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OCTOBER 3, 2016

VOL.2 NUMBER 7 from the publisher of The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine

The New Jersey Center for Teaching and Learning “Goosebumps HorrorLand” books OutlooK-12 Magazine’s Holiday Gift Guide

LAURIE HERNANDEZ The Journey of an Olympic Champion 2016

ROLE MODEL of the year

WWW.K12HISPANICOUTLOOK.COM


PHOTO COURTESY OF BUSINESS WIRE

PUBLISHER PRESIDENT AND CEO

JOSÉ LÓPEZ ISA TOMÁS CASTELLANOS NUÑEZ

VICE PRESIDENT

NICOLE LÓPEZ ISA

EDITOR IN CHIEF

MEREDITH COOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

MARY ANN COOPER

ART & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

RICARDO CASTILLO

ACCOUNTING & FINANCE DIRECTOR

JAVIER SALAZAR CARRIÓN

MEDIA RELATIONS DIRECTOR

MARILYN ROCA ENRÍQUEZ

CONTRIBUTING WRITER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

GARY COOPER ASHLEY BARANELLO

Editorial Policy The Hispanic OutlooK-12 Magazine Inc.® is a national magazine. Dedicated to exploring issues related to Hispanics in K-12, The Hispanic OutlooK-12 Magazine Inc.® is published for the members of the K-12 education community. Editorial decisions are based on the editors’ judgment of the quality of the writing, the timeliness of the article, and the potential interest to the readers of The Hispanic OutlooK-12 Magazine Inc.®. From time to time, The Hispanic OutlooK-12 Magazine Inc® will publish articles dealing with controversial issues. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and/or those interviewed and might not reflect the official policy of the magazine. The Hispanic OutlooK-12 Magazine® neither agrees nor disagrees with those ideas expressed, and no endorsement of those views should be inferred unless specifically identified as officially endorsed by The Hispanic OutlooK-12 Magazine®. Letters to the Editor The Hispanic OutlooK-12 Inc. ® E-MAIL: admin@k12hispanicoutlook.com

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CONTENT VOLUME 2, ISSUE 7

LAURIE HERNANDEZ

ROLE MODEL

The Journey of an Olympic Champion

6 MAKING THE GRADE MAKING THE GRADE

13

Veteran Educator Offers Advice to Teachers and Parents

OUTLOOK-12 MAGAZINE’S HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

RECESS

14

Hello! ¡Hola! The Care Bears™ Learn a New Language

READ ANY GOOD BOOKS LATELY? SCHOOL LIBRARY

19

This Month OutlooK-12 Features the Chilling "Goosebumps Horrorland" Series in English and Spanish

THE NEW JERSEY CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

REPORT CARD

22

Prepares Students, Including Underrepresented Minorities and Girls for AP Physics Exam with Powerful Results

NEWS AND TRENDS

SCHOOL NEWSPAPER

25

The Latest Education-related Stories from Across America


ROLE MODEL

LAURIE HERNANDEZ

The Journey of an Olympic Champion

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some ways, Laurie didn’t dwell on such a distinction. “I think people are people: if you want something, go get it,” she told NBC. “I don’t think it matters what race you are. If you want to train hard enough to go to the Olympics, you’re going to go out and do it.” Born on June 9, 2000 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Lauren Hernandez (who was nicknamed Laurie at the gym to distinguish herself from other gymnasts sharing that space) was raised as the youngest child in a close family consisting of her father, Anthony; her mother, Wanda; her brother, Marcus; her sister, Jelysa; and her grandmother,

Bruni. When not in the gym, Laurie enjoys spending time with her family, and she is also involved in her church. Her road to Rio began in 2005 when she was five years old and stepped into a gym class for the first time. As young as she was at the time, she was more fascinated with watching gymnastics on television than she was in attending dance and ballet classes. Those classes were a bore, and she had to be coaxed into attending them (bribed actually with cookies to go). Gymnastics classes, however, were another thing all together. Her mother enrolled her in the sport because she had so

PHOTO COURTESY OF BUSINESS WIRE

aurie Hernandez became a part of the elite sorority of world class gymnasts in 2016, just in time for the Rio Olympic Games. Her goal had always been to make an Olympic Team, and the Rio competition made her dream come true. The youngest member of the team that dubbed itself the Final Five and one of the youngest members of the entire 2016 U.S. Olympic Team, Hernandez is a 16-year-old of Puerto Rican descent and the first U.S. born Latina to join the U.S. women’s gymnastics team since 1984 when Tracee Talavera competed in the Los Angeles games that year. In

Laurie Hernandez, U.S. Olympic Gymnastics Champion, joins the P&G family as Crest® and Orgullosa ambassador. P&G, Worldwide Olympic Partner, also welcomes her mom, Wanda Hernandez, to the ‘Thank You Mom’ family.

6 · October 3, 2016


NBC, “because the energy of the crowd is really nice, and I can show my personality when I’m out there.” The energy Laurie exudes has caught the attention of the gymnastics community. International Gymnast Magazine called Hernandez the “Human emoji” for her expressive face while performing, and gymnastics podcast Gymcastic nicknamed her “baby Shakira” because of the way she combines dance with her athletic artistry. Beginning with the third grade Laurie was homeschooled, and she credits her hard work, leadership skills and her never give up attitude to her mom who was in the Army Reserves for six years and made sure she respected rules and stayed motivated while Laurie was growing up. Eleven years after enrolling in gymnastics classes, Laurie joined her team mates on the gold med-

al podium as the U.S. National Anthem played to accept the gold for Women’s Team All-Around. She capped her Rio experience with a silver medal for the balance beam competition. Laurie’s natural ability let her breeze through the ranks of junior gymnastics following a rigorous daily regimen, which was marked by arriving at the training facility by 8:30 a.m and practicing from five to six hours a day six days a week. In 2012, she finished 21st in the all-around at the national championships, and in 2013, at 13 years old she was second and won event medals on the uneven bars, the balance beam and the floor exercise. Her career hit a roadblock in 2014 when she fractured her wrist and dislocated her kneecap, which sent her under the knife to have a new ligament attached to her knee. By

PHOTO COURTESY OF BUSINESS WIRE

much energy and always wanted to experience the feeling of flying. “My earliest memory was watching gymnastics on live TV and wanting to do what the ‘big girls’ did,” Hernandez told NBC. “I started a gymnastics class at five years old, but it became serious at seven.” She enrolled in Monmouth Gymnastics where she met her coach, Maggie Haney, and they have been together ever since. Haney saw very early on that Laurie had a natural feel for music and decided that the grace and techniques of dance would make Laurie a one of a kind gymnastics champion. Her routines resemble carefully choreographed dances performed with the athletic prowess to introduce complex tumbling and gymnastic moves. Laurie’s athleticism is paired with a personality that feeds off an enthusiastic crowd. “I love competing floor,” Hernandez told

Laurie Hernandez, U.S. Olympic Gymnastics Champion, joins the P&G family as Crest® and Orgullosa ambassador. www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


