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ROOKIE R AM

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DREAMS BECOME

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REALIT Y

P ULTIMATE TAG AP SPRING 2016

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OUTFITTERS GUIDE

SPRING 2016

editor

OUTFITTERS GUIDE MAGAZINE

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WWW.OUTFITTERSGUIDETV.COM Art Direction Department: Jeff Jensen Stephanie Snyder

Sales Managers: David Lewis III Chase Lewis

Directors, Top Management: Jeff Jensen

Support Personnel: Stephanie Snyder

Technical Specialists: Stephanie Snyder

Jeff Jensen

Designer, Copywriters:

THE HUNT IS HERE... As with all new ventures, it can take a few tries to work out the kinks, find what fits and where. So it is with our new magazine, Outfitters Guide. The goal: make this your magazine. Your articles, stories and adventures - that’s what we're all about… you! We hope to share our adventures with you. Perhaps we

can inspire new dreams, giving you the knowledge and insight to make your dreams a reality. I personally invite you to join us. Share your thoughts, dreams, adventures and pursuits with us and those who share our passion for the outdoors. Welcome to the Outfitters Guide!

Jeff Jensen

Jeff Jensen Stephanie Snyder

CORPORATE AD SALES: REFLECTIONSMEDIAGROUP.COM SALES@OUTFITTERSGUIDETV.COM

www.outfittersguidetv.com Contributions: All submissions - articles, reviews and images of any type become the sole and absolute property of Reflections Media Group, LLC and may be used during development of this magazine or any OGTV/ RMG platform. Not all submissions will be incorporated into the publication. This publication may not be reproduced without permission. The Publisher and authors make no representation or warranties regarding the accuracy, completeness and timeliness of the information contained in this publication. Any reliance or use of the information is solely at your own risk, and the authors and Publisher disclaim any and all liability relating thereto. Some advertisements in this magazine may concern products that are not legally for sale to California residents or residents in other jurisdictions. Copyright © 2016 Reflections Media Group, LLC


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COVER STORY

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ROOKIE RAM The Glauser brother's first attempt at DIY Dall Sheep hunting after making the move to Alaska. S ubscr ib e t od a y ! w w w.outfittersgu i de t v. com/ su b scr i b e

INSPIRED Learn how a chance meeting with a veteran led to the hunt of a lifetime and the creation of Operation Rally Point.


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Rookie Ram

A

by Chad Glauser

s a kid I’d shuffle through the old tattered Tony Lama box full of dad’s hunting pictures. That cardboard treasure trove had all kinds of photos. Most were semi-faded mule deer pictures. That’s where I picked up the fantasy that when my time would come, I could expect big four-point bucks (by western count) lying on the back of my pickup on the opening day of the deer hunt. I liked the deer pictures well enough. But the ones I searched for were the photos of the sheep hunts. In those old photos, my dad looked his toughest. If it was cold, a checkered flannel shirt, if it was warm, a cotton T-shirt with a pocket, and when it was hot, they were shirtless, exposing big hairy chests. But always blue jeans, leather boots and a dirty freighter backpack. I knew those hunts were hard. The pictures told the story. And I knew I would grow up and be a sheep hunter. Growing up to hunt on my own, I quickly discovered the reality that 30” bucks don’t wind up on too many tailgates anymore. And most guys don’t really hunt sheep. The way I saw it, I wasn’t lucky enough to draw sheep tags very often. I wasn’t endowed with heaps of money. I didn’t want to be a hunting guide, I wanted to hunt for myself. That left only one choice, become Alaskan. So I did.


