confrontational, but the studios love your complacency. It results in them half-assing everything from the production of the film down to the eventual condition of the prints. The only way this will change is if people voice their thoughts. If you have good eyesight and it looks out of focus, it probably is. If you’re under 400 pounds and you’re still sweating in the theater, it is too hot. If the sound

isn’t working or the picture is too dark, don’t just accept it. Otherwise, why are you paying to be there in the first place? STEPBROTHERS Do you like 90 minutes of screaming? Do you not care about building laughs or story or anything besides watching two actors yell at each other in confused versions of profanity? Do you like being distracted by Mary Steenburgen’s disastrous facelift? Do you like movies that have so much product placement that it’s clear the movie was a profit before they even finished shooting? Do you like comedies that don’t bother with pacing, so while there may be a few good lines the movie feels like it is four hours long, because it doesn’t have ups and downs and the volume is always at 10? Do you like movies in which exhibiting profane, stunted adolescence is the only idea? Do you like John Reilly stealing the entire movie from Will Ferrell, proving that his comedic chops in Walk Hard were not a fluke? Well then, go see Stepbrothers. THE DARK KNIGHT The late, great critic for The New Yorker, Pauline Kael, talked about the manufacturing of the blockbuster and how the product was no longer important, just that it was considered a sellable ride. The Dark Knight is certainly a viable product: well made, sleek, sturdy, efficient, and yet sort of hollow. Part of the problem is that it is really two films crammed into one; there’s even a logical conclusion at the 90 minute mark. But then the movie varies its scenarios for another hour, exhausting the audience. While I could give credit to writer/director Christopher Nolan for expecting us to stay focused for that long, it would have been far more prudent to simplify. The first 2/3 of the film is about The Joker, masterfully played in a spectacularly mannered performance by Heath Ledger (who may win an Oscar solely because of his death, comic-book movies never have their acting singled out at award ceremonies, even if his award would be deserved). And the last third is about the conversion of Super D.A. Harvey Dent (played by Aaron Eckhart, who is beginning to look like the combover is permanent) from great white hope, to the vengeance minded villain, “Two-Face.” Because The Joker draws all of our attention, Eckhart’s drama seems like a distracting afterthought, when it would be perfectly valid in its own two-hour film. It is amazing how fast Nolan is able to move through twist after twist and the obligatory scenes where Bruce Wayne (still played by Christian Bale as a glum version of his Patrick Bateman from American Psycho, but without any acknowledgment of his smugness) longs for a normal life, cramming name actors into tiny parts (Nicky Katt is never even lighted well enough to recognize, then there’s William Fichtner, Cillian Murphy, Anthony Michael Hall, etc.), which allows Nolan to skip over some elements that don’t make any sense at all, like why would anyone willingly work for The Joker? His elaborate plans would take thousands of manhours, but there’s no money in it and you’ll end up dead, quite quickly. In the end I wasn’t so much entertained or thrilled, I just needed a nap.

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


26 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

MUSIC

FAITH REWARDED George Michael knew you were waiting for his first North American tour in 17 years! Ladies and gentleman: For the first time in more than 17 years, George Michael is coming to a city near you! Supporting his new retrospective record, Twenty-Five, which celebrates the 25th anniversary of his music career, the out legend brings his record-breaking 25 Live Tour to North America this summer following last year’s 80show European run. No topic was taboo during our exclusive one-on-one chat— “You can ask me whatever you like,” he insisted straight off—so read without prejudice as the Grammy winner, who turned 45 on June 25, squashes tabloid rumors and plays favorites with gay fans. OLW: Have you altered your tour for North American audiences? GM: I’m making adjustments. There are a few more tracks from Faith, but other than that, not really. I’ve got to play to the fans that have been buying my stuff that hasn’t been on the radio for the past 15 years. In other words, I’ve got to not play down to anybody. Ultimately, there’s enough old stuff in there for people who don’t know the newer stuff, so they’ll be alright. OLW: Is there any song you’ve officially retired? GM: Not really, but there are only a couple of Wham! songs I can get away with— “Everything She Wants” and “I’m Your Man.” Other than that, there’s nothing that I have a real objection to. OLW: Did you feel a special connection with gay fans even before you came out in 1998? Surely you must’ve known it

