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September 2016 RIP Sir Graeme Douglas The totara has fallen in the forest of Tane.

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our west

A few things you may not know about The Trusts

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Thank you for your generosity West Auckland!

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Natural burials now available at Waikumete Cemetery

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It's time to clean the barbeque!

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Our West is brought to you by The Trusts. For more information on The Trusts, visit our website www.thetrusts.co.nz find us on facebook or email us at info@thetrusts.co.nz


Helping to save lives and homes is part of The Trusts Giving Back" It's truly cool to have had a part in saving lives over the last three years.

have been lost, except for the fact that nearby residents were able to use the fire extinguishers to push back the flames until the youths were dragged free.

Twice in recent times Laingholm Chief Fire Officer Graeme Booth has told us of homes and possibly lives saved by Fire Extinguishers provided to West Auckland homes.

On another occasion a Laingholm resident’s range hood caught fire. She too thought to turn the appliance off at the wall before dousing the fire and limiting the damage.

On the most recent occasion Cornwallis residents Gayle and David Longdon probably saved their house after a built-in vacuum cleaning system malfunctioned. David Longdon, a retired clothing manufacturer, told Our West that Gayle had been using the vacuum on the upper level of the house, when it suddenly stopped. Going downstairs to find out what the problem was she found smoke coming from the vacuum unit which is mounted in the basement garage. “She had the presence of mind to switch the machine off at the wall,” David says. Mrs Longdon then called her husband in from outside and he smothered the fire with a Fire Extinguisher that had been distributed through The Trusts. “It was just brilliant that it worked when it was needed,” Mr Longdon says. He paid tribute to the Laingholm Fire Service that turned up soon after. The fire in the vacuum unit itself had been put out but the fire crew were concerned that it might have already spread into the structure of the house. Fortunately that proved not to be the case and thanks to the fire extinguisher and Gayle Longdon’s presence of mind, the house in Cornwallis “which is the perfect retirement spot” suffered little damage. The Longdon’s fire was the fourth where an extinguisher had saved the day in the Laingholm area.

Two youths saved from burning car

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giving back

The most dramatic saw two youths rescued from a burning car. The vehicle had left the road and burst into flames after side-swiping a power pole and crashing into a building. With two of the youths trapped in the vehicle lives might well

Prior to that, other residents had not been quite so lucky when their kitchen went up in flames. Fortunately between the householders and a neighbour, two extinguishers were available and stopped what might have been a catastrophic fire. As it was the kitchen was severely damaged. For the sake of accuracy we need to say that the fire extinguishers were distributed back in the days when The Trusts distributed community-wide gifts that had been bought with money raised in our venues by TTCF and donated by them. Changes since then have seen TTCF become a completely separate entity and The Trusts now make communitywide gifts from its profits from the hospitality and liquor retail businesses.

Smoke alarm to the rescue Our gift last year was to make available two free smoke alarms to every house in West Auckland. We also know that one came to the rescue within a few weeks of being installed early last year. After many years living without one, a Te Atatu resident decided to take advantage of our offer and just a couple of months later he was glad he did. He was in the middle of


cooking vegetables when he remembered he had to go out. He thought that he’d turned the stove off, but he hadn’t and the vegetables got hotter and hotter until the food started to burn and smoke came pouring from the pan. The smoke alarm screamed its warning; a good neighbour called the fire brigade and the house was saved. It's simple. Smoke alarms save lives. The fire service attends between 350 and 500 house fires a year. On average 38 people die in those house fires each year, including children and babies. Thirty of those people (80%) of them lived in a house which either didn't have a smoke alarm or the smoke alarm wasn't working.

Another West Auckland life saved by a smoke alarm On the evening of Friday 2 September a fire occurred in a home in New Lynn that grew quickly and destroyed the house within minutes. An occupant who was asleep at the time of the fire was woken by a smoke alarm sounding and managed to crawl to safety with flames and smoke above him scorching his hair and clothes. He has informed the Fire Service that the smoke alarm had been recently provided by The Trusts and credits this alarm with saving his life.

Having been a former Fire Chief for West Auckland I am aware of the great work The Trusts have done over the years investing back in to the West Auckland community with defibrillators, first aid kits, extinguishers, smoke alarms and other safety promotions over the years. I commend the members of The Trusts on your efforts and wish to acknowledge this has been another life saved because of your work." Peter Wilding, National Fire Investigation and Arson Reduction, New Zealand Fire Service.

Policing our toolkits This year the gift was a toolkit for every home and we’re very proud to say that apart from the tens of thousands we gave to every home, West Auckland Police cars now have a toolkit from The Trusts too.

Still more Toolkits available We still have some of our handy little toolkits available and so if you haven't claimed yours yet all you have to do is grab a household bill or something else addressed to you to prove you live in The Trusts area and bring it to any West Liquor or Village Wine & Spirits store. You don’t have to buy anything from the store, but we like you to at least think about it because we have some fantastic products and deals. If you don’t want to go to a liquor store, you may come to The Trusts Support Office at 3044 Great North Road, New Lynn.

Arawa St, New Lynn after the fire on Friday 2 September 2016.

