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July 2016 Neil Finn - Icon of the West

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our west

30th Anniversary of The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards

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Family with autistic daughter and a leaky home need a helping hand

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Chris Timms, so much more than an Olympic yachtie

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The Trusts Community Foundation helping West Auckland p16 Our West is brought to you by The Trusts. For more information on The Trusts, visit our website www.thetrusts.co.nz find us on facebook or email us at info@thetrusts.co.nz


BRINGING FAMILY AND FRIENDS S

TO TOGETHER OGETHER FOR OVER 80 YEARS

PRIMED FOR SELAKS ROAST DAY? WE’VE GOT A WINE FOR THAT. For inspiration and tips to help make it a memorable Selaks Roast Day, visit facebook.com/SelaksWines

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Enjoy Selaks Responsibly


Its election time for The Trusts. Have your say on election day! As most people know, The Trusts are owned by the people of West Auckland and every three years, local people get the opportunity to stand for election as an Elected Member on either the Portage Licensing Trust or the Waitakere Licensing Trust. The election happens at the same time as the Council and Local Board elections and is conducted under the same rules. This means that all the electors of West Auckland get to have a say on who acts as Elected Members overseeing the business on your behalf. Being able to vote on the Elected Members means you can make sure this business continues to sell liquor and conduct its business for the good of the community as a whole. This includes that, instead of paying dividends to shareholders, The Trusts return a large share of the profits to the community in the form of sponsorships, gifts, grants and other forms of support for community causes. The Elected Members also make recommendations to The Trusts Community Foundation (TTCF) on where locally raised money from TTCF gaming machines is returned to your community. This year’s elections will happen in September/October, with voting closing at noon, Saturday 8 October. They will be conducted according to the Local Electoral Act 2001 (LEA), the Local Electoral Regulations 2001 (LER) and the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. Voting is by postal vote and is on a First Past the Post (FPP) basis - which means that candidates with the most votes are elected. The official results will be made available on Thursday 13 October.

The election timetable is: Wednesday 13 July • Public notice of the election is made and nominations are called.

Friday 15 July • Nominations will open, allowing people to put their name forward for election (or have someone nominate them). • Electoral rolls open for inspection.

Friday 12 August • Nominations close (12 noon). • Electoral rolls close. (So, if you want to stand for election you must be nominated by noon on 12 August).

Wednesday 17 August • The names of candidates will be published.

Friday 16 September • Voting packs will be posted to electors.

Saturday 8 October • Election Day. Voting closes 12 noon. Votes will then be counted. • Preliminary results will be available as soon after close of voting as possible.

The official results will be made available on Thursday 13 October. 3


Changes mark the 30th Anniversary Important changes are happening for The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards Exhibition, as this most prestigious event on the New Zealand arts calendar approaches its 30th anniversary. These changes include on-line registration via www.waitakerearts.com and a viewing screen at the venue on opening night to showcase the prize winners. The screen will also be used to acknowledge sponsors and all the entrants’ artwork. An alteration to the name of the awards to include the 13-18 year old Art and Photography Sections, which was only introduced last year has now evolved as The 30th Trusts Art & Sculpture, 13-18 Yr Art & Photography Awards 2016. In order to streamline the process around exhibitions the Waitakere Central Community Arts Council (WCCAC) decided to set up a new Exhibition Committee whose job it is to focus on our two major exhibitions annually. This enables the WCCAC Committee, headed by President Marion Sutcliffe, to concentrate their efforts on ensuring the members are afforded the best possible experience with the day to day functioning of the arts council. As has become the norm over many years, we will be hosting The Trusts Exhibition in Shed 2 at the historical Corban Estate Arts Centre, from 17 - 25 September with a glittering awards night on 16 September 2016. Entries and online registration are already open and entries close on 1 September. Couriered entries must be received by 8 September and the final receiving date for all artwork is 10 September, 9am to 1pm.

The Trusts Art & Sculpture, 13-18 year old Art & Photography Awards are both prestigious and rewarding and accordingly attract entries from top artists from around the country. Last year’s winner, for example, was the German-born Claudia Recorean who has an international reputation and these days calls the West Coast of the South Island, home.