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

wasn’t just girls eyeing your butt in the Faith days. GM: Oh God, yeah, I knew that. With all those number one club records and stuff, I really have had a great amount of support from the gay community in America in the last 15 years, so absolutely that’s special. I actually write about my real experience now, and I think that’s one of the things that makes it easier for gay people to listen to. OLW: Did you get any positive feedback from a gay fan that made coming out professionally worth the drama? GM: Quite a few people have written to me over the years on that basis. From the moment I outed myself, when I wrote “Outside,” immediately I thought, Wouldn’t it be great to make a video for all those kids that are now where you were 25 years ago, with your only experience being cruising and feeling terrible about it because you’re 16 or whatever? If someone had made a video like that for my entertainment when I was a young guy, I would’ve loved it. OLW: Can a gay artist succeed if he’s out from the beginning? GM: It’s happening in Europe - Will Young was out from day one and it didn’t hurt him at all - but it’s still very tricky in America, where you’re so categorized as soon as people realize you’re gay.

album, Songs from the Last Century, in 1999. Is there any artist you’d like to hear do a George Michael cover? GM: Maybe Amy Winehouse, although I think maybe my stuff is a bit straightforward for her. OLW: How did you feel about Carrie Underwood’s cover of “Praying For Time” on American Idol’s Idol Gives Back? GM: I thought it was very flattering. She really sung her heart out, didn’t she? I’m going to find some opportunity to thank her. That’s probably why they invited me on to the American Idol finale.

OLW: Would you advise a closeted performer in America to stay in the closet? GM: Absolutely not. There is no career that’s worth that. I’d just say, “Come out and accept that you’ll lose some of your audience.”

OLW: Do you wish more Idol contestants sung George Michael songs? GM: Well, normally Simon Cowell tells them, “You just don’t touch a George Michael song,” which I thought was quite complimentary.

OLW: You’ve recorded a great cover

OLW: Earlier this year you made your

American acting debut on Eli Stone. On which other American show would you like to appear? GM: I prefer watching TV. I don’t think I’d like a career in it. It was just a remarkable thing because they wanted to name all of the episodes after my songs and write me into the actual storyline, but the music was the main reason I did it. People think because I did Extras and Eli Stone that maybe I’m trying to make a foray into acting, but I’m not. How do you maintain such a good sense of humor about your mishaps? GM: Well, with the stuff that I get up to, if I didn’t have a sense of humor I’d really be up shit creek, as they say. I can always see the funny side, especially if it’s about sex. For US tour dates and ticket information, log onto www.ticketmaster.com or www.georgemichael.com. Twenty-Five (Epic) out now.


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 27

CLASSIFIEDS ADULT CONNECTIONS

HOUSING/FOR RENT

MEN. CONNECT. EASY. Gay, str8, curious, bi. Instant, live action. Get on & off @ 1800GAYLIVE. Call now 614.410.1555. Free Trial.

OLDE TOWNE EAST One bedroom basement apartment, carpeted, utilities included. Pets ok with deposit. $475/month. 614.258.2298.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

OLDE TOWNE EAST 1096 & 1104 Bryden Rd, 1 BR FLORAL BUSINESS apartments available, new 70-year-old family-run floral busi- kitchen, wd flrs, vaulted ceiling, ness for sale. Established clients, $450/mo. More OTE rentals availgreat location. Please call Mary able. Call Beacon Property Mgmt. McCarthy at Sunbelt Business at 614.228.6700. Brokers, 614.734.8338, for more information. EAST SIDE Eastside roommate. $500/month HELP WANTED includes utilities and more; professional preferred; email shrafBANK TELLER man@aol.com for details or call Looking for an experienced Branch 614.404.4121; close to highBanker. Must have In Branch sales ways/Easton/airport. experience in the financial services industry. Outbound calling required. Please direct inquiries or send resume to: Jeff Bergandine 647 N High St Columbus, OH 43215, 614.241.5600, or email resume to jbergandine@firstcommunitybank.com.

Damian’s Back!

