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March 2015 You'd have to be crazy, right?

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our west

Photos by Photos4Sale

West Auckland's Wedding Expo

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The riddle of Richard Pearse solved in West Auckland?

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The road to ANZAC Cove, Part II

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What's happening at the Hangar bar?

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Our West is brought to you by The Trusts. For more information on The Trusts, visit our website www.thetrusts.co.nz Feedback on www.ourwest.co.nz or email us at info@thetrusts.co.nz


You'd have to be crazy, right? How about running 50 off-road marathons cross country in 50 days and scaling a named peak each day. How about at the end of it all, apart from the thousands of kilometres you’ll have run, you’ll have climbed a total of more than 100,000 feet or the equivalent of 12 times up Everest? Along the way they’ll have knocked off some of our highest peaks including Mounts Ruapehu, Ngaruahoe and Taranaki/ Egmont in the North Island and about 20 in the South. You’d have to be crazy, right? Well maybe Mal Law is crazy because that’s what he has been doing around New Zealand for the last six weeks with support from our own Simon Wickham (CEO of The Trusts) and many, many, other ordinary Kiwis who picked up the challenge to fundraise for people who are very definitely not crazy but who need the support of the Mental Health Foundation. Mal Law’s High 50 Challenge began on 7 February and each day he will have run a marathon with a side trip up the most challenging peak in the area every day for 50 days. Supporters who have signed up for one or more of the daily challenges, will have run at least one marathon and one peak with some support runners opting to do multiple days of the High Five-0 Challenge. Simon signed up for Day One, on the Tarawera Ultramarathon course, which included the extra challenge of Mal detouring off course to claim Rangitoto Peak, his first peak of 50. Simon is a bit crazy like Mal, both of them believing that if you know you can do it there’s no point in even being there. In Simon’s case not only was this was to be his first marathon, it was to be a cross-country marathon that would end 40 kms later at Lake Okataina. While he was never going to be on the winner’s podium, when he puts his mind to something, he stays focussed and for Simon, this was more about supporting the fundraising cause. And in this respect he is leading the field. He had committed himself to raising $10,000 towards Mal’s target of $100,000 for the Mental Health Foundation. By the time the gun went off in the shade of Rotorua’s Redwood Forest, at 6am on Day 1, the total was standing at over the $300,000 mark and still counting. Simon was top of the fundraiser leader-board, having already raised more than $23,000 and still going. As Mal says and Simon agrees wholeheartedly, what makes the challenge worthwhile is the real difference that they can make to the lives of people less fortunate than themselves. Mal Law is a Scot who grew up in the highlands and almost from the time he could run he was running in the highlands and “bagging” peaks. His passion for long-distance trail running started when he came to New Zealand and later thought up the idea of running New Zealand's 7 mainland Great Walks in 7 days (7in7), in 2009. It had never been done before and it proved to be a life-changing experience. Since then he’s run many thousands of cross-country kilometres, completed a second 7in7 Challenge, climbed 'Everest in a Day' and run the entirety of the 1,014km South

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West Coast Path in the UK in a record time of 17 days. All of which was a mere appetiser for the High 50 Challenge, certainly one of the most audacious endurance feats undertaken on New Zealand soil. It remains to be seen if Mal will run his 50 marathons and “bag” his 50 peaks, but Simon has conquered his own personal challenge on the track and is still furiously fundraising off it. The 7 hour run took a lot of determination to finish. When the going got tough, Simon had a little mantra he drew on - I asked myself, “What would Mal do?” Simon said afterwards. Then added with a chuckle, “he’d keep running that’s what Mal would do. So I kept running”. “As the slogan for the High 50 support runners says, the challenge is 90% mental and the rest’s in your head.” Having started out in August with a modest 6k run (“and I walked a couple of times”) Simon built up his training steadily over the next six months but even so, his longest training run had been 32kms and the terrain for that was nothing like as challenging. But for all the physical challenge, it was the cause that first captured Simon’s interest. He was talking to Mal about fundraising ideas, and Mal took the opportunity to make Simon aware of the high incidence of mental illness and his own personal reasons for taking on the challenge. The Mental Health Foundation estimates that at least one in five New Zealanders suffers some form of mental illness to some degree every year. The number may be far higher because many people won’t speak out for fear of ridicule or just from fear. People who have it aren’t crazy. They have an illness. Anybody can get it. Almost everyone can be helped if they speak out and seek help from the Mental Health Foundation and others. When they do, almost all discover to their great surprise, that they’re not alone. Simon was astonished to discover how many people he knew had suffered some form of mental illness and the challenge had provided a vehicle for them to speak more openly about it. “So in the end, it is really great to have raised a meaningful amount of money to help the Mental Health Foundation carry on its great work. What will be even better is if we have raised awareness that vulnerability is all round us, it’s probably in all of us. It’s nothing to be ashamed of and the more people who understand that, the better off we’ll be as a community,” he said.

