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thread MARCH 2013

6 LOOKS WE LIKE

THE ABCS OF FASHION . INSPIRED BY PASSION WORKS . BEARD BUSINESS OUTHREADMAG.COM | 1


The Color of the Year

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6 Looks We Like

Evening Affair

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Black Magic

Soft & Sweet

Cover photo by AUDREY KELLY

tableofcontents


MARCH

2013

e scenes

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Haute Online Top 5 Editor’s Note

16 20 24 28 30 36 42 44 46

Runway Realway Celeb Style Street Peeps Column: Unfashionable Sneaky Behavior Leather Lover Beard Business Bikini Bravery Prime Time

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diy

59 62 69 72

of

T E E W S & SOFT

behind th

DIY Nails: Formal Attire DIY Quick Tricks DIY Phrase Maven DIY Picture Perfect

PPELER

HELLE KA

IC Video by M

who, what, wear

78 82 88 94

Athens Ink Style Files Beta Data Passionate Souls

back of the closet

178 184 193 200 224

Measure Up Intern Wear Fierce Females Style Break Rant / Rave

in good fashion

220

Empowered Women

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hauteonline SONG OF STYLE Finding inspiration has never been easier, thanks to Los Angeles’ fabulous and trendy Aimee (pronounced "Aw-Meeh") Song and her blog Song of Style. As a fashion blogger and interior designer, Song reflects her modern taste through her personal blog.

STYLE SHOTS

Song provides every last detail to her wardrobe as well as links to purchase similar items with just a click of button — giving anyone the opportunity to recreate the outfit or take specific pieces and make it their own.

DESIGN

Song also believes in surrounding yourself with beauty. In the design section, readers are exposed to her world of beauty as they are invited into the embellished rooms of Song's own home, including her to-die-for walk-in closet and illuminating living room.

VIDEOS

Whether it is a visit with Vogue or a trip to Italy, Song shares her experiences through video. If her impeccable fashion taste isn’t enough to get you hooked, her quirky and fun videos take Song of Style to another level of personal and into the envious life of Aimee Song.

—EDIE BUESS 4 | THREAD


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CUP OF COUPLE Cup of Couple is a stunning, fashionforward blog. Mike Madrid and Gabriel García, the Spain-based couple, run the site and specialize in fashion photography and video. The blog is mostly full of beautiful fashion pictures though there are occasional posts in English and Spanish.

WILD PEOPLE

The two even contribute their work to other fashion sites, most notably, their Wild people series for Style Lovely. Wild people is a twist on the traditional blog, and really shows off the couple’s background in photography and video. Each post includes shots of men and women as they strut around the city in their designer duds.

BLOGLOVIN

Another noteworthy element of Cup of Couple is the inclusion of their blog on Bloglovin. This is where a viewer can find all of their past posts. Many contain photographs that surround a theme, like New Year's Eve, or the couple's trip to London. Video diaries, which show what the couple has been up to, can also be found here. The photos and videos make the blog personal to Madrid and García and give viewers a glimpse into their fashionable lives.

—KATIE FLOWERS OUTHREADMAG.COM | 5


NASTY GAL The typical woman found shopping at Nasty Gal is described by the website as the “coolest girl in the room, pulling off whatever wildly unique piece that suits the mood.” Nasty Gal features curated vintage pieces and looks from up-and-coming designers. Because Nasty Gal’s customers intensely search for unique pieces, the garments are picked weekly with the intent that the looks won’t be found anywhere else.

SHOPPING

Nasty Gal’s style is comprised of rock ’n’ roll, sexiness, sass and a surprisingly mellow feeling, which captures Los Angeles’ vibe perfectly.

BLOG

In its blog, Nasty Gal features sections like “Artsy Fartsy,” where they showcase artists and their work, “Nasty Gals do it Better,” which highlights pieces of clothing that are trending in the fashion world and can be found at Nasty Gal and “NGTV,” which consists of videos of interviews and a behind the scenes look at prominent fashion figures.

—ALESSA ROSA

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KICK OFF THE WEEKEND AT

THURSDAY

$2 domestic bottles $3 Rumple Minze

SATURDAY

$2.50 Miller Lite drafts with

bobcats stadium cup and $2 refills

Find us online for more specials @JBar_Athens facebook.com/jbar.athens 41 N Court St (740) 594-1000 OUTHREADMAG.COM | 7


TOP

5 ULYANA SERGEENKO | Blue-eyed Russian doll Ulyana Sergeenko puts other street style connoisseurs to shame when she dons stunning, full skirts and her signature, too-cute smile. A budding couture designer with her own spring 2013 line inspired by characters like Scarlett O’Hara, this lady is leading the fashion world into hat-filled territory with plenty of sophistication. Did I mention she’s also a brunette who can pull off going blonde? —KATIE O'CONNOR

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JENNIFER LAWERENCE | I have a girl crush on Jennifer. No, I’m not talking about Aniston. I’m talking about the “Hunger Games” champion, “Silver Linings Playbook” starlet and overall rad person, Jennifer Lawrence. Her costars gush about how down-to-earth she is, and she has the kind of body that’s not only normal (imagine that!), but attainable. She is quick to poke fun at her immediate stardom and isn’t afraid to be photographed shoving a greasy burger in her face. She sucks at giving award show speeches, but I like her all the more for it. When push comes to shove, I’d rather have this girl as my BFF than any man! May the odds be forever in her favor. —MADDIE GAITHER

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THE TIE BAR |

There are some accessories that exist simply to add detail to any outfit, the tie bar being a perfect example. A trend that first came to be in the 1920s is slowly reappearing in modern male fashion. This accessory adds a nice touch to any tie — fancy or not — and expresses a touch of a man’s personality. —MICHAEL MAURER

WEDGE SNEAKERS | Tired of your heels

catching on the Court Street bricks whenever you go out? No worries; wedge heels provide all the style and grace that stilettos offer — plus a bit of sass. Stores like Target and designers like Marc Jacobs are offering these babies in a variety of designs and colors, making it hard to say no to just one pair. Wedge sneakers look like a cross of moon boots with Marty McFly sneakers, and allow any college co-ed to rock a pair of pumped up kicks sans the hoverboard. —CARLY WIITA

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MIKAEL JANSSON |

I can’t tell Prada from Chanel, but I can tell Avedon from Demarchelier. Photography is what drew me to the fashion world. Recently, I’ve fallen for the work of Mikael Jansson, who is based in New York. If you’ve seen a recent issue of Interview Magazine, you’ve seen his work, but his client list includes names like Hugo Boss, H&M and Dior. And no wonder; his creativity and expert lighting are brilliant. —MARY HAUTMAN

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editor’s note EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

bridget mallon Hi Threadies! Welcome to our first issue of spring semester! Although the weather outside hasn’t warmed up just yet, we’ve got sunshine and spring fashion on the mind. We’re celebrating the transition from winter to spring this issue by sending the cold weather off in style and embracing the coming warmer temps. We took advantage of (hopefully) the last bits of snow this year to bring some dark Gothic style to Athens in our “Black Magic” photo shoot. The dark romanticism of that shoot was contrasted with a lighter aesthetic in our early morning “Soft & Sweet” shoot. If fashion history is more your style, check out our feature “Ohio University’s Fashion Closet: Inside the Doxsee Collection,” to learn more about OU’s fashion roots. We’re also paying tribute to some of our favorite female fashion stars in “Fierce Females.” We’re taking style cues from the characters of HBO’s hit show “GIRLS” in our 6 Looks We Like, and embracing the quirks and personal fashions of each stand out star. Emerald was named the color of the year, and we’re showcasing this stylish tone in our “The Color of the Year” shoot. Our love of this gorgeous green hue is also carrying over into

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our release party theme. Our Emerald City party is this Wednesday, February 27 at the J Bar. Come out to the fete starting at 9 p.m. and get some specialty green drinks! Thread would like to thank the Mary C. Doxsee Historical Costumes and Textile Collection, Sol Restaurant, HBO, Stop Objectification and Norma Kamali, Passion Works, Athens Book Center, Decorative Injections and our incredibly talented and hard working staff. Style on Athens, Bridget Mallon


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MARCH2013 Editor-in-Chief Bridget Mallon Managing Editor Maddie Gaither

seams editor Brooke Bunce

web editor Gina Ranalli

who what wear editor Jessie Cadle

photo chief Mary Hautman

diy editor Kathryn Potraz

picture editor Michelle Kappeler

copy chief Carly Wiita

creative director Katie O'Connor

business manager public relations chief Scott Lambert Nicole Ranieri design editor Mikaela Longo WRITERS

Louis Baragona, Maddie Bartman, Morgan Borer, Sophia Borghese, Corttany Brooks, Edie Buess, John Colburn, Julia Eberle, Alexis Evans, Jenna Finer, Katie Flowers, Rachel Haas, Colleen Kratofil, Nadia Kurtz, Danielle Limon, Lo Martinez, Deven Middleton, Sophie Mitchem, Megan Neonakis, Olivia Ohlin, Jackie Petre, Alessa Rosa Gina Rossi, Deanna Sakal, Rachel Sayers, Michelle Sebastian, Ali Shultz, Camille Rose Smith, Jolana Watson, Bentley Weisel, Mandy Yang | BLOGGERS: Corttany Brooks, Megan Carter, Karissa Conrad, Anna Moore, Michael Mytnick

PHOTOGRAPHERS | PHOTO CHIEF ASSISTANT: MICHAEL MAURER Emmy Baker, Kasey Brooks, Karissa Conrad, Candace Cunard, Levi Finley, Sydney Good, Bailey Harnar, Jordyn Humphrey, Audrey Kelly, Evan Lubinger, Kirsten Martinez, Michael Maurer, Ryan Murphy, Michael Mytnick, Kelli Oliver, Daniel Rader, Aaron Zake

DESIGNERS Kayla Breeden, Andi Danesi, Cassie Fiat, Emily Gardner, Alexa Hayes, Hannah Hitchcock, Rachel Keaveny, Jenna Kendle, Rachel Lambert, Allison Lembright, Catie Peterson, Dorrian Pulsinelli, Marcie Richardson, Kaitlyn Richert, Kristin Schmidt, Amber Vincent

STYLISTS | CREATIVE ASSISTANT: GRETCHEN GREENLEE

Amelia Adams, Sophia Borghese, Megan Carter, Julia Eberle, Lexi Lang, Deven Middleton, Lindsey Smecker