Laurie credits her hard work, leadership skills and her never give up attitude to her Mom who was in the Army Reserves while Laurie was growing up. 8 · October 3, 2016

to NBC, “My parents as well as my family have supported me since the beginning. They are always there for me when I need them! My coach, Maggie Haney, has played a big role in my gymnastics as well. She has been with me since square one and taught me everything I need to know about gymnastics. She truly supports me, and I know she wants the best for me. Jan, Maggie’s mother, and Carli, Maggie’s sister, have also supported me.” The response of the Hispanic community has touched Laurie deeply, and it fills her with a sense that she has a responsibility to present a positive Latina image to the world. “I’m just proud of my heritage,” Hernandez told NBC when asked about being a Latina gymnast. “I think it’s amazing that I

can just go out there and be myself, and the fact that I’m carrying Puerto Rico on my back a little bit, I think that’s an honor.” In the final analysis, Laurie and her teammates look back with pride when they remember what it was like to have been entrusted with the honor of being part of America’s Olympic team. She told People Magazine, “I wasn’t just representing Hispanics; I was representing Team USA. I hope people understand that.” The USA emblem on her gym clothes makes that point, but no one can deny that she has become an inspiration for young Hispanic female athletes – young girls that she can inspire to greatness not only in athletics, but also in life, just as she was once inspired herself.•

President Barack Obama attempts his best split with the gold medal 2016 U.S. Olympic Women's Gymnastics Team with First Lady Michelle Obama watching in the Map Room, prior to an event to welcome the 2016 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House to honor their participation and success in the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sept. 29, 2016.

PHOTO COURTESY OF OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PHOTO BY PETE SOUZA)

2015 she was back in competition and was undefeated in that year’s all-around in two domestic and two international competitions. At the national championships, she won the all-around gold and medals on all four events: gold on uneven bars, silver on floor exercise and bronzes on vault and balance beam. Most of those watching Laurie nab a gold and silver medal in Rio could never imagine how many challenges this young role model had faced on her arduous road to recovery. She makes no secret of the fact that her determination and strength has been fueled by a loving and caring family as well as a training team that makes sure she has everything she needs to be the very best she can be. She explained


LAURIE HERNANDEZ

Celebrity Spokesperson and Role Model Laurie and her mom will be featured in an upcoming campaign on the Orgullosa online platform (www. orgullosa.com), which was created to celebrate, empower and fuel Latinas’ accomplishments and dreams. The initiative, which carries the name of the Spanish word for “proud,” will spotlight personal anecdotes of the Hernandez family and the pride in their culture, traditions and family. The aim of Orgullosa is to empower Latinas to feel confident about their personal appearance, style and homes. Laurie’s partnership with P&G affords her the opportunity to present a positive message to young Latinas who may want to follow in her footsteps. P&G suggests that Hernandez represents a new wave of Latinas who shine with orgullo (pride) and confidence and are reshaping the face of America. Laurie is approaching this partnership with the energy and enthusiasm that she brings to her performances. “My motto in life is to embrace every moment. This is such an exciting time

for me, and I’m so proud, Orgullosa, to be a Crest athlete,” Hernandez said. “Olympian Laurie Hernandez has inspired people around the world through her talent, personality and amazing smile. We welcome Laurie to the P&G family, and we’re so proud to support her as a role model for the strength and power of Latinas and their families,” said Marc Pritchard, P&G Chief Brand Officer. P&G invites Latinas to visit Orgullosa.com to become part of the Latina-inspired community. In addition to P&G, Laurie has caught the attention of the Kellogg’s® Company. In celebration of the U.S. women’s gymnastics win in the team competition, Kellogg’s® has announced that is featuring Laurie and her teammates on gold medal edition boxes of Kellogg’s Special K® Red Berries. The boxes feature teammate Simone Bile’s medal image on one side and Team USA’s image on the other, as Kellogg’s first-ever double-sided pack honoring two distinct achievements.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ABC/LOU ROCCO

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o the victor go the spoils. And for Laurie Hernandez who has become part of Olympic history as a gold medal winner there are important choices to be made about what she will lend her name to and support. After all the years of hard work, it can be the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, but it can also be an opportunity to advance causes that are important to her. The Rio Olympics were still going on when Procter & Gamble (P&G) announced that Laurie was named the Crest® and Orgullosa ambassador. Laurie’s mom, Wanda Hernandez, also joined P&G’s ‘Thank You Mom’ family to share her journey and highlight the pivotal role moms’ play in the development of student athletes. Laurie and her mom made their first official appearance on August 19 at the P&G Family Home in Rio, a ‘home away from home’ that P&G set up as a convenient stop for families traveling among the Olympic sites, so they could enjoy a meal and relax in family rooms.

www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


LAURIE HERNANDEZ CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

Favorite TV Shows “Law and Order,” “Dancing with the Stars” and “The Voice” Favorite Musician The acapella group Pentatonix Favorite Movies “Star Wars: Return of the Jedi” and “Age of Adeline” Favorite Celebrities Theo James, Liam Hemsworth, Dave Franco, Chris Evans and Zac Efron Favorite Teams New York Giants, the New York Yankees, the Rangers and the Knicks Favorite Book “The Maze Runner” Favorite High Tech Activity Learning dances from YouTube and editing photos on PhotoShop Favorite Leisure Time Activities Doing her nails, writing poetry and sketching

2016 Olympic Silver Medalist (Beam) 2016 Olympic Gold Medalist (Team) Named to the 2016 U.S. Olympic Team 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials: All-Around Silver; Beam Gold; Floor Bronze 2016 National Championships: All-Around Bronze; Floor Bronze; Beam Bronze; Uneven Bar Bronze 2016 Pac Rim Championships: Team Gold; All-Around Bronze 2016 City of Jesolo Trophy: Team Gold; All-Around Bronze; Beam Gold; Vault Silver 2015 Junior National Champion 2015 U.S. Classic Champion 2015 City of Jesolo Trophy: Junior All-Around Champion; Uneven Bar Gold; Floor Gold 2015 International Junior Japan Meet: All-Around Champion, Vault Gold, Floor Exercise Gold, Uneven Bar Silver, Beam Silver

PHOTO COURTESY OF ABC/LOU ROCCO

FAST FACTS ABOUT GOLD MEDAL OLYMPIAN LAURIE HERNANDEZ

Laurie Hernandez appeared on “Good Morning America” to promote being one of the celebrity contestants on the 23rd season of “Dancing with the Stars.”