The inspirational Mal Law

Simon on the Tarawera Ultramarathon course


Pat Heron retires from Don Oliver Board Sixteen years of service by the Heron family on the Don Oliver Youth Sport Foundation board of trustees has come to an end with the retirement of Pat Heron, the foundation’s longest serving trustee. “The Don Oliver” came into being when a group of prominent West Aucklanders decided to create a memorial to the late Olympic weightlifter who had done a great deal of work with the youth of the west. Leading businessman Bryan Heron, was one of the founding trustees and as they say behind every successful man there is a woman, in this case Pat. Long before she became a board member, Pat was deeply involved in assisting Bryan and the other founding trustees. A central core of the foundation’s success has been the annual fundraising Awards Dinner. “This has become a hugely successful event on the West Auckland calendar and it is fair to say that all that success is due to Pat,” DOYSF chairman Dai Bindoff said, when Pat announced she was retiring from the Board. “The board and all the scholars, and all the sponsors and supporters owe Pat an immense debt of gratitude. She created a very successful template for the dinner, and tirelessly drove

the dinner organisation every year, finding new sponsors, keeping in touch with the ones we already had, selling the tickets, finding the auction prizes and a myriad other tasks. I don’t know how she did it all but I do know that without her, it wouldn’t have happened,” Dai Bindoff said. “She’s been a wonderful benefactor and colleague and a lot of fun to work with over the years. I miss her fund of knowledge and sense of mischief. We all do. Fortunately she’s incapable of staying out of things altogether and although she isn’t going to be sitting at the board table, she’s still in there helping,” he said. The Trusts is proud to be Associate Sponsor of the Don Oliver Youth Sport Foundation and joins the board, the scholars and the other sponsors and supporters, in thanking Pat and wishing her every success and happiness in the future. Colleen Acton who is a manager at The Trusts owned Quality Hotel Lincoln Green has joined the board in Pat’s place.

West Auckland Wedding Expo West Auckland will be the place for brides-to-be, on 29th March, with the sixth annual Wedding Expo at The Quality Hotel Lincoln Green. This event has gone from strength to strength, its popularity assured by the fact that unlike some other wedding shows, it is a free and very user-friendly event for brides-to-be and their entourages and inexpensive for the exhibitors who get quality time with prospective customers.


The riddle of Richard Pearse may soon be solved in West Auckland Kelston’s Ivan Mudrovcich made history at this years Wings Over Wairarapa airshow when his reproduction of “the Richard Pearse plane” made a taxi run under its own power in front of a large and appreciative crowd. Meanwhile, the “Pearse connection” with West Auckland was discovered to be even stronger than imagined, with Pearse’s nephew Tony and his partner Phyllis Costello now living in New Lynn after Phyllis’ house was destroyed in the Christchurch earthquake of 2011. Tony made contact with the Mudrovcichs last year when Tony and Phyllis learned how Ivan had spent the last 10 years re-constructing Richard Pearse’s first aeroplane, which some people believe was the first to fly, being airborne at least nine months before the Wright brothers. The Richard Pearse story is well known in some ways and a mystery in others. This South Island farmer was a haphazard farmer but clearly a genius and a visionary, but also a recluse. Later, after he left farming and went to live in Christchurch, he became increasingly reclusive and apparently obsessed that others were trying to steal his patents; finally, judged unable to care for himself, he was admitted to Sunnyside Hospital where he died in 1953. Tony Pearse, now 82, remembers biking with his father on several occasions, to see his uncle at his home in Wildberry Street in Christchurch. He was about eight or nine at the time and his memory of Richard is of a detached and abrupt man. Over time, after Richard’s death, the story of his extraordinary life began to be pieced together by others, notable among them was pioneer aviator George Bolt for whom George Bolt Drive at Auckland Airport is named. Bolt was assisted by Pearse’s sisters, Florrie and Ruth.