The winning artists and sculptors enjoy a substantial boost to their reputation nationally, while winning cash prizes with the added bonus of keeping their work for private sale. The winning artist takes home $4,000 and the winning sculptor $2,000. The second and third place in the art section receive $1, 500 and $750 respectively and sculptors, $750 and $500. The Trusts is sponsoring of the youth first, second and third prizes in the 13 - 15 year old and the 16 - 18 year old categories in Art and Photography, with the first prize winners taking home $450 each plus additional sponsored prizes. Second and third prize winners receive $350 and $200 respectively. In both the Art & Sculpture and Arts & Photography Awards, there is a number of merit awards and additional vouchers from many businesses sponsoring this event from around West Auckland. As history has shown, the event attracts the finest examples of art currently being produced in New Zealand. Particularly impressive, especially given the youth and inexperience of the artists, has been the sheer quality of the works submitted by young, up and coming artists in the 13 - 18 year categories, all of them students studying art and media at school or tertiary level. Due to the fact that adult photography is well represented in New Zealand with a number of award exhibitions held annually; and the reduced space at Corbans Estate for this years’ exhibition, this category will not be available this year. The encouragement of youth art is an important motivator for the 13 - 18 year old category.

New steps for an event with a very long history The Waitakere Central Community Arts Council was originally the West Auckland Community Art Council that met and held its exhibitions in what is now the Henderson Recreation Centre. The space is now “book-ended” by Zeal and West Wave. Back in those days it was thought of as the “old Plessey building”, the former premises of a British electronics giant that at one time had a manufacturing plant there. : Jocelyn A.A. Harwood 1st Prize The Trusts Art Award 2014 by Dick Frizzell ed Judg – as Canv on Oil i: Ranu for

Small and local the art council it may have been, but it was an important player in the New Zealand arts world.


Of The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards the huge showroom windows. The company very generously moved its “precious metal” in the form of shiny brand new cars, outdoors to make room for the artworks.

proud sponsor

The Waitakere Central Community Arts Council moved its headquarters from the recreation centre to the The Studio at the Corban Estate Arts Centre. Although a number of members didn’t want to make the move, about half-a-dozen stout hearted ones, made their way to the new home, set up their easels and went to work “to show a presence” that would encourage the others to accept change and move on. They are still there, still active and figuratively rolling up their sleeves to tackle the latest and the best, “The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards”, adding another chapter to this ever evolving history.

: 1st Prize The Trusts Art Award 2015 Klee & Tadpoles. Claudia Recorean - Thinking of Paul

Even back then, it regularly hosted and curated in Henderson, travelling art exhibitions taken around the country by the then Regional Art Councils. While the Regional Council paid the cost of touring, the Art Council had to assemble the exhibition, promote and advertise it and then pack it again for the next stage of its journey. Lynette McKinstrie, along with other long standing members, remembers those days well. They created their own posters with only a typewriter and Letraset. Letraset was sheets of letters in different sizes and fonts, capitals and lower case and even some different colours. These could be rubbed off their backing sheet onto another piece of paper to spell out the words needed to be created, in the sizes and fonts of their choice.

In the early days of what is now The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards this exhibition was previously sponsored by the Waitakere Licensing Trust, along with other local businesses, some who still support this exhibition 30 years down the track. The showrooms of Waitemata Autos in Lincoln Road were the home for the exhibition from 1986 to 2003 which then moved to the recreation centre at West Wave, then onto the Henderson campus of Unitec, before settling at the Corban Estate Arts Centre. Waitemata Autos is remembered with particular affection as it was a high and airy venue, flooded with natural light by

1st Prize The Trusts Sculpture Award 2015: Clovis Viscoe - Huia.


Build My Ride - The Trusts team building events are also giving back! The Trusts retail managers from West Liquor and Village Wine & Spirits stores recently had a planning day to review operations and their goals for 2016. As part of the day they completed a charity team challenge with a real difference. This charity event included team activities to 'earn' bike parts, then the building of brand

new bikes and then the giving of the bikes to kids from West Harbour School who really deserve them, all on that day! What better formula for a team event than having great fun, building new bikes and then making some incredibly deserving children very, very happy!

Protecting Swanson's heritage Swanson, named for early settler William Swanson, is one of the most historic places in the west, in terms of European settlement and now there’s a survey dedicated to drilling deeper into its heritage to ensure that as much as possible of the village’s history is protected. William Swanson, “Honest Willie”, first arrived in Auckland in 1844 and worked for five years before leaving for the California goldfields. Four years later he was back with money in his pocket and bought a substantial block of land that became the area we now know as Swanson.

Like Henderson, Swanson grew around the activities of its early settlers and developed its own culture and identity. Swanson himself was a logger and timber merchant.