COPY EDITORS

Louis Baragona, Katie Flowers, Colleen Kratofil,Danielle Limon, Sophie Mitchem, Camille Smith, Mandy Yang

PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM Sydney Cologie, Erin Radigan, Megan Valentine

VIDEOGRAPHERS

Michelle Kappeler, Michael Mytnick

MODELS

Anna Bengel, Megan Carter, A.J. Castro, Chase Caswell, Julianna Coleman, Helen Cothrel, Elizabeth Cychosz, Jillian Dellavalle, Haden Deroberts, Amna Durrani, Dave Edmunds, Ashley Ferrell, Trina Gannon, Nick Hart, Alex Higgins, Ian Hoyt, Bill Hrabnicky, Daniel Hubbard, Seth Johnson, Kaitor Kposowa, Adam Lubic, Tonya Marcotte, Laura McDermott, Alex McDonald, Megan Neonakis, Madeline Palmer, Rourke Papania, Chris Pitts, Murphie Rambo, Crystal Reedy, Taylor Reinhart , Nick Sander, Adam Senecal, Rachel Sharkey, Ian Shaw, Lindsey Smecker, Aaron Smith, Erica Smith, Emily Stevens, Will Stevens, Ryan Swartz, Ryant Taylor, Hannah Ticoras, Molly Vignos, Andrew Wehlite, Cidnye Weimer, Anga Welo, Tabor Wordelman, Bella Zhang, Rebecca Zook

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runwayrealway VICTORIA BECKHAM By DANIELLE LIMON I Photos by KYRA WILLNER

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eeding the need for something new, Victoria Beckham’s Spring 2013 readyto-wear line offers a sexy alternative to repetitive styles. VB’s newest collection focuses on classic fabrics and simple colors, with an obvious lack of print or pattern. Instead, Beckham focuses on keeping things fitted and structured with a variety of pantsuits, button-downs and sunset-orange pieces to liven up the collection. Achieving Beckham’s look this spring can be broken into a relatively simple equation: classic fabrics, basic tones and a splash of color. The structured neutrality of her pieces, even those that are very bright in color, are so versatile that adding even one item completely changes a look. Adding a bright statement skirt to a well thought-out outfit takes it from casually bland to spicy and exciting, without becoming overwhelming. Add an element of sex appeal to any outfit by including a sheer component. Whether it is an opaque blouse under a blazer or sweater during the day, or a dress featuring thoughtfully placed sheer panels for nightwear, the sexiness of the translucent material replaces the raunchiness of a too-short mini skirt. Beckham collaborated with designer Manolo Blahnik to bring a fresh look to the spring runway that is translatable to everyday wear: flat sandals and male-inspired monk strap shoes, similar to loafers or espadrilles. These are perfect for the bricks and hills of Athens, unlike the stilettos that Beckham is famous for wearing. This spring line shows Victoria Beckham is serious about her career in fashion and is finally ready to move on from the Spice Girls uniform and Posh persona.

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THOM BROWNE By SOPHIE MITCHEM I Photos by KYRA WILLNER

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right colors and vibrant patterns were the main stars of Thom Browne’s Spring 2013 men’s collection. The look makes vibrant statements and takes fashion risks in this startling twist on preppy style. Browne takes a nautical spin on the basic classics. Incorporating whale- and lobster-patterned clothing as well as colors reminiscent of a day spent at the Cape, this collection gives the expected style a new twist. The collection is comprised of tailored jackets and vests mixed with shorts of varying length or long pants. The mixture of different plaid patterns in an assortment of colors is nothing short of lively. Even for more conservative men, the pieces can be toned down. Taking a cue from Browne’s color choices, men can give life to any outfit with a splash of a bright red, blue, green or orange. To take a risk with a pattern, choose one piece of an outfit and really go for it. Experiment with plaid or other printed material and make a statement with your everyday attire. To tone down this look, choose just one patterned article, like the blue crab patterned polo, to create a shock factor. Another key aspect of Browne’s collection is pairing short sleeve jackets over long sleeve shirts. Mixing the patterns in both pieces creates for an interesting contrast. Details are the finishing touch. Whether Browne adds another punch of color in knee-high socks or a classic tie, small pieces bring the whole look together and add a touch of whimsy to the tailored looks. Keep it simple by balancing the statement pieces with white shorts and a pair of black Nikes.

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celebstyle JAMES FRANCO By JOHN COLBURN | Photos by BAILY HARNAR

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hile best known for lighting up the silver screen with his charming smile, James Franco has also tackled the worlds of writing, art and directing. This multi-talented man has also garnered attention for his suave style. The California native, elected best smile by his senior class, isn't just a pretty face; he has made strides in the realm of education as well. Franco received his B.A. in English from UCLA, and continued collecting degrees with a M.F.A. from Columbia University. And now he is studying for his doctorate at Yale, making him the epitome of beauty and brains. His penchant for all things collegiate continues in his boy next door style. Nicely fitted jeans layered with a simple tee, plaid shirt and rock 'n' roll inspired jacket make up his go-to outfit, perfect for class or a casual Hollywood meeting. Flip through the racks at a thrift store to find the perfect Francoinspired tee. Franco's classic good looks are the perfect compliment to his casually cool wardrobe, and have even garnered him a job as the face of Gucci. For guys who want to emulate Franco's maintained mane, minimal products work best. Think stylish, yet clean. Products like L’Oreal Overworked Hair Putty keep the stubborn strands in place without the excess shine or grease. A black leather jacket is ideal to complete this look. Just remember: To get the Franco look, think simple.

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LANA DEL REY By LOUIS BARAGONA | Photos by BAILY HARNAR

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ana Del Rey wore (and sang of) blue velvet and a whole lot more this past year. Del Rey’s pout is not her only asset; she also brings to the stage a distinctive aesthetic, a well-researched list of inspirations and a personality that somehow finds a happy medium between classic girl-next-door and dangerous temptress on the run. Del Rey describes herself as a “Lolita lost in the hood,” and a “gangsta Nancy Sinatra,” descriptions as fitting as the dresses she wears on stage, perfectly articulating her juxtaposition of modern strength and classic sex appeal. When performing, the sultry singer honors her inner Lolita with crop tops, sheer blouses, high-waisted skirts, heart-shaped sunglasses and cinched belts. Del Rey is all about the vintage silhouette, accentuating her hourglass frame. She pulls together her attire with an urban edge; a pair of high tops or thick-scripted earrings, taking an outfit from girl-next-door to biker-gang bad girl. Offstage, Del Rey keeps it casual with straightlegged jeans, old rock ’n’ roll T-shirts, Converse and leather jackets. Whether it’s in or out of the spotlight, channel your inner Lana by adding leather leggings or spiky fabric appliqués, taking an outfit from pop to punk rock. Adding in girlie details such as a flowery headband will keep any ensemble from overstepping the boundaries into total grunge. Del Rey's killer style is not her only accessory, she has been spotted on the arm of Axl Rose, lead singer of Guns N’ Roses. Del Rey always knows how to add the edge, even if it means adding a vintage accessory in the form a heavy metal legend.

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streetpeeps Photos by KARISSA CONRAD

WHAT’S YOUR YEAR-ROUND ITEM? RACHEL SHARKEY

year: sophomore major: news and information

MADELINE PALMER year: freshman major: undecided

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NICK HART

year: sophomore major: photojournalism

JILLIAN DELLAVALLE year: sophomore major: exercise physiology

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WHAT’S THE OLDEST ITEM YOU OWN THAT YOU STILL WEAR? HADEN DEROBERTS

year: sophomore major: journalism

ERICA SMITH year: freshman major: undecided

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IAN HOYT

year: freshman major: entrepreneurship

MURPHIE RAMBO year: graduated major: hotel and tourism

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blogger of the month

unfashionable By ANNA MOORE

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Photo by MICHAEL MAURER

ashion magazines have always left me asking questions. Why is that model contorting her spine and why does she look so angry? Why do I have to buy a pair of jeggings? And why in the world is that purse $10,000? I guess I just don’t like being told what to wear, what to buy or how to look. This antifashion attitude began when I was a kid. The first four years of my life I was either naked or in costume. During the awkward days of high school I started buying clothes from Goodwill to save money. This was way before Macklemore made thrift shops cool. My current wardrobe hasn’t changed much and includes an obscene amount of athletic spandex, tissue-thin T-shirts and an endless supply of American flag clothing. It was the six months I spent as a beach bum on the coast of Australia when I really let go of fashion. My American flag bikini was the outfit of choice most days and somehow I managed to make great friends without wearing make-up, or dressing to impress. In fact, the best times of my life happened while backpacking up the East Coast of Australia, wearing the same two dirty outfits for three weeks. I even

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went four days completely barefoot after my toe-worn Teva flip-flops were eaten by a sand dune. My all-time favorite article of clothing is still a tribal patterned fleece zip-up that I bought on the streets of Australia for $2.99. I’ll be honest … writing a blog for Thread began as a joke. Me? Write a fashion blog? You might as well have Mitt Romney write a blog about being liberal! But after some introspection, I thought that maybe I am not the only one tired of the fashion game. My blog, Unfashionable, is my way of sticking it to the fashion man via self-deprecation. By picking apart my own fashion flaws (and then posting them on the internet for all to laugh at), maybe someone out there will feel a little better about themselves and the hole in the crotch of their favorite jeans. It’s good to let your gotta-look-good guard down every now and again. There is so much more to life than clothes. Separating yourself from the constant consumerism of American culture is really liberating! Let’s get real. … We are not what we wear, but how we feel! Check out my Unfashionable blog and escape the tyranny of trends, because just being you never goes out of style.