SENSUAL MASSAGE

CUSTOMER SERVICE German Village State Farm • Incalls & outcalls seeks qualified sales/cus- • Starting at $85 tomer service representa• Deep Tissue, tive. Part-time and full-time positions avail- Sports Massage & able! Great environment to more! match a great opportunity! • In town July 24 Applicants with at least 6 July 27 months prior sales and customer service experience preferred. Interested Call today! applicants should either call 614.274.7130 or email

202.441.5385

nikki@nikkioinsurance.com.

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


28 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

PUCKER UP by Tristan Taormino

PornoPunkFeminism Sex, Love, Art, And Pornoterroristas In Spain Is pornography a universal medium? Does sex speak a common language? I contemplated these questions last week when I presented a history of alternative porn in the United States at “PornoPunkFeminism: Queer Micro-Politics and Subaltern Pornographies,” a conference held at Arteleku (arteleku.net), an art center just outside San Sebastian, Spain. It was a four-day event of multimedia presentations and performances by artists, filmmakers, performers, and activists from around the world. The theme centered around the concept of “post-porn,” a term coined by artist Wink van Kempen. “Post-porn” is defined by feminists and artists as sexually explicit work that critiques dominant representations of gender and sexuality and creates a politicized space for alternative, subversive imagery. As conference coordinator B. Preciado explained it: “This event takes post-pornography as a place where three political movements providing a cultural critique converge: feminism, the queer movement, and punk.” Del LaGrace Volcano (dellagracevolcano.com) is a gender-variant visual artist whose pioneering photography has documented lesbians, punks, transpeople, genderqueers, and other outsiders in stunning, often sexually explicit photos. Volcano presented work from his latest book, Femmes of Power, where he and co-author Ulrika Dahl profile dozens of people around the world who embody queer femininities. He also showed his classic smut film, Pansexual Public Porn, which follows the adventures of several transmen having sex in a popular gay cruising spot in England. Annie Sprinkle and her partner, Beth Stephens, presented a stunning retrospective of their individual and collective work over the past 30 years, which has ranged from Sprinkle’s famed Public Cervix Announcement to Stephens’s sexually charged multimedia exhibits. In 2004, they began a seven-year performance-art piece together, Love Art Laboratory (loveartlab.org), which culminates each year in a huge wedding. Because Sprinkle’s work originated in porn and has become increasingly about love, she challenged the audience with the questions: “Is there a place in porn for love? Is love the last taboo?” One response came from Massimo and Pierce of Black Sun Productions (anarcocks.com), who opened their presentation with an unforgettable line: “We fell in love making a porn movie.” Apparently, the Swiss government didn’t return the affection - the couple’s home sex movies were targeted and seized by the government for obscenity. They showed one of the images at the center of the controversy: a striking photo of Pierce peeing into his own mouth. (Porn can show all the cum it wants, but urine is off-limits.) After an extensive (and expensive) legal battle, their home movies were returned to them; one of those films was picked up by U.S. distributor Treasure Island (treasureislandmedia.com), who released it as Anarcocks: Pirate Tape #1. Notably, Treasure Island cut all the scenes that featured gloves and condoms and kept the scenes without safer sex. “We were censored by the police in Switzerland for being too dirty,” Massimo says, “and censored by the American porn industry for not being dirty enough. JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008