Buildings, sites, streetscapes, notable trees, landscapes, special ecological areas (SEAs) and its location as a gateway to the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area will all be considered in the survey. Oral histories about Swanson’s past will be sought from locals who will also be asked what heritage features should be studied as part of the survey. The final design guidelines will align with the Auckland Design Manual and Te Aranga Maori Design Principles. A team, including heritage planner Jane Matthews, local historian Lisa Truttman, and planning and design consultants Boffa Miskell, has been assembled to work with locals on the project.

Now, with Auckland City Council’s land use strategy showing there will be greater urbanisation, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board has commissioned a survey of Swanson’s heritage to ensure the village’s history is protected. Among other things, the survey will also identify local character elements for a design guide to inform future development. Swanson’s history has been rich and varied and perhaps its most colourful period was when the legendary Don Buck was the dominant figure. In its earliest European days it was a centre for timber milling and gum digging and later winemaking and farming. It also has significant Maori heritage and military history.

Home of T White, Swanson, 1919. Photographed by Henry Winkleman, West Auckland; from the J T Diamond Collection.


Celebrating 100 Years of Family Winemaking

The pioneering West Auckland Babich family is marking 100 years of winemaking over 2016. As part of this celebration, a group of lucky customers who purchased Babich wine in February and March from West Liquor stores received a very personal tour of the winery, enjoyed a private tasting with the winemakers and lunch with the Babich family. The guests gained a real appreciation of the dedication and passion in this family business, with generations of winemaking experience working across 11 vineyards in New Zealand’s finest wine regions.


New surface will make Douglas Track at The Trusts Arena world class again The Douglas Track is to get a make-over. Resurfacing the synthetic track will ensure that The Douglas Track and Field at The Trusts Arena will go on providing the best possible running surface for athletes of all types, from weekend joggers to those of world class who will go on enjoying one of the premier athletic venues in not just Auckland, but in New Zealand. Work on the track will begin in August and is expected to be completed by November. The Trusts Arena Chief Executive Mark Gosling says that new tracks are usually laid every eight to 10 years and the Arena has been working for some time now with Regional Facilities Auckland to get the project over the line.

The Douglas Track and Field Chief Executive Mark Gosling. facility is one of the jewels in the sports and recreation complex known as The Trusts Arena. Fully equipped with lights, artificial Olympic sized track and all the facilities needed for field events it has been one of the premier athletics venues in Auckland since Mt Smart Stadium, venue for the 1990 Commonwealth Games, was converted to be primarily a rugby league and concert venue. This fantastic facility has been attracting major IAAF events in recent years as well as being a regular training venue for the All Blacks and “home” to the Guy Fawkes spectacular, The Trusts Spooks and Sparks. It is named for major sponsor Douglas Pharmaceuticals, the great West Auckland company created by Sir Graeme Douglas, industrialist, philanthropist and former athlete.

“The joint initiative with RFA will ensure that prestigious IAAF events can continue to be held at the track and that the facility is in great condition for the World Masters Games in April 2017. “In addition to this key event, we will see community groups benefiting every single day including the Waitakere Athletics Club, which is the home club for the track.” Mr Gosling says that Arena management are aware that there will be an impact on regular users of the track and surrounding space and offer options at Arena Fitness for those interested in continuing to exercise indoors while the outdoor track is out of commission.

Arena Fitness & Arena Boxing are holding an

OPEN DAY! Date 30th July - Times 9am to 2pm

LOCATION: THE TRUSTS ARENA 65-67 CENTRAL PARK DRIVE

CONTACT 09 970 5202 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK WHAT TO EXPECT • Membership Deals • FREE Access to 9:15am Kettlebell Xpress & 10am Pilates • Supplement tasting • FREE Arena Boxing Classes 8:15am Team Circuit, 10am Blast 1:30am Blast • Spot prizes • Fun exercise challenges

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New Glen Eden Park and Ride Glen Eden is getting a new Park and Ride. With 80 spaces, the new facility at 18 Waikumete Road, is the same size as the existing Park and Ride at the corner of Glenview and West Coad Roads. It will be equipped with both security lighting and CCTV cameras connected back to the station, new stormwater drainage and landscaping.

When the original station was first built, it was located outside the Waikumete Road gate to the cemetery. The historic double-veranda Vogel Class Two station building, was moved to the new western station platform, in the early 2000’s. It was moved and restored by the Glen Eden Railway Station Trust.