10 · October 3, 2016


PHOTO OF "HAMILTON" CAST COURTESY OF ATL ANTIC RECORDS

US Women’s Gymnastics Team Flips Over Broadway’s “Hamilton”

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EW YORK (AP) — How do you follow winning Olympic gold at the Rio Olympics? How about a chance to see “Hamilton” on Broadway? The Tony Award-winning smash musical on Tuesday night welcomed the U.S. women’s gymnastics team — Simone Biles, Aly Raisman, Gabby Douglas, Madison Kocian and Laurie Hernandez — who gave the show a standing ovation and greeted the cast onstage afterward at the Richard Rodgers Theatre. The gymnasts, dressed in slacks and button-downs or rompers, sat together in Row G to take in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hip-hop-flavored biography about the first U.S. treasury secretary, a night that had athletic gold meeting theatrical gold. “I thought you were amazing,” Raisman told Tony Award-nominee Brandon Victor Dixon who just happened to be making his debut appearance replacing Tony Award-winner Leslie Odom Jr. as Aaron Burr. “Gymnastics is my favorite Olympic sport, hands-down. Since the days of Kim Zmeskal, I’ve been about the U.S. gymnastics team. So, I love these ladies. I’m so proud of them. I worship them. I think they’re amazing, and I got so hyped when I heard they were in the

audience tonight,” Dixon said. The U.S. women’s team won gold while also winning its second straight Olympic title and third overall. The team won a total of nine medals, including a record-tying four gold medals for Biles. The women had to rush through Times Square — at one point virtually sprinting through the crowds — to get to the theater in time after taping “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” at Rockefeller Plaza. Rhonda Faehn, senior vice president of USA Gymnastics’ women’s program, said adding “Hamilton” to their busy post-Olympic schedule was an “opportunity of a lifetime.” While they were in Rio, Biles’ coach would blast the “Hamilton” cast album for the athletes. “It was just meant to be,” Faehn said. The cast and crew took turns taking photos with the athletes after the show, and Renée Elise Goldsberry who plays Angelica Schuyler brought her young daughter to meet the so-called Final Five. Goldsberry and her fellow Schuyler sisters — Lexi Lawson and Jasmine Cephas Jones — then posed for a photo with the five athletes, their hands in the air as they riffed off a lyric in the show by shouting “Work!”

The show has been celebrated for putting African-American, Asian and Latinos at the center of America’s birth, and the U.S. Olympic team is a mix of races and ethnicities — black, white, Latina, Jewish. “They’re just like tiny versions of us,” said Okieriete Onaodowan who plays both Hercules Mulligan and James Madison. “It’s amazing, but it’s also remarkable what they’re doing, just to be able to perform and not choke under that pressure. At a young age, to be able to perform that way and keep your cool? I’m totally impressed.” The night before, the Broadway cast welcomed U.S. swimmer Maya DiRado who won two golds, a silver and bronze at Rio. She brought both of her gold medals to the show to share with the cast. She and the Final Five join a long list of celebrities at “Hamilton” including Beyonce, Kanye West, Bill Clinton, Julia Roberts, Eli Manning, Dave Matthews and Andre 3000. Mark Kennedy can be reached at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. • www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


2016

ROLE MODEL of the year

ROLE MODEL OF THE YEAR:

Olympic Gold and Silver Medal Winner Laurie Hernandez

W

e are proud to feature Olympic gold medal champion Laurie Her nandez on

t h e c o v e r o f t h i s m o n t h’s O u t l o o K - 1 2 M a g a z i n e a s o u r Pu b l i s h e r’s C h o i c e f o r t h e 2 0 1 6 O u t l o o K - 1 2 H i s p a n i c R o l e M o d e l o f t h e Ye a r. Like the rest of America, we were captivated by her spirited and picture-perfect g ymnastic performance on an international stage. Her poise under pressure came as a result of years of exhibiting the discipline and fortitude to a d h e r e t o a r i g o r o u s t ra i n i n g s c h e d u l e w i t h a n e x t ra o rd i n a r y f a m i ly t o s up po r t a nd n u r t ure h e r. I t i s t h e m i s s i o n o f O u t l o o K - 1 2 M a g azine to educate young Hispanics about the importance of getting a good education and encourage them to be the best they can be. Laurie Hernandez embodies that mission. It is altogether fitting during Hispanic Heritage M o n t h t o n a m e h e r o u r R o l e M o d e l o f t h e Ye a r.

12 · October 3, 2016


ILLUSTRATION LICENSED BY INGRAM IMAGE

MAKING THE GRADE

by Gary Cooper

IT'S USEFUL AT TIMES TO HAVE A FRESH PERSPECTIVE TO “MAKE THE GRADE.” WITH THIS IN MIND WE HERE AT OUTLOOK-12 HAVE CREATED A SPECIAL COLUMN WHERE YOU, OUR READERS, CAN WRITE TO US WITH YOUR PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL QUESTIONS AND GET PERSPECTIVE AND INSIGHTS FROM OUR RESIDENT AWARD-WINNING EDUCATION VETERAN AND CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST GARY COOPER. AN EDUCATOR FOR MORE THAN 45 YEARS, GARY HAS TAUGHT STUDENTS FROM NURSERY SCHOOL TO COLLEGE AND IS ALSO A GUIDANCE COUNSELOR.

The following three letters all involve different circumstances and yet have an overarching theme. Over my many years as both an educator and a counselor, I have prescribed an activity that almost universally was readily embraced by both youths and their parents—bowling. My rationale for selecting this activity was it could be done year round, virtually anywhere and by nearly everyone of almost any age. Although bowling can be substituted by a number of alternatives, I have found that it almost always seemed to work and has proven to be therapeutic for many of my students, counselees and their families. Q: My daughter is six years old and has trouble sticking with extra curricular activities. First, she wanted to be a ballerina, so I paid for ballet lessons only for her to give up after three classes. Next, she wanted to learn karate but gave up after four lessons. Now, she wants to be a gymnast like the women she saw in the Olympics who won the gold medal. On the one hand, there’s no point forcing her to do a hobby if she’s not going to like it. It’s not like it’s schoolwork. And I don’t want to discourage her from trying new things. But this is becoming a strain on my wallet. What are your thoughts?

Q: I’m the mother of an eight-year-old. We recently moved, and I can tell that he is having trouble fitting in at his new school. My son is a quiet child, a bit shy and (and I say this very lovingly) a little nerdy. Because of his polite personality and interests, he’s getting picked on and is not connecting with any of his classmates. I don’t know what to do. I’ve tried play dates. I’ve tried throwing parties and inviting kids over. I’ve tried encouraging him to join clubs at school. Nothing seems to be working. I feel very guilty since he did have friends and fit in very well at his old school. What else can I do?

A: I am delighted your daughter has taken a keen interest in extra curricular activities. She seems to enjoy interests that involve physicality, but the activities you’ve listed above can be involved and a little complex especially for a six-year-old. I’m recommend encouraging her to try something game-oriented: bowling. Admittingly, six is young to start bowling, however, beginners can measure their progress by keeping score. Most often, a few sessions of gutter balls will develop into modest achievements of improving scores. Have a family member join her and when she improves, involve a peer. She can assist her playmate in learning this sport. I’ve found over the years that students who take up bowling find it to be a good, healthy, wholesome exercise that can become a lifelong activity.

A: My general suggestion is to attempt to identify an activity that your son might be interested in and enjoy but also an activity that is different from what I’m assuming are his other more “nerdy” pursuits. I’m going to recommend having your son try bowling. After he has developed a little skill, invite a cousin, friend or neighbor to join him bowling. It is the type of sport that encourages communication between turns and for most becomes a friendly competition both with yourself and your bowling partners. This is not to say that other types of activities might not have similar results, but I have found over the years that bowling in particular worked wonders for many of my students and counselees.