“No stranger to censorship herself, multimedia artist Shu Lea Cheang has attempted to produce her live performance piece Explicit Express: I Am You Are High on Milk at several festivals, but has been stopped every time. So she clearly felt triumphant the night it finally came to life at this conference. As the story goes, the future’s most popular new drug is called Milk - an ejaculate that gets people high, and which is created by the Milk Gen, a group of people of all genders with special mutant DNA (related to the HIV virus). Although I knew only the basic plot, it was a striking performance where agents track the producers and consumers of Milk as they get off on both the drug and each other. Members of the socalled “Milk Gen” weaved their way in and out of the audience dripping white, creamy liquid from their mouths and hands as others donned strap-ons, fucking, sucking, and flogging their way to ecstasy. After the sticky substance was mopped up, Lazlo Ilya Pearlman (gendelicious.com), an American currently living in London who performs around the world, took the stage. He did three pieces, the best of which was a kind of gender tango with a woman named Nadege Piton. It was a dance-cumstriptease where the two swapped gender roles throughout, until Nadege was dressed in Lazlo’s vest and hat while puffing on his cigar, while Lazlo was naked. (It’s certainly not every day you see a transman stripped down under stage lights, so that alone was brave and unique.) Then they reached into each other’s cunts - Lazlo pulled out a string of pearls from Nadege, Nadege retrieved a necktie from Lazlo, and each donned the other’s hidden gender signifier as the piece ended. As for the less visual presentations, there was text and context I didn’t always get: my high-school Spanish didn’t exactly come rushing back to me. That meant I couldn’t understand much of the talks by Spain’s leading porno thinkers, including María Llopis and Itziar Ziga, along with groups like Medeak and PostOp. From what I saw of their work, it was much closer to activism and avant-garde art than what we call porn - even alternative porn - in America. For all that was lost in translation, I still walked away having learned so much about independent and underground porn in other parts of the world. One of the final events was a multimedia spoken-word performance by Diana Pornoterrorista (pornterrorism.blogspot.com). She started out encased in plastic wrap, standing against a screen that flashed rapid-fire images, each more disturbing than the one before: war casualties, hangings, decapitations, all intercut with graphic images of childbirth, anal fisting, and American porn star Belladonna giving and getting blowjobs. The juxtaposition of hardcore-sex images with depictions of unbelievable violence was totally disturbing. Meanwhile, Diana cut the plastic off and smeared blood all over her naked body as she read her provocative, sexually charged poetry. During one poem, a friend came up from the audience and fucked her with a dildo as she read: “Expand me/Move me/Impale me/Remind me there are no borders between/Pain and pleasure/Between sadism and tenderness.” Please visit my websites, puckerup.com and openingup.net


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 29

SAVAGE LOVE by Dan Savage

I am a heterosexual male in my 20s, and I need some help putting a label on my kink/fetish. I usually don’t care much for labels in any aspect of life, but I’m hoping that knowing what to call this may help me find others who share the same interest: I love it when a woman watches me masturbate. She doesn’t have to touch me at all, take off her own clothes, or play with herself. However, she has to enjoy watching me for me to enjoy performing. I have no interest in “flashing” or otherwise imposing myself on someone who doesn’t want to watch. Also, I don’t want to show just anyone; I just enjoy being watched by a woman. I’ve seen some CFNM porn, but that often seems to be more about humiliation, which I’m not interested in at all. Wanting A Named Kink If you’re looking for a label, WANK, what’s wrong with “exhibitionist”? It’s a fine, serviceable term, and an honorable sexual pursuit provided, of course, that you exhibit yourself exclusively to women who wish to take in your exhibition. A flasher may be the first thing that pops to mind when people hear the term “exhibitionist,” WANK, but while all flashers are exhibitionists, it doesn’t follow that all exhibitionists are flashers. Perhaps you could start a movement to reclaim “exhibitionism” from the creeps? As for CFNM porn - that’s “clothed female, naked male” - most of it features strong subtexts (or domtexts) of humiliation, even seemingly vanilla-ish iterations, but that’s unavoidable. CFNM upends all the usual gender power dynamics: The man is naked and vulnerable and subject to the woman’s gaze; the woman is clothed and in control and assessing the man. Perhaps the role that dom/sub dynamics play in your turn-on is so subtle, WANK, that you honestly believe humiliation has nothing to do with it. But it’s in there. I’m a gay man who never experimented with girls when I was younger. I’ve been in a relationship for a little over a year now, and it’s great. We have an “open-enough” relationship that allows for some exploration of our sexuality with other people and we talk openly about it. The only thing is, I don’t know how to tell him about this fetish I’ve developed for CFNM. I don’t want to have sex with a woman, but I really want to find one who wants to stay fully clothed while watch-

