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MAY 2014

6

LOOKS WE LIKE:

SWIM WEAR

DENIM ALL OVER

BRAZILIAN BLOWOUT:

REVIVE YOUR HAIR

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6 Looks We Like

Pieces of Louise

Les Chapeaux

Retro Recess

The Last Frontier

Cover photo by AUDREY KELLY

tableofcontents


MAY

2014

E SCENES BEHIND TH

Haute Online Top 5 Editor’s Note

IKE

EL W S K O O L 6

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Runway Realway Celeb Style Street Peeps Column: Duly Noted Elevated Style Classic Specs Inter Twined Man Handled Denim Revival Gym Savvy

diy DIY Wow Factor DIY Fired Up DIY Green House DIY Make It NEW! DIY Work It: HIIT

MES

KEVIN JA Video by

who, what, wear Shear Genius Printing Fashion Ramble On High Fashion

spotlight style Dressed Up Dilemma Behind the Blowout

back of the closet Switch Gears Stars Align Soleful Remedies Runway Our Way The Ridges Revisited Rant / Rave

in good fashion Toxic Beauty WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 3


hauteonline FLASHES OF STYLE Nestled in the fashion hotspot of New York City is fashionista Bonnie Barton, owner of the blog Flashes of Style. She has combined fashion, travel, beauty, and an exuberant lifestyle into one amazing source of content. Barton is “vintage loving, and always finding beauty in everything.” Beautiful, creative shots of New York along with Barton’s vintage-y and somewhat bohemian style are what followers of Flashes of Style see on a daily basis. She is almost always sporting a vivid-red lip and light-pink blush, making her retro look much more believable.

TRAVEL

Among fashion and beauty, Flashes of Style also highlights Barton’s travels. Her trips to places like Mexico are documented by bundles of posts that describe her experiences abroad. Her passion for traveling can be seen through her Mexican photoshoots, which radiate heat and relaxation.

FASHION

Barton focuses her posts on her classical fashion and style. Her photoshoots and outfits are perfect for her New York lifestyle. Her flawless execution entices her readers to follow her to find out what she’ll be wearing next. —MEGAN LAIRD 4 | THREAD


300 SANDWICHES Seeing the name of this food blog, there is immediate intrigue. When one actually reads what this concept is all about, every reader is slightly confused.

THE GOAL

This NYC woman has been spending the last 200 plus days making her boyfriend, “E,” all types of sandwiches. The end goal: an engagement ring. However archaic this idea sounds, this Brooklyn writer took a “dated” idea and turned it into a culinary masterpiece.

THE SANDWICHES

Whether it’s a scrambled egg, candied bacon, and parmesan breakfast sandwich or a cornbread chicken and waffle stacker, this girl has mad ‘wich skills.

THE BEST PART

She is transforming the idea of making your man a sandwich into something empowering. At approximately 250 sandwiches she is close to the finish line. She pairs each sandwich recipe with a small anecdote of the experience. Will E propose to his kickass girlfriend? Will she continue to make sandwiches? I see a cookbook in her future, and I’m buying it. —BENTLEY WEISEL WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 5


HE SPOKE STYLE Men’s fashion blogs are difficult to come by, especially ones that focus on grooming techniques as well as style. Brian Sacawe, author and creative director for He Spoke Style, has made a living doing things that he loves like inspiring people with his fashion, grooming, and lifestyle advice. With the recent release of his newsletter, He Spoke Style: Volume One Sacawe is allowing his readers to “see more, read more, and shop the look.”

STYLE

Visit He Spoke Style to find inspiration for fashionable looks, whether for men or women. Sacawe posts photos and small blurbs about how to pull off certain trends, such as how to wear the color cobalt, as well as advice on keeping a simple style. He Spoke Style is user-friendly, making it a go-to blog for anyone interested in men’s fashion.

GROOMING

Sacawe’s posts include videos as well as photos on grooming techniques that he deems essential. From a video showing how to achieve his iconic haircut, to photos of products with links on where to find them; this blog provides men with the perfect stepping stone to spot-on grooming. Sacawe also includes a post on travel essentials like a Dopp Kit, which contains everything from daily grooming products to “just-in-case items.” —ALICIA MACDONALD 6 | THREAD


THE KITCHY KITCHEN LA-born food enthusiast Claire Thomas is the inspiring blogger behind The Kitchy Kitchen. Doubling as a commercial director and food photographer, her blog radiates with refreshing ideas and impeccable taste. The Kitchy Kitchen offers everything from delicious recipes to step-by-step cooking videos, plus everyday advice on cute collectibles and DIY crafts. When she’s not hosting on Food For Thought or working on her very own cookbook, she uses her blog as an “experimental playground.”

10 SECOND LIVING

After years of teaching herself how to cook, Claire decided to use what she had learned to help those in need of guidance. Her YouTube series, “10 Second Living,” is a collection of web videos shot in her kitchen. They shed light on how to prep for a meal before cooking it— all in 10 seconds or less.

RECIPES

She provides recipes suited to satisfy everyday cravings. Filled with easy, finger-licking recipes, the dishes are reflective of the blog’s simplistic personality. — PERRI CAMELLA WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 7


TOP

5 SKATER SKIRTS | Whether it’s a

chilly evening or a sunny day, my go-to wardrobe piece is the skater skirt. The flared design can easily be paired with a simple tee for a casual shopping day or dressed up with a blouse for a date night. Feeling edgy? Wear a leather skirt. Feeling garden party chic? Try a floral print. The fabrics and prints are endless, making the skater skirt work for any occasion. This versatile obsession is a staple in my closet to give my outfits a whole new dimension. I normally keep it simple and dainty with my skater skirts, but I know I have the power and the option to be fierce if needed. —ALI SHULTZ 8 | THREAD


RAW GEMSTONE JEWELRY | Spring

fever is in full bloom, and I find myself fantasizing over all the spring inspired fashions on my favorite time wasting websites like Pinterest and Etsy. My favorite trend I will start incorporating into my spring wardrobe is raw gemstone jewelry. The raw gemstones show off the beauty nature can create and add a free spirit vibe to any style. Accenting the gemstones with metallic fixings helps give a great antique look to the jewelry. The natural colors allow you to flawlessly pair the jewelry with any outfit. Raw gemstone jewelry will be an easy addition to anyone’s jewelry box to instantly update their spring wardrobe. —CASSEY ECK

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SARAH JESSICA PARKER’S SHOE COLLECTION Public Service Announcement to all Sex and the City enthusiasts: the always fabulous Sarah Jessica Parker has released a new collection of shoes called SPJ by Sarah Jessica Parker. The stiletto queen teamed up with Manolo Blahnik’s chief executive, George Malkemus, to create the line for Nordstrom, which became available online and in-stores on February 28. In addition to shoes, the collection features an array of colorful clutches, which she deems “little pieces of candy,” as well as shoulder bags and outerwear. The shoes are handmade in Italy (would one expect anything less?) and sell for a pretty penny. I’m drooling over the ‘Diana’ pump, named after Lady Diana. Classic, sexy, timeless- these shoes are made for walkin’.

—MORGAN BORER


RIESLING | There really isn’t

anything much sweeter in life than sitting on your front porch, drinking a crisp, chilled glass of wine while enjoying beautiful weather. The perfect wine to pair with this joyous hypothetical is Riesling, a semi-sweet white originating from Germany. Its crisp apple undertones and floral aroma make it the perfect spring and summer drink. What makes this wine so special is that the Riesling grape is barely in the barrel, making the flavor of the wine almost identical to the flavor of the grape itself. Whether you are having a casual drink with friends or eating any type of cuisine, Riesling is the perfect pairing. Needless to say, I am wholeheartedly a wine-o and think Riesling is a great place to stSPart this spring and summer. Indulge responsibly. — KELLY GIFFORD WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 11


FREAKS AND GEEKS | Anyone who

knows me is aware that I’m obsessed with television shows from the 1990s. My most recent finding was the show Freaks and Geeks, which follows two groups of teenagers attending high school in the 1980s. The Geeks consists of Sam and friends, all freshman trying to understand the pressures and pecking orders of high school life. From wearing a Parisian night suit on the first day, to auditioning to be the school mascot, the show follows the Geeks as they try and find their place. The Freaks on the other hand are a group of upperclassmen that are outcasts, mostly seen as the “cool kids.” Skipping class and making smart-mouth comments define this group. Although its run time was cut short in 2000, Freaks and Geeks was the starting point for actors like James Franco and Seth Rogen. Not only is this show bound to make you laugh at its comedic relief, but the retro style of the characters is anything but dull. ­­—ALICIA MACDONALD

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people to work with, I proceeded with ordering large shipments of Shea butter, pigments, dyes, butters, and oils,” said Mumford. Then if she doesn't already have a recipe made up, it's just a process of tedious measuring and trial and error until she gets something that she likes and that she can trust. “If it's reminiscent to what my grandma used to make, then I know I'm on the HTTP://VIMEO.COM/THREADMAG right track,” said Mumford. She then pours the aromatic mixtures into molds purchased off the Internet and lets it harden before finally placing it into its packaging. “The first go around I was making everything,” said Mumford. “I went to the craft store and bought plain cardboard paper and printed out my own logo and cut them into boxes and put my lipstick inside of them. I still print WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 13


EDITOR’S NOTE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

bentley weisel Hey Lovely Threadies! WARNING: This note is about to get sappy, maybe even slightly cliché. Please proceed with caution. Truth be told, writing my final Editor’s Note for the last issue of Thread is difficult. It’s not hard because I fear the next step for Thread, it’s because this publication has been a huge part of my life, and my fellow exec members’ lives, the last four years. I have had many late nights editing, I have obsessed over the smallest details, and even suffered several sicknesses for Thread—I would not change a thing about it though. I feel that Thread has grown and evolved immensely this year through new sections, positions, and our first fashion week. I know I am incredibly fortunate to have been part of it all, and even more lucky to get to call my fellow execs friends at the end of this. Thread’s exec board this year has pushed boundaries and allowed the magazine to be seen on a new level. With a new website and host, Thread is set up for success for years to come. I am sad to say goodbye, but I know I am leaving things in more than capable hands that will nurture Thread into even more success. Speaking of success, Thread’s May issue is packed with content to get everyone excited for our favorite trends and fashions as of late. Thread highlights swimwear for men and women 14 | THREAD

in 6 Looks We Like (p 150), takes a trip to the 80s in our Retro Recess photo shoot (p 116), and shows the benefits of splurging for a Brazilian Blowout to revive winter hair (p 164). Thread also features Kendall Jenner and Pharrell in Celeb Style (p 22), how to tune up your style and workout gear after the winter weather (p 174), and what to do with those old beer bottles and matches left in your apartment (p 62 ). Best of luck to the future of Thread— you will all do wonderful things. As always—much love and fashion, Bentley Weisel


thread

MAY2014

Editor-in-Chief Bentley Weisel Managing Editor Brooke Bunce seams editor Colleen Kratofil

business manager Sydney Cologie

who what wear editor Kelly Gifford

photo chief Michael Maurer

diy editor Rachel Haas

photo editor Audrey Kelly

features editor Nadia Kurtz

video chief Joe Lalonde

copy chief Louis Baragona

creative director Gretchen Greenlee

public relations chief Morgan Borer

web editor Jordan Wilson

design editor Rachel Keaveny WRITERS

Rebekah Barnes, Kayla Blanton, Natalie Bigler, Sophia Borghese, Corttany Brooks, Michelle Frantz, Aaren Host, Holly Li, Alicia MacDonald, Deven Middleton, Courtney Mihocik, Katie Pittman, Nick Rees, Michelle Sebastian, Camille Rose Smith, Taylor Stano, Alex Warner | BLOGGERS: Rebekah Barnes, Anna Bekavac, Megan Fair, Deven Middleton, Gina Rokakis | EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: Holly Li and Katie Pittman

COPY EDITORS

Morgan Borer, Cassie Fait, Michelle Frantz, Jenna Guyot, Alicia MacDonald, Ali Shultz

PHOTOGRAPHERS PHOTO CHIEF'S ASSISTANT: KIRSTEN MARTINEZ | PHOTO EDITOR'S ASSISTANT: MEGHAN SHAMBLEN

Leo L. Allen, Erica Brechtelsbaurer, Kasey Brooks, Alicia Carter, David Creighton, Kara Frisina, Kara Guyton, Kaitlin Hatton, Elizabeth Held, Kelli Oliver, Halee Smith, Kaitlynn Stone, Rachel Wagner, Kyra Willner, Leah Woodruff