If you would like to write to Gary for advice, please email admin@k12hispanicoutlook.com

Q: My son recently lost his grandmother. They were very close, and I was prepared that his grades might suffer a bit especially since he’s never dealt with death before. But the exact opposite has happened. When he went into the third grade, instead of his grades suffering, he’s been throwing himself into his studies more than ever. Now, I know that sounds good, but he’s too serious now. He doesn’t go out and play with his friends anymore. He doesn’t read comic books, watch TV or play video games like he used to. I can’t even remember the last time I heard him really laugh good and hard. I’m worried about him, but I can’t tell if he’s just working through his grief or if this is something I need to address. What do you suggest? A: We all mourn in our own way. For some it takes longer than others. Physical activity is often recommended for dealing with grief since exercise releases endorphins, which are natural ways to improve mood and a sense of wellbeing. In many cases just flinging a bowling ball down the lane as hard as your can is a simple but effective and joyous release of energy. Although the sport of bowling has many nuances and skills, a newcomer can gradually improve with little formal instruction. In addition, bowling is an activity that can be done year round and encourages social interaction since most lanes have youth teams that encourage beginners to participate. It also offers many avenues of communication both between children and for a child to discuss experiences with an adult. While I cannot say that bowling is a cure all for your son’s sense of loss, it might be the first step to helping him open up more and help the healing process.

www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


OUTLOOK-12 MAGAZINE’S HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE As a magazine that serves the K-12 education community, we believe that mastering life skills can and should be fun. It is the one way we can ensure a generation of intellectually curious individuals that are committed to lifetime learning. The holidays are fast-approaching, and we recommend the products in this guide as ideal gifts because of their clear educational value. A list of our picks for this year is featured on the following pages, but the following six products are particular stand-outs for the way they enhance skill sets and promote the healthy social development of the K-12 generation. Calafant craft kits are perfect for the child who is into arts and crafts. And what child isn’t? Child psychologists, doctors and teachers recommend supporting the creative development of children. Calafant crafts projects and building models are easy to construct and fun to decorate. They appeal to different ages. All Calafant models are designed in Germany and made of high-quality, recyclable cardboard, so it is a green product as well. And what parent wouldn’t love a product that promotes creativity but doesn’t require the use of messy glues or dangerous sharp scissors. Aside from scissors, today’s headlines signal danger to youngsters who often feel powerless to keep themselves safe and carefree. Worry Eaters is not a product that claims to eliminate the worries and fears that plague young minds. Fear is often a useful emotion. It keeps us from making choices that would put us in real danger. What Worry Eaters do is tuck away those concerns and fears in a plush toy where the child can feel empowered to deal with the worry by talking it over with someone they trust. They learn that worries can be managed and controlled. OutlooK-12 editors are particularly drawn to toys that encourage manual and mental dexterity. These toys are especially important for students who may not have the strongest language skills – either because English is not their first language or because of general struggles with reading programs. Toys like 3Doodler require no such skills. It’s a pen that allows creative young minds to “draw” a three-dimensional object using a pen that “exudes” hot plastic much in the way a glue gun exudes liquid glue. The difference is that the plastic cools to a hard structure quickly – almost as soon as it leaves the pen. On a similar note, we found that Arckit is more traditional in terms of building kits for students. But this kit is so sophisticated that it is suitable for professional architects to use for client presentations. Building scale models of structures teaches mathematical ratio and the ability to follow sequential instructions to complete a project. Exploring creativity in design techniques can be the first step toward careers in everything from graphic design to interior décor. Another toy that promotes thinking outside the box and creativity is The Extraordinaires Design Studio Pro. What sets it apart is the story telling prompts it offers students as they design their school projects. Finally, we didn’t want to ignore books, which we view as so important that we regularly feature in OutlooK-12 in our School Library Department each month. Our "2016 OutlooK-12 Book of the Year Award” is a bilingual book entitled, “Bad Hair Does Not Exist/¡Pelo Malo No Existe!” The book written by Sulma Arzu-Brown deals with the very important issue of self-image – a crucial determining factor of whether or not we are successful and happy individuals. The author gives the young people permission to accept themselves as they are, and we applaud that. We'll have a review of this book in next month's issue of OutlooK-12. Our choices this year all have one thing in common. They help young people to be the best they can be physically, emotionally and intellectually. It is a goal that is compatible with the goal of not only of education institutions, programs and professionals but also the mission of OutlooK-12 Magazine. 14 · October 3, 2016


CALAFANT PONY FARM MSRP: $19.99

The Pony Farm is an example of Calafant cardboard toys, which encourage and support children’s creativity. Studies have proven that apart from language, creativity is the most important way for children to express themselves. Whenever they paint, do crafts projects, build models or engage in pretend play, they work out emotions, experiences and learn to find their own solutions. Plus, they practice their fine and gross motor skills. Calafant toys are easy to build, fun to decorate and wonderful to play with — for any child. All pieces are pre-cut, pre-punched and can be put together without glue or scissors thanks to the Calafant Easy-Lock-System. http://www.haywiregroup.com/products/calafant-large-pony-farm/

WORRY EATERS MSRP: $15.99

A doll with a zipper might be the easiest way to calm a small child’s fears thanks to the plush characters known as Worry Eaters. Each character has a hang tag that suggests to tots as young as three years old that they write their concern on paper — or draw it if the child is too young to write — and tuck it into the plush’s zippered mouth. Have no fear, their Worry Eater will hold on to that concern for them. Kids get a good night’s sleep, and parents are given a clue as to what’s worrying their child and an opportunity to talk with their child about their worries. Worry Eaters come in a variety of sizes and styles. The suggested retail price above is for a 9.8-inch plush toy. http://www.haywiregroup.com/worry-eaters/

3DOODLER MSRP: $99.99

If a child can use a pen, they can take their doodles and drawings up a notch and begin creating in three dimensions. The 3Doodler brings a new dimension to anyone's creations, and it won’t take up any extra space — no software or bulky gear to distract the imagination. The next masterpiece is just a doodle away. Create anything from art, jewelry, figurines, small-scale model buildings and more with ease! As the young, budding artist draws with the 3Doodler pen, it extrudes heated plastic. When the plastic cools and solidifies, it turns into a strong, stable structure — so anyone can build up sculptures that are as simple, or as complex, as they want. http://the3doodler.com/

ARCKIT MSRP: STARTS AT $69.99

ARCKIT is a freeform model-building tool that allows students to physically explore designs and bring their projects to life. Originally designed for architects, the interconnecting components use no glue and are completely modular, making it possible to create a diverse range of scaled models that are ideal for everything from class projects to art shows. Students as young as 12 year olds can work with ARCKIT’s versatile design, which allows for experimenting and tactile learning. And while ARCKIT can be used in the classroom, it is also a great kit for young builders that just want something fun and challenging to create whatever structures they dream up. http://arckit.com/

THE EXTRAORDINAIRES DESIGN STUDIO PRO MSRP: $79.95

The Extraordinaires Design Studio Pro is an innovative, engaging activity that features 24 Extraordinaire Characters who possess extraordinary needs and wants such as an Evil Genius, a Wizard and a Ninja. Design projects cover five discipline areas: Inventions, Buildings, Vehicles, Clothing and Gadgets and involve design challenges like designing a music player that’s perfect for a giant or a gift box that’s just right for a robot. With over 720 design challenges and featuring a quality 120 page design manual, the Extraordinaires Design Pro is a must have for all who dream of a career in design or who are just looking for fun projects that are also creatively stimulating. https://www.extraordinaires.com/