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sneakybehavior By MICHELLE SEBASTIAN Photos by KIRSTEN MARTINEZ

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here is no shoe more revolutionary than the sneaker. Yes, the style may change, but its comfort keeps it a staple in most wardrobes. They are worn during almost sports, seen at the gym and skate park, and even employed in utilitarian fashion. The sneaker is a shoe so diverse there are too many styles to count and too many uses to keep up with. Both men and women sport various sneaker styles on a daily basis due to tennis shoes' practicality and versatility. Many younger boys lean toward a more athletic sneaker such as Air Jordans and the various Nike styles.When searching for a shoe for athletics, try instead a sneaker with a neon hue. But there is a more sophisticated option for men’s sneakers. The Nike for J.Crew Vintage Collection features different styles and colors that give off a more refined and formal vibe than other sneakers. Jack Purcell Converse sneakers give off the same feel. They couple a more classic look with the trademark Converse appearance. For both men and women, Vans sneakers are a popular casual alternative. They slip on effortlessly

and are light and easy to wear. They are typically associated with skater style, but have since transcended into popular fashion. A shoe that has just come into the shoe-wear spotlight is the wedge sneaker. The wedge sneaker is a women’s shoe — with either Velcro straps or laces — that parade as hi-tops for girls. The hi-top effect is actually just made with hidden 2- to 3-inch wedges inside of the sneaker. Designer Isabel Marant started this trend and quickly other shoe designers such as Steve Madden, ALDO, Jeffrey Campbell and even Target made their own versions. This shoe has been seen on tons of celebrities and even the general public. These sporty wedges are the perfect way to change up your legging-and-riding boot look with something a bit more unique (plus adding a couple more inches is always good). The word “sneaker” may conjure an image of athletes and skaters, but these kicks have much more to give to the fashion world. Sneakers are a fashion staple no matter the style or design. Their versatility enables them to exist in an infinite number of closets, no matter whose it is.

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leatherlover By MEGAN NEONAKIS Photos by DEANNA SAKAL

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eather has been a trend for the last six decades, since the Greasers of the 1950s made the simple leather jacket a favorite. Now, leather trends are manifesting in unexpected ways. One style that has been popping up everywhere as of late is the leather-sleeved jacket: a jacket with black leather sleeves and a body of different material, such as army-green canvas or denim. These striking pieces make for great everyday outerwear and can be pulled off by anyone. With spring coming up, a trend that sounds almost counterintuitive has emerged — “warm weather leather.” This refers to leather pieces such as structured skirts and shorts made in black and other colors of leather, with some brands even making leather tank tops. These pieces bring leather accents well into the sunnier seasons. This trend has been displayed on the runways of Alexander McQueen and Alice + Olivia, but similar styles can also be purchased at H&M and Forever 21, or online at NastyGal.com. Leather is also infiltrating another facet of fashion: jewelry. Leather strips, in colorful or classic black, woven into oversized chains have been appearing everywhere, as necklaces or chunky bracelets. Another popular jewelry style is leather embedded in metal, carried by brands such as BCBGMAXAZRIA and House of Harlow. This combination of leather and metal can add some edginess to any outfit. Leather won't be going anywhere anytime soon, and these new leather trends are cute, fun and easy to incorporate into daily wear. It’s impossible to predict how leather will next be utilized in fashion, but be sure to try out these innovative trends before it’s on to the next ones. 38 | THREAD


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beardbusiness By ALI SHULTZ

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Photos by EVAN LUBINGER

rooming is essential for men who have long beards that resemble Zach Galifianakis' or even handsome stubble like that of George Clooney. Grooming a beard can be a simple task, as long as necessary steps are taken to tame those wild whiskers.

GROOMING:

1. Once the facial hair is grown, buzz the entire beard with a larger guard setting of three. 2. Buzz from the Adam’s apple to about an inch or two from the jawline with a lower guard of one. 3. Fade the rest with a two guard to even out the inch or two between the neck and jawline. 4. Shave the strays on the neck and below the Adam’s apple. 5. Wash with beard shampoo and occasionally use beard conditioner to keep the facial hair soft. Having a soft beard will help tremendously with rough, flaky skin. Not all men can pull off a handsome beard like George Clooney’s; however, different facial hairstyles can allow any man's face to pull off the bearded look.

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ROUND

SQUARE

OBLONG

TRIANGULAR

Focus on angular styles; add length to the chin and keep the sides of the beard shorter to make the face seem less circular.

Oblong face structures appear to have larger foreheads, therefore, a neat and medium-length beard will take the focus off the length of the face.

Soften the angles of the jawline with a short beard or stubble all around the jawline.

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bikinibravery By KYLIE WHITTAKER

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Illustration by RACHEL KEAVENY

ubic hair has, ever since I’ve had it, caused me great distress. As a feminist, I don’t feel obligated to groom myself to suit the preferences of men; as a modern American, I’m predisposed to despise body hair; as a weirdo, shaving gives me the creeps. I found a solution to my dilemma this past summer while I was living in New York City: Brazilian waxing, (i.e. ALL OF IT, GONE) and I couldn’t resist the urge to get that prepubescent vaginal look on the cheap. A few days later, I am lying on my back, pantsless in a dimly lit broom closet of a room, and a Brazilian aesthetician is ordering me to spread my legs. My knees separated reluctantly, and I had barely processed the humiliation when I felt hot wax smear onto my skin. I held my breath and every muscle in my body seized. And then the pain. It feels like exactly what it is: a bunch of hair follicles being ripped

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from your flesh simultaneously — and it hurts really, really badly. But, before I knew it, she was demanding “knees to chest” for the tail end of the wax (pun intended). I emerged from the torture room a new person, more baby-like than woman. I begrudgingly scheduled my next appointment, waddled to the bar next door and got what-the-f*ck-just-happened-to-medrunk all by myself.

1. BE PICKY

Getting waxed without prior research and recommendations is like getting your hair done at Great Clips: You will leave crying and quite possibly bleeding. My first two waxes were inexpensive and done by extremely skilled and experienced aestheticians in New York City, neither one lasting more than 15 minutes. My third was done back in Ohio; it was expensive, the wax itself took over an hour and the results were literally and figura-


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tively scarring. Before committing to a salon, search the internet for reviews. Call around and see what types of wax, hard or soft, each salon uses. Hard wax — my personal preference — hardens and rises off the skin as it dries, and is then pulled from the edge, removing the hair trapped within. Soft wax sticks to the skin and requires a cloth strip for removal. In my experience, hard wax is quicker, more efficient, less painful and causes little-to-no redness or skin irritation.

2. DON’T EXPECT SPA TREATMENT (unless you’re at a spa)

My experience has taught me that most skilled aestheticians are professional, efficient and won’t waste time with small talk. I’m skeptical of any aesthetician who looks me in the eyes or asks how my day is going.

3. PREPARE YOURSELF

Aside from doing your research, there are a few tips and tricks for better results. First and foremost, you need to have enough hair, so channel your inner American Apparel model and grow it out for a week or two. Make sure to schedule your first wax at least five days before or after your period; the closer to your period, the more sensitive your skin is, and the more painful the wax will be. Take ibuprofen 30 minutes prior to your appointment (seriously, do not forget this one) and don’t drink alcohol; a few glasses of merlot might ease the embarrassment of a stranger dissecting your labial mane, but it will also increase skin sensitivity, so you won’t be doing yourself any favors in the pain department. Use a loofah to exfoliate the area in the days before your wax; this will soften hairs for an easier removal.

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primetime By MADDIE BARTMAN Photos by LEVI FINLEY

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s spring arrives, a colorful collection is in store for men this season. Electrifying colors have been showing up on shirts and pants, and even though incorporating this trend may seem like a bold move, no need to worry, it’s effortless. Leading brands such as J.Crew, Banana Republic and Ralph Lauren are telling men that it’s OK to brighten up their wardrobe, just a few pieces at a time. Some popular shades for men this year include red, orange, lime green, forest green, blue, wine, gray, white, tan and caramel. All of these vivid hues can be incorporated tactfully into an outfit with singular accent pieces.

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Caramel pants have taken the place of boring khakis, so any bright color on top pairs well with this neutral tone. For a newbie to bold colors, try a pair of fitted caramel slacks with a cotton tee that’s any shade of

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the color spectrum (pick a favorite). Step out in rouge pants paired with a denim shirt and, for a jazzy twist, a plaid bow tie. The bow tie isn’t essential, though. Wine-colored pants, which re-


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semble a deep, rich purple, look striking topped off with a charcoal blazer, a striped white-and-blue top and a bright orange tie just for fun. To get lucky in green, wearing it with navy is the way to go. Deep berry, which is a

neat shade of pink, needs a natural tone on top with a navy or white shirt, but it always goes well with a trusty denim shirt. Incorporating primary-colored pants is easy — just wear a plain blue,

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gray or white shirt. Sweaters work well with colored pants because they make the outfit formal and sharp. For a nice hybrid of sweater-sophisticated and T-shirt-casual, try selecting a cardigan in a lively color to throw over a basic tee or button-up. Take advantage of those layers. No matter what, a crucial rule is that the top should stay simple to let vivid bottoms stand out. If color still needs to be added on top, a playfully bright tie or bow tie will do the trick. If that feels too classy, a printed shirt that coordinates with the color of the pant also works extremely well. A classic chambray shirt matches any color and can make the look neutral and natural. A chambray button-up over a vibrant shirt also works well as a way to add in color without going too out there. For the faintest of heart, military jackets in faded green are a great way to start adding a dash of color. They can easily be tossed over any outfit to up the style factor. Plus, hunter green matches just about anything. Don’t be afraid to power clash — red pants and a muted blue top, perhaps in a checker print, or a green cardigan sprinkled with polka dots paired with brown slacks could be just the key to take a look from so-so to intelligently superb. With some of these tips and tricks, step out on the scene with a colorful, creative closet and become the envy of every blandly-dressed bro.

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Just because a sweater has a grandpa vibe doesn't mean it can't be fun. Try a bold cranberry for a modern twist.

Take trousers up a notch with a bright punchy color. Choose a primary shade like royal blue or vibrant red.

Plain-colored tees pair perfectly with brighter colored cardigans and slacks. Stock up on a variety of shades.

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thread online HTTP://TWITTER.COM/THREADMAG

HTTP://WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/THREADMAG

@THREADMAGAZINE

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formalattire By MEGAN NEONAKIS Photos by KASEY BROOKS

W

ith formal awards season in full swing, fashion blogs are buzzing with speculation about what celebrities will be wearing. From the dress to the jewelry down to the shoes, every detail of a celebrity's attire is noted by fans and media alike. But at last year's Golden Globe Awards, style icon Zooey Deschanel made a statement with something other than her attire: her manicure. She rocked tiny black-and-white tuxedos on her nails, posting to Twitter, "I am wearing a gown, but my nails are wearing tuxedos!!" This cute and quirky nail dĂŠcor can add a little cheekiness to a formal look, or for a more daring look, rock them with everyday wear. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 59


WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

Nail polish remover

Black nail polish (preferably with a nail art brush) White nail polish

Top clear coat Tissues or cotton rounds

STEP BY STEP VIDEO:

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diy

STEPS: 1. Paint your nails with two coats of white polish. *Make sure both layers are completely dry before you move on in order to avoid smudging.

