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“Primary Sources is a reflection of the most pressing issues we are facing as teachers today,” Naima Lilly, a math educator in New York City said. “We need to include teachers in the ongoing conversations surrounding education, particularly on the tough topics, to determine what is actually happening, how it is working and how we can focus on solutions. The teacher’s voice is imperative, and I hope this report provides insight to leaders at all levels.” The Primary Sources study seeks to raise awareness of teachers’ views on current issues affecting PreK–12 education. Reflecting this goal, Primary Sources data show that teachers are most satisfied in their jobs

when their voices are heard in their school, district, state and nationally. “Throughout Primary Sources, we see that many of the anxieties teachers have today come from a place of concern for the diverse students who populate their classrooms and how best to provide a quality education for each one,” noted Margery Mayer, President, Scholastic Education. “We must listen to our teachers and provide them with the quality resources and professional development they need to raise the bar for their students and, at the same time, raise the floor for their students who are struggling.” This survey comes at a critical time for educators across the country.

“Teachers are leading this work, but they feel their voices are absent in national and state-level discussions about changes in American education,” Vicki Phillips, Director of Education, College Ready, at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation said. “This came through very clearly. Teachers’ thoughts provide critical insights for policymakers and administrators, and their voices must guide action on the implementation of new state standards, teacher evaluations and the use of technology for collaborating with other teachers.” The views and opinions offered in Primary Sources: America’s Teachers on Teaching in an Era of Change include:

֎ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ֎MIDDLE SCHOOL ֎HIGH SCHOOL 59%

62%

55% 39%

Students’ ability to effectively present their ideas based on evidence

59% 47% 37%

Students’ ability to think critically and use reasoning skills

52%

46% 35%

Students’ ability to read and comprehend informational texts

55% 45%

43% 33%

Students’ ability to use real-words, tools and resources (like the Internet, digital technology, etc.)

31%

Students’ ability to work collaboratively with peers

Q. Earlier we asked your thoughts on some of the potential impacts of the CCSS. Please tell us your opinion on how each of the following has changed, if at all, as a result of implementing the CCSS in your school.

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OutlooK-12 Magazine 05/04/2015  

OutlooK-12 Magazine! For 25 years The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education magazine has been a top news source, delivering nationwide cover...

OutlooK-12 Magazine 05/04/2015  

OutlooK-12 Magazine! For 25 years The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education magazine has been a top news source, delivering nationwide cover...

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