THE GIRL SCOUTS EASY BAKE OVEN MSRP is $59.99

The Girl Scouts® Cookie Oven is a new toy that allows young cookie bakers to create delicious treats inspired by some of their favorite Girl Scout Cookie™ flavors, including Thin Mints® and Trefoils®, letting children engage in equal parts fun, creativity and learning. The Girl Scouts® Cookie Oven helps teach little bakers some of the most basic and important culinary skills like how to properly mix and measure ingredients. Plus, they can watch their sweet treats bake through a special viewing window. The Girl Scouts® Cookie Oven comes with mix packets, a spatula, a baking pan and The Perfect Cookie measuring tool. No assemble is required, and the oven is made from ABS plastic. http://www.girlscoutshop.com/COUNCIL-OWN-MERCHANDISE/WESTERN-OHIO-COUNCIL/GIRL-SCOUT-COOKIE-OVEN

INSECT LORE MSRP: KITS RANGE FROM $24.95 TO $59.95

Beginning your butterfly adventure is easy with Insect Lore's Original Butterfly Garden. The award-winning butterfly kit lets one experience the magic and wonder of nature at home or in a classroom. This version of this best-loved kit comes with a voucher, which can be redeemed at InsectLore.com for one cup of 5 live caterpillars. The Original Butterfly Garden Includes pop-up, reusable 11.5" tall mesh habitat, feeding pipette and “caterpillars to butterflies” instruction guide. Once the caterpillars begin their transformation, they become glittering, jewel-like chrysalides. Transfer your chrysalides into the butterfly habitat, a cylindrical mesh container, perfect for up close butterfly viewing. http://www.insectlore.com/live-butterfly-gardens

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OCHO BUILDING SETS FROM KNUCKLESTRUTZ® MSRP: (see below)*

One of the most popular categories of playthings that many parents turn to for their children are those that spark an interest in constructing creativity with toys. Ocho, the latest innovative building set from the people that created KnuckleStrutz®, is an educational toy that encourages creativity and imagination in a child. It’s easy to learn how to build with Ocho pieces and connections, making the toy a great success with children ages three and up. The pieces easily stack or crisscross or even slide through each other. They can be connected in eight different angles, allowing for a wide variety of building options. Ocho building play sets come in small to jumbo sizes. *Ocho had not yet officially premiered prior to this magazine’s deadlines. For the latest prices visit http://fungamesandtoys.com/ product-category/ocho-building-kits/

KEY TO THE FRONT DOOR MSRP: $29.95

Amarillo College professor named Deb Avara’s board game, Key to the Front Door, tackles one of the most important life lessons for adults and students, alike — financial literacy. An award-winning, educational, reality money game, Key to the Front Door is suitable for ages eight and above and is perfect for the home, ESL, G&T, Life Skills and transition classes for Special Ed plus helps meet the financial literacy requirements for schools. The goal of the game is to furnish an apartment all while paying bills; saving for emergency, college/retirement and vacation; maintaining a budget; make wise shopping/buying decisions; choosing wants versus needs; and much more. https://debavarabooks.com/games/key-to-the-front-door/

HUGG-A-PLANET MSRP: RANGES FROM $14.95 TO $79.90

Geography can seem like a remote and dull subject for students. A plush toy like Hugg-A-Planet, which can also be tossed around like a ball, makes geography come alive for children. It’s been shown that children as young as two can start learning geography. For preschooler on up to eighth grade, children are exposed to the media always mentioning geography in the news, or they can find references while reading books and magazines or even listening to music. Different than a heavy metal globe on a stand, Hugg-A-Planet can always be in arms’ reach for easy reference. Often this becomes an opportunity for the parent, grandparent, teachers and children to interact. https://www.hugg-a-planet.com/

TALL TALES: THE GAME OF INFINITE STORYTELLING MSRP: $26.95

Tall Tales: The Game of Infinite Storytelling brings back the classic magic of imagination through electronic-free fun. Family and friends of all ages can enjoy this creative, non-competitive game because playing Tall Tales is simple. Players choose a story card for their setting and then draw random story elements from the bag. Using those element, the players then twist their best tale, continually adding more and more twists to their story. Some of the 24 story card settings include: a quirky game show, a colorful ocean, a fun theme park and a crazy circus. The story bag contains a wide range of 3-D pieces, including: a treasure chest, a baby, a unicorn, a light bulb, a stop sign and a rocket ship. https://scsdirectinc.com/product/tall-tales-the-game-of-infinite-storytelling/

KNUCKLESTRUTZ® MSRP: SETS RANGE FROM $11.99 TO $74.99

KnuckleStrutz® products are educational toys that encourage creativity and imagination in ways that no other construction toy can offer since KnuckleStrutz grows up with the individual. It can be enjoyed as a basic toy for younger builders then advances to a complex engineering system for more advanced players as knowledge and imagination expand. The fun and sophistication of KnuckleStrutz goes way beyond traditional block toys. Each KnuckleStrutz piece can be connected to the next in a wide variety of ways, making solid, bendable, spinning and even morphing joints. The unique design of the pieces allows completed KnuckleStrutz creations to move, collapse and expand — all while still connected. http://fungamesandtoys.com/about-us/

BOOK SELECTION: “BAD HAIR DOES NOT EXIST!/¡PELO MALO NO EXISTE!” MSRP: $9.50

Hair can be a sensitive subject. Too often people complain their hair is too thin, too thick, the wrong color or just in general not what they feel meets societal standards. But in Sulma Arzu-Brown’s bilingual book “Bad Hair Does Not Exist/¡Pelo Malo No Existe!” hair moves past fashion and appearance and into the areas of self-esteem, empowerment and cultural solidarity. “It looks like a children’s book, however the message is a mature one,” Arzu-Brown writes on her book’s official website. “Its target demo is from the age of comprehension to adulthood.” Arzu-Brown’s book seeks to empower by demonstrating that hair is not bad and not something to feel self-conscious about. http://www.nopelomalo.com/store/c1/Featured_Products.html

BOOK SELECTION: “ONCE WE WERE EIGHT” MSRP: $18.00

On August 31, 1939, Raymond Fishler went to sleep at about midnight dreaming of the wonderful future he envisioned for himself. He was awakened from his peaceful slumber by the start of World War II. After living through a brutal German occupation, his family was torn apart, and he was sent to a concentration camp. Raymond has told the story of his life's journey in classrooms and lecture halls and also on the March of the Living, an annual education program for youth, and now adults, who travel to Poland to learn about Jewish life there before and during World War II. Perfect book report material for young adults who want to sample something similar to “The Diary of Anne Frank.” http://tinyurl.com/oncewewereeight 16 · October 3, 2016


HELLO! ¡HOLA! THE CARE BEARS LEARN A NEW LANGUAGE ™

Tipitom© and American Greetings Entertainment Announce Partnership for Interactive Bilingual Apps for Children

