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October 2016 Don Oliver Gold Scholarship winner Gabrielle Fa'amausili

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our west

Walking the talk in a time of social change

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The Trusts Art and Sculpture Awards

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15 young West Auckland athletes receive Don Oliver grants

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Going West books and Writers Festival a triumph

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Our West is brought to you by The Trusts. For more information on The Trusts, visit our website www.thetrusts.co.nz find us on facebook or email us at info@thetrusts.co.nz


Walking the talk in a What we know from sound research conducted independently by UMR Research across a representative sample of West Aucklanders that the majority of our community support The Trusts and that the level of support is increasing year on year. That said, we never take that support for granted and we’re working hard to ensure we remain relevant to the large majority of West Aucklanders, both long time West Auckland and a surge of new West Auckland. The rest of Auckland is starting to realise the great things about being out West and moving out here to enjoy the beaches, the bush and ranges, the sense of space/quality of life and the neighbourly atmosphere and sense of being part of a community. There is no question that West Auckland is on the edge of significant social change and what suited people in the past may not suit people in the future. We, The Trusts, have to stay relevant to what people want now. If we don’t, we will lose the very strong support that we currently enjoy. We’re embracing that change, I promise you that. We are doing that because we want to. To be relevant into the future we must ensure the new generations’ lifestyle ambitions are well catered for in West Auckland. Amongst this change, the basic core values still remain out West. That Westie spirit is still alive, typified by salt of the earth, proud but humble values that make Westies special. There is a sense of community here that you don’t get elsewhere. I’ve lived or worked in many other areas of Auckland and they don’t share that same sense of community. It is deep rooted. I think this has created a sense of being part of a family or a whanau where we look after each other. It’s the place where we belong. Our place. Our values. Our way. It’s different in a good way.

Alternatively, you can contact any one of our Elected Members that guide and shape The Trusts on your behalf. Their details are on our website www.thetrusts.co.nz/yourelected-trustees

We're Giving Back more then ever. I agree with some recent comments, for example, that we could give back more than the $1 million from liquor profits every year, that currently goes back into the community. Five years ago it was less than $200,000 and we pledged then, that our goal was to be Giving Back over a million per annum. Why? Because it’s good for the community that we are committed to serving and supporting. We’ve passed the first million. We have kept our promise. Now we have our sights set on $2 million plus per annum.

Liquor retail was first & hospitality is next. We have invested heavily in bringing our retail liquor stores up to an international standard. AC Nielsen liquor-sector research recently confirmed that our West Liquor stores are world-class and this reinforced the Hospitality New Zealand Retail Store of the Year award we won in 2015. Our liquor stores are stores for today’s consumer. They’re about selling a wide range of products, selling it well and in a way that people find enjoyable. We have created welcoming, conveniently located shopping environments, where it’s easy to find what you are after and we have knowledgeable staff on hand to assist you make good choices based on good value.

I imagine that in the years to come, West Aucklanders will continue to care about the good that The Trusts bring to the West, but how we deliver hospitality, liquor retailing and ‘Giving Back’ will change with the times. There will be new opportunities, new challenges, changes in the way we do things. We’re up for that and excited about the future for the West. Beyond the UMR research that we use to help us understand West Auckland’s needs and wants in hospitality, retail liquor and ‘Giving Back’, we always want to hear directly from the people who own this business - you.

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Tell us what we’re doing well. Tell us how we can serve you better. If you do that we can grow this business together for the betterment of West Auckland. Our mission is simple - to play our part in making West Auckland a great place to live. My email is simonw@ thetrusts.co.nz if you wish to contact me directly.

Our retail stores provide world class service


time of social change Staying relevant is also why we’re investing heavily from our profits back into the business to bring our bars and restaurants into the modern era of casual dining, gastro-bars and local suburban bars with friendly atmosphere. We admit we’ve got some way to go yet and over the next 12 months we have six significant projects on the go to transform our hospitality offerings. We’ll announce more about each one in Our West as we go through this transformation.

The popular Hangar Bar after its recent renovation.

Once this phase of re-building and re-investment is complete we will also be able to Give Back in larger amounts every year. Like most households that are sensible with their money, we’re spending some on getting our house in order, some on renovating, some on new features and extensions, we’re putting away some in investments for the future and we’re gifting some to others (in our case Giving Back). Long-term this will enable us to Give Back more across many generations and sustainably play our part in making West Auckland a great place to live.

My invitation to talk to me always stands. If anybody wants to tell us what they think, good or bad, about The Trusts please do so, I welcome a constructive discussion about how we can deliver on our mission to Give Back more over the long-term and play our part in making West Auckland a great place to live.