The toolkit is great for myriad small tasks around the house, the bach, caravan, boat or car. It includes a pair of six inch (17cm) long nosed pliers, a spanner, a measuring tape, a screwdriver with adaptor handle, two clock screwdrivers, one Philips-head and one flat-head, four sockets - 5mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm plus Extender Bar, bits and an adaptor and three Allen keys.


a few things you may not Every three years there are local body elections held, at which you also get the opportunity to vote who you'd like your elected members to be on either the Portage or Waitakere Trust boards.

express your opinions. If you’re unsure who they are, their names and phone numbers are on our website or you can contact me directly on 826 2620.

How do The Trusts serve liquor responsibly? We have robust systems to prevent the sale of liquor to minors. We have not failed one police Controlled Purchase Operation (sting) for many years and they're been hundreds of them.

Our elected members help us to Give Back in ways that are relevant and make a difference in our community. They're local people, making local decisions for the people of West Auckland and they are elected onto The Trusts by you. The majority of Westies like having The Trusts as part of their community, and we survey a number each year to make sure that's still the case. There is a minority that may not have the same opinion and we respect that and have been working hard to win you over as well, recently. Why do The Trusts exist? The Trusts exist because the majority of the public wants us to. Every time there has been a referendum on whether The Trusts should continue, West Auckland has voted strongly to keep The Trusts. Licensing Trusts across New Zealand were set-up to let the public decide how liquor is sold in their community. Public ownership (the West Auckland community owns The Trusts) is delivering very well in West Auckland and has done for decades. Independent research tells us that that public strongly supports The Trusts:

• because of the way we strongly promote a socially responsible liquor culture

• because of the large number of community causes and organisations that benefit from our support

• because of the direct say our community has in to the management of liquor (bars and liquor stores) of The Trusts

Are the Trusts accountable? We’re totally accountable to the public. The Trusts are governed by people you elect. If you don’t like the job elected members are doing, you can elect other people. The next opportunity to vote for elected members is coming up in October 2016. If the public tell elected members they don’t like the job The Trusts are doing, the elected members can instruct us to do things differently.  You know who “our bosses” (the elected representatives) are and you can contact them any time you want to

We have 24 stores in the whole of West Auckland. This is to strike the ideal balance between providing a first class service and convenience without having too many outlets for the good of the community. Similar sized areas to us in the rest of Auckland have over 100 stores compared to our 24 and have a higher number of those stores selling to minors (as per Police Controlled Purchase Operation results).

 ommunities that have a “liquor store on every corner” C often have social, health and crime problems. The majority of Westies don’t want that. They approve of what we’re doing to keep the vulnerable people and youth of “our town” as safe as we possibly can. To increase the “Giving Back” for the good of the community we need to grow the business. But we have chosen not to grow by selling more alcohol to the same people:

• We have invested into making our stores the best in the country and world class in some respects. This has attracted more customers which is fueling our growth. • We have invested heavily in no and low-alcohol products to help satisfy the needs of more customers and emerging trends. Our culture is to: • encourage responsible drinking - which we do • encourage people not to drink and drive - which we do • provide food - which we do • encourage sober drivers - which we do • refuse to serve people who have obviously had “one too many”- which we do We are modernising our bars and restaurants and positioning them to be good neighbours. Our restaurants will be modern community friendly offerings. We have a strong working relationship with the Police and Council Liquor Licensing Inspectors to prevent or address any issues with our operators should they arise.

How do The Trusts 'Give Back' to West Auckland? Last year we gave back around $1 million from liquor sales alongside investing millions recently on refurbishing all our liquor stores to make them best in industry and we're now working on improving our bars and restaurants.


know about The Trusts This year each household (all 80,000 of them) in The Trusts area had the opportunity to collect a free Toolkit from us valued at $16.99. We've given away over 40,000 of them at a total value of close to $700,000.

What are the independent authorities saying? Auckland Regional Public Health Service Needs Assessment: Community Action on Alcohol Policy: February 2012 (Author – Nicki Jackson) noted West Auckland had the lowest incidence of alcohol and drug related crashes in Auckland Council zone urban areas, the lowest severity of alcohol and drug related crashes, the lowest incident of drink driving prosecutions (as based on data from NZ Transport Authority).

Last year each household in The Trusts area had the opportunity to collect two free photoelectric smoke alarms valued at $34.99. We distributed around 50,000 of these too and already saved houses and lives. One recently as a few weeks ago which you can read about on page two. We gave back to 200 West Auckland community causes from the big ones to smaller causes where a few hundred dollars can make all the difference to a school or local community group. No other trading business puts as much money into West Auckland than The Trusts. If the private liquor industry was to enter the market, we don’t believe they would give as much as we do back to the community as their private or offshore would take this share as dividends or profit. We have traditionally sponsored from liquor profits: • The Trusts Arena which is officially the most utilised events centre in the country. It makes a huge contribution to the richness of West Auckland. • The Mystics. We back them every year. • The Don Oliver Youth Sport Foundation that gives scholarships every year to young West Auckland athletes in all sports. For the last 19 years every New Zealand Olympic ands Commonwealth Games team has included at least one Don Oliver Scholar, and there were four at Rio. • The Portage Ceramics Awards, the most prestigious in the country. • The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards, again the most prestigious community arts awards in New Zealand. • The Trusts Spooks and Sparks, Auckland’s largest and most entertaining public fireworks extravaganza. • The Trusts New Zealand Bowls Open which is a national tournament that brings lots of expenditure from attendees in to the West Auckland community for the annual event. Separate to liquor profits, TTCF donates about $8 million to West Auckland every year from profits from the TTCF operations in our venues. These profits over many years have made a vast difference to the community of West Auckland. Our relationship with TTCF means they give the maximum possible in profits raised in West Auckland back to West Auckland. The elected members make recommendations to TTCF on all local grants, that's a real benefit having locally elected people you vote for, making local decisions about local money.