EW YORK, NY – American Greetings Entertainment (AGE) has announced that it has partnered with Bilingual Children’s Enterprises (BCE) to develop a new interactive app that introduces early learners to Spanish and English. Through videos, gaming and storybooks, the app uses science-based methodology proven to stimulate language learning for preschoolers through a dual language approach. BCE is a mobile learning and entertainment platform helping young kids learn English, Spanish and other languages and in so doing to help better prepare early learners for kindergarten. BCE is the creator of Tipitom, a series of bilingual early-learning videos and apps available for mobile devices. The app in development will feature a cast of multicultural characters alongside the Care Bears who will help children with pre-literacy skills, the development of fine motor skills, as well as identifying colors, letters, shapes and numbers in a fun and engaging way. AGE selected to partner with BCE because of Founder & CEO Deborah Castillero’s extensive experience in successfully launching products for the U.S. Hispanic and LaTam markets. Castillero has a proven track record using the dual language learning approach, which helps to accelerate second language learning while fostering bilingualism. This approach also improves overall academic performance, enhances problem solving skills and helps close the achievement gap particularly for English language learners; a segment of the U.S. student population growing seven times faster than the rest. “We want to give kids a high-quality experience and the gift of a second language,” Castillero said. “With our multicultural characters, conversational storytelling and vocabulary-rich topics in two languages, literacy and reading readiness is attainable through mobile for kids globally.”

IMAGE COURTESY OF AMERICAN GREETINGS ENTERTAINMENT

N

According to “The Early Catastrophe: The 30 Million Word Gap by Age 3,” it’s estimated the average low-income child hears 30 million fewer words than his or her higher income peers by the time he or she is just three years old, and high-quality, early-education programs can make up some of the difference. Exposing early learners to vocabulary-rich conversations in context can be an effective teaching method that appeals to kinesthetic, auditory and visual learners. “Care Bears is a global brand with nearly 35 years of history and fans all over the world,” said Megan Buettner, Head of Creative & Digital, American Greetings. We’re excited to partner with BCE to provide quality bilingual educational content to engage with some of our youngest fans.” First introduced by American Greetings in 1982 through consumer products, greeting cards and later an animated CGI television show, Care Bears has become one of the world’s most popular and endearing children’s properties. They first

appeared in their own television specials in 1983 and 1984 and then made the leap to the big screen in 1985-87 with “The Care Bears Movie” trilogy. They also had their own television series from 1985 to 1988, which is currently available to watch on Netflix as well as the new series “Care Bears & Cousins.” The brand also has a robust social media following, has more than five million views of new and classic videos on YouTube and has a portfolio of popular apps for mobile devices. •

LOGO COURTESY OF AMERICAN GREETINGS ENTERTAINMENT

LOGO COURTESY OF BILINGUAL CHILDREN’S ENTERPRISES (BCE)

www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


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Read Any

GOOD BOOKS Lately

B

especkled Bob Stine might appear like any other person that one might bump into on the street—until he reveals what he does for living. “My

job is to give kids the CREEPS!” That might sound puzzling and even strange but not for the author of one of the world’s best-selling children’s horror series. Ever since his first Goosebumps book was published by Scholastic in 1992, Bob Stine (or R.L. Stine as he’s better known) has been one of the most successful children’s writers in history, selling more than 350 million English language books in print and more than 50 million international copies in print in 32 languages. So in honor of Halloween, we here at OutlooK-12 are dedicating this October’s School Library to the chilling “Goosebumps HorrorLand” series where seemingly unrelated frightening stories are all connected by a terrifying amusement park. “Goosebumps HorrorLand” books are available in both English and Spanish and are published through Scholastic.

… www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


SCHOOL LIBRARY

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #1: REVENGE OF THE LIVING DUMMY/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #1: LA VENGANZA DEL MUNECO VIVIENTE

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #2: CREEP FROM THE DEEP/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #2: ESPANTO MARINO

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918695 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545128322

B

ritney Crosby thinks her cousin Ethan is pretty weird—and she happens to be right. Ethan won’t stop tormenting Britney with an old ventriloquist’s dummy. And the puppet has plans for Britney, too! Next, someone will be offered a vacation at a popular "scream park." An entire week for free? You'd have to be a real dummy to refuse that! But some guests aren't allowed to escape HorrorLand after just six days and seven frights.

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #3: MONSTER BLOOD FOR BREAKFAST/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #3: SANGRE DE MONSTRUO AL DESAYUNO English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918718 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545158855

F

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918701 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545154086

B

illy and Sheena always expect adventure when they join their uncle, Dr. Deep, aboard his hi-tech boat. What they don’t expect is a treasure hunt leading to a 200-year-old sea captain who refuses to stay dead! Just when they think the tide is turning, Billy and Sheena accidentally drive into a dangerous mystery. A chilling surprise awaits them in HorrorLand, the theme park where their worst nightmare is about to come to life.

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #4: SCREAM OF THE HAUNTED MASK/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #4: EL GRITO DE LA MÁSCARA MALDITA English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918725 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545238502

W

or an athlete like Matt Daniels, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It's also the most dangerous. That's because somebody is about to pull a mean prank. The recipe is simple: just add monster blood. As if Matt's problems weren't big and slimy enough, a surprise invitation will lead to even more trouble. How long can Matt survive inside a terrifying theme park? Not very long if his friends keep disappearing!

hat should Carly Beth be for Halloween this year? TERRIFIED! Late at night, an ugly green mask is mysteriously calling out to her, and ugly green masks don’t like to be ignored. If Carly Beth survives the night, even a scary theme park might sound like a vacation. Or maybe not! At HorrorLand, every night is Halloween. And those monster masks? They aren’t masks.

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #5: DR. MANIAC VS. ROBBY SCHWARTZ/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #5: EL DR. MANIACO CONTRA ROBBY SCHWARTZ

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #6: WHO’S YOUR MUMMY?/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #6: ¿QUIEN ES TU MOMIA?

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918732 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545270717

R

obby creates comic strips on his computer. His favorite creation is Dr. Maniac, weird and wicked super villain. Dr. Maniac isn't a real doctor, but he sure is a maniac! And now Dr. Maniac is on the loose—in the real world! Meanwhile, seven ordinary kids are now trapped in the popular theme park called HorrorLand. Can Robby survive long enough to find a save them? A hairy situation awaits in Werewolf Village.

20 · October 3, 2016

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918749 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545314374

A

bby and Peter are staying with Uncle Jonathan in an eerie old village. Their uncle knows a lot about Egypt, and his living room even looks like an ancient tomb. Do other secrets lurk inside the house? MUM’s the word! Next, Abby and Peter will get all wrapped up in a terrifying mystery. Slappy the Dummy and other villains have been sighted in HorrorLand theme park. A monster named Byron might offer help—if they can find him.


SCHOOL LIBRARY

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #7: MY FRIENDS CALL ME MONSTER/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #7: MIS AMIGOS ME LLAMAN MONSTRUO

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #8: SAY CHEESE – AND DIE SCREAMING!/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #8: SONRÍE Y ¡MUÉRETE CHILLANDO!