2.

Carefully apply a black V shape for the tuxedo lapels — this can be done with a thin nail art brush or a toothpick.

3.

Fill in the outside areas of the V shape, also in black, again being careful not to go outside of the V.

4.

Apply a small black X at the top of the white triangle area. This will be our bow tie.

5.

Fill in the sides of the bow tie with a toothpick — this gives you extra precision which is important on the smaller details.

6.

Using the toothpick, place two black dots beneath the bow tie to represent buttons. Be especially careful on this step, as it’s easy to mess up!

7.

Apply a clear topcoat to seal the look.

You can mix up the look by adding color or a statement nail. Inverting the colors (black base coat, white details) also looks great, or you could try changing the color of the bow tie. The options are endless, so get creative!

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quicktricks By CAMILLE ROSE SMITH

W

Photos by SYDNEY GOOD

hile doing your nightly perusal of Pinterest, you come across yet another do-it-yourself project to pin to your crafting board. You pin it and move on, but what’s stopping you from actually trying one of the 50 crafts you already have on your board? A recent study done by Nancy Monson, an award-winning author who focuses on health and creativity, and the Home Sewing Association shows that crafting is both physically and mentally relaxing. And don’t worry about not having the time, because these five D.I.Y. projects take less than five minutes to complete. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 63


T-SHIRT SCARF

If you search “T-shirt scarf” on Google, more than four million hits appear. T-shirt scarves are certainly one of the most popular D.I.Y. projects right now, and it’s easy to see why. All you need is a T-shirt and a pair of scissors and you’ll have the perfect conversation starter right around your neck. SUPPLIES: An XL T-shirt (preferably with no seams) . Scissors

STEP ONE

Cut from underneath the sleeve of the T-shirt to the opposite side. Save the top part of the T-shirt for later. Then cut straight across the T-shirt to create 1-inchwide strips. Do this to the whole bottom portion of the T-shirt until you have about 12 strips.

STEP TWO

Open up each strip (it will be circular), and line each of them on your arm. Those create the main part of the scarf.

STEP THREE

Go back to the top portion of the T-shirt that you cut off originally, and cut three straight strips of fabric. Braid those together, wrap around a section of the scarf (the 12 strips), and when it’s pulled tight, tuck in the end. No sewing required! 64 | THREAD


diy

IPHONE CASE

Practically everyone has an iPhone nowadays, and it’s sometimes hard to find a cute, quirky case to match your sense of style. So instead of purchasing a $30 piece of plastic, buy a plain one and paint it to create a one-of-a-kind case. SUPPLIES: Clear or plain iPhone case . Acrylic paint . Paintbrushes . Acrylic

STEP ONE

Use acrylic paint to create whatever you want on your plain iPhone case.

STEP TWO

When it’s dry, spray one coat of acrylic sealer. Wait another 20 minutes, and spray a second coat.

COLLAR CLIP

Collared shirts are an easy way to add interest to an outfit, but they can look plain and old fashioned. This creative one-step craft will bring your flair to the average collared shirt. SUPPLIES: Pair of earrings . Super Glue . Butterfly pin backing and posts

STEP ONE

Take a pair of dangle earrings and remove the hooks. Then take butterfly pin backings and posts, and glue them onto the back of the earrings with super glue. Once they dry, you’ll have a collar accessory to die for, and the best part is, it’s individual to you. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 65


COLORFUL LIGHTS

Everyone loves Christmas lights, but when springtime rolls around, are they still well suited for a dorm? They will be if you try this quick, easy craft. SUPPLIES: Holiday lights . Colorful cupcake liners . Scissors

STEP ONE

Take a large, colored cupcake liner and fold it in half until it’s flat. Fold it vertically two more times. When it’s in a triangle shape, cut the wider edge into a rounded shape. Unfold it and you have the perfect flower! Mini muffin liners can also be cut the same way to layer underneath the flower to act as the leaves.

STEP TWO

Push the center of the flower onto the Christmas light and voilà! It’s the perfect spring pick-me-up to add to any dorm.

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FABRIC ENVELOPE

The same white envelopes come day after day, but instead of sending a friend a drab envelope, surprise them with a handmade token of your gratitude with this deluxe letter holder. SUPPLIES: Fabric . Ink . Stamp . Thread and needle . Button . 4 x 6 Index card

STEP ONE

Take the index card and fold the fabric over the index card like an envelope. Fold in the sides and bottom according to the template.

STEP TWO

Using the needle and thread, make two stitches where the top of the lower flap connects to the sides.

STEP THREE

Decorate with a zany stamp and colorful ink. Add the finishing touch by sewing a button on for closure and cutting a slit in the top flap for the button.

Now you have an original way to give a gift or send a letter.

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thread join

MAGAZINE

WRITERS COPY EDITORS PHOTOGRAPHERS DESIGNERS STYLISTS MODELS PUBLIC RELATIONS ADVERTISING MEETINGS: WEDNESDAY NIGHTS at 9pm SCRIPPS 111

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seams

phrasemaven By GINA ROSSI Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

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F

estive banners are typically spotted at birthday bashes, weddings, showers or anniversaries. But have you ever thought about having an offbeat banner for no occasion at all? Artist Angela Deane has. Her inspiration for this idea came from wanting to re-pursue work in the fine arts. Deane created the website Banter Banner where customers can purchase “make your own” banner kits. Each kit displays different ideas for several humorous, sarcastic or rude sayings. Deane’s thought process behind her website was to make each day special. Deane’s humorous banners have been extremely successful and are even sold at large retail stores like urban outfitters. Display witty remarks for laughs or hang up inspiring statements for encouragement. Common banners always make special events decorative, but original, homemade banners make them memorable.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

Scissors Brads

Hole punch

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Jointed letter templates Download PDF Here


diy

1

Punch holes into the ends of each letter. Line up the holes of two different letters and set a brad in the overlapping holes. Spread the back of the brad to secure it in place.

2

3

Print desired letters from PDF onto computer paper. Cut out letter templates and trace them backwards onto the back of chosen paper. This way there will be no pencil marks shown on the banner.

Hang up your cute banner for all to see. OUTHREADMAG.COM | 71


pictureperfect By JACKIE PETRE Photos by ROYLE MAST

W

e’ve all been there — frustrated, searching through jewelry boxes for that matching earring that has either decided to play a game of hide-andseek or entangle itself with five other earrings. But a girl’s earrings are not like her socks; you cannot simply throw on a mismatched pair in the hopes that no one will see. Staying organized is the key to proper jewelry care; it will ensure that accessories do not get damaged, and that no pearl, diamond or hoop ever gets lost. In the same amount of time it would take you to find your favorite studs, you can create an adorable way to keep your earrings organized.

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WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

picture frame • variety of lace • tacky glue • hook

BEFORE YOU GET STARTED: If you choose a frame that is a neutral or plain in color, you may want to paint it a fun, lively color. Wooden frames work best, as they are the easiest to paint. Also, try using a variety of laces for an elegantly playful look.

1

Remove the back of the picture frame, as well as the glass. If painting the frame, do so and let it dry overnight.

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2

Measure the width of the frame, from one outside edge to the other. It is important to measure to the outside of the frame so there is enough lace to glue onto the inside of the frame.


3

Cut strips of lace the same length as the outside width of the frame. Lace is perfect for holding earrings because of the holes, although regular ribbon works just as well if you want more color.

4

diy

Glue the lace on the back of the frame, making sure to space out the pieces far enough so that there is room for dangle earrings. Cut off any end lace that sticks out past the edge of the frame.

5

Attach a hook to the back to hang on the wall, or simply prop up the frame on a dresser. Never lose an earring again!

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athensink By LO MARTINEZ Photos by RYAN MURPHY

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D

ecorative Injections is a fixture on Court Street as one of the longeststanding tattoo shops in town. Pushing open the heavy, black door, a distinctly creative space presents itself. The parlor mixes harsh Gothic installations with Tim Burton-esque art. Unusual paintings canvas the walls. The images are equally beautiful and disturbing, infused with surrealism while popping against the stark black panels to which they are affixed. It’s undeniable; Decorative Injections has a distinguishable style. But so do the adept artists who work within. The shop’s three tattooists have a look and technique that is as unique as their ink. In the shop’s backroom, owner and artist Jim Kisor relaxes in his chair. He fits perfectly into the atmosphere he helped to build. His tattoos peek out from the sleeves of his simple black shirt. As he starts to speak, he pulls up his sleeves, revealing new tattoos

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— a mesh of intricate and colorful art. Kisor, an Athens native, began tattooing in the mid-1990s. After only five years, he made the ambitious decision to buy Decorative Injections from his boss, and has been there ever since. “When I first started tattooing, I was really into a raver, kind of Gothic culture,” Kisor said. “I got a lot of darker, kind of kookier stuff. At that time, my tattoos reflected what I was interested in and the way I dressed.” Kisor reveals that many artists have an art or music genre that inspires the tattoos they craft, their personal tattoos and style. A perfect example: his 22-year-old tattoo apprentice Eric Pierce. His passion for hardcore music is hard to miss. He pays homage to his favorite bands in a fashion statement he can’t take off. He has countless tattoos across his calves inspired by his favorite bands, including: Cold As Life, Judge and Madball. He is even tattooed with his own band, Bad Terms. Beyond the tattoos, Pierce collects T-


shirts from his favorite bands, which he often wears under an open flannel that he couples with a pair of dark jeans. “I have an Entombed shirt that I wear a lot. I’ve worn it two or three days in a row before because I really dig it,” Pierce said. The final tattooist, Eric Creamer, joined the tattoo biz at 22 and spent the last seven years with Kisor at Decorative Injections. Kisor and Creamer joke about the pitfalls of tattoo artists in a themed shop. The most recognizable theme is pin-up, with female artists donning red lips and ’50s-inspired hair. “If you get adopted into the shop with a really specific style you start looking that way too," Creamer said. "You lose individuality." Kisor describes the hottest new style in the tattoo world as 1930s inspired. “Men will wear suspenders and those fluffy white shirts with the arm garters. It has a vintage feel,” Kisor said with a smile. “I always say, ‘Well I could do that,’ but my wife says no.”