Finally, by the time you read this the elections will be over and I wish to thank all those elected members of The Trusts for their service and their guidance over the years. I also look forward to working with the newly elected members who will serve for the next three years as we grow, as we win more of your support and that in turn enables us to grow our support of West Auckland’s bright future.

Kind regards

Simon Wickham CHIEF EXECUTIVE

For your information • West Auckland has the lowest incidence of alcohol related vehicle crashes in Auckland Council zone urban areas (Auckland Regional Public Health Needs Assesment research by Nicki Jackson) • West Auckland also has the lowest incident of drink driving prosecutions (NZ Transport Authority) • The Trusts don’t issue liquor licenses, that’s the job of the Auckland Council


The Trusts Art and

celebrate 30 years showcasing First prize in the Arts section of The Trusts Art & Sculpture Award, returned to West Auckland late last month when Joelle Bunt took out the $4,000 top prize with the landscape, Headland with Reflection, Wild West Coast Series. The $2,000 first prize in the Sculpture Award went to Ann Uerata’s Sea “Enemy” Anemone Fibre made from harakeke, muka, paper and stone.

First Prize The Trusts Art Award: Joelle Bunt, Headland with Reflection, Wild West Coast Series, Mixed Media

With the section for secondary and tertiary students getting ever stronger, Jessie Newman won The Trusts $450 first prize in the 13 - 15 Year Old Art, with ‘Self Portrait’, a painting the judge said any adult would struggle to produce; meanwhile Lauren Kirkley’s ‘Starry Night’ in the Valley took the $450 first prize in the 13 - 15 Year old Photography section. The Trusts First Prize for 16 - 18 Year old Art (also $450) was carried off by Rebecca Hazard for ‘Grey Smear on Hyacinths’ in Oil & House Paint on Canvas and; Shiyan Guo was awarded first prize ($450) in The Trusts 16 - 18 Year old Photography section, with ‘Home Sick’. All in all some 27 prizes were shared between more than 400 entries drawn from around New Zealand, to make this one of the most successful annual Awards in the event’s 30 year history. Making the Awards even more attractive to artists in recent years, is that prize winning artists get to keep their work with the option to sell it as award winning art. One notable feature was the growing diversity of New Zealand’s population as reflected in the subject matter of a portions of the works and the variety of ethnic origins. As always the Awards’ status as one of New Zealand’s most prestigious celebrations of the country’s art, drew top-line judges to assess the works and award the prizes before the selected works went on display to the public at Corbans Estate Arts Centre (CEAC). Award winning arts writer and journalist Josie McNaught judged the Art section; celebrated sculptor Chiara

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Corbelletto (who has her studio at CEAC) judged the sculptures while Liston College Art teacher, Andrew Rankin, an artist photographer and Masters student at Elam, judged the age group art and photography sections. Of the winning landscape by Joelle Bunt, judge McNaught said “How do we recognise a work as ‘landscape art’ today? Sometimes art does the job of words so much better and this work confidently conveys the landscape with its moody colours and cloudy sky, it calls us to go West!” That was an appropriate tribute to the artist who was raised on Auckland’s wild west coast where, she says “The scenery has ingrained itself in me.” She says she paints the rugged landscapes and tempestuous ocean from memory, trying to capture how it feels as much as how it looks. Second Prize ($1,500) was awarded to Stuart Jobling’s ‘Copper Filigree Panel’ and third prize ($750) was won by Celia Nelson with ‘Red Descent’, in ink & watercolour Pattern. All three prizes were provided by The Trusts. The winning sculpture was described by judge Corbelletto as a work that “presents us with concerns and comments about the risks of losing the non-renewable resources of the sea.” The second sculpture prize ($750) was awarded to Alistar Martin’s ‘Taupuhipuhi’ constructed in bone, pohutukawa, metal, wood, cardboard and Velcro. Sofia Athineou won third Prize ($500) with ‘Save Me’, a commentary on the tragic refugee events in the Mediterranean.


Sculpture Awards New Zealand's finest art

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13-15 Years Art Second prize ($350) went to Su Yeon Cho’s ‘Lion’ in acrylic and the $200 third prize was scooped by Zoe Dewhurst’s ‘El Pajaro’ Acrylic described as a colourful and somewhat quirky painting.

13- 15 Years Photography Lauren Kirkley’s ‘Starry Night’ in the Valley took the $450, First Prize, for capturing “a moment familiar to most New Zealanders fortunate enough to have spent time in a rural area”, The prize included a Lowepro backpack from Auckland Camera Centre. Neve Marshall took the $350 second prize with ‘War & Peace’ Photography while third prize of $200 was won by Ruby Upham with ‘Cross Hatch’.