ing me masturbate. I also have a fantasy for a woman to watch me have sex with my BF or another man. Attempts to find a woman via various websites have so far been unfruitful. I want to blame the prudes in Minneapolis for this, but I’m starting to think women just aren’t into watching a man get naked and jack off. How do I ask my boyfriend to get involved in this kink? And how do I find a woman who is into watching? Horny And Clothed In Minneapolis Make some lesbian friends, HACIM. Lots of dykes watch gay male porn, a phenomenon I would unpack in this space if, um, I had the faintest idea what was up with that. (Ladies? What is up with that?) And on more than one occasion, lesbian pals have asked me and my boyfriend to put on a live sex show for ’em. They apparently wanted to see what gay sex looked like without the bad lighting, the waxed eyebrows, and the faked chemistry. Equal parts modesty and performance anxiety have sadly prevented my boyfriend and me from obliging our lesbian pals. But you, clearly, could do better by your lesbian buddies. And how do you ask the boyfriend to go there with you? Just like any smart kinkster asks a partner to indulge, or consider indulging, his kink, HACIM: with a smile and a sense of humor. Kinks should always be presented as perks, as something that makes you a more interesting and fun sex partner, not as something that makes you a defective or problematic sex partner. And if your boyfriend isn’t willing to go there, HACIM, it doesn’t sound like you’ll have much trouble getting his permission to go there on your own. My boyfriend and I met sleazy about six weeks ago when a guy I met on Craigslist took me over to my then-future boyfriend’s house for a three-way. During the three-way, my then-future boyfriend struggled with a condom and said that they “choked” him. Then he asked if he could stick it in me without a condom. He stated that he had had a vasectomy and then asked me if I had any STIs. I said that I didn’t and he said that he didn’t either. Long story short, we hit it off and thus began a relationship. After a month of blissful, unprotected sex, my boyfriend told me that he has herpes! He said that he got it a long time ago at his bachelor party. I want to dump the motherfucker, but he’s telling me that he hasn’t had an outbreak in

three years and that if I really cared about him it wouldn’t make a difference. What do you think? Didn’t Know I Was Dating Herpes Boy What do I think? Honestly, DKIWDHB? I think you’re an idiot. You met up with a strange guy for a nearly anonymous three-way that some other guy set up over Craigslist, and it turns out that this strange man you met - your now-boyfriend has a rather common sexually transmitted infection. A thinking person who met someone under those circumstances would be shocked to discover that her now-boyfriend didn’t have herpes. Even though you may have already had herpes when you met this guy (you could’ve been exposed long ago and just not shown any symptoms to date), you still have a legit complaint. But it’s not about the STI issue, DKIWDHB, it’s about the lying. A man who’s selfish enough to lie to a woman about his health even a woman he’s just met and suspects he may never meet again - in order to get out of wearing a condom isn’t going to draw the line at that lie. He’ll lie to you about other stuff like, you know, vasectomies that he may or may not have had. You’re worried about the herpes when you should probably be worried about the most common STI of all: pregnancy. My girlfriend and I haven’t had anything resembling sex in months. But anytime I bring it up, she says she doesn’t like to discuss it and that she’d rather “surprise” me with it. That apparently feels more natural, and the mere discussion of sex is a dead turnoff. What The Fuck? Whatever the fuck is going on here, WTF, and whatever the fuck I tell you to do, I’ll get shitloads of mail - all from readers with no more information to work with than I have - explaining how this is all your fault. Because, you see, you’re the man and whenever a couple’s sex life goes off the rails, it is always the man’s fault. (That’s what makes gay relationships so egalitarian.) But for what it’s worth - and it ain’t worth much - here’s my advice: “surprise” her by moving out. Download the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at www.thestranger.com/savage. mail@savagelove.net