The new $900,000 facility is scheduled, weather permitting, to open in September. Historically Glen Eden has been rail focussed for almost all of its existence. Previously known as Waikomiti, the town was a key stop on the new Auckland to Kaipara railway when it was being planned in the 1870’s. This stop was a reason the then Auckland City Council chose Waikumete as the site for the new city cemetery and for a number of years, funeral trains brought the deceased from Auckland to Waikumete Cemetery. The railway was also a vital trade link between the growers of then rural Glen Eden and Auckland, as well as the fastest way to get to “the big smoke”. In recent years, the railway has resumed its role in the lives of commuters, hence the need for a Park and Ride.

Works begins on the new Glen Eden Park and Ride.


Family with autistic daughter and leaky home needs a helping hand as father loses his 35 year career The Glen Eden family of Richard Barry and Devona Busch have been hit by double misfortune and it has left them needing to take care of a severely autistic daughter and rebuild a leaky home, while Richard has lost his teaching job due to hearing problems.

Richard, Rhee, and Devora with their specially modified kitchen in the background

The family, now without an income, need $160,000 to meet half the cost of rebuilding their house, which is leaking and growing toxic mould that is no good for any of them.

Hearing this from a good samaritan, Laisa Taungahihifo, manager of the West Liquor Glen Eden store decided to step in and help. Early in June the samaritan contacted Laisa looking for prizes for a trivial pursuit fundraising evening she was organising for the family. Laisa pitched in as did Hancocks Wine and Spirit Merchants. The event must have been a stunning success because it raised $5,000. This added to the family’s own Give a Little page, means the fundraising has already reached $52,000. The family’s exceptional circumstances began with the birth of their now 10 year old daughter Rheegan, one of twin daughters. Rheegan was born with autism complicated by Pica disorder. Pica is the urge to eat things that not only have no food value but can be dangerous to health and even life. Recently Rheegan’s parents, Richard and Devora found Rhee (as she’s known) trying to eat pink batts. Although Devora first realised that there was something different about Rhee by the age of two, the autism was then relatively mild. It has now reached such severity that Rhee is in the top 5% of patients with high and complex needs. This compulsion to eat potentially lethal things means every household item is potentially lethal to Rhee and so Richard or Devora check on their daughter every three minutes and sleep with her every night. To compound this, Rhee is physically very able and will go to surprising lengths to get into places dangerous to her. As a result, every doorway in the house is equipped with a floor-to-ceiling barred gate and even the breakfast bar in the kitchen has a gate on either side and shatter proof glass between the bench top and the ceiling. All this to stop Rhee getting into what is for her a potentially lethal place with multiple hazards. For all that Richard and Devora, Rhee’s twin sister and older brother see Rhee as a blessing; living with her challenges adds

richness to their lives and defines love in a way most people are not called upon to experience. After Rhee was born, Devora gave up teaching leaving Richard, also a teacher, as the sole breadwinner, which was fine until their lives were turned inside out by double misfortune. First, after more than 35 years at Glen Eden Intermediate, Richard had to give up teaching; his hearing deteriorated to the point where he could no longer distinguish student’s voices in what became a jumble of sound in the classroom. That happened in 2015 and within months they got the news that many home-owners dread, the family home was not just leaky but infested with toxic mould as well. Although this leaves them trapped with no options, once again there is a silver lining that most people would struggle to see; the leaky homes settlement process means they “only” have to pay half the cost. Still, the $160,000 they do have to find would be impossible if it wasn’t for the kindness and good hearts of the people of West Auckland. This “rallying round” that typifies the generosity of Westies is something that Laisa at West Liquor Glen Eden, deeply admires. She hails from South Auckland and came from there to work with The Trusts. She thinks “the way people in the West look after each other, is awesome”. So, when asked to help out with the fundraiser, she wasn’t satisfied with just supplying product and putting collection boxes on the counter. She also arranged for this publicity to help spread the message and urge Westies to exercise their legendary generosity by making a donation to the Busch Barry Family Give a little page:

https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/saverheeshome Richard and Devora are very grateful. Every little helps reduce the amount they may have to borrow to fix their home, if public donations don’t meet the full amount. Please help The Trusts support this very deserving cause. Please give a little. 11