A recent Nielsen Shopper Trends online survey conducted in July 2016 yielded the following findings on performance factors customers say are important: 

• Nine out of ten West Auckland liquor store shoppers find West Liquor convenient to get to

 • Eight of ten West Auckland liquor store shoppers think West Liquor have a wide product range and variety  • Eight of ten West Auckland liquor store shoppers think West Liquor have efficient checkout counters  • Eight of ten West Auckland liquor store shoppers think West Liquor have clean and hygienic stores  • Seven out of ten West Auckland liquor store shoppers think West Liquor staff provide good service  • Seven out of ten West Auckland liquor store shoppers think West Liquor stores have sufficient car parks 

 urthermore, Nielsen research conducted this year has F shown our brand equity has a score of 3.3. Anything higher than a score of 3 is considered a world class result. Our brand health is the highest it has ever been.

Do we provide great customer service? We’re winning more customers since we’ve upgraded our liquor stores and continue to improve the way we sell quality products, at good prices with great customer service. Indeed West Liquor Westgate was judged the best liquor store in the country last year by Hospitality New Zealand at their annual Excellence Awards. Thank you for taking the time to learn more about your business, The Trusts.

Kind regards

Simon Wickham CHIEF EXECUTIVE

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RIP Sir Graeme Douglas Kua hinga te totara i te wao nui a Tane The totara has fallen in the forest of Tane. Sir Graeme Bruce Douglas; MNZM; the Pharmaceutical Society gold medal, Fellow of the Pharmaceutical Society; Member of the New Zealand Business Hall of Fame; inaugural Member of the Waitakere Business Hall of Fame, inaugural (and only) Life Member of the Waitakere Business Hall of Fame; builder of businesses, philanthropist, launcher of careers, sponsor of many worthy causes, patron of others, adviser to still more; a giant who helped transform West Auckland. Gentleman.

He has left a legacy of integrity, of honesty, of generosity, of example to others. Graeme Douglas built his life on pharmacy, starting 70 years ago as an apprentice. For two years, three nights a week he would bike from Papakura to Takanini, catch a train to Otahuhu and then walk to Otahuhu High School and study for two hours before retracing his journey to Papakura and dinner at 10pm. He travelled, to Seddon Memorial Tech in Wellesley Street (now part of the AUT campus), every Monday night and rounded out his study with three weeks’ at the School of Pharmacy in Wellington. The young Graeme met and married Ngaire. Ngaire’s sister, Billie married Graeme’s school friend, David Levene. By remarkable coincidence both became major businessmen and outstandingly generous philanthropists and were knighted together on the same day in 2010. Graeme and Ngaire set up shop in the pharmacy in Vera Road Te Atatu, still there albeit under a different name. In 1967, spotting a gap in the market for a cough syrup that worked. Graeme formulated “Kofsin”, and Douglas Pharmaceuticals was born. Elder son Jeff told Sir Graeme’s funeral that Kofsin tasted awful and after one spoonful he and his brother Richard were “too scared to cough”. Over the ensuing 47 years the company, located in both Henderson and Fiji, grew to employ 450 people and export to 38 countries. The product range encompassed both the company’s own products and generic versions of pharmaceuticals that were no longer under patent. The generics were produced to the very highest international standards, but were more affordable to more people, than the originals. In that way Douglas Pharmaceuticals made a huge contribution to New Zealanders’ health. Perhaps the crowning achievement was the development of an acne treatment that became the first New Zealand made human pharmaceutical to be approved by the US Food and Drug Agency. Having built the company originally on serving the domestic market, health sector reforms in the 1990’s threatened to cut the ground out from under the company. Graeme responded by restructuring and moving a great deal more focus onto exporting to a world market. Sir Graeme was a by-word for integrity and himself drew a link between sport and integrity.

More than 800 people attended Sir Graeme’s funeral in person at Purewa Cemetery in Remuera or via live streamed video at the Douglas Pharmaceuticals head office in Henderson or in Fiji. Tributes were paid by family, by the Hon Paula Bennett (on her own behalf and for the Prime Minister) and by lifelong friend and brother-in-law, Sir David Levene.