16- 18 Years Art

ts 5 Years The Trus First Prize 13-1 lf Se an wm Ne e Art Award: Jessi on Wood portrait Acrylic

The judge described the smear in Rebecca Hazard is first prize winning ‘Grey Smear on Hyacinths’ as a bold move for a young artist creating a painting that the viewer is forced to question. Rebecca won $450 plus a two year subscription to Art News NZ magazine.

First Prize 16-18 Yea rs The Trusts Art Award: Reb ecca Hazard Grey Smear on Hyacin ths

Second prize ($350) went to Elizaveta Zyuzina for ‘The Dawn Oil’ which the judges thought evoked the masters of traditional painting. Third prize of $200 was awarded to Saralouise Williams for ‘Swallows’.

16 - 18 Years Photography First prize of $450 and one year subscription to D-Photo magazine went to Shiyan Guo, for ‘Home Sick’, considered a narrative of isolation and loneliness. Second prize ($350) was won by Maisy McLeod-Riera’s ‘Infrared Sirens’ and the $200 third prize went to Jiayin (Emma) Fu’s ‘Fish and Green tea’.

The cash component of these main awards was contributed through sponsorship by The Trusts. In addition to the main prizes, the judges between them made nine merit awards. LANDSCAPE MERIT $300 voucher from Studio Art Supplies to Tarn Watkinson for ‘Mountain Face’. STILL LIFE MERIT $400 voucher from Homestead Picture Framers to Linda Poulton for ‘Still life with lemon Oil’. PORTRAIT OR FIGURATIVE MERIT $300 voucher from Takapuna Art Supplies to Karen Ric-Hansen for ‘Nakulwibo (their grandmother)’. ABSTRACT MERIT $500 voucher from Draw Art Supplies Ltd to Linda Dixon for ‘We Can’t Help It, It’s In Our DNA’. OUR PEOPLE OUR PLACE $500 from the Revell Family Trust to Grant Finch for ‘Lets Get Down There’. LOOKING WEST $500 from the Revell Family Trust to Michelle Reid for ‘Rangitopunu’.

First Prize The Trusts Sculpture Award: Ann Uerata Sea “Enemy” Anemone Fibre - harakeke muka, paper and stone

Sculpture Merit Awards THE TERTIARY AWARD $500 voucher [Frames] by Daniel to Natasha Smyser for ‘Kaitiaki’, a piece in the Maori tradition carved in Totara. FIRST MERIT AWARD $300 from Greg Presland to Alexander Efimov for ‘Juliana as a butterfly’. SECOND MERIT AWARD $150 from Sudan Hairdressing to Hamish Oakley-Brown for ‘The Hand Of Reason (That Old War Horse)’. THIRD MERIT AWARD $100 from Godwin Design to Karen Kennedy for ‘Clown and Rooster’.

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15 young West Auckland athletes receive Don Oliver grants Swimmers Gabrielle Fa'amausili (Gold) and Michael Mincham (Silver) headed up the list of 10 young Westie athletes who experts think can make it to the top of their sport and were therefore worthy of receiving a Don Oliver Youth Sport Foundation scholarship for 2016/17.

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ausili Gabrielle Fa'am

One gold, one silver and eight bronze scholarships were awarded. In addition, five other young athletes impressed the judges to the extent that “The Don Oliver” trustees elected encouraged them to keep trying, by awarding them training grants. These awards were made at the Annual Don Oliver Awards dinner at The Trusts Arena. At the event, world-class Roy Williams announced the next inductees in the Wall of Fame that runs around the walls of the Arena’s Genesis Room. The Wall memorialises great West Auckland sportsmen and women who made their mark internationally in their sport. All this was against a backdrop celebrating the 50th anniversary of Don Oliver’s gold medal at the Commonwealth Games In Kingston, Jamaica, a feat shared with Roy Williams who won gold in the decathlon at those games. Both men were proud Westies, and were celebrated on the night by some of the great names in New Zealand sport. A Gold sponsorship is worth $5,000 and is awarded to young athletes who have already been international medallists in their age group. It was awarded to backstroker and former Halberg Emerging Talent, Gabrielle Fa'amausili who has already been junior world record holder and twice world junior champion in her age group. A silver sponsorship ($4,000) is awarded to an athlete who has placed 16 or above internationally in their age group. Michael Mincham is one of the country’s top freestylers. He was this year’s recipient and appears to have “what it takes” to be one of our next male Olympians in the pool.