The fantastic art of West Auckland's Arwen Flowers capturing light to create dazzling images Arwen's landscapes capture the drama of the West Coast with an almost photographic reality from a distance; close up the technique is more obvious and the result is a rather paradoxical realism from an impressionist construction. Arwen concedes that a century ago she may have found company with Monet and fellow artists inasmuch as she is fascinated with light, and particularly the way it shifts during the day. Her favourite times, are the early morning and the late, late, evening. Brilliant as her landscapes are, Arwen is by no means confined to that art-form or even to painting. She is fascinated by the creative process, by composition and is just as much into photography and also the “photogramic” fusion of real subjects arranged as for a collage, and then caught on photographic paper in a camera-less process. The origins of this creative process can be traced back to the English pioneer photographer Anna Atkins who, in 1843, created what came to be called photograms. It was a form later explored by the American artist Man Ray. It involves taking objects from life, arranging them on photographic paper or plates, and exposing them to light. It is a process that helps to satisfy the urge to create and the urge to photograph. It is not photography in the classic sense. The resulting images do not come from a camera recording a scene, a person or an event; they are conceived in Arwen’s imagination, created in an almost craft-like way and then made to become a final image by a photographic process. It is an imagination fired partly by the fascination of creative composition and by the magic of seeing photographic images appear and partly by a love of the environment. Because Arwen uses items found in the environment to create much of her work in this format, she hopes that she may be

creating a new, creative, bridge between science and art. Her art is almost literally taking “snapshots” of the flora and fauna and the bio-diversity of today, preserving them for the record. She hopes that they may inspire the Arwen Flowers - Artist. viewer to want to know more about our environment and then to explore the collections of plants and creatures that scientific institutions and museums that have been assembling and cataloguing for several hundred years. Both the existing collections and the new one that Arwen is producing, are records of the environment around us at a certain point in history and both may help in the preservation of what we have, and to record what is changing. The use of the word “snapshot” two paragraphs ago was in the sense of capturing a moment in time. It was not in the sense of an image created by pointing a camera at something and pushing the button. What Arwen is creating is pure art deeply considered and created with enormous care. It was Arwen’s mix of artistic ability, originality and fascinations with the environment that this year earned her a residency from the Earthskin Foundation. This enabled her to spend a month at Piha focussing her soul in the elemental setting of the unspoilt and tumultuous west coast and conjuring images from that landscape. She left with a new body of work and treasure trove of new ideas. Being at Piha was ideal because the west coast is a spiritual home and source of inspiration and while she may now live at Helensville with her husband and three children, Arwen is a true Westie. She was born at St Helen’s Hospital, grew up in Waitakere village and went to school at Waitakere College, before taking a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Auckland University’s Elam School. Until a few months ago she worked in Henderson. Arwen’s fascination with how to create new and different images is probably inate. When she was a child she was given a poorly made camera that leaked light and left all the photographs with pink sides. Most people would have been disappointed. Arwen was fascinated by the resulting effects. It is a reaction that probably explains a great deal about the work of Arwen Flowers, not perhaps a modern Monet, but certainly a very gifted artist continuing and building upon the tradition of capturing light.

Arwen can be found at www.kiwiartist.com


Chris Timms, so much more than an Olympic yachtie A tribute by former Waitakere Mayor Sir Bob Harvey. We were only able to pick out one highlight of Chris’ outstanding life that ended suddenly in 2004, when his jet warbird plunged into the Hauraki Gulf. That highlight was the day when he and Rex Sellers won the yachting gold medal in the Tornado Class, at the 1984 Olympics. In fact Chris came to yachting only after other adventures and the tribute written by Sir Bob Harvey, then Mayor of Waitakere in his report to the Council, on 31 March 2004 cannot be surpassed.

Chris Timms (right) and Rex Sellers after winning the Gold Medal in Los Angeles 1984.

“I had just finished writing about him for my new book, “Westies”, and so the 19 March headline in the New Zealand Herald was a shock: “Olympic gold medal sailor dies in plane crash”. He was gone at 56. Chris Timms: Olympic champion, yachtsman, successful businessman, mountaineer, flower grower and finally … pilot. There is no doubt Chris was a wonderful citizen of our city. And I attempt to explain, below, why I think this was so… Given his later achievements it is ironic that the young Chris, the future Olympic gold medallist, growing up in the Christchurch of the 1950s and early 60s, hated the traditional sports - cricket and rugby. He was, in his own words, ‘nerdish’. He liked Biggles books. His entrée to competitive sports came at the age of twelve when the then diminutive Chris became coxswain for the Christchurch Boys’ High rowing eight. He liked it because, he said, he “got to order around the biggest guys in school”. He began mountaineering in his teens. And in 1966 a fall on Mount Cook killed his climbing partner, and almost killed him. He broke 13 bones: legs; arms; ribs; and bones in the bottom of his back. He landed within 200 metres of an orthopaedic surgeon on a climbing expedition. Chris spent three months in hospital. He went on to make a number of difficult “first ascents” in the Mount Cook region, some of which, he confesses, “were really beyond my ability”. Chris retired from climbing in 1972 because his friends were dying, trying to top each others’ performances. And after several “close calls” of his own, he decided he wanted to live, and called it quits. Meanwhile he was thrown out of Canterbury University for failing to pass enough subjects and ended up completing his chemistry degree in Wellington, part time. And then came sailing … in 1968, with the sleek, very fast Shearwater catamarans. By 1970 Chris had won the national title. But you couldn’t win at the Olympics in Shearwaters, so Chris began sailing Tornados, building one in his Wellington flat. He and his sailing partner won the national championships in 1974, 75 and 76. But surprisingly they were passed over for selection to represent New Zealand at the 1976 Olympics. Chris was passed over again in 1980. But in 1984 he got his chance when he teamed up with Rex Sellers. They were pure