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stylefiles By SOPHIA BORGHESE Photos by DANIEL RADER

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S

tudents fill Alden Library at Ohio University 24 hours a day, as do the unassumingly helpful librarians, such as the fashion-loving Sherri Saines, distinguished by her gray curly locks and penchant for Indian apparel. Saines is one of Alden’s nine reference and instruction librarians. She serves as the subject librarian for Human and Consumer Science Education, University College, Linguistics and Women’s and Gender Studies, and she has other duties as a member of the library governing body, a reference desk librarian and a teacher of various informational classes. “Everyone here wears many hats,” she joked. As part of the job, she aids retail merchandising majors with an extensive knowledge of fashion that ranges from history to the latest trends. Beyond her knowledge of fashion, Saines works her own sense of style. Saines loves to incorporate rings and other accessories into her look alongside a few homemade pieces. She aims for comfort. Because of her daily librarian duties traversing the floors of Alden, she dons sensible shoes. She gains fashion inspiration from the young students of Ohio University. “Scarves are my weakness. Don’t let me go to T.J.Maxx,” she said. Since she was a young girl observing her mother sew articles of clothing, Saines has always had a knack for fashion. In fact, for nearly 20 years she has worked as a historical actor, or

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reenactor, dressed in period-appropriate fashion. “We go about five or six times a year. Usually a historical site sponsors it. Different people have different roles, and we recreate the 18th century,” she said. She reveals that 18th century fashion is one of her favorite eras. Beyond her role as reenactor, Saines has performed her whole life and nearly became a dance teacher. Instead, Saines decided to work toward a master’s degree. Unlike other library jobs, reference librarians specialize in specific subjects, and the job requires a graduate degree. After receiving her degree from Allegheny College, she started her current job at Alden Library in 1998. As one of her myriad duties, she spends a lot of time working with and helping retail students succeed. One class that requires her help is Trend Forecasting. “She was an on-going asset to those (Trend Forecasting) group projects, channeling a cluster of creative ideas to form a cohesive vision,” said Justin Brown, a former retail student and Thread's former Creative Director. Saines enjoys being creative herself and loves to see other students explore their creativity. Though fashion is a small field of study at Ohio University, it is ubiquitous and everchanging, so it is worth studying and worth studying correctly, Saines said. “Fashion is a great study at Ohio University, since it allows for one to be a big fish in a small pond,” she said.


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Scarves are my weakness. Don’t let me go to T.J.Maxx. —SHERRI SAINES

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betadata By JULIA EBERLE Photos by LAUREN HOLLE

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T

he two girls behind Ohio University’s latest publication found inspiration in their shared love of video games and science. Sophomore Helen Cothrel, an astrophysics major, and her roommate Lizy Cychosz, a dual major in journalism and anthropology, came up with the idea for an online magazine celebrating nerd culture. “It seemed like a niche that just wasn’t getting filled,” Cothrel said. “People often label nerds as being socially inept, but we actually have very rich social lives — it’s just with other nerds.” So the two roommates put their heads together and Beta Fish — betafishmag.wordpress.com — was born. “I noticed that there wasn’t really anything like it on campus,” Cychosz said. “Helen and I like a lot of the same video games, but there just isn’t an outlet for people who are interested in nerd culture on campus to get together and talk creatively.” The girls’ first challenge in creating their online publication was deciding name. “We thought of using some kind of animal that would be iconic and we wanted to use something that is very solitary because nerds tend to be solitary people,” Cothrel said. They chose the name Beta Fish because of the animal’s inability to be in the same tank as other fish. It also worked out well, because the use of the word ‘beta’ is common in nerd culture such as ‘beta testing’ of video games or computers. After deciding on a name, the girls

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had to figure out content for their target demographic. “We boiled down ‘nerd’ to people who have academic interests that are essentially not liberal arts or to people who have passions or hobbies that are usually thought of as nerdy, like board games, video games or something like that,” Cothrel explained. On the Beta Fish page, readers can find anything from serious scientific articles about physics to lighter pieces about the popular game Skyrim. A little bit of something for every type of nerd, the page also deals with board games such as Dungeons & Dragons and TV shows like “Doctor Who.” They are currently in the process of developing an events calendar for the page to keep people in the know about nerdy culture and events here in Athens. “We are hoping to keep it pretty local,” Cychosz said. “The idea is to build up a community.” The two roommates began generating content back in early November, but the publication didn’t really take off until they began advertising and searching for other writers. They currently have about four or five contributors and are looking to expand as the interest in Beta Fish and their number of readers grows. “Nerd is becoming cool,” Cychosz laughed. “I’m not really sure when that happened, but I think there still are some underlying stereotypes that a nerd is not something you want to be or someone you want to be around, which isn’t true.” When it comes to nerd style, the key


who, what, wear

is keeping it simple. “As a nerd, a typical day can start out with a couple of hours at the library and then hiking across campus to get to class and end with a couple of hours of board games, so comfort really is the priority,” Cothrel said. “It’s

not that I don’t care about how I look, it’s just that I don’t want to put too much thought into it. If you’re going to sit in a chair and play three hours of PS3, you don’t want to wear heels and a cocktail dress — it just doesn’t make sense.”

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Inspired by

passionatesouls By RACHEL SAYERS Photos by JORDYN HUMPHREY OUTHREADMAG.COM | 95


T

he passion flower: vibrant, zealous and unapologetically quirky, is the official flower of Athens, Ohio. For good reason too, considering Passion Works Studio is a place where the artists are free to produce the brightest hodgepodge of brilliance ever constructed in the Lower 48. Passion Works began in 1998, in conjunction with the Athens County Board of Developmental Disabilities, as a place for adults with disabilities to learn social skills, dexterity and financial responsibility. Artists come from across Athens County and are presented with the chance to express themselves in a way that benefits both themselves and the community. “Everyone is an artist whether they know it or not,” said Wayne Savage, studio coordinator at Passion Works Studio. “We learn a lot from everyone who passes through our doors, but not everyone can do everything. That’s why much of our work is done collaboratively. One painting could have a dozen artists.” Therein lies the beauty of the Passion Works Studio, a nondescript commercial building that discreetly hides the Technicolor triage of bold

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hues within. The studio itself is alive with color and creativity, almost as if someone carelessly dropped dozens of paint cans only to realize, in the aftermath, that their rashness resulted in a captivatingly guileless interpretation of the world. That unassuming beauty is mirrored – or perhaps originates – from the artists who have created the variegated artwork within: a pastiche that ranges from sculptures and paintings to castles and guitars. “The story of our Passion Flower started with one of our artists, a woman named Carolyn Williams, who was passionate about drawing flowers,” Savage said. “She came here nearly every day and always drew these beautiful flowers. We developed that into our signature passion flower design, which are now sold as far away as Argentina and Chile and as close as the mayor’s office.” Williams is not the only one within the Passion Works family to house a not-so-secret infatuation, and she certainly is not the only one to depict that passion in her artwork. Every artist in the studio is known for their particular penchant, some more extraordinary than others. One artist


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is so fond of Smokey Robinson that she wears a T-shirt with the singer’s picture nearly every day, telling anyone who will listen about the time he gave her a kiss on the cheek; another can spout the year of every movie ever produced in Hollywood with unfailing exactitude. The world of developmental disabilities is wrought with debilitating labels. Those that fall within the diagnosis of these disabilities are taught to associate themselves with their disease first and foremost but at Passion Works, they learn that they are more than a medical term. “When artists first come here they introduce themselves by their name and disability,” Savage said. “They are shy and often avoid eye contact. Two months later they’re much more outgoing; they’re greeting becomes an enthusiastic 'Hey, I’m Bill, a Passion Works artist.’ They’ve found an identity.” Passion Works artists are defined by their quirks, but their quirks do not define them. They flaunt their aberrations with more confidence than even the most audacious of young adults. Despite their anomalies, they work together to create some of the most unpretentious art — art that includes the truest forms of oneself are the pieces that are truly transcendental.

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“

Everyone is an artist whether they know it or not. WAYNE SAVAGE

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THE

COLOR YEAR OF THE

Photos by EMMY BAKER

Each year Pantone color experts reveal one of the most important things in the fashion world: the color of the year. This color will be seen everywhere from runways to home decor. You can't hide from it — we dare you to try. This year's motto is Go Gre ... we mean Emerald!

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S o ft

&

Sweet

Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

Let the dawn light wake you up as you wrap yourself in honey-colored knits and delicate lingerie. Cozy up in thick fluffy socks as you float around in a daybreak trance. Share an early breakfast with a friend and revel in the sweet sunny morning.

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Black

Magic Photos by MIKE MYTNICK

As twilight nears and the winter haze casts an eerie glow, wrap yourself in smoky neutrals and charcoal-colored frocks. Bewitch with layered button downs and summon the supernatural with Gothically glam makeup sure to leave your admirers spellbound.

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EVENING AFFAIR Photos by MARY HAUTMAN

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6 LOOKS WE LIKE

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Photos by AUDREY KELLY

Raise your glass for the cast of HBO’s "GIRLS." Lena Dunham’s brainchild has given life to six rising style stars. Here’s to kinda sorta getting it together.

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CHARLIE

This nice-guy-turnedhipster-hunk may be Marnie’s ex, but his manly flannels and brooding style are making her secondguess dumping him.

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JESSA

The resident "It" girl mixes badass with bohemian in chic high-low skirts, airy floral prints and bright berry lipstick. A British accent and a free spirit don’t hurt, either.

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ADAM

Angry, artsy Adam showcases his manliness with his unkempt facial hair and oft-shirtless torso. A sucker for jeans and neutral henleys, Hannah’s ex never tries too hard.

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MARNIE

The gorgeous Marnie steals the show with sleek blazers, romantic frocks, and sky-high heels. Long, luscious locks complete her look as she works her way to the top.

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HANNAH

Hannah strives to be the voice of her generation, dressing like an indie secretary in cardigans, flats and easy fitting plaid dresses.

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SHOSHANNA "Sex and the City"-obsessed Shosh is like the little sister Hannah never had. Strutting around Brooklyn in her tailored girlie tops and highwaisted skirts is this girl's favorite pastime.