Michael Mincham

The training grants recipients were all newcomers to the Don Oliver scholarships process: Liam Bethell (brother of Peter and also in downhill mountain biking); Jack Roudon (Rugby League); Ikko Shibuya (swimming); George Smith (swimming) and Yzabelle Tevao (basketball). The scholars were chosen from among 26 applicants aged between 14 and 21, who live in West Auckland and who in the opinion of the selectors have the ability and X factor to be standing on a world podium some day soon. The selectors are Simon Wickham, deputy chairman of the New Zealand Olympic Committee and chairman of selectors for Olympic and Commonwealth Games teams, Gael Nagaiya, former Silver Fern and convenor of selectors for the Ferns and Ross Dallow a world-class coach, lifelong sportsman and sports administrator. The Training Grants allow the athletes $1,000 and are an encouragement from the Don Oliver Foundation Trustees to youngsters who the selectors themselves indicated were unlucky to miss out on a scholarship. In addition to the grant, scholarship winners receive six months free membership at Arena Fitness. Fifteen scholarships is the largest number of Awards ever made in one year. The awards are made at the annual dinner with the recipients receiving half their funding on that night and the second half six months later, provided they have met various criteria.

Bronze sponsorships ($2,000) recognise young athletes showing high potential for future results. The Bronze recipients were: Kana Andrews-Nahu (weightlifting); Peter Bethell (downhill mountain biking); Aaron Booth (decathlon); Britt Kindred (surfing); Nicole Mettam (football); and newcomers Jackson Dawson (open-water swimming); Matthew Oxenham (wrestling) and Montel Tivoli (weightlifting).

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Spray-free maintenance of local cycle way by Glen Eden community group The spirit of co-operation between sections of the community and the Council lives on, with a community group recently signing up to keep a cycle way weed-free without using sprays. The community group, Glen Eden Transition Town (GETT), recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. GETT first approached the local board with the idea, at one of its regular meetings and offered to maintain the cycle way linking Savoy Road and Inver Street in Glen Eden, and connecting to the northern edge of Ceramco Park. “Our group is concerned about the use of chemicals to control weeds and we wanted to find a way to minimise their use in our local area,” Sarah James of GETT, said. This spray-free maintenance aligns with Auckland Council’s Weed Management Policy objective to minimise agrichemical use. “The cycle way is used by many children as a route to and from school, so this is an important area to look after the health of people and the environment,” Ms James said. Waitākere Ranges Local Board Chair and parks portfolio holder Sandra Coney said “I was delighted when the group came forward to offer to carry out spray-free weed control.” “There is a lot of concern in the community about using chemicals to control weeds, so for Glen Eden Transition Town

to put their hands up and do something about the issue is wonderful. It’s something we’d like to see more of.” The local board is currently in talks with another community group to do a similar initiative in another place in the local board area. The fantastic Twin Streams project that reclaimed kilometres of stream banks and built a network of walking and cycling paths was a classic example of how a community/council collaboration could produce stunning results. GETT has been working in the Glen Eden area since 2012, focusing on waste reduction, community food production, environmental restoration and local sustainable transport. They have previously partnered with the local board on a number of initiatives.

Monique Olivier and Sarah James of Glen Eden Transition Town sign the spray-free MOU

LIVE MUSIC EVERY FRIDAY FROM 8PM: 21st October: Duoband 28th October: Johnny & Steve 4th November: Kara Gordon

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Corner of Great North Rd & West Coast Rd, Kelston facebook.com/workshopbarnz


New library courtyard reflects Glen Eden's long history Glen Eden Library has refurbished its courtyard as a place to help keep children engaged with the library, books and learning in all its forms, especially in the warmer months, while using artistic references to keep the area’s long history alive. The idea is to hold activities such as children’s story time and school holiday programmes, outdoors in the courtyard when weather and temperatures permit. The use of railway sleepers in the design reflects Glen Eden’s history according to Sandra Coney, a prolific local historian and Waitākere Ranges Local Board Chair. The sleepers allude to the importance of the railway in the history of Glen Eden, West Auckland and Auckland as whole for more than a century. In the 1870’s the Government decided to push a railway through the West and on to Kaipara (and ultimately Northland). The Auckland authorities decided that with the Grafton cemetery getting full, the new railway offered the opportunity to create a new last resting place at Waikomiti, as Waikumete was then called. Why they chose somewhere so very far from the infant Auckland city has never entered the folklore, but it was certainly far sighted with Glen Eden several hours’ train ride away and a day’s return journey by the primitive roads of the day.

phina, and Glen Eden Stephanie Mao with daughter Sera it: David Blocksidge Cred ello. Cost e Jann ager library man

With the railway built, for a number of years funeral trains with a special car for funerals and several for the mourners chugged out to Waikumete Cemetery. Old shilling coins embedded in the sleepers are reminder of the fare paid by mourners to travel on the train. One shilling was replaced with 10 cents back in 1967 but was worth a great deal a hundred years before that. Native plantings in the courtyard are a reference to the Waitakere Ranges. Waitākere ngahere refer to the rainforest, grassy mounds represent the foothills and local farms, and apple trees represent the orchards. "The project is a sign of other town centre improvements to come, including a town square at the other end of Glenmall," says Sandra Coney.