Tornado Class at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

magic. They won so convincingly at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics they didn’t even have to enter the final in the series of seven races to take gold medals. Chris Timms, Rex Sellers, and Russell Coutts shared the title of “1984 New Zealand Yachtsman of the Year.“

Timms and Sellers then went on to win Olympic Silver in 1988 in Seoul. “Chris had moved to Auckland in 1972 to be at the centre of New Zealand Olympic yachting activity and took a job in the related boat-building resin and paint industry. But his employer didn’t like his ideas and he was made redundant. So Chris took his ideas on new ways to market material into the boat building industry and started his own business, first called ‘West System Products’, then ‘Adhesive Technologies’. The business made him a wealthy man and in 1983 that Chris bought an eight-acre block in Waiatarua in Waitakere City. There he lived with his wife of 25 years, Susanne, surrounded by native New Zealand bush. He was still living there when he died. He served a term on the Waitakere Community Board. He was on the board of Sport Waitakere from its formation until his death, promoting grassroots sport in Waitakere City through programmes run at marae, clubs and schools. He helped to build The Trusts Arena. He was also a founder Trustee of The Don Oliver Youth Sport Foundation. He loved flowers. Especially rhododendrons. Not surprisingly, however, he sounded decidedly competitive about it. In 1993 he described himself as aiming “to disprove the current theory that rhododendrons don’t grow well in Auckland’ and “to breed a rhododendron to beat all rhododendrons”. He ended up with one of the biggest rhododendron collections in New Zealand, and one of the most dazzling gardens in the West. At 56, Chris was still a bit of a wild man with his unruly moustache, and was never ready to replace mountaineering and sailing with lawn bowls and golf. He instead flew war planes. He flew formation and aerobatics. Looped the loop. Defied the ground. And that is how he died. A witness said the plane had looked beautiful as it manoeuvred in the sky. Then it went down, very fast, and crashed into the sea … and a great Westie was gone.


icons

of the

west

New Zealand has had some big names in the music world but few have been bigger than Neil Finn, the enduring musician, singer-songwriter who started his road to fame with the iconic Split Enz and went on to form perhaps our greatest ever band, Crowded House. A Westie by adoption, Neil Finn credits the character of Piha with being “midwife” to some of his outstanding work. The Finn family, Neil and Sharon, plus sons Liam and Elroy have had a place there for many years but the association with Piha began even earlier. Back in 1994 Neil and older brother and Split Enz founder, Tim, went out to the village on the wild west coast to co-write their album “Finn”. It worked for them and eight years later, once again at Piha, they began collaborate on what was to be their smash hit album, “Everyone is here”. Strangely, the Finn Brothers rarely wrote together in the heady days of Split Enz and the first edition of Crowded House. It is strange because together they produce beautiful music that is known the world over and has stood the test of time. It’s also strange because of how they shared a bedroom at the Finn home in Te Awamutu and how often they performed together, frequently singing harmonies at the many family music nights. Tim was six years older and when he formed the zany, offbeat, Split Enz in 1972, 14 year old Neil was still at school, dropping out several years later he formed his own band, “After Hours”. In early 1977 he was still playing with them and doubling as a hospital porter when out of the blue, big brother Tim called from London inviting Neil to come and join the band.