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I didn’t know anybody in Alaska, but I met a few sheep hunters. When I asked them where I should hunt sheep, one said, “The Mountains”. The other said “Nunyabiznis Creek”. A sheep hunter would sooner give you a date with his wife than tell you where to find sheep. Or so it seemed. I’d have to figure it out on my own. I called pilots. All the good ones were booked. But I found one who was willing to take us, “Where some guys had good luck last year.” Sounded good enough to me. I booked it. My brother and I ventured into the Arctic to hunt the Brooks Range. Anxiety was high. The fear of blowing it was gnawing. We flew in a beaver and landed on a lake surrounded by tundra, within a few miles of the mountains. Our map had no sheep marked on it, so we took our best guess and set out in search of a legal ram. We climbed every mountain. We sat. We glassed, and when we didn’t see anything, we moved onto the next drainage, unlike an experienced sheep hunter. I’ve since learned that sheep can appear out of the rocks you have been looking at for three hours. You have to sit and glass until your eyes bleed. IF there are sheep in the area. But in any case, we made up for our inexperience with hard work. We walked and walked and walked. For five days we travelled and explored the canyons and ridges in search of rams. The land seemed desolate. We encountered around 30 sheep, mostly lambs and ewes, and a few sub-legal rams. Nothing was close to the mandatory full curl. We kept the GPS running to know how far we travelled. By day five we had gone nearly 60 miles. But that’s the day we found our first legal WWW.SPORTEXPERT.COM ram. He was with a smaller ram. They seemed impossible to get to, but my brother insisted we try.


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Rookie Ram

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We scrambled up the scree slide out of sight from the ram. There was no way to get above him, and we were still 1000 yards away. Mark regularly shoots out to 1400 yards at targets, and insists he can get him with his 7mm ultra mag. And he does. He carefully takes aim and fired a shot that nearly killed him. He made his adjustment and sent the 39” ram tumbling down the mountain. 19 miles from the LZ we got our first ram down. It was only 12 miles from the Dalton Highway if we were to walk in the opposite direction. But we had gear at the lake, so we pushed our way back, slowly and painfully but surely. I found a dead-head ram that I felt inclined to carry. Each of us with 100 lb. packs, we trudged across the rolling tundra to the LZ at sunset. Two rookies taking a big ram out of the mountains on our first DIY sheep hunt was highly unlikely. We logged 84 miles of backpacking in 7 days, and almost 15,000’ of total elevation gain. Like I said, what we lacked in experience we made up for in hard work. We only took one ram. But he was a cranker! And that felt pretty good, because it meant we were hunting sheep. I said to my brother, “I guess this makes us sheep hunters.” Chad is a longtime friend of OGTV and recently moved to Alaska with his wife and children to pursue his love of hunting and the outdoors.


OMEALS.....Made to Hunt

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FUEL YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

Less Water...More Fuel WWW.SPORTEXPERT.COM


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inspired

by Jeff Jensen

Operation rally point

It is amazing the journeys we take in life and how particular events lead to destinations we never had on our map. So it was with Brandon and I –and how our first handshake would change my understanding of true courage and the impact it would have on my life, my journey, my destination. As I walked the halls of the Hunt Expo in Salt Lake City, I was stopped by an old friend who told me about a young man - young from our point of view - who had served with his unit in Iraq. Like many veterans, Brandon had some extremely difficult experiences. As we talked about the service of our veterans, the individual we had been discussing, Brandon, walked up and joined our conversation. Brandon shook my hand and as we talked briefly, it was obvious that he had wounds from his service no surgeon could heal.

The journey that began with a simple handshake was about to change everything. Brandon spoke of tags he had applied for at the Expo; his excitement and hesitation, if he was lucky enough to draw, as he had not hunted since his return home from Iraq. I wished Brandon luck in his draws and told him to let me know if he was successful as it would be an honor to help him make his hunt a dream come true. A few short weeks later, I received a call from Brandon, who excitedly explained he had drawn the Nanny Mountain Goat tag for the Beaver Mountain Unit in Central Utah. The journey that began with a simple handshake was about to change everything. Fall that year brought early snows to the high country, which was just what we had hoped for. The early snows encouraged goats off the highest peaks and rugged crags of the mountain and brought in the long thick pelage that Mountain Goats adorn themselves in to survive the bitter Rocky Mountain winters.