DESIGNERS DESIGN ASSISTANT: ALEXA HAYES

Sarah Blankenship, Jillian Bloemer, Kaitlin Bucaro, Alex Doherty, Cassie Fait, Ina Grozeva, Alexa Hayes, Dempsey Murphy, Kaitlyn Richert, Emily Wolfe

STYLISTS | CREATIVE ASSISTANT: CASSEY ECK

Sophia Borghese, Taylor Von Doersten, Taylor McCarthy, Deven Middleton, Jena Tekavec

PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM Jenna Guyot, Kaylee Powers

VIDEOGRAPHERS

Elizabeth Held, Kevin James, Joe Lalonde, Julia Leiby

MODELS

Eric Bishop, Harold Bon, Scott Brendamour, Erin Casey, Flannery Chapman, Lloyd Furuta, Rachel Haas, Hannah Haseman, Sydney Joslin-Knapp, Kaitlyn Joy, Ross Lockhart , Evan Lubinger , Alicia McGuire, Bianca Milia, Jordyn Riley, Brad Stimson, Ryant Taylor, Will Venema , Brenna Vitou, Becky Wagner , Mariah West, Jessica Woods, Emma Wright, Donald Wymer

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seams denimrevival pg. 44

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runwayrealway PUCCI By JESSICA MOYER | Photos by KATE STONE

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he looks from Emilio Pucci’s Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear collection reflect the styles of celebrities such as Beyoncé, Rihanna, and Cara Delevingne by featuring both tight and short dresses as well as casual and baggy pieces that evoke a sporty vibe. Models strutted down the runway in bold tribal prints. According to Women’s Wear Daily, this was inspired by head designer Peter Dundas’ trip to Morocco. These printed pieces were adorned with details from statement belts to harem pant silhouettes. The statement belt was an accessory that played a prominent role throughout the collection. Cinching flowy blouses, loose pants, and airy dresses emphasized a small waist when paired with crop tops and provided structure to every look. Crop tops and athletic wear were two other trends that Pucci utilized throughout the collection. Structured jackets and printed mini skirts were paired with crop tops, while perforated leather and neoprene fabrics created an athletic, hip hop feel. Other looks included a chic, luxurious gym short and zip-up hoodie. Pucci Spring 2014 RTW is a collection that calls upon rock star styles to create a daring look that makes any woman stand out. Embrace your inner celebrity, show a little more skin, walk with a little more attitude, and take to the streets channeling Pucci.

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PAUL AND JOE By NATALIE BIGLER | Photos by KATE STONE

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triking patterns filled with birds, tigers, giraffes, zebras, and horses illustrate the liveliness of Paul and Joe’s Spring 2014 menswear collection. The mixing and matching of patterns and colors succeeds in taking us on a wild journey to the exotic land of Madagascar. The collection’s name, “A Cruise from Le Havre to Madagascar,” isn’t exactly subtle and neither is the collection itself. What appears to be a floral print is actually a myriad of wild animals intertwined in a paisley pattern. The use of bright colors, such as red, yellow, and blue make it so no man is overlooked, but instead noticed for his eccentric style. Sophie Albou, designer of Paul and Joe, took a risk by combining different colors and graphics. Overall, the majority of the collection featured a collared shirt tucked into khaki shorts, styled with a trench coat and pair of leather sandals. A standout piece this spring was short-shorts. Bringing back the revealing bottoms of the ’70s with a twist of the exuberant patterns of animals makes risktaking the main theme of the collection. “A Cruise from Le Havre to Madagascar” is filled with adventurous patterns and bright colors that bring forth a sense of daring exploration. Anyone who relishes in standing out is sure to be inspired.

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celebstyle PHARRELL By MICHELLE SEBASTIAN | Photos by LEO LOVELL A.

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he man who knows what being “happy” truly means is also very much in tune with what it means to have an exclusive style. Already a musical sensation, Pharrell, has marked the fashion industry with touches of his panache—shorts at the Oscars and a hat reminiscent of the Arby’s logo at the Grammys have definitely made him a red carpet style risk-taker. Pharrell emulates an effortless vibe through very simple pieces, but as a whole, he shows a definitive type of expression. He generally outlines his look with a suit or jacket and wears a simple tee underneath. Then he adds an interesting element such as a camouflage jacket or an infamous array of hats. Everyone knows his signature—the “mountain” hat from the Grammys. With its higher inner part and flat rimmed outer sides, it’s known as the “five-story fedora” or the “Arby’s hat.” As social media erupted with haters, lovers, and even the hat’s own Twitter account, a great deal of good came from his fashion choice. Arby’s bought Pharrell’s original hat for $44,100, which was donated to Pharrell’s charity, From One Hand to AnOTHER. Pharrell’s style contains the keynote pieces that make his look distinguished and irreplaceable and he also loves to break conventional style rules at award shows. Not only have Pharrell’s musical talents brought him to the forefront this year, but his personal style will keep him in the spotlight for years to come.

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KENDALL JENNER By KATIE PITTMAN | Photos by MICHAEL MAURER

K

endall Jenner is experiencing the life many teenage girls dream of living. At 18 years old, she has already walked in major fashion shows like Marc Jacobs, Givenchy, and Chanel. Jenner, known for her appearances as the Kardashian’s half-sister on Keeping Up with the Kardashians, has shed her reality show roots and come into the fashion limelight. Jenner was practically unrecognizable as she blended in with the pros on the most coveted runways, during the Spring 2014 shows. During the Marc Jacobs runway show in New York, many found Jenner to look completely unfamiliar. A wig cut with a blunt bob, bleached eyebrows, and nude makeup completely changed her look from her go-to dark long hair and minimal makeup. She modeled a sheer brown sweater, cropped riding pants, and ankle boots. Wearing a striped holographic coat, shiny purple leggings, and carrying a shopping basket, Jenner graced the supermarket-themed Chanel runway during Paris Fashion Week. Walking alongside established model Cara Delevingne and up-andcoming models Liu Wen and Edie Campbell, it’s safe to say Jenner has defined herself as a highfashion model. In the Givenchy show, Jenner wore a peachtoned snakeskin tank top with a sheer black striped maxi skirt. A snakeskin printed belt, sheer gloves, and a statement necklace completed the look. With bleached eyebrows and hair tightly pulled back, Jenner was, again, almost unrecognizable. Already catching the eyes of many major designers, one can only assume she will become a main fixture in the high fashion spotlight. Although she comes from a famous family, Jenner appears to be well on her way to making her own mark in the fashion industry. Follow her active social media pages to see where her career will take her next.

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streetpeeps Video by JULIA LEIBY | Illustration by DEMPSEY MURPHY

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90 N.

t e e r t S e Court

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Voted best vintage store in Ohio. A Revolution in Shopping Vintage Clothes and Other, Specialties

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blogger of the month

dulynoted By MEGAN FAIR Photo by MICHAEL MAURER

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rom the time that clothing was put on my body, nothing I was wearing was atypical. I have an incredible mother with an eye for unique and adorable fashion, so tiny little Meg was always dressed to the nines in bonnets, velvet dresses, and overalls. Even when my fashion choices were passed into my own hands, I continued with the tradition of stepping out of the norm. As a little girl, I refused to wear anything that didn’t twirl when I spun, but that very quickly changed as I grew older and acquired different hobbies. Throughout middle school and high school I experimented with everything from androgynous style to ultra femme to things as heinous as scene fashion (yikes!), but eventually I took nuggets from everything I tried and created a style completely my own. Let’s be real--Vogue is never going to approach me and make me a cover star; however, I will always be confident in my own ability to make a gnarly dad crewneck and Docs look delightful for any occasion. All the time I spent cultivating my still-growing style was intertwined with a deep, growing love of all things music. My parents and sister fed me the most eclectic and exciting mix of

genres, and I became infatuated with all music in some way. What else do musicians display besides amazing tuneage? Fashion. Whether they meant to or not, musicians were quietly feeding me a love of their style and its correlation to their own music. Because of this intertwined passion, it only made sense to create a Thread blog that allowed me to rant and rave about the two passions. Duly Noted is a platform in which I plan to display the trendiest and most unique musicians and their styles, and I also plan to venture into the exciting and complicated land of culture and music’s effect on this culture. Every single person on the street has a style resembling a musician somewhere, even if he/she is simply rocking a big white tee and sports shorts. Have you seen Brian Sella of The Front Bottoms? This is what he wears for nearly all summer performances. Two things are never going to change in my life: I’ll always listen to music, and I’ll always have to wear clothing (unless I lived in a nudist colony, which could be cool.) Now I just have a neat-o way to combine the two into words that people read on the Internet. Speaking of which, read these words every Wednesday on Duly Noted. Or I’ll come find you.

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elevatedstyle By BROOKE BUNCE Photos by MEGHAN SHAMBLEN

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ot long ago, wearing what the rest of the general populace wore wouldn’t cause any sort of uproar; it was safe, comforting, conformist, and ordinary. When New York Magazine’s fashion website, The Cut, decided to dub this typical outfitting as “Normcore,” the buzzword started flying around every corner of the Internet. Non-ironic baseball caps, plain New Balance sneakers, white T-shirts, and khaki pants are no longer the uniforms of touristy dads or kids at summer camp. Normal fashion as we know it is actually cool, stylized comfort is becoming intentional, and it’s time to celebrate functionality. It’s recommended to ease into stylized minimalism step-by-step, so as not to shock your style senses. In this case, the best approach is from the bottom up, starting with shoes. Remember those Birkenstocks shoved in the back of your closet from your environmental activist phase in high school? Or maybe you still have those Tevas you save for the occasional recreational hike through the suburban wilderness; either way, it’s high-time to dig those puppies out for some serious flatform-meets-mandal inspiration. Spring Fashion Week 2014 certainly did just that, with “chic” orthopedic-inspired sandals popping up in the lineups of Acne, Marc Jacobs, Dries van Noten, and Prada. Flat sandals have been repping regular-folk fashion for ages, and the sartorial leap into normalcy doesn’t have to be startling. Simple, thick straps are trademark for platform sandals. In true '90s-revival style, Dr. Martens has a wide selection of flatforms that feature inchwide straps, usually in a trio on top of the shoe, to keep tootsies snug and secure. For a similar look with a bit more nostalgia and a bit less money, harness the power of platform jelly sandals. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 31


Jellies have made a powerful comeback at Urban Outfitters, American Apparel, and ASOS.com, available in a spectrum of colors—some even flecked with the remains of unicorn horns (otherwise known as glitter). These styles provide ample amounts of sought-after height without arch pain. Plus, they won’t slow down your perfected model-stomp. For a more demure look, aim for 32 | THREAD

lace-up varieties of flatforms. With a sleek black peep-toe pair, fun and functionality can coexist. Or, keep it monochromatic with all-white platform sandals, which go well on their own or with a pair of thin socks (to up the #Normcore inspiration, of course). Whichever route you take, know that even if you blend in with the rest of the crowd, your efforts to conform will never be overlooked.