It says something of the status of Split Enz that Neil had barely arrived in the band’s recording studio when the legendary Sir George Martin, the man who arranged nearly all the Beatles’ music, walked in. Later Neil wrote the band’s biggest hit, “I Got You” which featured on the 1980 album “True Colours”. A mix of triumphs, tribulations and changes in line-up dogged the band as its fortunes plunged and then were restored by the brilliance of songs like “I Got You”, touring and sheer hard work until, in 1983, Tim called it quits. As always as one door closes another opens; the departure of his big brother opened up a leadership role for Neil that was to see him scale even greater heights. For a while he took over leadership of “Enz” but eventually the band folded and Neil formed “The Mullanes”, which took its name from his mother’s maiden name and his own second Christian name. Crammed together in a small house in Los Angeles to record an album, “The Mullanes” soon gave way to “Crowded House” and “Crowded House” achieved what Split Enz could not; it made it big in America. The single, "Don't Dream It's Over", on debut album “Crowded House”, went to Number 2 on the US charts. Five years earlier history reversed itself. Tim and Neil had at last begun on a song writing collaboration for an album to be called, “The Finn Brothers”. In the end the music was needed for Crowded House’s second album “Woodface” and Tim, agreeing to donate the songs, joined the band for a short while.

In 1993 the brothers were invested OBE in the Queens Birthday Honours List. It was almost as if the world was telling them they belonged together. A year later the joint effort, "Finn", largely conceived at Piha, was released in 1994. 14

Neil Finn,


Neil Finn Globally Crowded House was very big and released four huge albums before the departure of drummer Paul Hester. The band broke up soon after with a final concert in 1996 from the steps of the Sydney Opera House, with 150,000 people jamming Bennelong Point to say farewell. Neil went on to a number of solo projects until 2002 when the brothers were drawn back to Piha to begin work on “Everyone Is Here”, regarded by many as their masterwork.

They went to Piha to find a common ground; a place where the world and its history and its baggage can be set aside. Here they sank into the environment and began to synchronise their minds to this project. The resulting work was fresh and alive and they knew they were on to something special. Eventually others, friends and collaborators from the past were called in to what started in isolation on a wild and at times primeval beach in West Auckland, grew into an international production that ranged across London and Los Angeles and was eventually recorded twice. Tragedy followed when former Crowded House drummer Paul Hester took his own life. In 2004 Neil felt the need to reform Crowded House and the new band released two albums until Neil’s career took a new twist.

Sons Liam and Elroy had now left home and were pursuing their own musical careers and the rock star found that he and Sharon were faced with that bewildering time that comes to nearly all parents; the empty nest. They began late night jam sessions in their pyjamas. Neil took the drums, an instrument he didn’t know well, so that he could develop this skill while Sharon developed hers on bass guitar. As always seems to happen an album resulted; “The Pajama Club”. Two more albums “Going Your Way” and “Dizzy Heights” followed and there’s no suggestion yet that perhaps this most prolific and enduring star is done yet.

Icon of the West, the West salutes you.

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Who We

TTCF supported the following locally based applicants 60s Up Movement of NZ Inc, West Auckland; Adventure Camp Piha Trust; Adventure Camp Trust Board (T/A Carey Park); Adventure Specialties Trust; Arthritis Foundation of New Zealand Incorporated; Athletics New Zealand Inc; Auckland District Kidney Society Inc; Auckland Festival Trust; Auckland Kindergarten Association - Avondale Kindergarten; Auckland Kindergarten Association - Don Buck Kindergarten; Auckland Mountain Bike Club; Auckland Playcentres Assn Inc; Auckland Waitakere Rollersports Club Inc; Avondale Business Association; Bay Olympic Soccer and Sports Assn Inc; Bay Roskill Sports Club Inc; Big Buddy Mentoring Trust; Blockhouse Bay Mainstreet Assn Inc; Bruce McLaren Intermediate School; C.A.R.E. Waitakere Trust; Charlotte Museum Trust; Combined Probus Club of New Lynn; Conservation Volunteers NZ; Croatian Cultural Society of NZ Inc; EcoMatters Environment Trust; Edmonton Primary School; EDUK8 Charitable Trust; Environmental Education Resource for Sustainability Trust (EERST); Fair Food Trust; Family Action; Fruitvale School; Gecko Trust; Glen Eden Community & Recreation Centre; Glen Eden Primary School; Glen Eden Tennis Club Inc; Glen Eden United Sports Club Inc; Glenora