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New park for teenagers opens in Ranui Yet another park designed around what young Westies say they want has been opened in Rānui. The park, on the corner of Birdwood Road and Glen Road in Rānui, has a number of new facilities designed specifically for young people aged 12 and older. These include a multi-sport half court and full court, a climbing wall, rope course, whānau shelter, barbecue, picnic tables and bike racks. The park was opened at the beginning of this month with events including a “have a go” day organised by Sport Waitākere and also some live entertainment. “The new park will be a fantastic place for local youth. It’s got some really innovative features like the climbing wall and rope course. The equipment in the park is what people asked for during our engagement with the community,” Henderson-Massey Local Board Chair Vanessa Neeson said. The park was created by the HendersonMassey Local Board.

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Helene Wilson appointed as new Northern Mystics coach Helene Wilson will step up to the role of head coach of the Mystics as they head into the brand new, elite domestic league, netball competition next season that replaces the Trans Tasman Championship. An assistant with the SKYCITY Mystics, Wilson has a rich coaching background that includes guiding the New Zealand Secondary Schools team to victory over Australia and leading the Northern Zone Under 23s to a National title. She’s also coached the Northern team in the Beko Netball League this year. While the full details for next year’s new elite domestic competition are still to be confirmed the SKYCITY Northern Mystics’ full 10-player roster for 2017 has been confirmed and Wilson is working hard to plan for the upcoming season to ensure the squad hit the ground running as pre-season gets underway. Coaching the Mystics next season is a huge honour for Wilson and she feels very humbled to have been given the responsibility to coach the flagship team for the Northern Zone.

She describes the team and competition as exciting prospects and she's very much looking forward to working up a winning squad. “Being able to coach fulltime, doing something I love is a real privilege. It is my role to grow great people, great professionals and people who have an ability to perform under pressure. I believe great coaches leave an imprint on people’s lives that enable them to transfer the skills they learn through sport to their lives outside of sport. I hope the players in the Mystics will look back on their time with our team feeling respected, challenged and having learnt more about themselves.” “We are very lucky to have recruited players for next year who have made a clear commitment to want to play for the Mystics. They are players who want to give back to the netball community in our zone and want to lead through their actions and performance. Our four key Silver ferns are all from the Northern Zone and it will be exciting to see Maria Tutaia and Bailey Mes combine in the shooting circle. We have a new and exciting combination in the defence circle, with Storm Purvis and Anna Harrison. Sacha Corbin adds dynamic power and experience to our talented midcourt of Elisapeta Toeava, Samon Nathan and Mererangi Paul. “Michaela Sokolich-Beatson re-joins us after a successful debut year and we will be looking forward to her growing her game for a more permanent position. To round out the squad we have Tera-Maria Amani and Brooke Watt who have both performed consistently in the National League competition this year. It will be exciting to see them take the next step up in 2017.”

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Wilson said of all her coaching achievements, there are two that stand out. “There have been many over the years but the ones where you are with your team over a year-long campaign are the most challenging and satisfying. For that reason, I would say coaching Westlake Girls High School to qualify for the NZSS Championships for the first time in the school’s history and coaching Shore Rovers Netball Club to their first Premier Club Championship in 12 years are both very special.” Wilson’s mother grew up in West Auckland and her father on the North Shore. She is the second eldest of four children and has an older sister and a younger brother and sister. Their family settled in Torbay in East Coast Bays. Wilson’s dad built their family home when she was a baby and they lived there the whole time. She now has a family of her own. Wilson is married to Kane and they have two children Jayden (10) and Brady (8). Wilson was a keen netballer herself, and she played every position on the court in a representative team across her netball playing days. “I was really lucky to have been able to play across all those positions. In school I was a circle defender because I was taller than everyone else so I got put into GK and GD. Once I left school I was a mid-court player, mainly WD and C and a little bit of WA. I then went to Australia to live for a time and I enjoyed playing GS and GA over there. But I considered my strongest position to be WD.” Wilson’s coaching career began while she was playing netball at school in Year 11 as the senior girls had to coach a junior team to give back to the school. “I have enjoyed coaching many sports over the years, but I guess it is a part of who I am. I enjoy being a change agent and seeing people grow to their potential. Once I left school I trained as a Physical Education teacher and coaching is part of the job description.” While the full details for next year’s new elite domestic competition are still to be confirmed, Wilson is working hard to plan for the upcoming season to ensure the squad hit the ground running when pre-season gets underway.

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icons

of the

west

In a departure from tradition our Icon of the West this month is not just a person but a combination of person and place. Tui Glen is a historic place that has had an indelible place in the hearts of generations of Westies thanks to its visionary and philanthropic creator, Claude Brookes.