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


30 • OUTLOOK WEEKLY

ABOUT TOWN Following an exhaustive search and much media speculation, Steve Guyer, Shadowbox president and CEO, announces the Shadowbox Board’s decision to move the sketch comedy and rock ‘n’ roll club to a permanent home in Columbus’ Brewery District. After a ten year stint at the Easton Town Center, the popular performance troupe plans to build the Shadowbox Homecoming Project, a multi-use, multi-purpose facility at 495 South Front Street, currently the Brewmaster’s Gate building. Increased seating capacity, a coffee shop / bar, and additional programming will make the building operational 7-days a week. Guyer cites four primary reasons for the move: Seating capacity, Artistic expansion, Additional administrative and rehearsal space, & Location. SEATING CAPACITY Shadowbox currently seats 214 patrons. In recent years, however, this just hasn’t been enough to accommodate the growing crowds during the troupe’s busy season and on the most popular nights of the week. “For example, we have consistently been turning people away from our 7:30 Saturday shows,” explains Guyer. “We could easily sell another 50 tickets to that one show if we had the space to accommodate the demand.” Guyer, and the rest of the Board recognize the good fiscal sense it makes to accommodate the demand. “We’re a non-profit 501c3,” continues Guyer. “And it’s not like we’re making money hand over fist. In order to get us through the slow times we have to find a way to maximize the benefits from the busy times.” The new facility will seat 350 in a 6,500 square foot space (square footage includes seating areas as well as stage areas). A clever, flexible design will keep the venue intimate and allow for excellent sight lines from both floor and mezzanine locations. ARTISTIC EXPANSION Over the past two decades Shadowbox has become known for its wide range of artistic expression. From theater to music to dance to television Shadowbox has engaged Columbus’ arts scene. With the debut of the Homecoming Project, the Shadowbox team plans to complement their regular shows and the recently introduced Musical Series with three new ventures, the most aggressive being “Stage 2.” An open-format venue, Stage Two, will bridge the gap between traditional theatrical productions, dance concerts, and multi-discipline shows, some of which will resemble the popular presentations from former Shadowbox spin-off, 2Co’s Cabaret. Additionally, Guyer hopes to collaborate with other Columbus arts organizations, sharing the space to produce unique, intimate, and interactive works. In addition to Stage 2, Shadowbox plans to implement a movie series with WCBE’s John DeSando

THE SHADOWBOX HOMECOMING PROJECT:

SHADOWBOX BUILDING PERMANENT HOME – MOVING DOWNTOWN TO BREWERY DISTRICT

and Clay Lowe, as well as a live music series. “We recognize the importance of a healthy, vibrant arts community and we want to contribute to all the positive things the arts can bring to this city,” said Guyer. ADDITIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE AND REHEARSAL SPACE Currently, Shadowbox is in a constant state of performance/production, resulting in a 52-week per year performance schedule. As a result, back-toback show closings and openings mean that the troupe members are always rehearsing one musical and two Shadowbox shows while performing another musical and a Shadowbox show. The number of active productions in the small Easton space has caused significant storage and rehearsal issues, which have resulted in a less efficient operation. “Right now we can only rehearse one discipline at a time,” explains Guyer. “If the band needs to practice we can’t very well run sketches on the same stage at the same time. The problem is expanded when you consider that at any given time we have three bands that need rehearsals – the Shadowbox house band, the Musicals band, and the Lunchbox band. The vocalists practice catch-ascatch-can and often use spaces like our dressing room because every other space is being used for something else.” The Shadowbox Homecoming Project will have several rehearsal spaces where actors, singers, dancers and bands can work on upcoming productions. Likewise, the administrative offices, which were never intended to house the entire Shadowbox administrative staff (a portion of the staff was supposed to work out of the Spring Street theater but the 1999 fire rendered the space unusable), are overcrowded. “Most of the administrative staff actually share workspaces,” says Guyer. “We don’t have private meetings rooms, we’ve punched through concrete block walls to create more work space, and some of the staff even work under the stage!” The new facility will have adequate storage for all props and costumes, and increase the administrative office footprint from 2,500 square feet to 5,000 square feet. LOCATION In 1998, the decision to take up residency in the Easton Town Center was sound and critical to our growth. “We’re very grateful for the time we’ve had at Easton,” says Guyer. “In fact, I would say these have been our most important formative years and they simply couldn’t have happened were it not for the understanding and vision of Easton.” Guyer hopes that a downtown presence will attract even larger audiences, will allow the company