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classicspecs By KELLY GIFFORD Photos by DAVID CREIGHTON

"AMES"

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his season, men’s oculars are taking on iconic connotations reminiscent of the 20th century’s leading literary minds and classic film characters. The scholarly framework of specs styles with rounded lenses and thick framing give off an air of sophistication with a hint of sex appeal. Move over hipsters, looks like bookish charm is becoming a spectacle. The top-framed, hornrimmed Ames bring a whole new meaning to the phrase “man-brows.” The style’s prominent brow line accentuates the eyes along with its angular lenses, creating a smoldering effect. No one smolders more in these optics than Zachary Quinto during his run as Dr. Thredson a.k.a. Bloody Face in “American Horror Story: Asylum.” He made a psychotic serial killer seem well read and intelligent. While Ames specs emphasize the eyes, Downing frames are a statement themselves. These glasses scream PILF — P for professor — and the wearer will receive nothing but attention while donning these bad boys. Think Matt Damon in “Good Will Hunting” or Woody Allen anytime ever. The 1950s style round lenses paired with an extended brow were worn while American beat generation poet Allen Ginsberg wrote his famed work “Howl.” Who knows what other intellectual WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 35


"DOWNING" endeavors could be accomplished through these lenses. If the Downings aren’t quite round enough, then the 1920s-inspired Begleys will strike the right chord. These classic frames are evocative of the Gatsby era, followed by resurgence in the World War II period. Their modern equivalent is featured on the silver screen through ’90s heartthrob 36 | THREAD

"BEGLEY" Hugh Grant in beloved films such as “Notting Hill” and “Four Weddings and a Funeral.” He was just a boy, asking for a pair of glasses to love him. And love him they did. If circular lenses seem too obscure, never fear for angular thin-framed lenses are still in style. Ryder glasses take rawboned frames to another level, with long rectangular lenses and


seams

"RYDER" slim edges to emphasize their oblong form. These early 2000s inspired specs bring a professorial element to any ensemble, drawing more attention to the entire face as opposed to the glasses themselves. “Mad Men” star and allaround beautiful man Jon Hamm rocks these lenses, which is reason enough to try out Ryders. The happy medium between round

"WALKER" and angular styles resides with Walker frames. These squared frames with rounded edges, featuring an accentuated top frame are a timeless tribute to the late great Philip Seymour Hoffman and his Oscar-winning portrayal of Truman Capote, the author of “In Cold Blood.” May he rest in peace and many a man pay tribute to him by donning these classic oculars. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 37


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intertwined By REBEKAH BARNES Photos by ELIZABETH HELD

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ith spring around the corner, gals are ditching the messy buns and ponytails, and swapping them out for their favorite braided do’s. Milkmaid braids, side braids, and waterfall braids bring a sweet, but interesting twist on the everyday plaits. Just the simple crown of a milkmaid braid is sweeping the fashion world. In Rebecca Minkoff and Naeem

Khan runway shows, models sported the milkmaid braid, which allowed for an added accessory, without overpowering the outfit. Even celebrities are stealing this style for the red carpet. Jennifer Lawrence, Zoe Saldana, and Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen have all sported the retro, 1960s-70s style. Celebs are able to “up” their hair without the classic curls. Along with milkmaids, waterfall WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 39


GET THE LOOK:

Video by ELIZABETH HELD

braids and side braids are popping up as serious celeb style contenders. Starlets like Blake Lively tend to always rock a waterfall braid on red carpets. For more creativity, pull half of the hair up, make a crown on top of the head and let loose waves hang down. Or even leave a few strands in front to frame the face to create a messy and easy-going finesse. Add flowers, clips, or other accessories, to take the look into serious flowerpower mode. Perfect for festing and enjoying the springtime air, these braids can take an outfit from blah to braid-tastic. After talking with Kate Kendal from

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Attractions salon, her biggest tip was spritzing a bit of working spray into the hair and brushing it through before beginning to braid. Clean, justwashed hair is not the best option because it’s harder for the hair to stay in place. To go for messy braids, instead of wrapping a rubberband around the end right away, first use hair clips to hold the ends in place and then start spreading apart the strands. This way, bigger braids can be achieved without a difficult struggle. Interested in completing any of these looks? Watch the video to see a step-by-step guide to “up” your braidgame and join the “Braidy Bunch.”


seams

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d e l d n a manh

REES By NICK VENY HEL KEA C A on by R Illustrati

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ody hair. Two little words, so much misery. For years, men have been dealt the dirtiest of all deeds: hair sprouting from underwear, surprise appearances when shirts rise, and rude comparisons to cavemen. Take offense and take charge of that body (hair). Manscaping, or the male equivalent of personal grooming, has become the en vogue term to describe trimming the “fields” of the male body. To preface all the information to come, I would like you all to know 42 | THREAD

that it will verge on explicit content. For me, genetics have generally represented personal anguish, self-loathing, and far too much time spent in the bathroom. After spending years “accepting” the body hair covering far too much of my skin, I decided to take control. This is not to exclude the disgusting amount of personal mistakes made along the way (i.e. shaving too close, creating clean lines where they shouldn’t be, and generally f**king it all up nearly every time a razor and shaving cream are put to skin).


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If you find yourself timid to take off your shirt and swear off tanks all together, it's evident that manscaping is desperately needed. First, buy a trimmer. Pick something sleek and with attachments because it could also be used for that flourishing beard or bush below. Use the trimmer to give a unified length to all of the curly hair covering those chiseled pecs and washboard abs. With the chest, keep minimal hair to avoid the redness and irritation that follow a clean shave. Although similar to shaving your face, the clean, trimmed look will last only a few days before regrowth is noticeable. Maintenance should be done weekly, at the very least. The back area, however, should be maintained through the hardcore route of waxing. Everyone wants to grip onto a muscled back without receiving rug burn. The pain is intense but temporary, and the effects last longer. A full three to four weeks can pass before returning to the white strips and steaming wax. Some skin types might make this salon procedure impossible because allergic reactions are an itchy reality. I speak from experience. Following many back waxes, I was hit with an unwanted red rash and had to ingest far too much Benadryl. Avoid the drowsiness of a back wax gone wrong if your skin is extremely sensitive. All things considered, shop around for a decent waxing technician and pay the money for a few weeks of smooth, baby soft skin. Remember to avoid using lotions and soap for the first 24 hours, and stock up on calming tea tree oil for the days to come.

Finally, the area shrouded in mystery and curly hell: the nether region. The groin is an untamed wilderness of sexual intrigue and unwanted pubic hair. Warning: This is risky business and should be attempted sober with a hydrating razor and plenty of shaving cream. The butt, balls, and bulge are the places a clean shave is allowed. Although, please keep some bush, and avoid making any sort of shape with that scratchy hair. This isn’t a time to wimp out. If you want smooth balls and a hairless ass, you need to leave fear on the other side of the shower curtain. Wet the intended area, apply ample amounts of shaving cream, and begin shaving. It’s important not to pull the skin taut and to make small strokes against the grain of the hair. Wet the razor after each pull to avoid cuts. A smooth butt is aesthetically pleasing, but this whole process comes with annoying hands-downthe-pants itching. Be prepared. Similar to chest trimming, the shaving of the Three B’s (butt, balls, and bulge) requires upkeep; at least twice a week is recommended. The clean appearance will bring a new happiness to your sexual attempts and to the friend in your pants. Without the ‘fro below, he’s never looked bigger. As a benefit for spending twenty extra minutes in the shower shaving the balls, men see an increase in sensitivity in the groin area. Imagine the pleasurable possibilities extra sensitivity could bring to an area of sexual interest and desire. Practice makes perfect with male care, but if the practice brings more attention and arousal, what is the downside? WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 43


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denimrevival By HOLLY LI Photos by MEGHAN SHAMBLEN

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other was right: eventually everything comes back in fashion. This time, Gwen Stefani’s circa-1990 boyfriend jeans and your preteen denim overalls are back— but with an upgrade. This season, denim overalls and boyfriend jeans might just be the most versatile pieces in your wardrobe. Designers such as Chanel and 3.1 Phillip Lim introduced the trend in their spring 2014 collections, pairing boyfriend jeans with oversized blazers and denim overalls with printed t-shirts on the runway. The trend was wildly popular at fashion weeks across the world, and famous bloggers such as Julie Sarinana and Blair Eadie have made them this season’s most wanted pieces. Overalls can be paired with virtually any kind of top for a myriad of different ensembles. To create a classic Parisian look, channel your inner Keira Knightley and pair overalls with a slouchy striped tee and casual sneakers. For a traditional look, wear overalls with a printed polka dot, gingham, or striped button-up top underneath. Add heels and statement jewelry for sophistication that mirrors looks created by stores like Anthropologie. To be daring, try printed overalls. Wear a cool patterned pair with a vintage, lacy blouse for a bohemian look. Opting for something a little more Fashion Week-inspired, go monotone like Emma Watson and pair white or black denim overalls with a neutral-colored tee. To step it up a notch, switch out the simple t-shirt for a fancier, mesh, lace, cropped, or embellished version. Boyfriend jeans are equally adaptable. As one of fashion bloggers’ staple pieces, boyfriend jeans have proven themselves capable of being everything from artsy to preppy, and girly to tomboyish. A lesson in flexibility, they integrate seamlessly into anyone’s wardrobe, and suit any look with a few simple swaps. When worn with a colorful graphic tee, an oversized, textured coat, and sneakers, the outfit is perfect citywear. Substitute the coat for a striped blazer and the WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 45


look is preppy enough for the New England coast. Pair distressed boyfriend jeans with black slip-on Vans and a baseball tee for a timeless tomboy take popularized by minimalists like Rachel Bilson. Soften the look with a crystal bib necklace, colorful flats, or add a camel blazer for a more refined approach. If looking to channel a more urban vibe, ditch the blazer for a camouflage jacket, and substitute the flats for strappy leather sandals while adding a black leather accessory. The girly gal in all of us can appreciate this trend, because style icons 46 | THREAD

such as Alexa Chung pair light-wash boyfriend jeans with vintage blouses and cognac booties. For a less conventional twist, try adding a structured, textured jacket or kimono. Regardless of what style you call your own, the casual denim look is sure to compliment. It’s rare for any trend to be quite so universal, and adored equally by bloggers in Tokyo, international models, and everyday fashionistas. This year, boyfriend jeans have made an impressive, Justin Timberlake-caliber comeback, and slim-fit overalls made their farming heritage just that—a thing of the past.


ACCESSORIES: Rustbelt Americana, Sam Sloma


gymsavvy By DEVEN MIDDLETON Photos by KAITLIN HATTON

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thletic wear, the ugly step sister of high fashion, is finally getting its moment to shine. For years, workout clothes have been exiled and shamed from seeing the sunlight, deemed inappropriate outside the gym. Now, there’s no more sacrificing comfort for style, as high fashion designers have finally realized the flexibility of athletic wear. Dolce & Gabbana and Marc Jacobs were just some of the designers showing sportier outfits on the runway, ushering in a new era of


athletic street style. Nike and Adidas aren’t just watching idly, they’ve been collaborating with TopShop, Opening Ceremony, and Jeremy Scott, making their marks as leaders in the new trend. To achieve a casual look, grey cotton fitted sweatpants are essential. They are meant to fit like a slim jean, hugging the waist and leg, but these have added breathing room. Pair them with a plain T-shirt and sneakers to appear slightly more dressed up. Nylon warm up pants from Adidas or Nike, usually in black, fit close to the body without becoming male leggings. Dress them

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up with black sneakers or dress shoes and a neutral colored oxford or T-shirt for a posh meets fresh-off-the-tennis-court vibe. To get the ultimate blend of sporty and structured, throw on a baseball jacket. Traditionally brightly colored and baggy, baseball jackets have turned to their bomber coat cousin for style advice. Try to find one in either neutral or two-toned colors to throw over a white shirt and shorts and ascend to the Best Dressed list of the country club. Men who have once been condemned for wearing sweatpants and a hoodie should no longer be afraid to try out these new trends. Athletic wear has received a high fashion upgrade making it look just as cool on the streets as it does on the treadmill.

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wowfactor By JESSICA MOYER Photos by ALICIA CARTER

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rom the runway to the red carpet, the statement necklace seems to be a trend that has yet to go out of style. This spring's fashion focuses on standing out with bold styles, and there is no better way to achieve this than by adding attention-grabbing jewelry to your everyday ensemble. With these simple steps, you can create a necklace that dresses up anything from an LBD to your favorite old T-shirt this season.

SUPPLIES

Rope (about 1 cm diameter) • Super Glue • Rhinestones • Piece of felt (matching in color with jewel tones) • Scissors • Jewelry Pliers • Needle and thread • 2 end caps • Lobster clasps • Jump rings WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 59


STEPS

1

Plan the design for your necklace. Draw out your design to get a better idea of what you want it to look like. Using a toothpick, put glue onto the back of the rhinestones. Be sure to create space in the felt between each section of your pattern. Begin applying the rhinestones to the felt according to your design.

4

Once your jewel patterns have been glued to the felt, let them dry overnight. Cut out each section of your pattern, cutting as close to the felt as possible so that the felt cannot be seen. Put glue in the end caps and press them firmly to each end of the rope.

7 Put a jump ring on each end cap and add a lobster clasp to one of the ends. Sew or glue your jewel pattern to the necklace. Be sure they are centered on the rope. You now have a one-of-a-kind necklace perfect for a night at the bar, the office, or on your next date. Wear it with confidence and get ready to make a statement. 60 | THREAD

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firedup MATCHSTICK COASTERS & BEER BOTTLE GLASSES By RACHEL HAAS & ALI SHULTZ Photos by RACHEL WAGNER

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osting a party can be expensive with food and drinks alone, but most people don’t realize the investment of real glassware. As young adults in the college scene, most of our money is not used for fancy cocktail glasses. With this “hot” DIY, you can use the empty beer bottles lying around the house and transform them into unique drinking glasses. These glasses can be 62 | THREAD

made out of beer, wine, or glass soda bottles. This project calls for fire and cutting glass, so be extremely careful while crafting. To go along with your new glassware, try making coasters out of matchsticks to add a rustic feel to your home and ensure that your furniture is free of the dreaded watermark rings. These glasses and coasters will be great at parties, or even as gifts for the drink connoisseur in your life.


diy

MATCHSTICK COASTERS SUPPLIES

STEP THREE

Cardboard, Matches, Glue Stick, Scissors, Black Acrylic Paint, Paint Brush, Spray Can of Polyurethane, Wood Finish

Paint the matches with watered-down black paint. It’s OK if some of the paint gets on the cardboard, you’ll cover that up in the next step.