Tui Glen has had so many 'lives' in the last century that if it was a creature, it would be a cat and it wouldn't have been there at all had it not been for the philanthropic and visionary Claude Brookes.

Tui Glen circa 1930

Tui Glen was first established in 1912 and has been a picnic and camping ground, a temporary residence for immigrants, a “dive” for misfits, drug addicts and the homeless. Now it’s a fantastic Tree Tops adventure playground with towers, slides, the Eagle’s Nest, a “flying saucer” and a double flying fox. In many ways it’s a return to its first “life”, a place to play and come alive every weekend and holidays with laughing children having the time of their lives under the fond gaze of their parents, aunts, uncles and other whanau. It’s a long way from the dark days in the year 2000 when a disturbed young man was drugged in his caravan, driven out into the ranges and murdered. Something over a year later a fellow resident of the park was convicted of the murder, dobbed in by a third person who was an accessory. Two years after that Waitakere Council closed the caravan park because it had become a centre for drug taking by transients with attitude, bringing to an end the very first registered camping ground in Auckland and a history as a camping ground that had existed for some years before registration; around 80 years in total.

set out to barge a cottage, in two parts, up the creek. While this didn’t go exactly to plan as one barge and therefore one part of the cottage sank, the Brookes family did soon establish “Glen Haven”. Three years later he purchased another seven acres (3.5 ha) and then realising the potential dedicated seven acres of his land as a place for picnicking and camping. Whether this was the same seven acres that he bought in 1915 or just seven acres out of the total is not certain. In any event from then on, Tui Glen came into being, as a place that entranced generations. It is thanks to Claude Brookes’ energy that there are so many mature trees to be enjoyed and take shade under today. He began adding ships cabins as an added attraction for visitors wanting to stay in the 1920’s. The very first was the captain’s cabin from Union Steamship ship Wainui. These ships cabins were later supplemented by others built by the Brookes family. All this was partly paid for by the sale of apples from the family’s orchard.

It has made an enduring mark on the hearts of many. Former Henderson and Waitakere Mayor Assid Corban has very fond memories of endless summers as a child at Tui Glen with swimming, boating, donkey rides, a plethora of sporting activities and just plain “larking about” as children do.

A jetty was built with the deck some metres above the low tide level to allow not just for the river’s rise at high tide but also floor events. Because of the height, the jetty was completed with a crane for lifting boats in and out of the water. Photos taken at the time show the jetty jammed with holiday makers in their “Sunday best”.

The term cabin is as historic as the park itself. The original cabins were in fact cabins off ships that were barged up the Henderson Creek and placed on site.

About 80 years later, the jetty was rebuilt partly to keep faith with Claude Brookes’ original vision and partly as a deliberate attempt to once again open up the waterways of West Auckland to the public. The jetty was refurbished at the original height and a floating pontoon was placed in the Henderson creek itself, joined to the top deck via a hinged ramp to allow pontoon and ramp to raise and fall with the tides and floods.

The history of Tui Glen began in 1911. An early Aucklander and engineer Claude Brookes was exploring the Waitemata and its streams by boat, when he discovered the land that Mr Brookes later named Tui Glen (presumably for an abundance of tui in the trees). The following year he purchased the land, cleared it and

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Tui Glen and Claude Brookes


Tui Glen and its creator Claude Brookes At the same time the Waitakere Council built a second jetty on the far side, below The Trusts Arena. This, the Chris Timms Jetty was dedicated to memory of the Westie icon who died when his antique warbird jet crashed in the Firth of Thames.

As the New Zealand Herald said when the new park was opened “Call it a rare victory for the anti-PC brigade a more challenging type of playground is here to stay, despite one local body temporarily closing a slide last week after children sustained bruising”.

Back in the 1920’s and 30’s Tui Glen had become one of the recreation centres of choice for many Aucklanders. On busy weekends and holidays hordes of holiday makers could be found picnicking, camping, and playing tennis, cricket, quoits, skittles, football, deck bowls, swimming and boating.

“Steep slides and towering climbing frames have been installed in seven New Zealand locations by Whanganui company Playground Centre”. The park features towers and an eagle’s nest were designed to take children’s eyes level with the tree tops, from which it takes its name.

One of the “wonders” was the The Tui Glen Dell. This was an area Brookes converted into a Japanese Garden with ponds, fountains lit with coloured lights, secluded walks and ornamental bridges. Virtually all trace of this has now vanished.

Huge slides and flying foxes used existing contours with the new playground to create fun and physical challenge for the whole family.