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We scheduled Brandon’s hunt the last week of the season, to take full advantage of the goat’s pelage and allow the nanny goats to settle in on the transition zone between the high peaks and their eventual wintering grounds. MidSeptember is by far my favorite time to be in the woods, the Bull Elk fill the canyons with their songs amongst the aspens standing tall in their blankets of gold, announcing with every breeze that the mountain is preparing for another long winter. As we made the long drive up the winding mountain road, as we turned from the pavement on a rutted frozen dirt track that would lead us toward the snow covered peaks. Brandon began to share his story - his journey that had led him to this time and place. “Iraq was tough, but my unit was family. We watched out for each other”, he said as we sat huddled behind our optics glassing the steep slopes and peaks for that beautiful speck of white. “We all had bad days - that is part of it. I don’t know if it was dumb luck or divine intervention, but I should not be here”. Brandon stopped himself, the memory visible in his eyes and he had said enough…too many memories. The feelings took his words and we just glassed quietly with an eye towards tomorrow. 17 degrees is what glowed on the dash in a strangely calming green as we headed up the mountain hours before dawn. We tried to make conversation on the dark drive, but we were content just being there, enjoying the hum of the tires on the road as we pushed to “our” glassing point from the night before. The wind blew strong and cold as we left the truck and settled into the search, clearing the snow from the ground for a somewhat warm and dry spot to park our backsides. I told Brandon that half of the key to effective glassing is being comfortable - “no one with a numb-bum looks at every spot”. We laughed and turned our eyes to our goal.


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“Goats” I quietly told Brandon not 30 minutes into our search, as we watched the band of nearly 50 goats move across the steep slope through the spotting scope. One animal stood out, “it looks like a Billy, it must be a Billy”, Brandon whispered. It dwarfs most of the goats as they fed along the steep slope chasing the warming morning sun. “It’s a Nanny”, I said as she assumed her unmistakable position and prepared to settle into her bed for the morning. “Can we get to her?” (The question every goat hunter asks themselves as they plan a stalk). “Yes, we can get to her. All we have to do is cross that snow and ice-covered slope then climb down the backside of the ridge” I said it like it was no problem, all the while thinking, “This could be a problem.” We dropped into the canyon, hidden from view of the resting band that had moved to a grassy peak that allowed them to survey the land like a lord over his manor. I knew this would be a challenge to get close, but it was a stalk worthy of our quarry and the terrain it calls home.

Are you ok? asked Brandon.... “Are you ok?” asked Brandon, as I picked myself up from the frozen ground. “Yes”, I was lucky that the icy trail was carved into the deep snow and had stopped my fall. I looked below me at what could only be described as a “bad day” as we pushed towards Brandon’s goat.


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“We were in a convoy, and the truck just quit. No explanation, it just stopped running.” Brandon explained as we took a break during our climb. “We were leading the convoy, we called it in and we were told return to base.” As Brandon shared his experience, I realized that he needed to say it…to let me know, in his way, the event that will forever be part of who he is. “As the convoy started passing us, the truck just started up again. We didn’t do anything, it just started up. We just fell back in, now the third truck in line”. Brandon fell quiet, “It just exploded.” The IED buried in the road was meant for his truck. “I am not supposed to be here.” Our eyes were filled with tears, hurting for my new friend’s loss and his struggle with the guilt of circumstance - a why that cannot be answered.

"You can honor them by living your life fully"..... “You have a goat over the ridge waiting for you. You can honor them by living your life fully”. I said, not realizing at the time the impact that statement would have - not on Brandon, but on me and my thinking. “402 yards” is what the display read out on the range finder, 402 yards to Brandon’s dream. I looked across the open, timberless canyon between us and the lords upon high as they gazed down from their sunny perch. My decision for Brandon to carry the lighter 6.5x284 Cross Canyon was now being questioned in my mind, especially as I thought about the 300 Cross Canyon locked safely in the truck. No time for those thoughts - this needed to happen now.