STEP ONE Cut out a 4-inch square of cardboard.

STEP TWO Draw a design onto the cardboard. (You can create your own design or find a template online.) Start gluing unused matches to the outlined shapes of your design.

SUPPLIES

STEP THREE

STEP FIVE

STEP FOUR Fill in the rest of the cardboard with unpainted burnt matches

STEP FIVE Cover the coaster with Polyurethane Wood Finish. Use about three coats. Be sure to wait a couple of hours between each coat.

STEP ONE & TWO

STEP FOUR


DRINKING GLASS

SUPPLIES

SUPPLIES Bottle, Yarn, 100 percent Acetone, Scissors, Sandpaper

STEP ONE Measure a string of yarn to fit the bottle.

STEP TWO Cut the string of yarn and soak it in acetone.

STEP THREE Wrap the yarn around the bottle where you wish to cut it, then tie and trim any loose strings.

STEP FOUR Be extremely careful as you light the yarn on fire.

STEP FIVE Begin twisting the bottle for about 30 seconds.

STEP SIX Once the fire burns out, submerge the bottle in cold water.

STEP SEVEN Smooth the edges of the glass with sandpaper.

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STEP SEVEN


STEP ONE

STEP THREE

STEP TWO

STEP FOUR & FIVE

STEP SIX

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greenhouse By MEGAN FAIR Photos by KARA GUYTON

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niform dorm rooms, blank slate apartments, and mass-produced university food make for an equation that lacks something essential to healthy living: freshness. With all the blandness, it may seem impossible to bring any sort of life into your spaces, but it is actually rather easy. If you have windows or a small porch, you can use sunlight and a modest amount of water to create an easily manageable micro-garden to serve all your creative and garnish needs The easiest decor plants to maintain are succulents, such as mini-cacti and aloe vera (especially great for breaking off, freezing and applying for sunburn relief), as well as echeverias, which are aesthetically pleasing and easy to maintain. This how-to will teach all you green gardeners how to create a mini herb garden to add a fresh garnish to everything from Grab ‘N’ Go pasta to tea and more.

SUPPLIES

Starter Herbs (best to acquire plants from the farmer’s market) • potting soil • a needle • upcycled plastic containers (i.e. old yogurt cups) • Popsicle sticks • double sided tape • string or ribbon OR water-based oil paints • a medium-sized and small brush • newspaper fragments.

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To avoid creating a mess later, start by decorating your plastic container by either painting it to match the plant inside—such as a cute little basil leaf painted on a red base—or wrap the container with double-sided tape and wrap yarn or ribbon around the container, starting at the top and winding down to the bottom. While you’re working on the herb plant’s future home, use a needle or any sharp, thin, and round object to poke several holes in the bottom of the container. This will allow the excess water to drain when watering your plant. Fill the container 3/4 of the way with potting soil, making sure it’s free of chunks and well-mixed. Carefully remove the herb of your choice from its original planter (the easiest herbs to grow are mints, rosemary, savory, and oregano), gently removing as much dirt from the roots as possible without damaging them. Next use your fingers to create a small hole in the soil to place the herb in, carefully covering the roots with the potting soil. To maintain happy plants, check the soil with your finger each day. If it feels dry to the touch, water until it drains out the bottom. To keep your dorm windowsill from getting wet, fold a paper towel in four and place it under the planter.

As you get more comfortable with your gardening abilities, try trickier herbs to add to your garden. Not only will these herbs be handy for garnish, but their rich greenery will also breathe some fresh air into your space.

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makeit By ANNA BEKAVAC Photos by KARA GUYTON

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unshine, music, gingham tablecloths, and family recipes: They’re the essential staples of picnic season. But in case you’re a little bit tired of the same old pie, there are ways to spice up your take on this classic all-American dessert. Mini pies are simple, quick, and perfect for your next outdoor rendezvous and easy enough to make on your own.

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Mini Pies

Prep Time: 20 min | Bake Time: 25-30 min | Servings: 12 INGREDIENTS: 2 (2-count) packages of refrigerated pie crusts 4 cups (or 2 21-ounce cans) pie filling (cherry, blueberry, apple, peach, etc.) 1 egg, whisked

SUPPLIES: Rolling Pin 4-inch round cookie cutter/large glass 1 cupcake pan

STEPS: 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease the 12 cups of the cupcake tin with cooking spray. 2. Roll out your crust. Using a large cookie cutter, top of a cup, or anything circular, cut out 4-inch circles of dough. Press each dough circle into the bottom of the 12 cups of the tin so a tiny rim of dough remains sticking out the top. 3. Fill each cup with about 1/4 cup of pie filling, or until the filling nearly reaches the top of the cup. 4. Use the remaining dough to cover the tops of each pie. Use your fingers to gently press the crusts together until they stick and no gaps remain. 5. Use a pastry brush to glaze each pie with the whisked egg. Then bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the crust is lightly golden and the filling begins to bubble. 6. Remove and let cool for at least 15 minutes. Then very carefully use a knife to loosen the edges of each pie and gently lift each pie out. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate.


Ginger & Honey Iced Tea Prep Time: 5 min | Total Time: 25 min | Servings: 8 INGREDIENTS/TOOLS: 8 cups boiling water 8 tea bags 2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger 1/3 cup honey 1 heat-resistant pitcher

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STEPS: 1. Pour 8 cups of boiling water into a heat-resistant pitcher. Add 8 tea bags and let steep for 10 minutes. 2. Remove and discard the bags and allow the tea to cool to room temperature. Stir in the honey and ginger and then refrigerate until ready to use. 3. Serve over ice.

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workit By KELLIE RIZER Photos by KATE STONE

(HIIT)ING THE GYM

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he search for the “best” fitness plan— maximizing results without suffering through hours on a treadmill or in a gym lifting weights—can seem nearly impossible for many people. HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) has gained popularity for anyone balancing busy schedules and exercise boredom due to its ability to provide efficiency, variety, and effectiveness into working out. Ready to jump on the HIIT bandwagon? Follow this short but effective workout to begin burning fat and building muscle. 76 | THREAD


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WARM UP: 5 minute run at comfortable pace or jump rope if available BURPEES

JUMPING LUNGES

30 seconds all out

30 seconds all out

PUSHUPS

60 seconds all out

1 MINUTE COMFORTABLE JOG 30 SECONDS BURPEES

MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS 30 seconds all out

SIT-UPS 60 seconds all out

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1 MINUTE COMFORTABLE JOG | 30 SECONDS BURPEES

SPRINTING

PLANK HOLD

30 seconds all out

60 seconds all out

COOL DOWN: 5 minute walk or 10 minute brisk walk

The theory behind HIIT focuses on alternating between intervals of low and high intensity training and combing them into one cohesive workout. This method can be applied to running or exercises, such as squatting, lifting weights or jumping rope. An example HIIT workout could be 5 or more cycles of sprinting for 30 seconds and jogging for 120 seconds. So, what exactly sets HIIT apart from more traditional workouts? HIIT is quick and convenient whether short on time (30 minutes or less.), unable to access a gym 78 | THREAD

or equipment (hello body weight exercises) and can be performed outside, at home or even in a hotel room. HIIT workouts have also been shown to be potentially more effective than normal cardio because the increase in intensity improves both aerobic and anaerobic endurance while burning fat. This also boosts metabolism, which can last up to 48 hours after your sweat session ends. The combination of cardio and muscle building benefits allow HIIT workouts to improve levels of overall fitness.


STEPS:

Come be a guest at Attractions 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease the 12 cups of the cupcake and enjoy services from friendly and tin with cooking spray. talented stylists.

2. Roll out your crust. Using a large cookie cutter, top of a cup, or anything circular, cut out 4-inch circles of dough. doughpersonalized circle into the bottom stylistsPress willeach create of the 12 cups of the tin so a tiny rim of each client whether enjoying Paul dough remains sticking out the top.

Attractions experiences for Mitchell hair color, various cutting styles, quality 3. Fill each Brazilian cup with about 1/4 cup waxing, Shellac nail services, Blowouts, of pie filling, or until the filling nearly fantastic facials, andtheeven reaches top ofmore. the cup.

4. Use the remaining dough to cover the topsour fingers to gently press Attractions is proud the of being a full until service salon crusts together they stick and no gaps remain. satisfying the needs of its guests and creating

quality 5. relationships. Use a pastry brush to top each pie with the whisked egg. Then bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the crust is lightly golden and the filling begins to bubble.

6. Remove and let cool for at least 15 minutes. Then very carefully use a knife to loosen the edges of each pie and gently lift each pie out. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate.

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sheargenius By CAMILLE ROSE SMITH Photos by ERICA BRECHTELSBAUER

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he propped open door of Red BarberShop allowed the mix of loud, yet soothing wind and traffic to drift in while Robert Keane Parkinson quickly cut another customer’s hair with a 2-inch razor. As he worked, Parkinson talked with a comfortable nonchalance. He swiftly showed a hand mirror to his customer to see if he was satisfied with his work. Once the customer walked out the door, Parkinson set his barbering tools into one of the several mechanic’s tool boxes placed around the shop and began to clean up floor with the sweep of his broom. Minutes later, yet another customer walked in and said casually, “I’ll have the usual.” Parkinson had been a barber for nearly 10 years before he and his now wife, Carla, decided to start their own barbershop. That was “five years, three months, and 26 days ago,” he said, knowing the exact date he began his beloved business. Parkinson originated from Albuquerque, New Mexico; however, his father’s family led him to rural Athens. Starting a business is difficult, but details quickly fell into place for Parkinson and his wife. One day Parkinson’s mom was driving on County Road, right outside of Athens when she spotted an old brick building that looked perfect for her son’s barbershop. Between Parkinson and his mom, they were able to rent the building; it took a little over a year to transform the space into a classic barbershop with a mechanic shop flare. The 1950s antique chairs that Parkinson had in-

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stalled in his shop add to the mechanic shop vibe. Each cast iron chair weighs 250 pounds. The spacious, yet cozy shop contains a red, black, and silver color scheme. Eventually, plans were made to paint the back wall of the shop red and the shop had a name—Red BarberShop. Many customers are regulars including Mark Hudson, a sexy ginger and local welder. “You did it, I’m a new man,” Hudson said, after receiving a quick haircut and trim of the beard. Hudson left happy; that is why customers keep coming back. The Red BarberShop is a word-ofmouth business, as it does not have any 84 | THREAD

social media presence. His dissatisfaction with technology led him to forgo having a phone line for the shop. Customers who aren’t recommended to the barbershop tend to drive by and decide to stop for a quick cut at some point to support the local business. This same story applies to customer Deak Arch, a professor of aviation at Ohio University. Pleased by the shop's aesthetic while driving, Arch stopped in and has been going to Parkinson for his haircuts for the past six months. Parkinson’s grandmother was a barber, so the trade seemed to be a good option for Parkinson when he was in high school. Over the years, he met others barbers with fascinat-


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You did it, I'm a new man." 86 | THREAD

MARK HUDSON


ing tales; he met a barber a couple of years ago with more experience than Parkinson could even imagine. “I did meet a World War II barber once...he had Parkinson’s disease. He was like 93 years old. He was telling us how he would do 300 boots [people] through his chair a day,” Parkinson said. Even though the World War II barber was well past retirement age, he still worked in his trade day after day. Parkinson cherished the opportunity to observe the Word War II veteran in action. “He still shaved faces with a straight razor. It was actually really scary. It was the first time in my life that I’ve ever seen muscle memory overcome Parkinson’s disease. He’s been doing it for so long that he’d be shaking with the razor in his hand going up, but then when he actually went to do the stroke, his muscle memory would kick in and overcome the disease,” he said.

Barbers are the only people licensed in the country to perform a straight razor shave. Straight razors, also known as cutthroat razors, are sharp enough to cut through a person’s skin with just the slightest pressure and turn of the blade. A straight razor is “a sharp object that can cut through flesh like a hot knife through butter,” Parkinson said. It’s one thing to allow someone to cut your hair, but it’s a whole new ballgame when a straight razor is involved. The phrase “practice makes perfect” certainly applies to becoming a barber. Parkinson acknowledged that it’s difficult to gain a customer’s trust otherwise. After a long day of doing what he loves, Parkinson closed his shop for the night. He swept the floor one last time and slipped his wellused barber tools into a mechanic’s toolbox, where they will wait for him until tomorrow.