to collaborate with other arts organizations, and will further associate Shadowbox with the city of Columbus. THE BUILDING The land is owned by developer Bill Schottenstein and his partners, and Meyers and Associates Architects have been hired for the design. In addition, the Shadowbox team has been working with design consultant Jay Panzer, who specializes in theater design, to create a state-of-the-art facility for all of Shadowbox’s needs. The theater, soundstage, prop storage / construction, and a café/bar (The Backstage Coffee Shop and Bar) will occupy the first two stories of what will eventually be a mixed-use development. Additionally, Shadowbox, Panzer, and Meyers are planning to make the building “green” following LEED approved guidelines. “The Backstage Coffee Shop and Bar will be open to the public from early morning until late at night seven days a week and will give patrons a place to meet before they see a show as well as a place to socialize afterwards,” said Guyer. Administrative offices, rehearsal spaces and a costume shop will be located on the mezzanine level of the theater along with conference rooms and offices. Shadowbox hopes to take occupancy by late summer 2009. THE BUDGET The move to the new space will increase Shadowbox’s annual Columbus budget from its current $1.8 million to a projected $3.2 million, and will increase local staff from 38 to 58. The number of patrons for the first year of operations is projected at 72,000; a number that combines Shadowbox, Stage Two, Lunchbox, Musicals, Movie Night, New Music Series, Company Events, and shows designed for families and school-aged patrons. Through donations and innovative financing Shadowbox has arranged for some of the funds needed to make the move downtown. To that end, Jim Coleman and his company, Ohio’s Tomorrow, and long time Shadowbox ally Dave Whinham and his organization, The Team, have been instrumental in securing meaningful funding to begin the project. Guyer has also enlisted Coleman to spearhead Shadowbox’s first-ever capital campaign. Shadowbox’s non-profit / 501c3 status makes it eligible for tax-deductible donations from corporations as well as individuals. “We’re very excited about this opportunity and anxious to see what the future holds for Shadowbox,” said Guyer. “The Homecoming Project will give us a permanent home and meet our growing needs while allowing us to make a larger contribution to the city’s arts and entertainment scene.”

COLUMBUS NEXT MEETING: AUG 13, 6P-8P; LOCATION: WALL STREET NIGHTCLUB (144 N WALL) SPEAKER: STACIE BOORD OF SHADOWBOX • WWW.NETWORKCOLUMBUS.COM

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008


OUTLOOK WEEKLY • 31

fin

THE LAST WORD by Leslie Robinson

THE FUTURE OF JESSE HELMS It’s a popular notion that, after we die, we get what we deserve. So let’s assume that’s precisely what’s happening to Jesse Helms, the longtime U.S. senator from North Carolina who expired on July 4. As I picture things, after Helms died he immediately passed into a spiritual realm. He found himself in front of gates, where a man in a flowing robe was in charge. Helms smiled broadly. “St. Peter, I’m glad to see you!” The man responded, “I’m not St. Peter. I’m Ralph. And this isn’t heaven. The Big Guy hasn’t decided what to do with you yet, Helms. He’s well aware that conservatives believe you should be in heaven, and liberals think you belong in hell. He’ll make up his own mind, eventually. Go through the gates and sit on the bench. We’ve arranged for a few visitors.” Helms proceeded to the bench. After a minute Richard Nixon joined him. “Jesse, I knew you’d get here eventually. Remember how, when I went to Beijing, you accused me of ‘appeasing Red China?’ I just want to say, up yours with a pair of splintery chopsticks.” Before Helms could gather himself to reply, Nixon vanished, replaced by the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Helms smirked. “I’m not surprised you’re here in limbo,” he said to the civil rights leader. “Actually, I’m here just to see you. Lord knows I wasn’t perfect, but He’s seen fit to give me a place upstairs. Deal with it.” King continued, “Now Jesse, in life you relied on race-baiting to get elected. You found low-down ways to scare all those white people into voting for you. Remember 1990?” “Ah,” cackled Helms, “we pulled that one out of the fire.”