Bolt almost literally stumbled over the remains of Pearse’s last plane which was an attempt to create a machine that took off like a helicopter and flew like a plane. Apparently, Richard saw this as the personal transport of the future. From there began a long process that was part archaeology and part historical detective work, re-assembling the story of Richard’s life from the shreds and shards of life left behind. Parts of his plane were dug out of farm rubbish dumps, copies obtained of patent applications, letters and other writings were tracked down. The story is best told in Gordon Ogilvie’s book “The Riddle of Richard Pearse”, which describes accounts by eyewitnesses who saw in March 1903, the first Pearse plane crashed three metres up on top of a gorse hedge. How did it get there if not by flying? The plane was too big and the hedge too high for Pearse to have put it there as a prank. But for all that the final proof remains tantalisingly out of reach. Did Pearse fly? Whether he flew before the Wrights will never be settled for some people, but the chances that he did, increase massively if that original plane was actually capable of flying. And it is to solving this riddle that retired Kelston automotive engineer Ivan Mudrovcich has devoted the last decade of his life. Poring painstakingly over patent applications, descriptions and other sources of information, and hours upon hours of deduction and analysis, he built a reproduction of plane and engine in his Kelston back yard. The plane ran beautiful under its own power at Wings over Wairarapa and test pilot Neville Hay reported that it felt like it wanted to lift off the ground. That of itself was an historic moment. The ultimate test, take-off and flight, will follow soon and the riddle of Richard Pearse may finally be solved here in West Auckland.

The reproduction of the Pearse plane on display at Wings Over Wairarapa after its successful ground run under its own power.


Major Te Atatu road project to go ahead this year Work should soon begin on the construction of a modern new block of mixed-use shops beside the intersection of Edmonton Road, Te Atatu Road and Flanshaw Road in Henderson. The original shops were demolished late last year in what was the first action in a $25.5 million upgrade of Te Atatu Road between Wakeling Avenue and the motorway and for some distance up the roads that intersect with Te Atatu Road. The aim will be to ease traffic flow, and especially the flow of buses and cyclists. Getting Te Atatu Road to flow more smoothly will also allow the improvements to the Northwestern Motorway and the new Waterview Connection to operate at their best for traffic accessing and leaving the motorway at Te Atatu. Among the improvements are widening Edmonton Road at the junction with Te Atatu Road and Flanshaw Street, and this was the reason for demolishing the old shops. Because the upgrade will remove the Te Atatu Road roundabout and replace it with traffic lights, the other

obvious change in recent times was that the Council removed the sculpture from the roundabout, just before Christmas. Among the key elements in the upgrade are bus-priority measures and cycle routes (a mix of on and off-road), widened intersections and more dedicated turn-lanes at intersections and a median strip down the centre of the road. The new traffic lights will be synchronised with other traffic lights along this route, to ensure that traffic benefits from better and fairer control. Likewise the painted flush median between Wakeling and the motorway will enable turning vehicles to get out of the traffic stream, helping to improve overall traffic flow. Auckland Transport is expecting that the provision of safe cycle routes that can be used by school students will in time, reduce the number of cars using the streets to take children to school. Working together, these measures will help traffic to flow better on Te Atatu Road and into and out of, surrounding streets. Work is expected to begin in June and to take two years.