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inspired

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I looked over at Brandon, lying like a contortionist in the boulders, peering at the goats. The wind whipped down the narrow canyon adding to my concerns. “Look at the hair blowing on the goats.” Brandon’s observation quickly pointed out that the wind on the peak was blowing up canyon, opposite the direction from which we would have to shoot. We looked at a small rock pile, some 60 to 70 yards down the slope from our position. If we could get to that point, we could take a shot. As we crawled in what had to be plain view toward the goats, Brandon had a look in his eye that displayed pure courage. “I am struggling here. I feel like I am back in Iraq,” he whispered to me. I paused, “We can do this. YOU can do this.” We moved forward, indeed like two snipers in the grass, looking for cover where none existed. The rock pile was yet another goal reached. As Brandon collected his thoughts, he said a quiet “thank you” to those who were heavy on his mind, “I am ready” he mouthed to me, “I am ready”. “341 yards” I whispered to him as he set the rifle over the pack tucked into the rocks. He settled the crosshairs high on her shoulder. The angle was steep, the wind was high and the shot was long. I said a little prayer, “Please God, let this happen.” We discussed the wind. At this range with a 140 grain bullet, we decided 6 inches into the wind is where it should be. Brandon moved, adjusting for the wind and I heard his military training take over. A deep breath, Brandon exhaled fully. A second deep breath and a steady exhale as he squeezed off the shot.


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“Great Shot!” I yelled out. As the bedded goats jump to attention, I see Brandon’s goat disappear over the skyline as the rest of the goats stand motionless. “Good Hit”, I told Brandon as I see the tears well up, “I can’t believe this just happened.” The goats moved to the crest of the ridge, peering over the edge. As they moved up over the peak we count, 47 total, plus one more for Brandon’s goat makes 48.

As we started to make our way towards the peak, the goats appeared in the next draw. We quickly set up for another shot. 1, 10, 30, we counted as the goats appeared from the break of the hill, 47 total. Brandon’s goat was not with them. We made our way to the backside of the peak scouring the tracks for any sign that Brandon’s goat had been in the group. The view of the canyon heading down from our trail gave me a knot in the pit of my stomach. If his goat had left the group and went down the canyon… I tried not to think about it as we moved forward. Brandon waited at the base of the peak as I made the climb to the top. “There is no way that goat is up here” I kept thinking. Even if she was hit perfectly, she would have made it off the peak. As I stepped on to the yellow grass the band had used for their beds just a couple hours earlier, my heart sank. No white hair blowing in the wind, no sign she had been hit. I rounded the bench to the little gap we last seen her in and there, on a lone white snow patch less than 10 yards from her bed, was Brandon’s prize.


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I raced back to the top of the peak and yelled down to Brandon that he needed to make the climb. He did not believe me, it was not possible, as we had both questioned if she could still be there. As Brandon ran his hands through the thick white pelage, realizing that this was real, this did happen. The wind went strangely quiet, the sun warmed us as we sat in the midst of the most beautiful canvas imaginable "thank you”, Brandon whispered, “thank you”.


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RaLLypoint My experience with Brandon inspired me to create “Operation Rally Point”, a Veterans program where entire teams or squads are invited to spend a week together as friends, not soldiers. We provide a fun, safe “this is real life” experience to help veterans reconnect with those with whom they will always share a unique bond. Operation Rally Point is about helping veterans like Brandon realize that that the physical and emotional scars will never leave them, the greatest way to honor those with whom the served and lost is to live a life worthy of their sacrfice. As the participants share this time togeather with those the served with, one member of the team, like Brandon, will be selected, by their team, for a hunt of a lifetime, provided by Outfitters Guide. We invite you to read more about Operation Rally Point and nominate a team/squad you know would benefit from this program and join us in saying "Thank You" to all those who have served. Be sure to watch for Brandon's episode this fall on Outfitter Guide TV.


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Dream

“Dreams are a preview of life’s coming attractions.”