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printingfashion By BECKY WAGNER Photos by DAVID CREIGHTON

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n Ohio University’s Putnam Hall, a sleek black MakerBot Replicator 2 hummed quietly next to colorful spools of plastic and an open MacBook Pro. Scraps and shavings of plastic covered the hardwood floor next to a trashcan that overflowed with crumpled paper. A vibrant red, coral-patterned cuff slowly formed under a sliding extruder, within the MakerBot’s steel frame. The cuff finally came to fruition after three lengthy hours. A few days later, Julian Stapleton, an OU senior majoring in production design and technology in the division of theater, examined the bracelet with interest. Stray bits of plastic still needed to be scraped off. Stapleton, a technical assistant at CREATE_space, frequently uses the MakerBot Replicator 2, which is a desktop 3D printer from Brooklyn’s MakerBot Industries. The consumergrade printer brings three-dimensional objects to life from liquefied plastic and innovation. It's as simple as downloading a file, dropping it in the MakerBot program, and pressing start. CREATE_space, an acronym for Creative Research Exploring Arts Technology and Entrepreneurship, is a part of OU’s College of Fine Arts. It exists as a creative research program that provides a range of technologies to students in exchange for blog

posts documenting said research. Clothing and accessories have become more accessible through 3D printing in the last few years. 3D printing is mostly trending in haute couture. In early 2014, designer Francis Bitonti utilized a MakerBot Replicator

I think that's one of the most beautiful things about it ... You can materialize basically anything." JULIAN STAPLETON 2 to print a starkly beautiful two-piece wearable called the Bristle Dress made from clear and flexible plastic filaments. Bitonti then collaborated with other studios to custom-design a 3D-printed gown for burlesque model Dita Von Teese. The gown consists of nearly 3,000 individually printed joints adorned with more than 12,000 Swarovski crystals. While complex pieces like the Bristle Dress are beautiful, they don’t exhibit much day-to-day practicality. One of Stapleton’s recent projects was a 3D-printed tie made of several connecting pieces of flexible plastic. In another project, he designed and 3D-printed plastic cubes, which he WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 89


then mapped colorful light projections on the cubes. Files, including the Bristle Dress and Stapleton’s tie, can be designed or downloaded from the MakerBot’s website, Thingiverse.com. Under a Creative Commons license, the site is a “thriving design community for discovering, making, and sharing 3D printable things.” Site users are allowed and encouraged to make use of and alter existing designs. If the user is willing to wait a very tedious 135 hours, he or she can print off the Bristle Dress skirt; the top takes an additional 160. “I think that’s one of the most beautiful things about it — that people can download and share whatever they want,” Stapleton said. “You can materialize basically anything.” The printer can produce a wide range of objects. Stapleton printed Darth Vader cufflinks, a case for his iPhone, a double-headed Sriracha nozzle, and a clip-on bowtie to name a few.

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CREATE_space Operations Coordinator Nathaniel Berger, who purchased the MakerBot, printed GoPro camera handles, wine racks, and even a baby rattle for his nextdoor neighbor’s newborn. He printed the rattle and added coffee beans halfway through before completion. Most objects take anywhere between 20 minutes to 12 hours to print. “CREATE_space is like the toy chest of the fine arts,” Stapleton said. The MakerBot is a great tool for prototypes and entrepreneurial projects, which CREATE_space enthusiastically encourages. Sculpture, engineering, theater, arts, and new media students from the Fine Arts department experiment with the printer in various ways. “It’s like a pre-incubator for those who’re interested in entrepreneurship or entrepreneurial activities. So you can come here, take that idea from its nascent form, and make something tangible,” Burger said.


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rambleon By KELLY FISHER Photos by CAITIE BRENNAN

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W

hen most people throw ingredients into a blender, the product is usually a refreshing fruit smoothie. Trade out the assorted fruits and a blender for various music genres and a sound board, and you get the blended stylings of the Burning River Ramblers. Inspired by Dave Matthews Band, Led Zeppelin, and the Beatles, the band describes itself as “your friendly neighborhood alternative-rock-funkreggae-folk band.” “The Burning River Ramblers stimulate the sense of a funky, breezy blend of blues, jazz and ’90s pop rock,” drummer Owen Park said. “It appeals to ears of all ages.” Jeff Deacon, a fan and longtime friend of most of the band members, agreed and added that he rarely misses a show and would compare

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the Ramblers to the Revivalists, an upbeat septet that puts a funky spin on traditional rock. The majority of the Burning River Ramblers met in Athens as Bobcats. The group has been playing together since 2011 and has continually changed—picking up new members and losing another—and not all of them majored in music. Conor Standish, vocalist and rhythm guitarist, studied psychology and business. His love of music began in eighth grade when he picked up the guitar to serenade his thengirlfriend with a Dave Matthews Band song. He quickly realized there was more to music. Park is the newest band member and the only one to attend Kent State University. He graduated with a arts degree with a focus in studio art and painting. Even though he was


passionate about music, he kept his distance from the music department. “I found their methods predictably grueling and entirely formulaic,” he recalled. “I suppose you could say college was more of a distraction from music-making than anything else.” Chris Rush, the band’s bassist, was friends with Standish before college, which led the two to live in an apartment together as upperclassmen. Jesse Catania, the band’s original drummer, happened upon the duo and their drumset while delivering them a pizza. After an impromptu jam sesh, the duo became a trio. Jesse later introduced his brother Zach, who is now the lead guitarist, to the group. The Catanias’ friend Dave Young, on keys, asked to play a demo with the band simply for a school project

and caught the Burning River bug. “Right out of college, I ended up (working) at 87.7FM Cleveland’s Sound,” Standish said. “Now I have a few part time sales jobs that allow me to have flexibility with the musician side, which is my true passion.” After graduating, all of the Ramblers packed up and moved back home to Cleveland, the land where every sports team tests your loyalty as a sports fan and the weather isn’t any more reliable. Aside from the guys’ part time jobs and the digs to sports and weather, it’s also the city that sparked the band’s name: “Burning River” is a nickname to the Cuyahoga River, located in Northeast Ohio. “I had previously played lacrosse for a team called ‘Burning River,’ and I liked the name and really loved what it stood for,” Standish said. “Our friend helped come up with the ‘Ram-

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blers’ part and it stuck.” They have also performed in Cleveland on local TV shows and in venues like The Beachland Ballroom, where they opened for Tim Reyn-

The Burning River Ramblers stimulate the sense of a funky, breezy jaz blend of blues, jazz and '90s pop rock." OWEN PARK

olds, solo artist and guitarist for the Dave Matthews Band. “Tim is great, but I was there for (the Burning River Ramblers),” Deacon said. “They are all great guys... (and) their shows are what have kept me a such a loyal fan.” 96 | THREAD

Many college kids in Jackie-O’s or The Union recognize the name and express appreciation for the group. “I always meet new people at their shows that are hearing them for the first time, and usually people are blown away,” Deacon said. “Your typical band playing at a bar around Cleveland is nothing to write home about...they really shock people with how good they sound.” Many people have the perception that in order to be a member of a band, the musician has to endure an endless slew of nights sleeping on couches, half-heartedly accept jobs waiting tables and accept endless criticisms from people who are unfamiliar with their brand. “So far, our journey has had some ups and downs,” Standish said. “But in my mind, we haven’t really hit those ‘true struggles.’ We will (hit them) shortly though, and we can’t wait.” The band said they are in the process of planning a summer tour and plan on returning to familiar venues in both Cleveland and Athens.


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people to work with, I proceeded with ordering large shipments of Shea butter, pigments, dyes, butters, and oils,” said Mumford. Then if she doesn't already have a recipe made up, it's just a process of tedious measuring and trial and error until she gets something that she likes and that she can trust. “If it's reminiscent to what my grandma used to make, then I know I'm on the HTTP://VIMEO.COM/THREADMAG right track,” said Mumford. She then pours the aromatic mixtures into molds purchased off the Internet and lets it harden before finally placing it into its packaging. “The first go around I was making everything,” said Mumford. “I went to the craft store and bought plain cardboard paper and printed out my own logo and cut them into boxes and put my lipstick inside of them. I still print WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 97


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tandard 60-meter rope and well-fitted harness: check. Thirty-eight-liter backpack: check. PrAna pants: check. Rock climbers’ equipment is vital to their safety and their lives. For many Athens, Ohio climbers, fashion sense is equally important to the rock climbing culture. Climbers trust a wide variety of brands, such as PrAna, Evolv, and Arc’teryx, to get them through their climbs. The brands ensure highquality products that range from $80-$400. Outdoor Pursuits Trip Leader and Supervisor, Aaron Pynos, considers it an art to find articles of clothing that are reduced from the original retail price. To combat high costs, Pynos finds deals on gently used cloth100 | THREAD

ing and shoes on Gear Trade, a website where people buy and sell outdoor equipment, along with buying things from his friends and vice versa. He found his favorite red Arc’teryx rain jacket on Mountain Project, a site that’s similar to Gear Trade, for only $150, whereas the original retail price was $475. However, climbers do not “short” the price for essential gear such as harnesses, ropes, or belaying devices. Pynos prioritizes safety. As a result, all vital gear should be bought new. The fabric of the clothing is just as important as the article of clothing itself. Caitlyn Tetterton, a sport climber and outdoor recreation education major, suggested that outdoor enthusiasts steer away from wearing cotton because “cotton kills.” If cotton gets


wet, it takes a longer time to dry than other fabrics. Wet cotton leaves climbers feeling miserable when they are out enduring Ohio’s unpredictable weather. Down jackets such as Patagonia and Black Diamond jackets can be worn to protect climbers from any harsh wind in addition to keeping warm. Tetterton said climbers should wear jackets, especially because they are stylish. Climbers embrace the culture by trying different types of climbing such as bouldering. Bouldering involves high strength and intense power that comprises of a different physicality than traditional or sport climbing. Traditional climbers create their own routes on the rocks, while sport climbers rely on pre-placed anchors bolted on the rocks with a pre-set path.

Climbers tend to go to Witches Hill and COAD, a park behind the COAD building on East State Street. The climbing culture in Athens truly accentuates individuality and showcases everyone’s personalities. Some climbers wear particular products to add their own flair to the scene while still wearing clothes that are comfortable, durable, and flexible. As far as men’s fashion, climber Pynos swears by flannels and jeans rather than gym shorts while climbing. Tetterton’s typical climbing outfit comprises of GAP stretchy pants purchased from Goodwill, a gently used pinkish-red Arc’teryx pullover hoodie, and a pair of Mad Rock shoes. Tetterton acquired the pair of Mad Rocks for free, because Outdoor Pursuit’s Graduate Assistant, David Roth, WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 101


received them at a conference. Although Tetterton adores her Mad Rock shoes, fellow climbers mock her for the shoes’ poor quality. Evolv, Five Ten, and Scarpa are climbing shoe brands. The type of shoes that climbers use depends on the specific style of climbing. Climber Rhue explained that shoes for bouldering contain a tight fit and are relatively flat on the bottom so climbers are able to feel gripping points on the rock. Even though Tetterton said it can be a fashion show within the climbing community, some jewelry, such as rings, should not be worn while climbing. Rings can latch onto smaller rocks, the caught rings could rip fingers off.

CLIMBING TERMS BELAYER

Because climbing is a male-dominated sport, climbing clothes tend to appear more masculine because of their athletic structures. Tetterton likes embracing her femininity by wearing earrings and various shades of pinks and reds to support female climbers. In spite of any weather they face, OU’s rock climbers create a sense of community at Ping Recreation Center and Athens. Regardless of experience level or fashion choices, the Athens climbing community knows its about the climb. “It’s very close,” said Pynos regarding the climbing community, “we’re like a family. Everyone’s so different but with this thing in common, we all come together.”

A MUERTE

a word used often within the Athens climbing community.

a phrase meaning “’til death” in Spanish that adds to the bond of the belayer and the climber (“A lot of the times you chalk up, get ready, make sure everything is set, give a bump it, then say ‘a muerte,’” said Pynos.)

“I’M SO PSYCHED”

HARNESS

The phrase used to express excitement before climbing

a piece of equipment used to secure a person to the rope.

a person who controls and secures the rope for the climber.