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icons west of the

Rt Hon Jonathan Hunt ONZ

He was known as the Minister of Wine and Cheese and was the MP for New Lynn for 30 years. He was also known for a while as the Father of The House and was a Minister of numerous portfolios in different Labour Governments. But, what Rt Hon Jonathan Lucas Hunt ONZM deserves great recognition for, is being the man who made it possible for adopted children to find their birth parents and vice versa. By the middle of last century, social pressure was building for a law change to make it possible for adult adoptees and birth parents to be allowed to find each other. In 1985 Jonathan Hunt helped to change the unintentionally cruel world in which some women felt that they had no choice but to give up their babies for adoption, and then were unable to see their child ever again. It didn’t come without a struggle, a struggle that was led in Parliament by the MP for New Lynn, Jonathan Lucas Hunt, who first introduced the Adult Adoption Information Act as a private member’s bill in 1978. “I had about eight or nine goes at it,” he said later. “Sometimes that is not a bad thing, because I finally got the bill right and very little amendment to the Act has been needed since that time. The then Prime Minister, Sir Robert Muldoon, said one night: “You’ll never get a vote while I’m Prime Minister.” However, as soon as Muldoon was swept from power in late 1984, Jonathan Hunt leapt straight in yet again. “I had to get another member, Fran Wilde, to introduce it on my behalf, because by then I was a Minister,” Mr Hunt said noting that eventually, the new law passed easily. It seems inconceivable now that such a world existed. In the world of intersecting lives so typical of New Zealand he lived at Karekare on the west coast, not a stone’s throw from former Waitakere Mayor Sir Bob Harvey. Sir Bob, an adoptee, found his birth mother after the Act was passed and came to thank the MP. Mr Hunt told him: 'I've done that for you, now

you've got to stand for mayor of Waitakere'." It may have planted a seed because in 1992 Bob did exactly that and remained in office until Waitakere was amalgamated into the Supercity. Along the way Bob and his council were able to turn one of Jonathan Hunt’s biggest regrets into a triumph. He told Parliament at his retirement: “I regret not being able to pass a bill to protect the Waitakere Range and foothills. I tried in 1973. I am unashamedly a “Westie” who lived out there for 30 years, and I think the Waitakere Ranges is amongst the finest of its type in the world.” He was also a patron of The Waitakere Ranges Protection Society. Thirty five years after his failed attempt, and three years after he finally retired from Parliament, that regret turned to triumph when the proud Westies on the Waitakere City Council finally pushed for and won, the Waitakere Ranges Protection Act. Having earned his BA in history at Auckland University, been a history teacher at Kelston Boys High School and a University Lecturer, Jonathan Hunt was first elected to Parliament in 1966, as MP for New Lynn. It was an electorate he was to represent for the next 30 years, until moving to the List in 1996. When he arrived in Parliament he was one of the youngest MPs, when he left he was the longest serving. In 1989, then Prime Minister Sir Geoffrey Palmer had him made a Privy Councillor and 10 years later he became the Speaker of the House, serving in that role until his retirement six years later. A lover of the arts and all things cultural, not least his wine, Jonathan Hunt knew that he was nicknamed the Minister of Wine and Cheese, typically turning it to his advantage by saying he was proud to be a champion of the wine industry, a very large part of which had its origins in West Auckland. In 2005, he achieved the double accolade of being named as New Zealand’s High Commissioner to London, and receiving his country’s highest honour, the Order of New Zealand.