“My major sport was always track and field,” he told an interviewer, “and there are no financial rewards whatsoever. But some of us went and practised every day. Why? Because we enjoyed it and we enjoyed the thrill of getting a little better and doing something worthwhile. If you don’t have that sort of ambition, what are you going to do? What are your goals? Where are the ethics?” “I’m a big fan of the integrity of New Zealand business,” he said. “A handshake is still adequate for most contracts and, as we get more and more experienced in international trade, we recognise how fortunate we are that we can do that here.” Such was the standing of the company in the following two decades that when Sir Graeme died, messages of condolence came from around the globe. When he stepped down as Managing Director of Douglas Pharmaceuticals and Douglas Manufacturing, in 2014, he promptly created Douglas Nutrition to develop world-class nutritional products. Already the “go-to” man for worthy causes seeking funding support, Sir Graeme and Ngaire created the Douglas Family Charitable Foundation which took responsibility for the enormous philanthropic support made in the Douglas name. The giving has included the sponsorship of the Douglas Track and Field stadium at The Trusts Arena and athletic events including the Douglas Waitakere Athletics Festival, featuring activities for school children, teenage athletes and elite athletes. The Going West Books and Writer’s Festival features the Sir Graeme Douglas Orator on its opening night. The Foundation is a Gold Sponsor of the Don Oliver Youth Sport Foundation, and supports the Neurological Foundation, Heart Foundation, Cancer Society, Liggins Institute and the Oliver Smales Memorial Trust. The Foundation recently refurbished wards at, and donated an MRI scanner to Starship Hospital. Other causes include West Auckland Hospice, Guide Dog Services. pharmacy conferences and symposia and the Pharmaceutical Society and pharmacy in general. Organisations such as the New Zealand College of Pharmacists owe much of their success to his benevolence and wise counsel. This truly great man was deservedly showered with honours but the one dearest to his heart was the Gold Medal of the Pharmaceutical Society of New Zealand. Graeme Douglas. Giant. Gentleman. Legend. You made a better world.


Thank you for your amazing generosity West Auckland! West Aucklanders have raced to the rescue of Heather Moore in the most amazing and generous ways. Thanks to you, Heather has been able to afford to start treatment for an inoperable brain tumour, using a drug called Avastin. Avastin has the capacity to slow her tumour's growth or even stop it altogether, yet it is not on the list of drugs funded by Pharmac. Heather needed to find $80,000 to fund 10 courses of treatment but was able to make a start once she had raised $60,000. With the treatment now under way, the incredibly brave Heather is sharing her journey on Facebook and not only reports that the tumour is shrinking, but has included pictures from the scans.

Heather's Beer Perhaps the most innovative fundraising venture for Heather was the decision by Black Sands Brewery in Kelston to brew a special craft beer to help raise funds for Heather.

Black Sands creator Ian Hebblethwaite's idea was to brew a totally original beer exclusively for The Trusts to sell, with profits to go to our Heather Moore appeal. So Ian brewed a very special 1,200 litres of pale ale. It is a fantastic beer made with New Zealand Southern Cross malt from Motueka that gives the beer a refreshing hint of lemon and lime. Now instore for all to purchase, Ian hopes that the sales of Heather's Beer will add about $8,000 to Heather’s fund.

Hobsonville Point School kids fundraised for Heather Hobsonville Point Secondary School also joined the campaign to help Heather Moore, when a student learned we are fundraising for Heather and took the story to his teacher Tracey Abbot.

The student believed that the campaign fitted with school values and wanted to know if the school could do anything to help. Tracey agreed and the school organised a fundraising lunchtime event at school, with a sausage sizzle and a candy floss machine, a gaming tournament and a zorb-football event. The event was a great success and while the final total wasn’t confirmed at the time of writing, it was looking as if it would be around $750 and to quote Tracey “the kids want to give Heather the money personally.”

good beer Heather works for us here at West Liquor and she is fightin fighting g an inoperable brain tumour. Our awesome friends at Black Sands Brewery have brewed this Pacific Pacific Pale Ale especially for her to help with fundraising for an expensive drug, drug to help called fight the Avastin cancer , to help.fight The Avastin the cancer will. reduce the Avastin will swellin reducegthe andswellin give her g and Ayla precio give her usAyla and timeprecio togeth user. time together.

For every bottle of this Black Sands Pacific Pale Ale purchased, $3 will be donated towards helping Heather.

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$ 99 ea


Portage Ceramic Awards 2016 attracts internationally celebrated Australian ceramicist as judge The Trusts Portage Ceramic Awards, the richest in New Zealand and highly prestigious with an international reputation, have announced Janet DeBoos, a worldclass international artist, to judge this year's entries. Entries in the 16th event have closed, attracting works by artists from around the country and the awards are about to enter the pre-selection phase with about 50 to 60 works being selected by Australian judge Janet DeBoos, from photographs. She will select 50 to 60 finalists and visit Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery in Titirangi to make the final selection. The works pre-selected will be announced on 30 September and the finalists decided on 26 October. The final stage of the process is the announcement of the winners at a special evening at Te Uru on 10 November. This is the second time the event will have been held at Te Uru since the new gallery was completed in 2015. Gallery director Andrew Clifford and his team will have to come up with something extra special if they are to surpass last year’s event. Last year, the privileged 100 or so guests were chatting in the basement area assuming that it was the biggest safe space for drinks, nibbles and socialising and not realising it was in fact a makeshift concert venue. Just when everyone was wondering how soon the formalities would start, out on stage strode none other than New Zealand’s greatest ever pop singer, John Rowles, himself a West Auckland lad.