In the 30’s an artificial beach was created with sand from Shelly Beach bathing and boating sheds. Then came war and afterwards Tui Glen was used as a transit housing camp for migrants. In time it became redundant and run down until purchased by the Henderson Borough Council in the 1960s. The council must have given it a new lease of life because a report (unfortunately undated) noted that in the period 1977-78 the number of visitors who stayed a night or more had increased to 3,053, 373 more than in the previous year. After that it began it’s long plunge into decline finally closing its doors to caravans and temporary homes in 2002. But Tui Glen wasn’t going to go without a fight. First Waitakere Council set about revitalising it as a place of recreation and protecting and gradually refurbishing the cabins and also the original Brookes home of Glen Haven.

One community leader welcomes the playgrounds after decades of boring swings and gentle slides, cushioned by rubber mats. "It's so great that we're now out of that mould of building little slides and little swings and rubber mats. It's about teaching the kids to enjoy being kids and take some risks," said one local political leader after watching the way the park drew and excited kids. Billed by Auckland Council as a "destination park" the fabulous new Tree Tops park at Tui Glen has not only revived Tui Glen and put it back where Claude Brookes imagined it should be, it also encouraged Auckland Council to start considering similar destination parks in other parts of Auckland.

Then, with Waitakere Council absorbed into the new Supercity, Auckland City came the idea of a magnificent adventure playground where children can have real thrills and excitement. Nest Tui Glen - The Eagles

Tui Glen Tow

er and Slides

Icon of the West.

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Santa is coming to West Auckland "You better watch out, you better not cry, you better not pout, I'm telling you why, Santa Claus is coming to town" The jolly man in the big red suit will be turning up to the Henderson Christmas Festival between 10am - 2pm on Saturday 19 November.

AND HENDERSON IS GETTING READY WITH RIDES including a ferris wheel, merry-go-round, tea-cup ride and bouncy castle. There's also a 4-in-1 bungy, a rock climbing wall and much more.

All of this will be set up in Henderson Town Centre, Great North Road between Railside Avenue and Trading Place.

The day is free for all and includes carols, performers and bands as well as face painting, ice cream and lots more!

The 2015 Henderson Santa Parade was a fantastic success.


Going West books and Writers Festival a triumph The famous West Auckland Going West Books and Writers Festival transitioned brilliantly last month when the month long literary event was delivered under "new management". After 20 years the founders Murray Grey and Naomi McCleary stood back allowing a new group of trustees to deliver the much loved event which is unique in New Zealand because of its focus on New Zealand authors and their works. While the Poetry Slam, the event that turns poetry into a combat sport, ran through its regional events in August. The lead-in to the festival was a season of Sham, a blistering black comedy, at Te Pou Theatre in New Lynn.

Dame Neva Farris and Meryl face-off in a poison laced scene from Sham.

The association with Te Pou has added a compelling new dimension to the Festival and this year’s play, featuring the west’s acting grand dame, Annie Whittle, took up where Sister Anzac left off last year. Sham, by Jess Sayers, tells the story of how Fern (Amanda Tito), the adult daughter of a somewhat threadbare Meryl (Michele Hine), discovers her aunt is none other than Dame Neva Farris (Annie Whittle), an internationally acclaimed opera diva. This all transpires when Dame Neva and her riotous, alcoholic, lesbian lover, Ann (Darien Takle) come to dinner. And between them they rip the lid off a can of something much more profound than worms. As always the Festival proper launched with a Friday night opening night at Titirangi Community Hall. Inevitably, it began on a sombre note as the sell out crowd paid tribute to long time supporter Sir Graeme Douglas whose funeral had been only a week earlier. The tribute was followed by Emma Neale, a young and talented young poet as the Alan Curnow Reader, the legendary Albert Wendt as the Sir Graeme Douglas Orator before wrapping up with Michele A’Court who had the audience in stitches with the things she hadn’t told her daughter.

The rest of the weekend featured as usual the works of the well known and the newbies in the New Zealand literary scene being teased out with assistance of some excellent interviewers such as John Campbell. Perhaps the most unusual was the interview by doctor and poet Glenn Colqhoun of Intensivist David Gallens, about being Jewish, an intensivist and his new book, Things that Matter. David Gallens is the doctor you would hope to meet if your life is hanging by a thread and you need someone to perform miracles to stop the thread from snapping altogether and to bring you back into the land of the living. This rather pell mell dash through corridors and New Zealand literary imagination wrapped up on the Sunday night with food and wine connoisseur Jules van Cruyen and the audience, discovering the delights of craft beer under the guidance of Te Radar. Other festival events included a theatre season at Te Pou, play readings by aspiring young authors, a whanau day, a studio season with Oratia playwrite Gary Henderson, a Film Season and Maori Theatre Development Season, Poetry Slam and Word Up finals.