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’ Y T I S R E O UNIV

o i h fas OHI

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MARY hotos by HLIN | P

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A

rose-colored silk dress with an intricate nude lace overlay that was worn at the time the Titanic sunk; a funky plastic purse made from a fashion magazine and carried at a time when The Beatles were a new band; and a silkchiffon flapper dress straight from The Great Gatsby era have all found their home in The Mary C. Doxsee Historical Costumes and Textile Collection. The collection isn’t on display in carefully lit glass cases. It doesn’t even have its own large warehouse space. The Doxsee Collection’s 3000-plus vintage items are hung, stacked and shoved in an unassuming office smaller than most classrooms. The array of accessories and garments began accumulating over half a century ago by Mary C. Doxsee, a former professor in Ohio University’s textiles department. Doxsee retired in 1983 and passed away in the ’90s, but her legacy and enthusiasm for fashion and clothing live on through her collection. Dr. Sky Cone, a professor in apparel, textiles and merchandising is the current curator of the collection and doctoral student, Trina Gannon, is the

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assistant curator. Gannon says what began as Doxsee’s personal collection continued to grow throughout the years to become what it is today. “Colleagues and students began learning of her passion for textiles and soon enough, they were donating pieces to her from their families and items purchased while traveling around the world,” said Gannon. The thousands of items, with the oldest piece dating almost 200 years old, include hats, quilts, textiles, shoes, coats, wedding dresses, haute couture pieces and everyday wear. Although the collection may look like a cluttered vintage store upon first glance, each item


serves a purpose as a piece of history and a piece of art. “Clothing is utilitarian art,” explained Gannon. And although people don’t typically view fashion as art because it’s an essential part of everyday life, “clothing is the biggest industry in the world and it acts as a representation of who you are as a person,” she said. One of Gannon’s favorite pieces that sits among the congested racks is a 1940s day dress, a style that was made popular by many women during the Great Depression and World War II. When the economy was in a downswing and America was making sacrifices during wartime, housewives would make

do with their limited budget and sew dresses out of feed sack bags. These thick woven cotton bags that could be purchased at markets or grocery stores were originally filled with grain and other dry foods that were fed to farm animals. Eventually, the feed companies caught on to the ladies’ creativity and gave the feed sack bags interesting, colorful patterns that dresses would look good in. Gannon explained that the red dress’s shorter length indicates that it is from 1940s, not the Great Depres-

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Clothing is utilitarian art. Although people don’t typically view fashion as art ... clothing acts as a representation of who you are. TRINA GANNON, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF THE DOXSEE COLLECTION

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sion, and that it was most likely worn by a woman who worked on a farm or garden because of the headscarf made to match the dress. Gannon is positive the piece was handmade out of feed sacks because of the various seams around the garment. When examined closely, little cars can be observed from the geometric pattern on the dress. Gannon points out that the concept of the print is similar to the Victorian era’s concept of conversation patterns. Whether it was a bird or intricate design, clothing at that time began to feature patterns to start conversations within circles of women who would get together for tea, for example. So even though this dress was made out of a humble fabric, it has its roots in a more romantic era. This one dress’s intricate story is the epitome of what the collection strives to provide to the Athens community and OU students: an understanding of fashion as a part of history. Selections from the collection have been featured at private showings and small public exhibits. Gannon said the collection recently moved to its Grover W319 location and is currently being sorted through and reorganized. After the massive organizational task is complete, all of the items will be photographed and archived on a website called Pass Perfect. The

program allows the public to search any type of garment or time period and view the pieces for research and education. In addition, Gannon hopes that when the Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education is re-modeled, the collection will have its own designated space for public viewing. A significant advantage to the collection is its universal appeal, with various styles and eras represented. Gannon said there is an extensive selection of female military uniforms from World War II, the Vietnam War and the Korean War that have been displayed before at private events and in Alden Library. There is also a range of OU-related apparel, much of which was once worn by prominent figures. Hanging on the clothing racks and stuffed in boxes are gowns formerly owned by first ladies MaryAnn Alden and Claire Ping as well as Ada O’Bleness’ 1906 white lace graduation outfit (a stark contrast to the cheap, massproduced polyester gowns OU students wear today). There is also a Marching 110 uniform from the 1960s and old wool graduation gowns. Dresses dominate the collection, with plenty of diversity in their origins and history. Against 1960s day suits and 1920s flapper dresses hangs a rare rufflesleeved, fire engine-red and

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A Closer Look –– FASHION FROM OU’S FORMER FIRST LADIES ––

GOWNS

MaryAnn Alden and Claire Ping

1906 GRADUATION OUTFIT

Ada O’Bleness Illustrations by KAITLYN RICHERT

black Saint Laurent gown, before the designer was referred to as Yves Saint Laurent, or YSL. There is also a wedding dress that doesn’t fit into today’s view of a typical bridal gown. The structured two-piece silk garment from 1904 is a muted mint green color with chiffon detailing on the collar and Jacquard weaving throughout the piece. A tag on the hanger indicates that the former owner was Geneva Shrock from Pottstown,

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PA. Gannon presumes Shrock was relatively wealthy because the garment’s silk is a high quality, expensive material. Gannon said that the custom of women wearing a white dress didn’t get its start until 1837, when Queen Victoria wore an all white wedding dress, but it wasn’t until the 1910s that the trend popularized enough that it became standard for brides to wear white. The pieces that have found their


home in this collection are more than just fashion statements to the people who work with them. “Everyone can relate to clothes,” said Gannon. “They spark emotional memories and are representative of the time period in which they were made. Whether you have prior information on clothing history and recognize the details, or simply think, ‘Oh that’s a really pretty dress; I like that,’ people can appreciate the collec-

tion on so many levels.” Until the Pass Perfect is up and running and a space that the gallery deserves is created, small selections from The Mary C. Doxsee Historical Costumes and Textile Collection will continue to make appearances throughout the community. During the entire month of March, a textiles gallery will be shown at the Athens County Public Library for all to engage, learn, appreciate and admire.

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Aa Bb C FTHE f Gg H Kk Ll M Oo Pp Q O Tt Uu V Yy Zz 1 2 3 4 5

AB

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c Dd Ee h Ii Jj Mm Nn q R r SS s OF FASHION v Ww Xx .,!? 6 7 8 9

BC By NADIA KURTZ

Illustrations by AMBER VINCENT

From the A-line skirt to zippers and everything in between, these are only a few terms employed in the fashion world. Thread has provided its very own fashion dictionary, so read on to become well-versed in the language of style.

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A

is for the A-LINE which looks much like its name suggests. Fitted at the waist, this skirt (or dress) widens at the bottom, creating the shape of an “A.” The A-line skirt was popularized in the ’50s by Yves Saint Laurent, and in the ’90s, the hemline rose to mid-thigh and became what is now the famous mini-skirt.

B C D E

is for BERET, and yes, it is French. Typically made from wool or felt, the soft round hat sits on top of the head and pulls an outfit together adding that perfect je ne sais quoi.

is for CROPPED PANTS, which are quickly replacing capris. Rather than ending mid-calf, cropped pants come just above the ankle and are usually narrowly tailored. They pair well with flat-soled shoes and fitted blazers, creating a good office look. Think Audrey Hepburn in “Funny Face.”

is for D’ORSAY PUMPS to show off the feet. The mid-section of the heeled shoe is cut out, revealing the arch of the foot.

is for EMERALD, the color of the year. The bright green hue makes a statement in jewelry, shoes and handbags, while symbolizing prosperity and energy.

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F G

is for FLATS, which give women the chance to flaunt their natural height. These shoes have completely flat soles with no heel. It is best to wear them with tights or panty hose, but definitely not socks.

is for GAUNTLETS in the warm and the cold. Extending above the wrist but below the elbow, these gloves are sometimes made with leather to shield hands from the cold. They can also be a decorative accessory when made of satin or silk.

H I

is for HIDDEN PLATFORM, one of high heels’ subtle tricks. Almost everyone wants extreme height, but sometimes platform shoes are overwhelming. The fabric on these shoes covers the platform and gives a more elegant illusion.

is for INTERMISSION-LENGTH DRESS, otherwise known as “High-Lo.” This means the hem is high in the front and low in the back, creating an asymmetric cut.

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J K

is for JABOT and making a statement with a decorative blouse. “Jabot” originally referred to an embellishment or ruffling attached to the collar of the shirt. Today it can mean any type of embellishment, including a cluster of jewels or decorative lace. is for KITTEN HEEL so as not to break one’s ankles. The Audrey Hepburn signature is a shoe with a heel that is between 1 to 2 inches tall. Their height of popularity began and ended in the 1950s, and they later evolved into the stiletto heel which is usually much higher.

L

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is for LAPEL, a necessity for dapper men. There are three types of lapels, which are the two flaps of cloth on the collar of a suit or sports coat. Notched lapels are more casual and commonly found on business suits and blazers, creating a sharp angle of cloth. The peaked lapels are normally on double-breasted jackets and the flaps point up. A shawl lapel is for formal wear and instead of being at an angle, the flaps create a continuous curve.

is for MAXI SKIRTS OR DRESSES that lengthen the legs. They fall all the way to the ground and are usually made of soft and flowing fabric. Since the fabric around the midsection is usually stretchy, maxi dresses were originally worn as maternity clothing, but they have evolved into a high-fashion trend.


N O P Q

is for the NATURAL WAIST DRESS which is made to fit the smallest portion of the mid-section. This style dress is meant to create the timeless “hourglass” shape and accentuate the waistline.

is for OVERSKIRT, and it isn’t as weird as it sounds. An overskirt is basically a bit of fabric that goes over top a skirt or dress, making it very similar to the peplum trend.

is for PEEK-A-BOO, or a cutout. A peek-a-boo is a type of garment that has fabric cut out, revealing the skin or other clothing underneath.

is for QUILTED PATTERN, typically seen on coats and bags. The pattern is formed by sewing two or more fabrics together creating a raised material usually in a diamond-shaped pattern. Since the fabric is usually very thick, quilted coats are wonderful for cold weather.

R

is for ROMPERS, otherwise known as stylish overalls. A romper is a garment that includes a shirt and shorts connected into one piece. A decade ago, rompers were mostly seen on children, but recently they became a cute, stylish and sometimes even fancy trend.

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S

is for SILHOUETTE, the shape created by an outfit. Some silhouettes will take the shape of the clothing style, while more fitted clothing will create a silhouette the shape of the body.

T

is for TEALENGTH SKIRT and maintaining a modest look. The tea length skirt falls somewhere below the knee and above the ankle. This length of skirt is appropriate for a variety of events ranging from weddings to the office.

U

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is for UTILITARIAN, which is singular in purpose. Utilitarian means a type of clothing or shoe that is meant solely for a functional purpose, such as warmth. It is definitely possible to stay warm and be fashionable, though, so many designers work on creating comfortable and stylish designs.