Potters and Handbook for Australian Potters). proud She has been guest speaker at national and sponsor international conferences, and conducted workshops and demonstrations in most states of Australia, the USA and China. She is represented in many major permanent public collections in Australia, UK, Canada, China, Taiwan, Belgium, and New Zealand. In 2015, a careerspanning retrospective exhibition covering five decades of her work was held at Craft ACT in Canberra.

Andrew Clifford, says Janet DeBoos' interest in the relationship between industrial productions, studio processes and domestic use will bring an exciting dimension to this year's awards. She is an influential artist and teacher and has been a passionate advocate for her medium for four decades." says Clifford. For her part the celebrated Australian says she anticipates the judging with pleasure. "I like functional pottery because of its interaction with people, so it's about relationships, and, in fact, that relationship that exists between the maker and the user is also something I enjoy seeing. “I like work that sees the spaces between things, so rather than it being specifically this or specifically that, I find this grey or difficult area much more interesting.”

The premier Portage Ceramic Award carries a prize of $15,000. Up to three merit awards worth a total $3,000 are also on offer. This year’s prize selection includes a workshop at Peters Valley School of Craft, New Jersey, USA.

DeBoos’ work has been heavily influenced by her relationship with Chinese ceramic practice, which began in 1996 at a symposium attended by Professor Zhang Shouzhi, a respected Chinese designer and Head of Ceramics at what is now Tsinghua University in Beijing.

The finalists will be on show at the Gallery through summer, from 11 November 2016 to 5 February 2017, with the winning pieces entering the ever expanding, ever more valuable Portage Ceramics Collection.

Under Professor Zhang’s instigation a set of her porcelain domestic ware designs were put into production at the Huaguang Bone China Factory, Zibo. DeBoos now uses decoration heavily in her work.

The event has been sponsored from small beginnings in 2001 by The Trusts. It is a particularly fitting association for The Trusts as the ceramics industry was historically an important sector around which the West originally grew.

The international reputation of the Awards is such that every year they attract world-class ceramicists as judges. This year it is Janet DeBoos, one of Australia's most respected ceramicists. Janet is the author or co-author of three books on glazes (Glazes for Australian Potters, More Glazes for Australian

Raewyn Atkinson’s Supreme Award 2015 Winner - Wasters III (Accumulate).


Henderson Hospice Shop needs your volunteer help The Henderson Hospice Shop needs help if you have a few hours to volunteer and like helping worthwhile causes. The shop’s a busy place and needs a few more people to join our team, both in store and in our distribution centre. You will join a crew of regular volunteers supporting our staff to make sure the great pre-loved goods donated to us, are showcased to their best and help secure funds to help us keep hospice services free to West Aucklanders and their families. If you can spare three or four hours one day a week, please get in touch with Hospice West Auckland Volunteer Services Manager Sarah Jeffs on:

The quality is excellent with products that some of our best shops would be proud to have on their shelves, available at fantastic prices. The great joy is, of course, that everything on show is original and not to be found in the traditional shops, making Craft Out West an ideal place to find something that is both different and affordable.

VolunteerServices@hwa.org.nz or call 869 2346.

All proceeds go to support Hospice West Auckland,

Hospice's Crafty way to get the drop on Christmas

This year's Craft Out West will be for one day only, Saturday 12 November at West Wave Recreation Centre. The show is open 10am-4pm on Saturday 12 November, entry costs $5 Adults with children 12 years and under, free.

One of the best places to shop for Christmas gifts in Auckland each year is the Hospice Craft Out West fair held at the West Wave Recreation Centre, Alderman Drive, Henderson. There’s a huge range of stalls, crafts, toys, jewellery, textiles, clothing, accessories, health and beauty, beading, papercrafts plants, food, sweets and lots more.

For more information go to the Craft Out West Facebook Page for up-to-the-minute regular updates.

MON D A Y

2 1 stonegrill for

T. 09 826 0060 www.blacksaltbar.co.nz

Origins Restaurant, Westgate Shopping Centre Ph: 831 0266 originsrestaurant.co.nz 9


Concert to commemorate the Battles of Somme The Band of the Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery will provide a free concert on 25 September to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme, one of the darkest episodes of New Zealand's participation in the First World War. The event is being hosted by the Waitakere Ranges Local Board. Immediately following the concert, a free afternoon tea will be served next door at the Glen Eden RSA. Admission is by ticket which can be obtained (while they last) by emailing your name, phone number and address to civicevents@aucklandcouncil.govt. nz or by dropping in to the local board office at 39 Glenmall Place, Glen Eden. Tickets are limited.

ch Mortar Officers in the gun pit. A quiet day on the Somme. N.Z. Tren aki Paenga Hira. Tām Auckland War Memorial Museum

Tickets will be posted to you, or you can pick them up under your name at the door on the day of the event.