Rt Hon Jonathan Hunt ONZ, Icon of the West, the West salutes you. Retirement is for life’s well deserved pleasures and of course, putting your feet up! So... let us do the cooking for you with Bricklane’s famous “Gold Card $10 Lunches” 11am - 3pm Monday, $10 Roast of the day Tuesday & Wednesday, $10 Beer Battered Fish & Chips 6

5 Clark Street, New Lynn. Phone 826 3654


March 1915 - defeat snatched from the jaws of victory and the legend of ANZAC began taking shape Part two of a three part series tracing the road to ANZAC Cove on 25th April 1915 and the beginning of the ANZAC legend. Contrary to popular myth, the Gallipoli campaign was not a wild idea by Winston Churchill, at that time the First Lord of the Admiralty. In fact, Churchill’s brainchild was to use the Navy to smash the Turkish forts on either side of the Dardanelles. There was no suggestion of landing armies on Gallipoli. The Dardanelles is a narrow strip of water between the south eastern coasts of the Gallipoli Peninsula and the Turkish Coast. They allow ships to sail from the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Mamora, on the northern show of which stands the Turkish capital Istanbul (Constantinople as it was then called). Having joined the war in 1914, the Turkish military activated a string of forts on the Gallipoli Peninsula and on the far shore of the Dardanelles. With big guns covering the narrow straits from both sides, any ship trying to get through was almost certain to be destroyed. Churchill’s idea was very simple. Use battleships to destroy the forts. Naval forces could then sail through the Dardanelles and across the Sea of Mamora to Istanbul. Only then would armies land in order to take the capital of the then Ottoman Empire (centred on modern Turkey). This would almost certainly take Turkey out of the war and relieve pressure on Russia’s southern border. It would also free-up the passage of thousands of tonnes of wheat from Russia’s Black Sea ports to the bakeries of Britain and Western Europe. Churchill asked Vice Admiral Sackville Hamilton Carden if the idea was feasible and Carden created a bold, three-stage plan to send up to 10 battleships (mostly obsolete and expendable) to do the job.

But then a desperately ill Carden who would have pressed on regardless, was replaced by Admiral John de Robeck. Initially, de Robeck continued the naval campaign and was nearly successful, but on 18 March he suffered a shocking, unnerving, blow when after going six weeks with barely a scratch, three battleships hit mines and sank in a single day. Despite the fact that the loss of battleships had been accepted from the very start, a distraught de Robeck insisted that no further attempt be made by ships to pass up through the straits until ground troops had been landed and given time to capture the high ground around the Narrows. The navy was so close to completing the campaign it was heartbreaking and de Robeck’s chief of staff, Commodore Roger Keyes begged for the navy to carry on. de Robeck was heavily criticised in London by Churchill and others for dooming the whole Dardanelles campaign to failure but it was to no avail; the British Admiralty also lost their way and their nerve. So, in one afternoon, defeat was snatched from the jaws of victory by one Admiral who seemingly didn’t know that it was acceptable to lose his battleships. It was only now that the decision was made to compound the tragedy. In a meeting held with de Robeck on 22 March, Sir Ian Hamilton, Commander-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force agreed to attempt to capture the land on Gallipoli that overlooked “the Narrows” where ships were most vulnerable. When this decisions was confirmed, available a short distance away were the ANZAC forces in Egypt, along with British and French divisions. Thus, 100 years ago this month, the final pieces fell into place for the ill-fated landings at Gallipoli that were to become forever part of the history of our nation and add the word ANZAC to our lexicon.

This purely naval campaign began in February 1915 and for a month went like clockwork. It looked bound to succeed and if it had, world history could have been dramatically different. Certainly, the ANZAC legend would not have been born on the blood-soaked beaches and hills of the Gallipoli Peninsula. Possibly the war would have been shorter and possibly Germany may not have been able to sponsor the Russian Revolution of 1918 which took Russia out of the war and made her a communist state. It was coincidental that Australian and New Zealand divisions were training in Egypt at this time and it was purely coincidence that it was decided to put them in the same camp together to begin to work as a single unit. As they were doing this the British and French sent their battleships and the Australians sent some destroyers, to smash their way through the Dardanelles and the two stories of the naval force and the ANZAC forces began to go forward together. Throughout February, 1915, the battleships relentlessly poured fire on the forts. The massive and modern Dreadnought HMS Queen Elizabeth was also brought in, with 15 inch guns she could sit in the Aegean Sea and fire right over the peninsula and over the Dardanelles, pulverising the forts on both sides.

Rt. Hon. Winston S. Churchill M.P. First Lord of the Admiralty


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