V W X Y

is for VELOUR and goes back to the ’70s. The fabric is similar to velvet and often used for the track suits that Jennifer Lopez and Paris Hilton were so fond of in the early 2000s.

is for the WEDDING-BAND COLLAR which is not just for wedding dresses. These types of collars hug the neck in a choker-like fashion, but connect to the rest of the shirt or dress with fabric. is for EXTREME FOOTWEAR and breaking ankles. Any shoe that is incredibly high and physically impossible to wear falls into this category.

Z

is for YOKE which is the fitted part of a shirt or dress. The yoke can come around the waist, creating a cinched effect and smaller waistline. It can also come around the neckline, with looser fabric hanging from it.

is for ZIPPERS. Although the functional accessory is obvious, it becomes fashionable in all the right places. Pants with zippers, dresses with zippers in the front and pockets sealed with zippers make them a complimentary accessory.

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stylebreak pg. 200

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measureup By DEVEN MIDDLETON Photos by KELLI OLIVER

F

or the past century, no article of clothing has represented power better than a tailored pair of pants. Just a couple of sexist decades ago, men were the only members of the family who could provide and who could — both figuratively, and literally — “wear the pants.” Though social norms and fashion have evolved ­— it’s now normal to see just as many women as men wearing pants and females are just as likely to be the main provider for a family — pants as a fashion piece are still primarily associated with men. For many men though, it seems that the power of a well-tailored pair of slacks has lost its importance. Don’t believe it? Just look at the number of guys walking on the street in overly-ripped jeans, baggy cargo pants or even worse, sweat pants. Chances are the number will easily exceed double digits. Luckily, it only takes a few easy steps to figure out how to finally find that special pair of pants that can showcase men’s juiciest attributes and personal style.

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COMMON MISTAKES The measurements have been taken and the types of fit have been studied, but there are still so many ways to go wrong when purchasing that great pair of pants. As noted, tailored pants are not sweat pants, so wearing them so baggy that they do double duty as a wind tunnel is typically frowned upon. On the other end of the spectrum, pants are not the same as leggings, and wearing them just as tight could slow the national birth rate. A new pair of pants should also look new. Ripped jeans, frayed hems, or paint-splattered pants off the rack usually look as authentic as Britney’s latest weave. Let natural wear and tear add rips and snags to clothes, not a manufacturer.

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TYPES OF FIT After finding the perfect size, it’s time to move on to the ideal fit. To boot cut or not to boot cut, that is the question. For a skinnier frame, skinny or slim straight is the best path. Though both sit low at the waist, skinny hugs the thigh tighter and has a smaller opening at the end for a more fitted look. For a stockier build — soccer players, here’s looking at you — a straight or boot cut pant is the answer. Straight will again sit low on the waist and have just a little more breathing room than slim straight. Boot cut, on the other hand, will sit on the waist and drape all the way down. Be careful; boot cut can sometimes look baggy, and though 10 years ago this might have gotten all the Jennys from the block, today baggy jeans are scaring them all away.

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HOW TO MEASURE When it comes to a man’s bottom half, there are two crucial numbers to look for. No matter what kind of pants: jeans, cargo, etc., waist and length measurements are needed. For waist — repeat waist, not lower butt — wrap a string around the area slightly above the hipbone. Then, lay the measured string against a tape measure to find that magic number. For length, or inseam, start at the bottom of the crotch and measure to where the pants should end. Keep in mind though, if the string goes above the ankle, a senior discount may be offered at restaurants and stores. Beware of going too far and measuring past the shoes.

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internwear By BENTLEY WEISEL Photos by KATE IRBY

W

hether your dream job or internship is on Wall Street or in Los Angeles or a small business in your hometown, what you wear to an interview is crucial. Don’t feel obligated to shy away from red lips, a bright blazer or a statement necklace; just avoid doing all of these things at once. Simplistic tendencies and the “less is more” concept come in handy when planning the perfect interview outfit. The biggest thing to remember when interviewing is to know who you are interviewing for, where you are interviewing and what the position requires. Your outfit will be circumstantial depending on the position you are applying for and what type of field it is. Never underestimate the power of the perfect outfit, even when it comes to interview dress; wear something that makes you feel your best.

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UNIVERSAL DOS AND DON’TS

Though every job or internship position is different, there are some things that are always acceptable and some things that a person should never wear to a professional interview. Keeping these key rules in mind can make picking out an interview outfit a breeze, leaving more time to prepare a polished resume or portfolio.

DO...

DON’T...

TOP Investing in a quality suit is the first step to building a professional wardrobe when entering the professional world. However, if you are going for a more creative position, finding the compromise between professional and fashionable is always a challenge. Stocking up on blazers in various styles and colors is convenient and provides you with interchangeable pieces to wear with dress shirts or shift dresses. Sandhya Kambhampati, an Ohio University junior studying broadcast journalism, has held more than five internships during her time at OU. Her most recent position was at CNN Newsource in Atlanta last summer. She also holds multiple positions on campus that require professional dress. She has experienced a variety of interviews and knows some key tips to looking great, being taken seriously and nabbing that dream job. She recommends finding a brand and style of shirt that works for your figure and buying multiple in different colors. “I have so many of the same shirt but in a bunch of colors,” she said.

“I stick with pastels and sometimes subtle patterns, but try to avoid wearing really bright colored shirts. I don’t want my outfit to scream at the person interviewing me. Another thing to factor in is what colors work with your skin.” Although avoiding distracting colors and crazy patterns is a key to creating the perfect internship wardrobe, don’t be afraid to play up your personal style. Not all internships require subdued suits and minimal makeup, so after acing the interview, find out about the office’s unofficial dress code. Kate Hoselton, an OU junior studying health care administration, is a member of a business fraternitiy on campus where she has learned everything about interviewing with an emphasis on the outfit. Because she will enter the business field, she is encouraged to stay basic and wear black suits for interviews. Being aware of what the typical outfit requirements are for different fields, can help keep interview anxiety at bay. Shopping at outlet malls or stores, looking for sales or sticking to cheaper places is key to looking professional, but also helps with staying on budget.

wear a suit and/or blazer stay simple and not trendy wear natural makeup wear your hair natural, but keep it tamed if you’re going to wear open-toed shoes, make sure your toes are neatly pedicured be clean, ironed and groomed

wear tennis shoes wear jeans, especially ones with holes have chipped nail polish on wear something you will have to fidget with or adjust wear anything low cut, tight or short wear bright colors

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BOTTOM

Dress pants, skirts and dresses are all appropriate options for an interview if they follow the “Universal Dos and Don’ts.” Some things to keep in mind with dress pants are length, fit and fabric. Hoselton finds that dress pants and suit pants must be specifically designated to be worn with flats or heels. “It’s practically impossible to find a pant length that works with both flats and heels. It looks unprofessional if your pants are too long or too short, so I end up deeming them as pants that must be worn with heels or must be worn with flats,” she said. The fit should naturally shape your body, but not be too tight or too loose. An unfortunate reality for women in the professional world is that loose professional clothing looks cheap and unflattering. Try to find the best fitted bottoms or get them tailored to perfection. Fabric is another key factor in professional attire. Buying inexpensive dress clothing from Forever 21 and H&M is an economical and fashionable option, but pay attention to what the pieces are made of. The fit and fabric rule can also apply to dresses and skirts. Whether you are attempting to show the interviewer or boss personal style, professionalism or both, being appropriate will never go unnoticed. 188 | THREAD


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HAIR

Hair should be tamed and clean, but also natural. If you are a fidgeter, stroker or hair-puller, wear your hair up or out of reach to maintain the professional tone of the interview, and keep your habit at bay.

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ACCESSORIES Jewelry should be limited and classic. You want the interviewer to focus on you and your abilities, not be distracted by a plethora of pieces. If you want to show personality or your personal style through jewelry, find one key accessory and leave it at that. Keep the loud, jangly bangles at home and opt for a sleek and stylish watch to adorn one wrist.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2013-2014 EXECUTIVE BOARD

EDITOR IN CHIEF Bentley Weisel

MANAGING EDITOR Brooke Bunce

SEAMS EDITOR DESIGN EDITOR Colleen Kratofil Rachel Keaveny

DIY EDITOR PHOTO CHIEF Rachel Haas Michael Maurer

WHO WHAT WEAR EDITOR PHOTO EDITOR Rachel Sayers Audrey Kelly

COPY CHIEF VIDEO CHIEF Nadia Kurtz Michael Mytnick

PUBLIC RELATIONS CHIEF CREATIVE DIRECTOR Megan Valentine Gretchen Greenlee

BUSINESS MANAGER Sydney Cologie

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fiercefemales By MORGAN BORER

Illustration by RACHEL KEAVENY

By MORGAN BORER Illustration by RACHEL KEAVENY

L

ove them or hate them: fashion icons rule the style world. They reign over the runways. They direct some of the biggest companies in fashion. They might even rule our closets and wardrobes. Throughout the decades, a handful of renowned designers, models and celebrities have influenced the way ordinary American women dress and think about fashion. Many of these superstars have been crowned “icons� because they broke the style mold of their time period and were fearless pioneers of new inventions and ideas. Among these fierce women are Coco Chanel, Twiggy, Anna Wintour, Grace Coddington, and Princess Diana.

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COCO CHANEL

In late 1883, Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel was born in Samur, France. Storming onto the fashion scene in France around age 20, she changed her name to Coco Chanel and opened her first shop in Paris. During the post-war period of the 1920s, Chanel revolutionized women’s clothing as she introduced simple, practical designs made for comfort and movement. She freed women of corsets and petticoats, which were popular at the time. Chanel once said, “Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only,” which is a sentiment her designs stayed true to. She introduced trousers and suits for women, as well as the collarless cardigan jacket. Her signature Chanel No. 5 scent remains wildly popular and her quilted handbags furnished with chain straps are a mainstay of society’s elite. Chanel’s greatest contribution, however, was the invention of the little black dress, which she often paired with endless strands of pearls. Her company, currently under the direction of Karl Lagerfeld, continues to thrive today.

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TWIGGY

Decades later, another icon was born: Twiggy. Known today for her judging appearances on “America’s Next Top Model,” Twiggy began modeling at the ripe age of 16. She quickly became the world’s first supermodel and was a poster child for teenage fashion in the ’60s. Photographers fell in love with her barely-there figure, gorgeous wide eyes and striking eyelashes. Her daring, boyish haircut represented the carefree vibe of London in the 1960s. Popular photographs capture Twiggy in Peter Pan collars, T-strap flats and shift dresses, the epitome of the mod style. Today, her hair and makeup is often copied, as celebs including Anne Hathaway and Miley Cyrus have adopted her “pixie” haircut, just another indication that her importance has had a lasting impact.