The first Battle of the Somme was massive and lasted five months, starting on 1 July 1916 and ending in what was optimistically called a victory on 18 November. The victory" gained 12 kilometres (a little further than the Round the Bays Run) and cost 1.2 million men who were killed or wounded. Each day of the five month battle cost an average of 8,500 casualties. On the worst day the British Empire forces alone lost 19,000 men killed and had 38,000 wounded. In the inhuman accounting of the time, it was a “victory” and the battle that spelled the end of the German Army. Germany suffered 450,000 - 600,000 casualties, 164,000 of them killed and historians agree that Germany’s ultimate fate was sealed by this dreadful carnage, even if that fate was still more than two years away. The New Zealand Division joined this nightmare on 12 September 1916, when the artillery first began firing on the German positions. Three days later, 15 September became an historic day as the day tanks were first used in warfare. The day after the New Zealanders went into battle, the rains came and turned the battle ground into one vast mud wallow and the troops suffered mightily from lack of great coats, blankets and shelter, sometimes standing knee deep in mud. By November rain had given way to snow. Fifteen thousand members of the division went into action for the third big push of the offensive. They went over the

top on 16, 25 and 27 September, and finally on 1 October. On each occasion the division did its job but with losses each time. Both sides fired poison-gas shells when the wind was blowing in the right direction. Going over the top meant staggering through 150 metres of mud and shell craters in the teeth of withering machine gun fire. Those who survived had to cut through barbed-wire only to confront an enemy, professional, brave, resolute and well dug in. The push cost New Zealand 2,000 dead and 6,000 wounded. Among the casualties were 52 members of the Pioneer Battalion (which included the Maori Contingent) who were building trenches. Among the dead was 26 year old Sergeant Donald Forrester Brown, the only New Zealand VC in that year. His citation reported his utter contempt for danger and coolness under fire on 15 September, and again on 1 October, Sergeant Brown captured key German machine-gun positions, enabling the New Zealand forces to push through the lines. He was killed on 1 October and buried in the Warlencourt War Cemetery. After 1 October the Division’s infantry began to withdraw but the Kiwi artillery stayed until the end of the month suffering a further 500 casualties.

The majority of New Zealand casualty of the First World War was suffered at the battles of the Somme, in 1916 and again in 1918. The Somme gave the country some of its worst days in military history with one in seven of the division killed, and about four in every 10 were wounded.


Natural Burials now available at Waikumete Cemetery The historic and famous Waikumete Cemetery has introduced natural burials. With a natural burial, no embalming chemicals are used and caskets or shrouds are made of natural materials. The grave is generally shallower than for a traditional burial, meaning the natural processes of returning the body and its nutrients to the soil happen faster. There is generally no permanent memorialisation of individual plots although temporary untreated timber markers are often allowed.

This is similar to and an extension of the concept of natural or eco-burials initiated in 1999, during the time of Waitakere City Council. Then for every interment there were two adjacent plots for the planting of one tree. This proved so popular that by 2013, the cemetery's original eco burial area was full.

The public join in planting at the opening of new natural burial sector of Waikumete Cemetery.

Cemetery manager Roscoe Webb, decided something had to be done to keep the concept alive and with his team, came up with an idea that made it possible to integrate natural burials with on-going native forest restoration. The idea benefits both the environment and those people who want a natural burial. Revenue generated from plot sales could be reinvested into the on-going restoration of an area that would otherwise become neglected. Mr Webb thinks the project could bring the community closer together. Annual planting days could be combined with periods of commemoration for loved ones. He also believes it’s an idea that is likely to inspire other cemeteries. It involves an extension of natural burial ground.

Sheree Stout, Head Sexton at Waikumete Cemetery shares a lighthearted moment with "Mary" the mannequin used to demonstrate natural burials.

Mr Webb said some people liked the option of a because of its lesser environmental impact. Mr Webb said all work had been done in the best interests of the environment. Families could be assured that a great deal of care and thought had gone into the newly developed areas and that every stage had taken into account the needs of mourners, he said. During development the team went out of their way to consider the local fauna. They undertook bat and lizard surveys, left felled vegetation on the ground for weeks to allow lizards time to move, relocated lizards, and ceased works during bird nesting season.

Mr Webb and his team have now accurately surveyed burial plots, and with the assistance of landscape architect Nick Robinson have finalised the plot layouts and design.

The Reverend Judy Cooper (multi-coloured umbrella), Waikumete Cemetery manager Roscoe Webb (centre) and the Reverend Papa Fred Hollowa (right, black umbrella) lead the blessing of Waikumete's new natural burial sector.

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icons

of the

Some people make such an indelible mark of society that every town or organisation which has had some sort of connection, want to claim him or her as “their own”.