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Shock Strap MUST

OGTV GEAR REVIEW

HAVE

We've all been there. Bouncing down an old dirt road with half the garage stacked in the bed of the truck, trailer or whatever mobile storage facility we have in our arsenal. We'd make any engineer proud. We stop every 10 minutes enroute to our secret hunting spot to make sure our valuable gear (and more importantly - our mastery of engineering) stays intact. Which brings us to straps - tangled, finger-pinching, knuckletearing straps - and those are the good ones! The bad ones, well, they just fall loose on the bump of the gutter between the driveway and the road. Then they flap wildly and bang conveniently in the wind to let you know you need to stop and attend to their needs. Like I said, we've all been there, and it’s not a good place. Enter Shock Strap. Fred Gill, was one of us, until he found a brilliant solution to our plight, the Shock Strap.
 Fred was so impressed with the straps that he set out to buy more, but Featured could not find them..anywhere. After a bit of searching, he Partner tracked down the inventor and was saddened to learn he had passed on. He did learn that Shock Strap was for sale, which was all Fred needed to hear. Fred bought the company and although Shock Straps were great, he found little ways to make them even better! From the original cam strap to the all-new Ratchet strap that was released in 2016.


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The secret is in the stretch. Our ATVs, sleds, gear and everything else we have expertly stacked and loaded wants to bounce every time we hit a bump, slow down or speed up. Just about anything creates a force on our little treasure troves. The “shock” in the shock strap takes that force off the strap and hence, they stay just like we like them, tight and in place! No more loose straps, snapped straps, bent hooks! All the action takes place in the shock, not your strap or (more importantly), your gear, bike, ATV, sled and so on. Fred didn’t stop there. You know that fear you feel when right before you release the tension on the ratchet strap you tightened to the point you flatted the suspension on your ATV? Yeah…it can be painful to let go. Fred solved that problem, too. He added a retaining strap so when you let the tension off, it’s only going to the end of the retainer - brilliant! You now have looped hook ends so you can always attach the strap to itself. Loops to put over handle bars and axles. Let's not forget that hard earned trophy bull’s 6x7 rack (we know it'll happen for you this year)! Not only does it keep it secure, and is about 100 times easier to use, it also keeps it from being damaged by the hooks. Like I said - brilliant! Fred explains the Shock Strap system in the video on Page 21. Check out all the technical details and buy any of the Shock Strap products at www.ogtvgear.com. Save 15% on your purchase - just use shock15 at checkout!

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...a priceless, amazingly healing and bondin

Legacy D

ear OGTV, I just wanted to thank Outfitter’s Guide TV for the experience you provided my children and I. This was truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience that may never have come to fruition without you. It was a priceless, amazingly healing and bonding time that my little family so desperately needed. It couldn’t have been a more appropriate or fitting dream adventure, that became a reality


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ng time that my little family so desperately needed.

for us, forever documented for us to relive anytime we need to feel that healing and peaceful place again for the rest of our lives and our legacies. ;) There are no words to express our gratitude for our Dream Adventure! Outfitters Guide TV really went above and beyond our wildest dreams! Thank you so much for your time and dedication to making our trip a memory of a lifetime. Thank you!

Danielle Greenwood

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When we first learned of the tragedy that Danielle and her family had endured we knew that we had to make her dream of the kids learning their late fathers' passion of fly fishing a reality. As with many of people we are lucky enough to share experiences with, they had a tremendous impact on our lives. During our few short days with Danielle and her family they left a special imprint on our lives we will never forget. This young family came together to heal and learn something from the legacy of the kids' father, which will endure throughout the remainder of their the lives. The power of the outdoors is something we get to see everyday. Anyone who has ever walked against the current casting a fly knows the calming, healing effect of the water passing by to the rhythm of the fly rod. We hope you will enjoy "Legacy" as much as we did providing this experience for the Greenwood family, and hope it will inspire you to take someone fishing.


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Introducing the danielle greenwood family: Legacy

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Profile for Outfitters Guide Magazine

Outfitters Guide Magazine Spring 2016  

The official magazine of Outfitters Guide Television. Stories of your dream adventures made a reality with the Outfitters Guide Team....al...

Outfitters Guide Magazine Spring 2016  

The official magazine of Outfitters Guide Television. Stories of your dream adventures made a reality with the Outfitters Guide Team....al...

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