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GRACE CODDINGTON

Another pioneer of the radical ’60s was Grace Coddington. Coddington was no cookie-cutter British model; her ghostly skin and geometric orange perm set her apart in the fashion industry from day one. Though she made a name for herself quickly, her modeling career was short-lived because of a car accident, which sliced off part of her eyelid. After extensive plastic surgery, and a brief return to modeling, she began working with British Vogue in the ’60s, and later became the creative director of Calvin Klein. She moved to American Vogue in 1988 and has taken the reins as the acclaimed magazine’s fashion director. Coddington represents the simplistic, no fuss, down-to-Earth girl, but has styled some of Vogue’s photo shoots that are most well known and that have had the most impact. Her decades of experience with Vogue and the fashion industry confirm her icon status.

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ANNA WINTOUR

Coddington’s superior, Anna Wintour, the Editor-in-Chief of Vogue, has guarded the publication with her life since 1988. Wintour’s signature look includes her straight bob, oversized dark sunglasses, heels and surly expression. And her love of fur and chunky necklaces is known throughout the style world. She fearlessly covered new ground in the industry, as she was the first to combine low-end fashion with expensive pieces in photo shoots. She also pioneered the switch to featuring celebrities, rather than supermodels, on the covers of magazines. As a woman who wore heels and Chanel suits throughout her pregnancy, it’s safe to say Wintour is committed to maintaining her diva status no matter what. Driven, competitive and merciless, Wintour and her empire continue to reign over the sartorial sector.

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PRINCESS DIANA

In the ’80s, Princess Diana made headlines not only for her philanthropic work and charity, but also for her unerring sense of style. Her wedding dress in 1981 included a 25 foot train — the longest in royal wedding history — that was the talk of the style world. One month later, she graced the cover of Vogue wearing nothing but diamonds, looking every bit the picture of grace. The always-sophisticated Diana wore suits and matching floral skirts and blouses during the day, and rocked sequin gowns at her evening events. Her style was a combination of preppy and tailored structure. The Princess of Wales was even spotted wearing a peplum skirt at a Polo Club in 1986. Though she may not have been a fashion model, designer or editor, like so many other iconic women of style, Diana’s fashion undoubtedly influenced a generation of women throughout the world. 198 | THREAD


thread join

MAGAZINE

WRITERS COPY EDITORS PHOTOGRAPHERS DESIGNERS STYLISTS MODELS PUBLIC RELATIONS ADVERTISING MEETINGS: WEDNESDAY NIGHTS at 9pm SCRIPPS 111

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stylebreak By ALEXIS EVANS Photos by AARON ZAKE | Illustrations by CATIE PETERSON

T

he plans have been made months in advance. Flights have been booked, road trips mapped, hotels acquired and base tans started. All in preparation for the sacred week-long hiatus from school, work and, hopefully, crappy weather. This magical week has spawned movies, wet T-shirt contests and is rarely taken lightly. Sunblock isn’t the only item you’ll regret not bringing on a spring break trip so before you pack your bags, check out this list of essentials.

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OUTFIT

As far as outfits are concerned, the perfect sundress is essential. A simple dress can act as a swimsuit cover-up after a day at the beach, and with the help of some key accessories, can transform into a showstopper at the clubs. Opt for a printed maxi or a modern kaftan that can transition smoothly from day to night.

SWIMSUIT

Keeping up with a New Year’s resolution to get fit can be challenging especially when burritos are oh-so tempting. No worries though; embrace Lena Dunham’s self love (minus the incessant nudity) and rock a swimsuit that makes you feel comfortable. For a beach bunny vixen, metallics and pieces with cutouts offer up a subtle seductiveness. If fun and flirty is more your style try vibrant colors or ruffles.

SHOES

Ditch the boots and revive those sun-starved toes with a fresh pedicure to match a rockin’ pair of sandals. Anyone can throw on a crusty pair of flip-flops, but dare to challenge the status quo with a pair of colorblocked sandals. These will instantly add a splash of sass to your spring break style. Combine this colorful trend with a ’70s inspired platform or wedge heel and prepare for your sandals to turn heads. 202 | THREAD


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COCKTAILS

Take a break from the Bud Light Limes and experiment with a beachy, yet peachy Bay Breeze. This simple and delicious drink combines the fruity flavor of ABSOLUT Apeach Vodka with refreshing cranberry and pineapple juice with a lime to garnish. Malibu Coconut Rum is also a great alternative that provides the same tropical taste. For those who haven’t yet reached their 21st year of life, a great virgin alternative is a Miami Vice. This icy concoction of half piña colada mix and half strawberry daiquiri mix will taste delicious, minus the buzz.

ENTERTAINMENT

After a day of planned excursions, some downtime is a must and a good page-turner can make all the difference. Delve into something exotic and new, rather than relying on the predictability of a Nicholas Sparks’ novel. Herman Koch’s international bestseller The Dinner renders a dark suspense novel that turns two couples’ simple meal into an awkward dance around their children’s horrific crime.

BEAUTY

The beach is known for waves and not just the water ones. Boogie boarding for hours can give a Blake Lively-esque effect to wavy hair, so embrace the natural. The extra room from leaving flat irons and curling irons at home means more room for souvenirs anyway. The same goes for makeup. Let a good tan do most of the work for you and pick products with multiple purposes like a lip stain that can be used for blush and a cream highlighter that can be used to liven up the eyes. 204 | THREAD


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empoweredwomen By COLLEEN KRATOFIL

A

Photos PROVIDED

s everyone else was busy watching and incessantly quoting dialogue from “Bridesmaids” last year, legendary fashion designer Norma Kamali was getting a dash of inspiration to begin her campaign “Stop Objectification.” Most people probably laughed their way through John Hamm’s character Ted’s ridiculously arrogant comments and actions toward Kristen Wiig’s character Annie, but did anyone take the time to think seriously about the way he actually treated her and her body? In society, it’s become an acceptable behavior for men to act in chauvinistic ways toward women, and Kamali realized she needed to make a change. Last fall Kamali created the website, stopobjectification.com and the short video, “Hey Baby” to kick-start

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her movement. The video is her way of showing what the male eye sees when he looks at a woman. She uses the phrase “hey baby” throughout the clip to show how annoying it is for a woman to constantly hear it day in and day out. On the website, she encourages women to take a photo of their favorite body part and write an ‘empowerment statement.’ She wants women to proclaim why they’re proud of themselves and explain what makes them more than just a body part. “When you can take action and turn the tables on something, it’s empowering, and it starts a rollercoaster of empowerment,” Kumali said in an interview with Teen Vogue. In the interview she makes it clear that men’s attention and appreciation is more than OK; she just wants “to


in good fashion

define the difference between respect and appreciation.” She encourages women to sit down and talk about this problem because they frequently don’t realize how their comments hurt women. For problems arising in the workplace, she advises to talk through the problem. She suggests telling the man, "I don’t mean to be rude, but I really feel uncomfortable with what you’re saying to me." This protects self-esteem and body image, which in the end, comes before any job worth having. In an interview with refinery29.com she explained she believes having women share their stories with one another “opens the floodgates of experiences.” Having conversations about objectification is what she calls “an emotional cleansing,” because some don’t realize the moments

they’ve been objectified until they have a conversation about it. “The most important thing I learned was objectification is the root cause of self-esteem and image issues for women, and it’s one experience all women around the world share. We want to be careful not to police male behavior but to simply bring awareness. Awareness is meant for both men and women,” she told refinery29.com. As the innovative designer behind the sleeping bag coat, packable, multi-use clothing and Farah Fawcett’s legendary 1976 red bathing suit, Kamali confronted the skepticism some have about her ability to talk about objectification while she’s made a living designing risqué swimwear. She told refinery29.com,“It clearly is not the clothing, but the attitude and the image of the women in the clothing."

}

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shortshorts Rant

By LOUIS BARAGONA

A

ah, the sweet smell of romance in the air. Oh wait, that’s just Nair. Who wears short shorts? Hopefully not your boyfriend. During the sweatier months of June, July and August, men have been cooling down and showing off their gams (or in some cases hams) in short shorts. Whether it’s a frat boy who shops the Chubbies — a brand of mini-short marketed directly for bros — website, or a grandfather exposing his knobby knees for the first time in years, it is very difficult to find a man in skimpy shorts at all attractive. 
 I understand that the weather may be unbearably hot, but really how warm can your upper thighs be? Throw on a pair of basketball shorts and you’ll be just as refreshed and even more masculine than you would have been in your revealing bottoms that seem to be only inches away from Speedo territory — a bridge no man should cross. Short shorts require a level of maintenance that most men are not capable of accomplishing. Females are known to spend large amounts of time shaving, applying lotion and tanning their legs just for short-short season. The most work the average man puts into summer-time fashion is buying a new package of Hanes tank tops. If your man aspires to dress like Daisy Duke then it just might be a sign you need to buy him an industrial sized package of Nair and walk out the door with your dignity intact. No season is steamy enough for him to look hot in a modern day loincloth.

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Rave

By CORTTANY BROOKS

I

tion by Illustra O

A LONG

MIKAEL

n today’s world, men are becoming trendier by the day, and with that change, their shorts are getting shorter — finally! With classy dress taking reign all over college campuses — not just at the fraternity houses, as some might argue — these stylish bottoms are making a comeback, and who doesn’t love a good comeback story? This trend should get men out of the dreaded cargo shorts and baggy varsities more suited for the basketball court. These unstylish and far too long shorts have been dubbed by Chubbies’ website as “the only proven form of contraception that is 100 percent effective.” I see no room for argument there. Men who have the courage and panache to rock a pair of short shorts not only give the ladies something to look at, but less stylish men something to strive towards. Insinuating that higher hemlines immediately call to mind feminine allures is a far cry from the truth. Until Michael Jordan’s generation made long shorts cool, short shorts were the epitome of the everyday “American Man.” These shorter styles combined with striking colors and designs were the signature of the 20th century guy — vibrant, confident and brave enough to embrace a sense of style. So why not bring that same style vibe to the closets of all modern young American men. Take it or leave it: around here, this radical rewind with a twist has women and men alike saying, “Don’t be shy, show off some thigh!”

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EMERALD CITY Wednesday, February 27th JBar | 9 pm | 21+ Specialty drinks

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March 2013  
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