Such a person was the late Judge Mick Brown CNZM, LLD, Blake Leadership Medal. Although strictly speaking he wasn't quite a Westie", having lived most of his life in Mt Albert, he rose to fame and began a world-wide revolution in youth justice during 15 years as a District Court Judge in the Henderson District Court. He was the first Maori to be made a District Court Judge and on 10 August 1989 while still in that capacity, was appointed as New Zealand’s first-ever first Principal Judge of the Youth Court. This was in preparation for commencement of the Children, Young Persons and Their Families Act 1989 on 1 November 1989. Michael John Albert (Mick) Brown served on the University of Auckland Council for 15 years and was Chancellor between 1986 and 1991. He was Pro Vice-Chancellor (Maori) at the University until late in 2005. He was a member of various charitable trusts, including the Auckland Cricket Association, The Child Development Foundation of New Zealand, and Chairman of the Alcohol and Liquor Advisory Council.

west

In the late 1980s, this hugely compassionate and humorous man once described as the Billy T James of New Zealand law, introduced the concept of family conferences in which serious young offenders are given the opportunity to atone for their offences directly with their victims. Based around community accountability and responsibility, this holistic approach transformed the system addressing as it did a wide range of factors, including poverty, poor parenting skills and social welfare, instead of just a narrow approach to the law. His personal awareness of Maori discontent focussed partially on a sense that laws based on a system developed half a world away were not working well for Maori. To avoid criminialising young offenders he began sending them and their families to the Hoani Waititi Marae to meet and talk with their victims, as the way of holding young people to account for their actions and developing a plan to stop it happening again. This focus on not charging youngsters, if at all possible, brought about a jaw-dropping drop in youth appearing in the court from 40,000 to 2,000. It was an approach that proved that, with good communitybased intervention, teenage offending can often be nipped in the bud with the youth growing out of offending and often becoming useful and achieving adults. Mick Brown was born in Northland on 19 August 1937 of Ngati Kahu, Te Aupori, Te Rarawa, and Nga Puhi lineage. But his life didn’t have a promising start. His father was elderly, his mother died in Auckland from tuberculosis when he was one year old and he grew up with a foster family in Auckland. Tragic as this was, he remembered the remainder of his childhood and his new family fondly. As a teenager he developed tuberculosis which affected his knee and spent three years at the Wilson Home for children with disabilities in Takapuna with Bruce McLaren, later to become a motor-racing legend and founder of the McLaren brand of racing cars which is still one of the primary forces in Formula One.

Judge Brown was awarded an honorary LLD (Doctorate of Laws) by the University of Auckland in 1992, and made a Distinguished Alumni 2002. In 2006 Auckland Mayor Dick Hubbard bestowed the title of “Living Legend”. During his time as Principal Youth Court Judge, he personally created much of the philosophy that revolutionised the way the justice system manages young offenders. It is a system envied and copied throughout the world and made Mick Brown an international name.

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Recovering from this set-back Mick Brown went on to play senior club cricket and golf. Golf became a lifelong passion and one he wanted to share with every young person. Apart from loving the game for himself he mentored upand-coming professional Phil Tataurangi, donated the Mick Brown Trophy played for annually at Chamberlain Park Golf Club and made significant contributions through the Ngati Tamariki Trust. From 1951 to 1956, he took his secondary schooling at Mount Albert Grammar School which in 1997 made him one of 14 inaugural members of the school's Hall of Distinction, for his services to law and community.

Judge Mick Brown,


Judge Mick Brown He went to Auckland Teachers' Training College and then taught for a while. However, he decided the law offered a better outlet for his quickly developing debating skills and he completed an LLB at Auckland University law school. At University he became friends with future Prime Minister David Lange, Future Governor General Sir Anand Satyanand, Future Chief Justice Dame Sian Elias and future Cabinet Minister Sir Doug Graham. He married Te Hana Paniora and the couple had five children, Paul, Caleb, Lee Anne, Georgia and Hemoata. Hana died in June 2004.

Mick Brown was one of the first of a growing number of M ori lawyers. In February 2012 Bernard Brown celebrated 50 years at the law school and recalled that on his arrival in 1962 Mick Brown was the only identifiably" M ori law student. By 1979 Mick Brown was mentor to the newly-formed Brown Bar" which evolved to become the M ori Law Society in 1988. Arguably he first stepped into history after the 1984 riot in Queen Street when he acquitted DD Smash lead singer Dave Dobbyn of charges of behaving in a manner likely to cause violence against person or property and using insulting language. Brown served as a member of the University of Auckland Council for 15 years and was the university's chancellor from 1986 to 1991. He was also pro vice-chancellor (M ori) at the university until 2005. During his term the university marae was opened and doubled the number of M ori students from 3% of the total to 6%.

He was a commanding orator and when he stood to speak, everybody listened. Including judges. His sense of humour was legendary. On one occasion he commented that when he was a lawyer many of his clients “did not want greater access to the courts; they were trying to find the exit." (Law Stories, LexisNexis, Wellington 2003, page 168). On one occasion a barrister’s pager went off while he was speaking to the judge. Quick as a flash Judge Brown quipped "Mr X. I think your eggs are ready." (Law Stories, page 240). On another occasion a police inspector gave evidence about a dawn raid on a motorbike gang headquarters. When asked whether there was any resistance by the occupants the inspector replied that it was peaceful except that the gang dogs and police dogs “had a bit of a stoush.” “Who won that?” A lawyer asked and judge Brown replied: 'my money is on the mongrels'." (Law Stories, page 248). He was appointed Chair of the Alcoholic Liquor Advisory Council in 1994 and worked for a number of charitable trusts. He was the first Director of the University of Waikato's Te Matahauariki Research Institute. In 2000 the Minister of Social Services and Employment, Steve Maharey, commissioned Mick Brown to prepare a report on the Department of Child, Youth and Family Services. This was a major exercise and in preparing it he spoke to a wide range of stakeholder groups and interested parties. Judge Mick Brown's lifetime of service to New Zealand was further recognised on 5 July 2013 when he was awarded the Blake Medal at the Sir Peter Blake Leadership Awards.