Rugby League Trust; Gujarati Samaj NZ Incorporated; Hannah Sport and Culture Association Incorporated; Henderson Bowls Inc; Hoani Waititi Marae Trust; Huntington’s Disease Assn Auckland Inc; Interacting; Kaurilands Community Kindergarten Inc; Kelston Boys’ High School; Kelston Community Hub Inc; Kelston Community Trust; Kelston Deaf Education Centre; Kelston Girls’ College; Kelston Intermediate School; Laingholm Baptist Church; Lynn Avon United Association Football Club; Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse Trust Auckland Inc T/A Better Blokes; Man Alive Charitable Trust; Massey Athletics Club Inc; Maternity Services Consumer Council; Matipo Primary School; Mercy Hospice Auckland Ltd; Migrant Action Trust; Monte Cecilia Housing Trust; Mt Albert Ponsonby Assn Football Club Inc; Neighbourhood Support Waitakere Inc; Netball Waitakere Inc; New Lynn Tennis Sports and Social Club Inc; Norwest United AFC; Ohana Young Parent Charitable Trust; Parkinsonism Society Auckland Inc; Peninsula Arts Incorporated T/A Harbourview Sculpture Trail; Piha Community Centre Society Inc; Playhouse Theatre Inc; Presbyterian Support Northern; Public Works Performing Arts Collective Inc T/A ConArtists

TTCF Committed To Local Distribution


Have Helped The Trusts Community Foundation, or TTCF as we prefer to be known, has had a longstanding relationship with The Trusts operating here in West Auckland and we are by far the most significant class 4 gambling funder in the area. TTCF is dedicated to ensuring that a broad cross-section of applications from the local community is supported now and in the future. At this point we wish to acknowledge the elected members of The Trusts for their recommendations on applications received. The TTCF Board places a lot of credence on their local knowledge and expertise. The ongoing commitment and hard work of all venue staff and support personnel is also worthy of recognition. They work tirelessly to ensure TTCF’s gaming machines are operating in a user friendly and safe environment.

during the period 1st October 2015 to 31st March 2016: Theatresports; Ranui Community House Inc; Ranui Swanson AFC Inc; Rosebank School; Rotary Club of Henderson Charitable Trust; Rotary Club of Waitakere City Inc; Royal Guards Marching Teams; Rutherford Primary School; Seniornet West Auckland; Shakti Community Council Inc; Silver Fern Motorsport Charitable Trust; Sport Waitakere; Starling Park Sports Club Inc; Sturges West Community House Inc; Suburbs New Lynn Cricket Club Inc; TalkLink Trust; Te Atatu Association Football Sports & Social Club Inc; Te Atatu Memorial RSA Inc; Te Atatu Netball Club; Te Atatu Rugby League and Sports Club Inc; Te Atatu Toy Library Trust; Te Atatu Union Church; The Auckland Kids Achievement Trust T/A FYD Auckland; The Mixit Charitable Trust; The Parenting Place; The Stroke Foundation of New Zealand Limited; The TYLA Trust; Timatanga Community School; Titirangi Festival Trust; Titirangi Returned Services Assn Inc; Touch New Zealand Inc; Toughlove Auckland Inc; Tuilaepa Youth Mentoring Service (TYMS); United North Piha Lifeguard Service Inc; Vaishnav Parivar NZ Inc; Vikings Kiwi Tag Club Incorporated; VisionWest Community Trust; Violence Free Waitakere Inc; Waitakere Arts & Cultural Development Trust/

Corban Estate Arts Centre; Waitakere Badminton Association; Waitakere Central Community Arts Council; Waitakere Chess Club Inc; Waitakere City Assoc Football and Sports Club Inc; Waitakere City BMX Club Incorporated; Waitakere City Improving School Attendance Programme Trust; Waitakere City Masters Swimming Club; Waitakere City Stadium Trust; Waitakere Health Link Inc; Waitakere Indian Assn Inc; Waitakere Outrigger Canoe Club; Waitakere Performing Arts Society Auckland; Waitakere Regional Hockey Turf Trust; Waitakere Volunteer Rural Fire Force; Waitakere Womens Volleyball Club Inc; Waitemata Hospitals Chaplaincy Committee Inc; Waves Trust; Weedfree Trust; Well Foundation; West Auckland Aquatics Inc; West Auckland Assn Football and Sports Club Incorporated; West Auckland Education Trust T/A Learning Network NZ; West Lynn Garden Society Inc; West Auckland Hospice; West Auckland Resource Centre; West Harbour School; Western Magpies Softball Club Inc; Western Quilters Circle Inc; Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust; Woodlands Park Community Kindergarten Inc; Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust; YWCA Auckland;

Application forms may be downloaded from our website www.ttcfltd.org.nz

17


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24

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