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918756 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545375474

M

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918763 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545419970

A

ichael Munroe is learning a few new lessons in school this week: Never trust a teacher who believes in monsters. Don’t even think about entering her house. And stay away from the giant egg in her attic—especially if it’s about to hatch. What could be worse than a monster egg? An entire theme park filled with monsters! But that’s not the only surprise. Soon, Michael and his friends will discover shocking new secrets about HorrorLand theme park.

picture is worth a thousand screams—if it’s taken with an evil camera that has a nasty vision of the future. Julie’s future doesn’t look pretty. And neither does anyone else’s after they’re caught in her lens! Things start looking up when Julie gets to HorrorLand. That is, until she starts falling down—into the Tunnel of Screams. A giant spider attack really bugs Julie and makes her suspect the park isn’t all fun.

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #9: WELCOME TO CAMP SLITHER/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #9: BIENVENIDO AL CAMPAMENTO DE LAS SERPIENTES

GOOSEBUMPS HORRORLAND #10: HELP! WE HAVE STRANGE POWERS!/ ESCALOFRÍOS HORRORLANDIA #10: ¡AUXILIO! ¡TENEMOS PODERES EXTRAÑOS!

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918770 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545488723

B

oone and Heather are psyched for summer camp. The legends of man-eating snakes and disappearing campers are hisss-terical! Sure, it's strange that the camp lotion makes their skin peel, but there's a good explanation, right? Right?! Things get even worse when Boone joins the other eleven Very Special—And Very Terrified!—Guests at HorrorLand. There's something very wrong about a bumper car ride called the R.I.P.P.E.R.

English: ISBN-13: 978-0439918787 Spanish: ISBN-13: 978-0545571975

J

illian and Jackson freak out when they suddenly can read people’s thoughts. But the trick turns to terror when the twins are stalked by a strange scientist who wants to know exactly what’s on their minds. Will the twins ever lead normal lives again? Not in HorrorLand they won’t. There are free meals, free games and free falls down the Doom Slide. Someone’s watching their every step. But is she friend or foe?

Read Any

S K O O B D GOO ely Lat

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REPORT CARD

THE NEW JERSEY CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING Prepares Students, Including Underrepresented Minorities and Girls for AP Physics Exam with Powerful Results

T

RENTON, N.J. -- The New Jersey Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) has announced the results from a Hanover Report that examined trends in the number of students taking and passing Advanced Placement (AP) Physics B among the schools participating in CTL's Progressive Science Initiative® (PSI®) in New Jersey from 2012 - 2014, as compared to trends among students in schools that used traditional physics instruction in New Jersey and more broadly throughout the United States 22 · October 3, 2016

during the same time period. Differences in both the representation and achievement of minority and female students were also examined. [The full report is available at: http://njc.tl/1b8]. CTL supports the development and adoption of PSI, a groundbreaking pedagogy that uses new technology such as interactive white boards for engaging instruction and polling devices for real time assessment, together with a highly collaborative classroom structure that helps every student fulfill their potential. PSI is designed to build a fuller working

“We have never doubted that results like these are possible. Now we have proof that the way to achieve those result is to trust educators to do what they do best.” —Wendell Steinhauer, President of the New Jersey Education Association and Member of the CTL Board of Trustees


15.00% 10.00% 5.00%

8.47%

6.92% 0.80% 0.64%

11.94%

10.28%

3.21% 2.61%

1.83% 1.47%

1.35% 1.14%

11.11%

2.54% 2.06%

0.00%

Black

Hispanic

Female PSI

NJ

Male

All Students

PRNEWSFOTO/THE NEW JERSEY CENTER FOR TEACH)

2014

US

Comparison of PSI, NJ, and US Student Participation Rates, AP Physics, 2014. Source: The College Board, US Census Bureau, and NJDOE.

knowledge of both mathematics and science principles for students as well as to motivate students with an understanding of the integration of these disciplines and their relevance in daily problem solving. Key findings from the Hanover Report include: PSI students take the AP Physics B exam at a higher rate than their peers, and they are also passing the test at a higher rate. C o m p a re d t o s t u d e n t s throughout New Jersey and the United States, higher percentages of students enrolled in grades 9-12 at PSI schools participated in the AP Physics B exam in recent years. In 2014, PSI students were 4.4 times more likely to participate in the AP Physics B exam than New Jersey students, and 5.4 times more likely to participate in the exam than students across the United States. Comparative participation in the AP Physics B Exam is particularly strong for underrepresented minority and female students enrolled in schools using PSI. These higher participation rates are

especially notable among African American students: PSI African American students were 8.7 and 10.8 times more likely to participate in the exam than African American students within New Jersey and across the United States. For minority and female students overall, PSI students are more than five times as likely to participate in the AP exam as students throughout New Jersey or the United States. Similarly, schools using PSI have higher passage rates than schools in New Jersey and throughout the entire United States. In 2014, students in PSI schools were 3.4 times more likely to pass the AP Physics B exam than students in New Jersey and 2.4 times more likely to pass than students across the United States. These differences are especially notable among Hispanic students: these students were 5.0 and 3.9 times more likely to pass the exam than Hispanic students taught with traditional programs within New Jersey and across the United States. African American students passed exams at 3.4 times the rate for African

“Our country currently has a serious shortage of physics teachers, and providing high quality physics and chemistry education to previously underserved populations increases social justice and better prepares our country's next generation for global competition.” —Dr. Robert Goodman, Executive Director of the New Jersey Center of Teaching and Learning

www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


5.20%

6.00%

4.16%

5.00% 4.00%

3.12%

3.00% 2.00% 1.00%

1.96% 0.61%

0.00%

Black

1.11%

0.50% 0.39%

0.18% 0.18%

2.27%

Hispanic

Female PSI

NJ

0.76% Male

1.66%

1.71%

1.22%

All Students

PRNEWSFOTO/THE NEW JERSEY CENTER FOR TEACH)

2014

US

Comparison of PSI, NJ, and US Student Pass Rates, AP Physics - 2014. Source: The College Board, US Census Bureau, and NJDOE.