SWAG

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the last

frontier O

Photos by AUDREY KELLY

ut here, on the prairie, the purest form of tranquility exists. As the sunlight drips through the stables, soak up the last of the golden light and wrap yourself in crèmecolored sweaters and thick wool shawls. Demure sweeping hemlines and washed-out denim let the simple palettes shine. Top it off with a wide-brimmed fedora, and lay out in the pastures as long as you please. ​

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ighties fashion is making its way back to the future with its signature scrunchies, acid-wash denim, and vibrant color schemes. Move your ponytail off to the side and make any updated '80s look totally rad.

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Chapeaux

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dd a little vintage elegance to your look with an exquisite chapeau. Whether attending an upscale tea party or gracing a royal wedding, a statement hat adds instant class and sophistication. Match plum and burgundy tones with contrasting pearls to have that certain je ne sais quoi. A lady is most mysterious when hiding beneath her delicate brim. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 129


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ye-catching and whimsical, London-based designer Louise Gray does just about everything but play it safe. The Scottish-born lass smashes together colors that shouldn't match and patterns that should clash — but somehow, they all work. They create a wild, fantastic fashion landscape of power and poise. Steal a bit of inspiration from Louise, and create a zany ensemble that's far from predictable. ​

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6 LOO K S W E LI K E

SWIM A bold print enhances your typical pair of trunks. 150 | THREAD


WEAR Photos by KELLI OLIVER

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Wade into summer in a classic pair of trunks that add a punch of color with simple stripes.


Your summer blues will fade away while soaking up the sun in a scalloped string bikini.

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Show off your creativity by mixing and matching a fringe top and frilly bottom for an all-new aesthetic.

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Arm your suitcase with a pair of army green trunks for the next summer getaway no one will ever forget.


Let all your worries float away while lounging by the water’s edge in a strapless one piece with metallic accents. Throw on a crochet cover-up for good measure.


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~ Clothing ~ Accessories ~ ~ Jewelry ~ Gifts ~ Check out our Men’s section too. 16 W. Union St. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 157


DRESSED UP

DILEMMA By JENNA GUYOT Photos by KASEY BROOKS

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spotlight style

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tyle is a way to say who you are without having to speak,” said fashion icon Rachel Zoe. Style is essentially a means of self-expression. For instance, a bright, floral sundress screams playful whereas a fresh coat of ruby red lipstick exudes boldness. Finding the perfect outfit for a specific occasion can be stressful when considering the perception of others. What is worn directly affects how people are seen by their peers or employers, which is why there is pressure for men and women not to be over or under dressed. Sometimes societal influence can lead to conformity, but not all outside impact is negative. Finding one’s personal style can add an extra boost of confidence needed to dress successfully.

Skin tone can dictate which colors naturally compliment or detract. People with warmer skin tones should gravitate toward oranges, reds, greens, and yellows. While people with cooler skin tones should stick with whites, blacks, blues, and greys. From this point on, one can decide what staple items are needed for a multifaceted wardrobe. The basics for women: light or dark wash jeans, blouses, skirts, dresses, dress pants, jackets, and blazers. Staples for men: light or dark wash jeans, khaki pants, sweaters, button-up shirts, and the basic suit. Once incorporated into one’s wardrobe, these items can be mixed and matched for styled outfits suitable for many different situations.

PROFESSIONAL

In a professional setting, it’s important to stay away from jeans and casual tops. Dress in a way that exudes seriousness and professionalism to superiors and co-workers at a company. Every day should be an opportunity to impress others. Andee Scaife, a previous New York City intern for Steve Madden, described the typical outfit worn at her internship, “There were absolutely no jeans allowed. We typically wore nice blouses and heels—business casual. The people who got in trouble for dressing down too much were the ones who wore cotton shirts or leggings.” For women, business casual is a loose term that can revolve around many different staple items. It may vary from skirts with a longer hem close to the knees, to khaki, corduroy, linen, or dress pants paired with a blouse, sweater, or dress shirt. How formal or professional the company is determines what kind out clothing is worn on a day-to-day basis. Although some companies allow business casual, others expect a more formal ensemble. Michael Ringer, a former Columbus intern for Governor Mary Taylor, said, “Some people wore suits, but everyone always had a button down shirt and tie on. I normally wore dress slacks, a jacket, and a shirt and tie.” For men, that is pretty standard in a professional work environment. Men should choose shirts that have collars, such as longsleeve button-down shirts. White button-down shirts are the safest because they are the most formal. Opposed to pants, all shirt colors are acceptable paired with a tie. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 159


I would say confidence plays a role. We made our way to campus in full suits, and no one there is dressed up at all." MICHAEL RINGER

DAYTIME OUTFIT

For daytime activities, it’s extremely important to find a balance between style and comfort. Denim jeans paired with a minimalistic top is a safe bet. It’s almost impossible to go wrong wearing a pair of dark denim jeans during the day. Dark denim could be dressed up or down depending on the occasion. Tobi is a women's clothing website that sells many different types of cute yet stylish tops. Depending on how formal the occasion, multiple types of shirts

OUT FOR DRINKS

can be found on Tobi within different tabs such as: “blouses, shirts, graphics, sweaters, tanks, and tees.” That allows for a variety of choices for a wide range of daytime outings. In warmer weather, a cute sundress with flats is fitting for a nice lunch date. For men, a cotton shirt and khakis or jean pants are suitable for a lunch outing. Keep in mind, people tend to adapt to their surroundings, therefore location also plays a factor in what is considered appropriate for daytime attire.

After a long day of work, it’s time to finally unwind with friends while sipping on an ice-cold drink. As many women can relate, dressing up for a night out is a time to look and feel one’s best. It’s ultimately the time to express personal style in a non-judgmental atmosphere. For Scaife, her ideal ensemble for an evening out is a dress, tights, and heels accessorized by jewelry. Whatever creates comfort will ultimately allow for one to be confident. “I would say confidence plays a role. We made our way to campus in full suits, and no one there is dressed up at all. Confidence is definitely a factor,” said Ringer. This is especially true when finding a perfect outfit that fully encompasses one’s style. When going out for drinks, there are many different personal styles. “There would be a clash of everything, sometimes we would have dinner downtown, we would go out afterwards in suits and wouldn’t think twice about it,” said Ringer. When out for drinks, one could never be “too dressy” and as Scaife would say, “I don’t think you could ever be overdressed.” 160 | THREAD


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QUICK SWITCH

There is no need to be stressed about going from work then out to drinks with friends. With a few tips, the transition can be very effortless. Scaife gave a few tips that are quick and easy when in a rush to achieve a different look. “A dress because you could switch whatever jacket you wear over it. You could wear a blazer for work, and denim jacket for the day,” she said. The right shoes are also extremely important when transitioning outfits. “A comfortable pair of flats is neces-

sary, but make sure to go up a half size in case your feet swell from walking around all day,” Scaife said. Flats can easily be dressed up or down making them the ideal shoe for women who are running around all day long. For men, it could be as easy as switching the shirt. Take off the tie and settle for something more relaxed. As far as men’s shoes go, a pair of Cole Haan Oxfords can be versatile and worn for most occasions. At the end of the day figure out what style works best, and then as Tim Gunn would say, “make it work.” WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 163


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BEHIND the BLOWOUT By KAYLA BLANTON Photos by AUDREY KELLY

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here’s nothing worse than constantly maintaining a head of untamed, frizzy hair. Anti-frizz serums, shampoos, and conditioners might offer temporary relief, but the morning always promises a certain amount of bedhead and a Medusa-like mane. Washing and styling such a mess on a daily basis can be a tedious process.

HAIR HEALTH

A Brazilian hair straightening treatment, also known as the Brazilian blowout, can dramatically transform bedhead into dependable, silky smooth strands. “The Brazilian blowout is the only hair smoothing system that improves the health of the hair,” said Kate Kandel, a local hair stylist at Attractions Hair and Tanning Salon in Athens, Ohio. Other smoothing systems involve harsh chemicals like formaldehyde and sodium hydroxide that change the actual bond of the hair strand, which causes permanent damage. These smoothing systems bring the risk of chemical burns to the scalp and hair breakage due to lack of hydration. A Brazilian blowout improves the health of natural hair over time. The process involves a solution that encases the hair shaft in amino acids making the cross section of each hair perfectly circular. This means the hair will lie straight and smooth. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 165


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The amino acids act as a natural, conditioning sealant that keeps the hair looking healthy and frizz-free for at least three months. According to Kandel, it depends on the type of hair, but she has seen some blowouts last up to five months. Other smoothing techniques using harsh chemicals can create an undesired look as the solution begins to wash out. A Brazilian blowout rinses out slowly and evenly instead of leaving the hair with kinky roots and pin-straight ends. The gradual breakdown gives those natural curls a healthy sheen. This hairstyle is ideal for the busy collegiate woman because it cuts the time to get ready in half; flawless hair can be ready with little to no effort. Ohio University student Sarah Davanzo was extremely impressed with her results after getting a Brazilian Blowout for the first time. “So far I think it’s worth the cost,” she said. “I am not using nearly as much product when I do my hair and I am saving so much time.” According to Kandel, the cost of a Brazilian blowout varies depending on the location. There’s a much higher demand for perfect cameraready hair in places like Los Angeles and New York. For small college towns like Athens, the service costs around $250. Kandel also mentioned that the Brazilian blowout is ideal all year, but becomes a sought-after style during the warmer months. The process protects the hair against sun and chlorine damage, making fuzzy, air-dried hair a thing of the past. Not only does the Brazilian blowout improve the health of hair, but it can also improve the lifespan of vibrant hair color. “Penetrate the hair with hair color

and then seal it with a blowout. The color lasts longer and it looks shiny and amazing,” Kandel said. Other smoothing systems can chemically fade or change hair color, and a blowout will ensure the opposite. It’s perfect for repairing bleached hair or relaxing hair that has a natural ethnic texture. When the Brazilian blowout technology first became popular, it took hairstylists at least seven hours to complete the process. Now the silky smooth look can be achieved in around 90 minutes. If color precedes the process, it could take nearly two hours, depending on the salon. No other solutions can transform hair from frizzy to fabulous in that amount of time.

BRAZILIAN BLOWOUT ZERO

This treatment doesn’t always result in super straight hair. Another formula of Brazilian blowout, known as Brazilian Blowout Zero, maintains the natural wave or curl of the hair. The process of smoothing and sealing the hair remains, which leaves hair looking healthier and softer. The process begins with washing the hair multiple times with a cleansing shampoo that rids the hair of any external pollutants. This ensures no dirt or unhealthy oils are encased in the smoothing solution. The washing would occur after the hair is colored if that step is chosen. After the hair is washed and rinsed, the “magical” Brazilian Blowout solution is mixed by a certified beautician and then applied. The application requires a trained professional to attend multiple classes that focus on the technique and the solution used. These classes are additional to those that are taken to acquire a standard beautician license. The solution is WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 167


then combed through the hair by section, starting at the nape of the neck. Once the solution is evenly applied throughout damp hair, the smoothing technology starts to happen and the results are almost instantaneous. The hair is then blown dry, activating the technology that encases and smoothes the hair. Continuing this process, the hair is straightened to further seal in the product. This has to be done at a temperature determined by the hair’s thickness so it isn’t damaged. The hair is then washed a second time and blown dry again to reveal a transformed load of locks, from poofy and out of control to sleek, shiny, and manageable. There is zero downtime between these steps and there aren’t any requirements for post-blowout care. There isn’t a 48 hour wait time before the next wash, or the need to keep hair in a cap for a certain amount of time. Kandel has received blowouts herself, and raves about the technology from her own personal experience.

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“This is hands down my favorite technology in the industry,” she said. “You have to get one to believe it.” Brazilian Blowout does offer a line of hair products to increase the longevity of the solution. These products include shampoo, conditioner, a daily smoothing serum, a deep conditioner, and a straightening balm. Although these products can be used to enhance the results of a blowout, the air-dried look has proven to be more than satisfactory.“ I am able to let my hair air dry and it dries straight. People think I blew dry and straightened my hair,” Davanzo said. Most who decide to go for a Brazilian blowout for the first time instantly fall in love. The addiction to perfectly managed, healthy hair is unbelievable. The investment is worthwhile for fashionable and on-the-go students and for anyone else with the dry, damaged tresses. A Brazilian blowout is the perfect way to start off the summer with a healthy and vibrant look that will last.


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switchgears By COURTNEY MIHOCIK Photos by HALEE SMITH

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hen brutal winter cold gives way to sunny spring, the better weather allows for outdoor playtime. Before hitting the ground running or cycling, outdoor gear may need a few checks and tune-ups before it is ready for spring.