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The Bridges of Waitakere City

Art Bridges were designed by artists and then created by engineers. In our last issue we introduced several new bridges being built in Waitakere, and made mention of how Waitakere City, when it ran the West for 21 years, had started a tradition of creating “Art Bridges”, the first of which was the beautiful Rewarewa Bridge in New Lynn. The idea was to make something very ordinary into something very interesting and build it into the “culture of the west”.

Another of these bridges links Corban Community Arts Centre and Henderson Park. The Opanuku Footbridge was designed by local artist and sculptor Neil Miller as a reminder of the importance of the railway in the history and growth of West Auckland. Constructed in 2003, the design reminds us with its signal like structures that it sits on what was once railway land. Highlights around Opanuku include the kowhai in flower in October and the calls and company of fantail, tui and kingfisher.

Free community event celebrates Te Kotuitanga Park, New Windsor The first major community event organised for the new Te Kotuitanga Park was a great success. Along with traditional activities for such events attendees had great fun making their own free smoothies by using pedal power to blend them, with a modified bike to power the blender. The event also featured music and children’s entertainment, including origami and face painting, as well as an instructor demonstrating and giving lessons in Tai-Chi and reflexology. The event was the celebration of a park designed in consultation between the Whau Local Board and local people, to promote well-being. Designers incorporated many of the features the community requested. These included raised stones for reflexology; a shelter for picnicking, Tai-Chi or other exercise; to a mound to control noise levels and great views to the Waitākere Ranges.

oothie makers Peddle powered sm

The park also has a central ‘kick-a-ball’ space that will accommodate a variety of activities and community events, plus landscape planting including native plants, fruit trees and wildflowers. Other features include a shared concrete walkway around the reserve, which can be used as a learn-to-ride track and for scooters too. The park was previously known informally as Tiverton Reserve.


Cemetery staff take a long walk to honour the memory of a sailor Who cares if a gravestone 122 years old gets vandalised? For Waikumete Cemetery the answer recently was cemetery staff, led by manager Roscoe Webb, the friends of Waikumete and a bunch of bikers, among others. They organised a fundraising walk to pay for a new headstone for 34 year old Yeoman Carpenter James Cross, Royal Navy, after the original was vandalised. Yeoman Carpenter James Cross was a member of the ship’s company of Royal Navy cruiser HMS Orlando, when it called in at Auckland. On 9 May 1896. James Cross and shipmates were returning from shore leave in the dark and endeavouring to board the liberty boat at the Man O’ War steps at the foot of Queen Street, when James Cross tripped or slipped into the water. Newspaper reports from the day suggest he may have struck his head and been dazed. Whatever the truth of that, a shipmate, a marine, plunged into the harbour but in the inky blackness could see nothing. Then, in a macabre turn, a hand reached up out of the depths and seized his leg. The marine tried to reach down and grab hold of the hand, when it relaxed its grip and slipped away. Unable to see anything in the dark, the sailors were forced to give up the search and James Cross’ body was recovered the next day. The sailor was buried at Waikumete and the grave marked by a 1.5 metre headstone paid for by his shipmates. There the matter might have rested, with James Cross unremembered by anyone other than readers of Matthew Grey’s Tales from the Crypt, except for the fact that 121 years later, in November last year, vandals smashed the headstone. Annoyed by the vandalism cemetery staff and Friends of Waikumete staged a 24 hour fundraising walk in December, doing sponsored laps of the cemetery to raise money for a new headstone.

Roscoe Webb himself walked 24 hours continuously and estimated he covered 120 kilometres. Head sexton Sheree Stout walked 11 hours and sexton Bruce Corry 19 hours. Besides Auckland Council staff and Friends of Waikumete, Deputy mayor Penny Hulse, Councillor Linda Cooper, Waitakere Ranges Local Board chairwoman Sandra Coney, and Titirangi RSA president Matt McMillan also joined in, as did former sailors with the Royal New Zealand Navy. Funds to meet the $5,500 cost also came from donations including from a group of bikers. One former sailor, Kelly Kidd, shared that he was drawn to the event because of parallels with his own service. He said he and Cross were of a similar age when they enlisted (Kidd was 16 and Cross 15 and a half). He was in the same branch of the navy and the same rank, and like James Cross went by liberty boat for a night on the town, embarking and disembarking at Admiralty Steps (once the Man O’ War Steps). In an eerie parallel, Kidd and his shipmates lost a colleague in almost identical circumstances at Admiralty steps. HMS Orlando was the lead ship of the Orlando class of first-class cruisers built in the yards of Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow and launched on 3 August 1886. At the time of James Cross’ death she was flagship of the Navy detachment on the Australia Station. Three years later she sailed into history by being assigned to the China Station. While there she was part of a force sent to rescue the British Legation under siege in Beijing during the 1900 Boxer rebellion.

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