“You were losing to the black candidate, until the famous ad showing a white man’s hands crumpling a job application, with the voiceover, ‘You needed that job… But they had to give it to a minority.’” Helms looked King square in the face. “You’re just mad because I was the only senator to vote against your holiday, you

being patient while He decides what to do with you. I think we’re looking at more than 40 days and 40 nights here.” Helms groaned. He groaned again as Robert Mapplethorpe replaced King. “You may not be pleased to see me, Jesse, but it could be worse. It was a toss-up between me and some victims of the El Salvadoran death squads you supported.” Mapplethorpe threw his arm around the former senator. “Jesse, sweetie, let’s remember the good old days. When you fought to keep gays and lesbians out of appointed positions in government. When you stood firm against federal aid for AIDS research and treatment. Was that when you called gays ‘weak, morally sick wretches?’” “Can’t remember,” grumbled Helms. Mapplethorpe continued, “And who could forget your battle with the NEA for subsidizing my photos? You made me a household name, honey. By the by, I won’t tell you where I landed afterlife-wise, but for tonight, we’re roommates.” As Helms gagged, Ralph the gatekeeper replaced Mapplethorpe. “Oh Helms,” mused Ralph, “where should a demagogue go? You get credit for loving your country. Trouble was, that country was the Confederacy. You were dedicated to public service - but you cared only for a portion of the public.” Ralph shrugged. “I think you’re going to be with us a long while. If you want company, I can put in a request that Mapplethorpe remain for the duration.”

communist.” “I’m glad you brought that up. The 16-day filibuster you staged against me caught the attention of The Big Kahuna, who said that if you can delay that long, you’ll have no trouble

Leslie Robinson lives in Seattle. E-mail her at LesRobinsn@aol.com, and read other columns at www.GeneralGayety.com.

HOROSCOPES by Jack Fertig

LEO (Jul 23 - Aug 22): You’re looking especially fabulous these days, but duty calls - and not to the runway you’d rather be on. Work on your attitude as well as the labors at hand. If you focus that dazzle into professional development, you’ll be a star!

SCORPIO (Oct 23 - Nov 21): You have great ability to organize friends constructively. Rely on charm, and don’t push too hard. Assuming authority will backfire, but inviting people to participate will push you to the top.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 - Feb 18): Venus and Mars are eager to get you some hot action, but the route to fulfillment is through some kind of charitable service. No, not pity dates! Doing good will help you meet the right people or improve your partner’s amenability.

VIRGO (Aug 23 - Sep 22): Your playful impulses may seem a bit severe and critical to folks who don’t quite get you. Brush up your creative skills in private, or donate your services to a good cause.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 - Dec 20): Being resourceful and good with money can get you terrific notice at work. Play up your strengths and values. The temptation to adventure could get the better of you, but that yen could be channeled into great work. Remember what’s important!

PISCES (Feb 19 - Mar 19): Your inclination is to socialize, and you could easily be the belle or beau of the ball. More to your advantage, you could harness those social skills to work better with your colleagues and improve productivity or other problems at work.

LIBRA (Sep 23 - Oct 22): If you’re torn between needing some downtime at home and wanting to please your friends, you should set times for both. Finding the balance could be tricky, but adequate solitude is necessary for your spirit to sparkle in public.

CAPRICORN (Dec 21 - Jan 19): You’re looking very hot now, but a bit severe and hard to approach. Take the first move, and be willing to try something new. If at first you don’t succeed, consider improvements in your style and try again!

ARIES (Mar 20 - Apr 19): The urge to strut your stuff can be an awkward distraction. Reroute that bit of exhibitionism into your work. You can get a lot accomplished, win positive notice, and open opportunities. Just let your work speak for itself!

TAURUS (Apr 20 - May 20): Whatever hobbies, sports, or creative outlet you have will benefit hugely from some fresh input and attention on technique. Unless it’s a home-based activity, the nest may be a cozy distraction from accomplishment. Think instead of awards you’d like to be able to display. GEMINI (May 21 - Jun 20): Is your sex life suffering from bad feng shui? House cleaning, maybe even some re-decorating, could make both your boudoir and your attitude more inviting. Smart-ass remarks from a close friend offer a clue to what you need to do. CANCER (Jun 21 - Jul 22): If you must have some flashy little bauble to show off, at least check your budget before giving in to expensive impulse. A serious discussion with your partner or a close friend will be good for your discipline and your relationship.

Jack Fertig, a professional astrologer since 1977, is a founding member of the Association for Astrological Networking. He can be reached for consultations at 415.864.8302, www.starjack.com, and by e-mail at QScopes@qsyndicate.com.

JUL 24 - JUL 30 2008



07.24.08 Outlook Weekly - Travel: Hocking Hills