RUNNING SHOES The essential workout item for the warmer months is a good pair of running shoes. Sneakers should last 300 to 400 miles when kept in high-quality condition. Cheyenne Buckingham is an Ohio University freshman who has been running competitively for three years and trains for half-marathons. “To preserve the running shoe, only wear it when you go on your runs,” Buckingham said. “Don’t wear them around campus; have a separate pair for that.” As comfortable as those cute black-and-pink Nikes are, using them for everyday wear degrades the cushioning in the heel. To optimize shoes to the fullest, it’s important to use running shoes strictly for workouts. Mud and dirt may have accumulated on running shoes in the past season. Instead of condemning them as unusable, try cleaning them up. Asics.com provides a handy threepoint guide for cleaning running shoes if they’ve gotten dirty. Take out 174 | THREAD

the insoles and sock liner to wash separately. Using an old toothbrush with warm water and anti-grease soap, scrub off the dried mud and dirt to make them shine. When drying them, let the insides air out and never place them next to a radiator. The high heat will morph the shape of the shoe, effectively ruining them.


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CYCLING AND BIKE RIDING There are other ways to enjoy the warm months without pounding the pavement. Many have other outdoor exercise routines, such as road cycling and mountain biking. OU sophomore Conor Emser is a cycling enthusiast of three years who has tips on how to tune and take care of a bike coming out of the wet and windy winter months and entering the warmth of spring and summer. During the winter, cities lay salt and sand on the streets to melt the snow. This can get on the rims of the bike and affect the braking mechanisms. “Before you go out and ride, just sort of push off and pump your brakes. Or you can wipe down the dish rings,” Emser said. “The first couple of times you pump your brakes, it gets everything [that has collected] off.” Rust is the silent killer of bikes. If the bike isn’t kept inside during the winter months, the moisture in the air combined with the snow and rain will ruin the chain, and possibly the

frame,unless properly stored. “Snow and water gets in the chain, and that’s the first thing to go, that’s the first thing to rust,” Emser said. “You can take care of your chain by every 70 to 80 miles, just oiling it up and putting bike lube on.” WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 175


FITNESS APPAREL No matter the activity, proper workout attire is imperative. Not only what is worn, but also how the clothes are washed and kempt. As the spring and summer months roll around, layers of running tights and pullovers are switched out for shorts, capris, and short-sleeved t-shirts. To keep those outfits as nice as the day they were purchased, it’s important to know how to wash out the dirt, sweat, and smell that accumulates in the duration of the workout. The wash tags attached on the inside of the garments usually contain cleaning instructions. It is typically better to wash in cold water, as warm water may cause the color to fade and the material to deteriorate. There are also tricks to get rid of the odor of the gym or sweat from clothes without ruining them. As strange as it seems, rinsing off in the 176 | THREAD

shower with the clothes on before peeling them off and washing them will help reduce accumulation of a funky sweat smell. That also removes the sweat before the salt has time to settle in the fibers of the spandex and other clothing materials. Another option is throwing the clothes in a tub of water, detergent, baking soda, and vinegar to let soak overnight before drying and throwing them in the cold wash cycle. Last but not least, after washing, do not put attire in the dryer. Air the clothes out, as the warm drying cycle could shrink or damage the material. “Anything that has elastic is potential to shrink if it’s under hot circumstances. Don’t do it,” Buckingham warned. Taking care of those items will help improve the outdoor experience in the warmer months. Worn-out or dirty gear is easily reusable with some tuning up for the spring and summer.


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sually fashion speaks for itself — especially if it’s a pair of shoes that costs $600 — because for that price, they had better talk. But highend brands are becoming more apt to put a familiar face with their products to gain an edge on competitors. Celebrities are ubiquitous, appearing on magazine covers, blogs, and E! News at any given hour of the day. It’s no secret that modern society idolizes celebrities. Big fashion brands know that people want to emulate celebrities, from their hairstyles down to their questionable trucker hats in 2005 (here’s to looking at you Britney Spears). Actors, models, and performers who have huge fan bases are scoring lucrative contracts with beauty and fashion labels that want to reach a wider audience. The thing about celebs is that they can afford the good stuff that the average person cannot, especially college students eating a Cup of Noodles every night for a week. Every aspect of celebrities’ lives is overanalyzed, including their clothes, opening promotion possibilities for name brands. Take, for example, the British brand Mulberry that specializes mostly in leather goods and other accessories. Recently, the label enlisted the help of supermodel Cara Delevingne, who designed her own handbag called “The Cara.” Mulberry handpicked the new “It” girl to front its Spring 2014 campaign amid financial woes. According to Fashionista.com, the label has issued three profit warnings in less than two years due to disappointing sales. With the exposure that Delevingne brings, Mulberry is relying on her

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celebrity status to boost its profits. As for brands that are firmly established, major fashion houses like Chanel, Dior, and Alexander McQueen have had a slew of campaigns featuring famous faces. Rather than having the celebrities define their labels, brands purposefully select celebrities who embody the style and feel of the product. For example, Keira Knightley has long aligned herself with the fashion powerhouse Chanel. Most recently, Knightley shot a promo for Chanel’s Coco Mademoiselle Spring/Summer 2014 fragrance campaign. The British actress lent her own personal sense of elegance and demureness to the brand that relies on romantic, subdued glamour. It is important for the success of a partnership that there be chemistry between a celebrity and the label. In order for a successful partnership to occur, it has to be the right fit. Ke$ha just would not have the same effect as, say, Betty White. Speaking of chemistry, many felt the heat when David Beckham’s collaboration with H&M, titled David Beckham Bodywear, debuted a new commercial during Super Bowl XLVIII. The commercial, which features an underdressed David Beckham running around New York City in his underwear, created social media buzz for being arguably the sexiest advertisement of the Super Bowl weekend. The David Beckham Bodywear campaign relies on Beckham’s fit physique to garner attention and sales. H&M was the only retailer to buy an advertisement spot for Super Bowl XLVIII. The massive promotional efforts emphasize the

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collection’s star and H&M believes the investment will work in its favor. “We need to build brand awareness in the United States and increase traffic to the stores,” said Daniel Kulle, president for the H&M North America division, in an interview with The New York Times. Increasing store traffic, apparently, is as easy as having Posh Spice’s husband take it off for the camera while millions of Americans watch (and drool). For men, physical appearance takes center stage in advertisements, while female celebrities tend to have more creative influence. Some brands give more leeway to celebrities who have already established a distinct personal look. Beauty campaigns tend to showcase the celebrity’s signature assets over a long-established essence of a brand. Rihanna’s collaboration with MAC Cosmetics highlights the singer’s eccentric beauty looks, a personal statement of hers. The partnership, titled “Riri [Hearts] MAC,” features Rihanna’s signature red lipstick “Riri Woo” and other bold and colorful products. John Demsey, group president of the Estée Lauder Cosmetics, MAC’s parent company, stressed that the re-

lationship between MAC and Rihanna was more than just a sales ploy. “This is really the convergence of pop culture, fast fashion, and iconic style and makeup,” Demsey said in an interview with Women’s Wear Daily. “She’s a star. The world follows her look — how she wears her hair, her nails, her clothing, how she styles herself.” Celebrities and icons can be just as choosy when deciding to align their images with a brand. “I’ve been using MAC on tour for such a long time it was a natural fit for me,” Rihanna told WWD. “I have always loved makeup, and I always said that if I do it, I want to do it with a credible brand.” But, for some celebrities, shooting a campaign is just like taking another role. Nicole Kidman has done three campaigns for Jimmy Choo and relishes the opportunity to channel a different type of character. “It was fun to shoot new and surprising perspectives, it felt a little bit daring, dangerous,” Kidman said in Glamour magazine. “I really enjoyed being able to play a role that was playful and free of any inhibitions.” For some famous faces, it’s just another fabulous job.

Rather than having the celebrities define their labels, brands purposefully select celebrities who embody the style and feel of the product."

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solefulremedies By CASSIE FAIT Illustrations by INA GROZEVA

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ace it: when taking care of the body, feet are usually the most neglected. It is time to recognize the importance of those appendages and give them some pampering. Feet are like a car, as both are vital to everyday existence. Fine-tuning feet is just as important as a mechanic refurbishing a car. Whether in sky-high heels or cushioned athletic shoes, feet are put to the test in today’s busy lifestyles.

HEELS

Sometimes a pair of heels are necessary for an evening out. Many people weigh the option whether wearing heels is worth it. Do not hold back when the urge to sport a pair of pumps arises. When buying fashionable shoes, make sure that they fit nice and snug so no slippage occurs. If the shoes are slipping, buy inserts for the back of the shoe at the shoe or local drug store. Sole inserts also add comfort for long days wearing the same shoe. However, wear with caution; blisters and bumps could occur, so keeping some Band-Aids on hand is a good idea. Better yet, stash a pair of flats in a handbag for later. There’s no reason bruised feet should ruin a night out. 184 | THREAD


back of the closet

FOOT SCRUB

BOOTS

During the winter months, feet are often cooped up in boots but deserve the same attention as any other time of the year. Thoroughly moisturize the soles and heels of your feet since the air is especially dry and chilly. The Body Shop offers fantastic foot creams to soothe dry and cracked skin. Whenever possible, be

ATHLETIC SHOES

While exercising, the body sweats everywhere including the feet. Take care of athletic shoes just like the rest of the workout attire. Most tennis shoes are washer machine safe, so throw them in to be cleaned when necessary. If footwear starts to have a foul stench, stuff them with laundry sheets to fight the odor.

sure to let them breathe and be free of any material including socks. When wearing boots, keep your feet warm with a comfy pair of fuzzy socks. Just because it’s cold outside does not mean feet need to be as well. Also, utilize waterproof shoes during rain or snow, as foot fungal conditions may occur in moist environments.

After a workout, athletes usually perform a stretching routine for well-rounded body care. However, most athletes forget to take care of their feet. Slip off those pesky shoes and provide feet with some love after a workout. Massage them to relax the muscles and get the blood flowing for a bit of relaxation. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 185


SANDALS

After a long winter, nothing beats the feeling of freedom from closedtoed shoes. Freshen those feet after a long winter’s hibernation by treating oneself to a pedicure at a spa. If that’s too pricey, perform a homemade pedicure with some friends at a do-

it-yourself spa party. (Check out the sidebar for a homemade sugar scrub.) For a lively element, buy bright nail polish colors to celebrate spring’s blooming flowers. FingerPaints is a reliable nail polish brand, which can be found at Sally Beauty Supply.

ALL NATURAL SUGAR SCRUB Inspired by Natural Home Remedies for Life Ingredients: • 3 tablespoons Whole Milk • 2 cups White Sugar • 1/2 teaspoon extra virgin Olive oil • 1 tablespoon dark organic Honey

HOMEMADE SUGAR SCRUB

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Combine all the ingredients together until a smooth paste is formed. If the mixture contains a runny consistency, add additional sugar. Rub the paste on your feet to exfoliate your skin. After a few minutes of exfoliation, rinse the sugar scrub off your skin with lukewarm water. Then massage your feet with lotion. Your feet are now rejuvenated.


740-249-4536

~ Clothing ~ Accessories ~ ~ Jewelry ~ Gifts ~ Check out our Men’s section too. 16 W. Union St. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 187


Video by JOE LALONDE 188 | THREAD


runwayourway By SOPHIA BORGHESE Photos by MICHAEL MAURER WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 189


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T

he cold in Athens was coming to an end, and Ohio University students were anticipating spring break. Meanwhile, Thread was hosting its first-ever Thread Fashion Week, or TFW, according to social media. Even though Athens is a rural town, Thread is inspired by the small-town feel of Athens, Ohio, while incorporating the latest local trends. This idea propelled Thread’s current Editor in Chief, Bentley Weisel, to plan a week of events inspired by Mercedes Benz Fashion Week. Thread Fashion Week occurred in February to give Athenias the feel of being at Fashion Week in New York. Although no theme was intended for the week, Pantone announced its Color of The Year, Radiant Orchid, in January. The exec board for Thread loved the not quite pink, not quite purple hue, because it gave TFW attendees spring fever. The first event was a clothing swap at the Front Room in Baker Center. As advertised by social media, students on campus could “bring in old clothes in good shape to trade for new ones.” People could do more than just study and sip coffee in The Front Room, and were hunting for new flavor for their wardrobes. Thread’s exec board had clothes, donated from students all around campus, laid out on tables, and pro-

vided people with a flea market-like experience. Everyone loved how the Clothing Swap let people add to their closets, even while most attendees were on tight college budgets. Some of the items that were up for trade included a professional an artistic inspired dress, an oversized Rag Union light purple denim jacket, and many other items that would be hard to find elsewhere. As the week continued, Thread Fashion Week hosted a Celeb Shopping event at Kismet on Union Street. Thread felt that it would be fun to give people in Athens the shopping experience that celebrities get to have, so they closed the store exclusively to event participants and offered people a 20 percent discount with every purchase. Kismet was the perfect place to host, since it is a new boutique, and it is a major contributor to Thread’s styling team. Because of this, readers received a little more access to the clothing shown in the magazine. The Celeb Shopping event provided much more than deals; it also gave shoppers a chance to enjoy a more relaxing atmosphere, browse the store’s selection, and enjoy the provided refreshments. The following evening, Thread hosted its release party at Sol on Court Street. Most Thread release parties offer a specialty drink, and WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 191


to celebrate Pantone’s Color of The Year, the featured drink was Orchid Fizz. These purple cocktails were served in style. Attendees were caught wearing radiant orchidhued clothing, as they sipped the specialty drink that was served in a pretty martini glass with cherries for garnish. Everyone was happy to be there to celebrate another success of the magazine, while gaining 192 | THREAD

excitement for the grand finale of Thread Fashion Week. As the final day came around, Thread finally had the chance to host its own fashion show, named the Spring Preview Fashion Show. The final event took place inside the spacious Walter Rotunda. The show featured 30 female and five male models, who wore clothes from Kismet and The Other Place.