Sir Peter Blake Medal winner Judge Michael Brown addresses the dinner.

Icon of the West.

Humble, compassionate to the end this visionary man who revolutionised the law for all young people died on 2 April 2015, aged 77 and was buried at Waikumete Cemetery.

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The amazing Bridges of West Auckland" West Auckland is known for many things, but often not mentioned are the amazing bridges that began with the “Art Bridges of Waitakere City” built here during the late 1990’s.

Naomi McCleary, who was Waitakere City Council’s arts “supremo” had the idea that bridges in the eco city should be “different” and commissioned well known Artist's impression of the Alford Bridge. sculptor Virgina King to design a bridge between Caspian high and 30 metres long and has required engineers to actually Close and Hugh Brown Drive in New Lynn. lower the overhead power lines for the electric trains. The bridge was to be a work of art, a Not as big, but equally interesting is the 70 metre boardwalk sculpture that engineers would then build. that will link between Harbutt Reserve and Phyllis Reserve. The result was the stunning, serpentine, Rewarewa Bridge inspired by the shapes, seed pods and colours of the Rewarewa tree that grows hereabouts. The Rewarewa Bridge was the first of about seven bridges that were designed or later adorned by the city’s artists.

The Waterview Shared Path is an important link in the network of pedestrian and cycle paths being woven across West Auckland. It will allow connection from New Lynn to Avondale via a shared path that will cover most of its length inside the road corridor and the ambitious coastal walkway that will reach from New Lynn to the mouth of the Whau at Te Atatu.

Te Whau Coastal Walkway is being part funded by The Trusts Community Foundation (TTCF) with grants made from profits raised in the Portage Trust area.

While the new Rewarewa Bridge. Alford Street Bridge to be built in Avondale is not an “art Bridge” it is certainly impressive. The 90 metre long, 3.5 metre wide cycle and pedestrian bridge will span the Oakley Creek ravine from Great North Road (opposite Alford Street) to Unitec and stand some 16 metres above the stream. It will form part of the new Waterview Shared Path that will by next year link Alan Wood Reserve and Great North Road. A massive temporary platform can already be seen from Great North Road jutting out over the ravine. It is so big that passersby often think it must be a new road bridge, but it needs to be so big to hold the huge cranes that will swing the beams for the footbridge into place. The Alford Street bridge is one of three along the path. There will be another connecting the path over the western rail line to Soljak Place. This bridge is to be approximately 6 metres

Temporay platform to build Alford Bridge.


Auckland’s Largest

fireworks

Extravaganza

November 5th*

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Featuring

Levi Sherwood

FMX Pro & Red Bull X Fighters Superstar

and Live Entertainment, War Birds, Fairground Rides, Laser Show and so much more!

pre-purchase tickets and save $5 per ticket at

www.thetrustsarena.co.nz *weather cancellation date: 6th November


LIVE MUSIC

Every Friday night from 8pm

$5 BURGERS ON SUNDAYS ALL BLACKS GAMES LIVE 17th September 7.30pm 2nd October 11am 22nd October 7.30pm

HAPPY HOURS

4pm-6pm, Monday-Thursday

ENJOY A BURGER ON US! Buy 1 burger, get 1 free when you bring in this voucher. One voucher per person, per day, Conditions apply. Valid until 31st December 2016

Corner of Great North Rd & West Coast Rd, Kelston

facebook.com/workshopbarnz


Check out The Hangar's recent refurbishment A fresh colour scheme, extended dining area, softer furnishings and a new menu are just some of the changes at The Hangar. The venue has been revamped into a landing zone for everything from after work drinks to catching up with friends and family for dinner. There’s plenty going on - enjoy 50c wings everyday between 5pm-6pm, or $17.50 mains on a Monday. The venue boasts two private function spaces available 7 days a week. The Mezzanine is the largest of the two spaces, perfect for all occasions such as birthdays, engagement parties, Christmas functions and more. The Bethells Room is ideal for seminars, training workshops and meetings. The functions menu has a range of great options to cater to all types of events.

The Flagship continues to impress Since its launch in November, The Flagship continues to grow. Overlooking the magnificent upper reaches of the Waitemata Harbour, it has become a popular spot for functions such as engagement parties, and even weddings. During the week you can take advantage of ‘All You Can Eat Mussels’ on Tuesdays, and ‘High Tide Trivia’ quiz night on Thursdays. And as summer approaches, Sunday Sessions will kick off again with a DJ out on the deck the perfect place to unwind and enjoy some sunshine. The Flagship is open for brunch, lunch and dinner, and it’s family friendly with a kids play area.

The Flagship's delicious Pork Belly Bites.

The popular Warm Lamb Salad.


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