“We are pleased to have the opportunity to make inroads in both creating enthusiasm for and increasing proficiency in physics among all of the students we serve, including underrepresented minorities and girls.” —Dr. Robert Goodman, Executive Director of the New Jersey Center of Teaching and Learning

24 · October 3, 2016

American students in New Jersey or across the United States. Female students passed at rates that were 2.8 times that of New Jersey and 4.1 times that of the United States. CTL has also become the number one producer of physics teachers in the country using the same pedagogy to equip current teachers who are certified in other disciplines to successfully teach physics. The program was accepted in 2015 by 100Kin10 as one of 236 “Best in Class” partners working to achieve President Obama's goal of 100,000 new mathematics and science teachers by 2020. Minorities and women are also more highly represented among these CTLtrained teachers. This model can thereby provide the availability of new physics and chemistry teachers who better reflect the current racial and ethnic makeup of students in American schools and facilitate broader diversity in accessible STEM role models. Dr. Robert Goodman, Executive Director of the New Jersey Center of Teaching and Learning said, “We are pleased to have the opportunity to make inroads in

both creating enthusiasm for and increasing proficiency in physics among all of the students we serve, including underrepresented minorities and girls. Our country currently has a serious shortage of physics teachers, and providing high quality physics and chemistry education to previously underserved populations increases social justice and better prepares our country’s next generation for global competition.” “These stunning results show what can happen when professional educators are given the opportunity to try new approaches to teaching and learning. What these teachers and students have accomplished with the support of the Center for Teaching and Learning should encourage policymakers to empower educators in other areas as well. We have never doubted that results like these are possible. Now we have proof that the way to achieve those result is to trust educators to do what they do best,” added Wendell Steinhauer, President of the New Jersey Education Association and Member of the CTL Board of Trustees. •


News & Trends in K-12 Education from Across America …

“The Little Prince”

IMAGE COURTESY OF HAPPY PRODUCT INC.’S FACEBOOK PAGE

Wins César Awards’ Best Animated Feature Film

T

he 2015 film adaptation of “The Little Prince” was honored as Best Animated Feature Film at the 41st César Award. Similar to the Oscars, Césars have been awarded annually since 1976. Directed by Mark Osborne, “The Little Prince” is inspired by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s novella “Le Petit Prince.” In Osborne’s

film, a young girl meets “The Aviator,” an eccentric, kind-hearted neighbor who introduces her to a new world where anything is possible. It’s there that the girl embarks on a personal odyssey into the universe of “The Little Prince.” “The Little Prince” features an international team of artists and actors including Jeff Bridges

(“The Aviator”), Rachel McAdams (“The Mother”), Marion Cotillard (“The Rose”), James Franco (“The Fox”), Albert Brooks (“The Businessman”), Mackenzie Foy (“The Little Girl”), Benicio Del Toro (“The Snake”), Ricky Gervais (“The Conceited Man”), Paul Giamatti (“The Teacher”), Bud Cort (“The King”) and Riley Osborne (“The Little Prince”).• www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


SCHOOL NEWSPAPER

2016 Teen Read Week

Grant Recipients Announced

• Brasfield, Amanda. Findlay (Ohio)

• Otis, Emily. Anaheim (California)

Library Services Association

High School Library

Public Library

(YALSA), a division of the Amer-

• Chadwick, Stephanie. Middle-

• Porche, Shannon. Lockport (Loui-

ican Library Association (ALA),

town (New Jersey) Township Public

siana) Public Library

announced the recipients of its 2016

Library

• Shutts, Cynthia. White Oak Library

Teen Read Week™ Activity Grant

• Frey, Sara. Plymouth Whitemarsh

District; Romeoville, Illinois

aimed at the 22 percent of the nation’s

High School; Plymouth Meeting,

youth who speak a language other

Pennsylvania

October 9-15 with a multilingual take

than English at home.

• Gaudet, Katina. Lafourche Parish

on the theme of “Read for the Fun

Public Library - South Lafourche

of It!”

The 10 recipients of the $1,000

Branch; Cut Off, Louisiana

grants were:

• Gomez, Guadalupe. Haskett Library;

• Andronik, Catherine. Brien McMa-

Anaheim, California

hon High School Library; Norwalk,

• Myers, Cheryl. McHenry (Illinois)

Connecticut

High School West Campus

Teen Read Week will run from

For more information visit http:// teenreadweek.ning.com/ •

IMAGE COURTESY OF HT TP://TEENREADWEEK.NING.COM/

C

HICAGO -- The Young Adult

Horatio Alger Association Officially Opens

W

ASHINGTON -- Horatio

character and family income as well as

ship recipients are invited to attend

Alger Association of Distin-

serve their communities.

the National Scholars Conference and

guished Americans, Inc. announced

Horatio Alger Scholars are provid-

Awards Induction Ceremonies where

that applications are open for its

ed with resources for a successful higher

they connect with current members

2017 scholarship programs and being

education experience, including finan-

many of whom will serve as their men-

accepted through October 25, 2016.

cial aid advice, access to guidance and

tors.

The Association will award nearly $14

crisis counselors, mentoring programs,

million in college funding to students

channels to interact with other Schol-

across the United States who have

ars, tools to manage the disbursement

overcome significant adversity. Stu-

of funds and access to educational staff

dents interested must meet a series

for assistance with their scholarships.

of requirements related to education, 26 · October 3, 2016

Horatio Alger National Scholar-

For more information visit www. horatioalger.org •

LOGO COURTESY OF THE HORATIO ALGER ASSOCIATION OF DISTINGUISHED AMERICANS, INC.’S FACEBOOK PAGE

Applications for Its 2017 Scholarship Programs Nationwide


SCHOOL NEWSPAPER

Lighthouse Guild Scholarship Program

Helps

Students Who Are Blind Achieve Their College Dreams college or university of their choice.

sity, University of Texas at Austin,

Guild, a leading not-for-profit

The 15 high school students

University of Notre Dame, Michigan

vision and healthcare organization, is

who have received Lighthouse Guild

State University, New York Universi-

offering the largest financial scholar-

Scholarships will be attending some

ty, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,

ships in the country for students who

of the most prestigious universities in

Central College (Iowa), Louisiana

are legally blind. Every year, it awards

the country, including: Yale Univer-

State University, University of Iowa

15 scholarships based on strong aca-

sity, Duke University, Texas A&M,

and Berry College (Georgia).

demic accomplishment and merit to

Catholic University, University of

college-bound high school graduates.

Pennsylvania, Georgetown Univer-

For more information visit http:// www.lighthouseguild.org •

Lighthouse Guild scholarships are up to $10,000 per student and up to $5,000 for graduate students providing financial support to help students continue their academic studies at the

LOGO COURTESY OF THE LIGHTHOUSE GUILD’S FACEBOOK PAGE

N

EW YORK -- Lighthouse

Online Gifted Math Program to Grow

to Several Hundred Students in Broward County Public Schools

P

LANTATION, Fla. -- Broward

for sixth, seventh and eighth grades,

child finds EMF enjoyable and chal-

County Public Schools (BCPS)

which allows BCPS to offer EMF as

lenging.

is increasing the number of middle

a complete math curriculum for the

school students enrolled in the Ele-

district’s middle school students.

For more information visit elementsofmathematics.com •

(EMF) curriculum from 40 to several

A survey of current BCPS/EMF par-

hundred over the next several years.

ents found:

EMF was created for mathematically

• 100 percent said that their

talented children by the Institute for

child’s focus, study skills and ability

Mathematics and Computer Science

to analyze complex problems have

(IMACS), an independent teaching

improved since beginning EMF.

and educational research institute based in South Florida.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PRNEWSFOTO/IMACS

ments of Mathematics: Foundations

• 92 percent believe that EMF has made their child more ready for

EMF is an online curriculum

high school and college mathematics.

that covers Florida’s math standards

• 92 percent report that their

Corbin Diaz, a rising seventh grader in the BCPS/ EMF program, is excited about learning advanced mathematics. www.k12hispanicoutlook.com K


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The Hispanic OutlooK-12 October Issue 2016  

The Hispanic OutlooK-12 October Issue 2016 Laurie Hernandez