Thread showcased clothes from local stores so the event would be true to Athens. As attendees entered the rotunda they were treated to free desserts from Fluff, and individually wrapped sugar cookies iced in swirly “TFW” script awaited guests on each seat. The front row was reserved for Thread’s exec board and a few OU professors. The runway was lit up with decorative

lights, and when it was time for the show to begin, the models came walking down one by one to the beat of a carefully curated playlist. The attendees, who were all major Thread enthusiasts, watched the show and were extremely pleased. If all goes well, Thread Fashion Week will continue to grow and become one of the most anticipated events of every year. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 193


toxicbeauty By MICHELLE FRANTZ Photos by PROVIDED

T

he tube of toothpaste lying by the sink, the facial exfoliator sitting on the counter in the cabinet, the shaving cream residing in the shower; each of these products, scattered throughout bathrooms across the world, could potentially be harming the environment. The cause of this major pollution? Microbeads. Microbeads are the tiny, plastic beads found prevalently in many body care products on the market today. Traditionally made of polyethylene, the beads are not biodegradable. Instead, they are washed down drains and eventually enter lakes and oceans around the world. Because of their small size, it is extremely difficult to remove them from wastewater, as facilities are not designed to filter them. Microbeads not only add to the plastic waste in waterways, but also are potentially toxic to a variety of aquatic organisms. Their “beadlike� appearance mimics the look of fish eggs, presenting them as food to many organisms. Once microbeads enter a marine environment, they are virtually impossible to remove. Microbeads are found in a plethora of products including exfoliators, shampoos, shower gels, shaving creams, and even toothpaste. Microbeads were viewed favorably, compared to other exfoliating alterna-

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seams

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tives, because they are smoother and less abrasive. Microbeads are also added to products simply because of their appearance. For example, some Crest toothpaste products contain microbeads (yes, those little specks in toothpaste might mean you are essentially brushing with plastic). Since microbeads were found to be potentially harmful to the environment, many companies, with the help of environmental organizations, have pledged to phase out the use of the substance in their products. Several of these companies have already begun the process. Unfortunately, the process of removing a component, such as microbeads, is a painstakingly long one. First, an alternative needs to be found that is safe, cost-efficient, and has the same efficacy. Finding the right substitute for microbeads and implementing it into all facets of production could take years. One company, Unilever, which owns personal care brands including Axe, Dove, and St. Ives, has promised to completely phase microbeads out of all of their products by 2015. Johnson & Johnson, which owns well-known skin care brands Aveeno, Clean & Clear, and Neutrogena, has stopped developing new products that contain polyethylene. The company will also have completed its first round of reformulations, which covers about half of their products that contain microbeads, by 2015. According to a company statement, a timeline for the phasing out process for the rest of their products will be released after the first round is complete. Procter & Gamble, which owns the companies Crest and Olay, has committed to the removal of all microbeads by 2017. Since just last month, New York is poised to become the first state to

ban all products containing microbeads. The push for legislation stems from scientists discovering tens of millions of microbeads in the Great Lakes alone. The major fear of scientists is that as the toxins are consumed by marine life, they will begin making their way up the food chain, inevitably leading to humans. Scientists are unsure of the potential health effects consuming microbeads could have for people, though recent studies have shown detrimental effects to the test subjects of lugworms, or marine worms, that ingested plastic, whether it was polluted or not. The study found that the ingestion of plastic attacks the worms’ immune system, lowers their energy, and could result in death. 5 Gyres, a chief environmental organization against plastic pollution, had a major hand in convincing manufacturers like Procter & Gamble and Johnson & Johnson to get rid of microbeads, and is currently working with New York legislators. If the Microbead-Free Waters Act passes, it will prohibit the production, distribution, and sales of products that contain plastic fragments that are less than 5 millimeters in size. The average microbead found in most beauty products is less than 1 millimeter in size. New York hopes not only to preserve their water, but also to serve as an example for other states. After finding microbeads in the Pacific Ocean and other waterways, California has introduced a similar bill. Based in Santa Monica, 5 Gyres has also been instrumental in implementing legislation in California. Not all exfoliators, toothpastes, or other body care products contain microbeads. When searching for a safe product, look for organic prodWWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 197


ucts or those with another element listed as the exfoliant. An example is the line of apricot scrubs from St. Ives or Burt’s Bees exfoliators that use powdered pecan shells. For an accurate judgment, be sure to check the ingredient list to see if it contains

polyethylene, polypropylene, or polyethylene terephthalate. 5 Gyres has created a free app called Beat the Microbead. It scans the barcode of a product to check its database to see if it contains microbeads, giving users the option to find safer products.

*For a list of cleansers and exfoliators known to not contain microbeads, visit http://beatthemicrobead.org/images/pdf/greenUK.pdf. 198 | THREAD


theridgesrevisted By BENTLEY WEISEL Photos by PROVIDED

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S

outh By Southwest (SXSW), an annual Austin-based music festival that takes place for a week in mid-March, is known for housing an incredible collection of musical talent, as well as noteworthy fashion trends. This concentrated bubble of creative inspiration, however, feels no limitations and follows no rules. There’s neon, but there’s also leather, even fringe; there’s angst, but there is also folk and some hope intertwined in various lyrics— something for everyone. The Ridges, a local band that Thread highlighted in the inaugural issue this year, ventured down to Austin for the first time in 2013 for SXSW. This year, however, they got to be an official band on the roster. Being a small town band at a big music fest, however, only allowed their sound and style to thrive. “We're always proud to represent Athens on the road and SXSW is no exception. We make it a point to tell every audience about the incredible music scene at OU but, more excitingly, festivals like SXSW offer us the opportunity to tout the gem of Appalachia's greatness to tons of our favorite touring bands,” Victor Rasgaitis said. We never miss an opportunity to encourage SXSWers to check out our little corner of Ohio. Hopefully some of these bands will be coming to an Athens venue soon.” The style that the band typically dons at each show is classified under an “unspoken fashion code,” according to banjo player Andrew Poulsen. No graphic tees, no shorts, and muted colors are a few of the fundamental guidelines. At SXSW, however, the increased Texas temperatures and desert-like conditions resulted in the occasional fashion compromise. For Poulsen, this meant some short-sleeved shirts were

worn—fear not, the integrity of The Ridges aesthetic remained in tact. “Everybody in the band has a good sense of our ‘look,’ but it developed naturally out of our own personal styles. Our biggest ‘dress code; problem is when we all show up wearing the same thing,” Rasgaitis said. Unlike the synchronized wardrobe of The Ridges, the SXSW fashions worn by fest-goers and even band members had no bounds—in the best way possible. “In a city where the streets are crawling with thousands of uber-hip music loving festival junkies, the overwhelming breadth of trends is blinding. Amid the dayglo neon of the new new wave and the deafening blandness of overly understated norm-core, Austin's 6th Street becomes an incomprehensible sea of anything, everything and, occasionally, nothing,” Rasgaitis said. “From the attention deprived to the genuinely fashionable, everybody starts to look pretty much the same—except the bands. You can always spot the bands. It can't be explained, but the undeniable unifying thread among that group of guys huddled around the taco truck is unmistakable: They're in the band.” The Ridges have discovered where fashion and music can collide. While people may never remember the exact shade of slacks that were worn, or the type of collar on a shirt, they will, without fail, recall that a group of people on stage were not only playing in harmony, but were dressed as such too. Poulsen elaborated by saying that clothing coordination naturally occurs with bands because you are all in sync with each other after a certain point. After returning from their second SXSW experience, The Ridges, chose to end their tour the only way that seemed appropriate: by having a concert in Athens at Casa Cantina. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 201


festfashion RANT By JESS CONROY

Spring has finally arrived here in Athens, and we all know what that means—OU fests. In addition to the copious amounts of day drinking accomplished, fest goers also strive to find their perfect fest outfit. Fest fashion has gone from casual spring outfits of high-waisted shorts and shirts with endearing representations of our school to what looks like clothes that should have stayed in a rave. You would almost have to be delusionally drugged out to think this trend actually looks good. The most dominant trend I have noticed with fest wear is neon. It’s everywhere, and the way it’s being worn is assaulting to the eyes. Both the ladies and the guys are sporting blinding neons; whether it be trucker hats or tank tops with flashy and trashy phrases such as “Black Out With Your Rack Out” or the ever popular “Bitch Don’t Kill My Vibe.” I could go on and on with these examples and they would all be just as disgusting. Even the less sleazy shirts are often incredibly overused phrases such as “Cool Story Bro,” or “Do Epic Shit.” I thought we were all done with shirts with ‘edgy’ phrases after middle school. However, there are ways to pull off neon in a classier way. During New York Fashion Week, Ralph Lauren debuted a line featuring bright whites and super saturated neon colors. A week later at Chanel’s quirky grocery store runway during Paris Fashion Week, neons popped up again, this time in the models’ makeup. A simple flick of bright eyeliner or a fun and colorful lipstick can make any outfit a statement. So if you are looking to leave the trashy look behind, go for a simple yet colorful staple piece you can wear on multiple occasions, and throw out those tacky tanks. 202 | THREAD

Illustration by TIA KROPKO

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RAVE By ALEX WARNER

ST

The array of neon colors flooding the streets of Athens indicates that fest season has arrived. Brightly colored tops, short shorts, and snapbacks all signify that summer is just around the corner. I like to think that breaking out the summer clothes early on is our way of making summer come just a little faster. The fest look can be comfortably casual or forwardly fashionable and it’s all up to the person wearing the clothes. Wearing neon colored tops, either cropped or regular length, is the perfect way to draw attention. It’s as if neon shirts are a magnetic force that attract males. Men are drawn in by the bright color, which will lead them to start up a conversation and possibly bring some romance. Fest season draws in a huge crowd. That’s why it’s best if you dress in less. Wearing shorts and tanks is an easy way to avoid pit stains and that uncomfortable sticky feeling. It’s not uncommon to see people dressed more casual in leggings and cute tops. I love my leggings, both patterned and plain. They are comfortable and you can dress them up or down. Why wouldn’t you want to show off those sexy curves you’ve been working ever so hard for at the gym? Ball caps, known as “snapbacks” have become a fashion statement for both men and women. Any modern-day pop artist, from Miley Cyrus to Justin Bieber, is sure to have been seen wearing a snapback, which makes them very in fashion. My advice is to mix and match a little of everything and find what works best. I love to see the cute outfits guys and girls can pull together for fest season. There is so much variety between each outfit. From short shorts to crop tops, it’s rare to see anyone wearing the exact same outfit. WWW.OUTHREADMAG.COM | 203


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2014-2015 EXECUTIVE BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF Nadia Kurtz MANAGING EDITOR Louis Baragona BUSINESS MANAGER Camille Smith

FEATURES EDITOR Nick Rees

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Cassey Eck

WHO WHAT WHERE EDITOR Cassie Fait

DESIGN EDITOR Alexa Hayes PUBLIC RELATIONS CHIEF Morgan Borer

SEAMS EDITOR Alicia MacDonald DIY EDITOR Ali Shultz

PHOTO CHIEF Kirsten Martinez

VIDEO CHIEF Ben Leeson

PHOTO EDITOR Meghan Shamblen

COPY CHIEF Michelle Frantz

May 2014  
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