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March 2016 Jazz in the Vines raises $18,000 for Hospice West Auckland p8

our west

Tim Livingstone awarded New Zealand Order of Merit

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The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards celebrate 30 years

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Get planning, Wedding Expo Waitakere is coming soon!

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Babich shares stories from its 100th Birthday

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Our West is brought to you by The Trusts. For more information on The Trusts, visit our website www.thetrusts.co.nz email us at info@thetrusts.co.nz


The Trusts support successful return of athletics Kiwi athletes were well to the fore as international athletics made a successful return to West Auckland at the Auckland Track Challenge, held on the Douglas Track and Field at The Trusts Arena. Among the highlights was the return to form for world champion shot putter Valerie Adams. She unleashed a shot of 18.85m, her best throw since September 2014. “I’m not happy with it, but I am going to take it,” said Adams. “I’m pleased to be here after everything that happened in 2015 and it was better than I performed last year.” More encouragingly, she had no pain from the elbow that has put her career on hold for a year. Commonwealth silver medallist Tom Walsh eclipsed Jacko Gill’s month old New Zealand Residents’ record with a throw of 20.91m. In the discus Dani Samuels, the 2009 world champion, drew upon her vast reserves of experience to beat England’s Jade Lally with a 66.41m throw. On the track, four-time national 1,500m champion Hamish Carson proved too strong for the opposition in the SOS Rehydrate men's 1,500m, to win in a creditable 3:40.39. Joseph Millar (Waikato BoP) confirmed his recent blistering form in the MakoXcell men’s 100m, winning in 10.54, running into a 1.7m/s headwind.

Joseph Millar (NZL) 100m winner.

Championships. Fiona Morrison (Canterbury) won The Trusts women’s 100m hurdles. Otago’s Andrew Whyte won the 400m in 46.78, the fastest time this year by a New Zealander. World University Games champion Angie Petty, won the women’s 800m by three seconds, in 2:02.32. In the same event, Wellington’s 18-year-old Allison Andrews-Paul demolished her personal best and went 4.5 seconds under the World Junior proud qualifying standard of 2:07.00. sponsor

Zoe Hobbs (Taranaki) took the MakoXcell women's 100m in a time of 11.95 and now heads for the World Junior

Zoe Hobbs (NZL) 100m winner.

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Tom Walsh (NZL) shot put winner.


World title boxing is coming to The Trusts Arena World title boxing is coming to The Trusts Arena on Saturday 16 April with the Royal Rampage staging New Zealand's first ever WBC World Title fight.

“We wanted to push the envelope with a focus on including more female professional boxing bouts at New Zealand events. We decided the best way to do this is to host our own event “Royal Rampage”.

Wellington’s Gentiane Lupi will go up against American Ronica Jeffery for the vacant World Boxing Organisation (WBO) World Featherweight title.

Since initiating something that started out as a project, Royal Rampage now showcases both male and female boxing in professional and corporate bouts sanctioned and officiated by NZPBA, The New Zealand Professional Boxing Association Inc.

Mother, actress and kickboxer, Lupi is the Women's International Boxing Association, World Super Bantamweight Champion and Jeffery is the International Women's Boxing Federation World Super Featherweight champion.

“This will be a world-class event with worldwide interest right here in New Zealand. By including corporate boxing bouts we are hoping to encourage New Zealand females to take up the sport,” Ms Lewis said.

If Lupi wins she will be only the second New Zealander to hold a credible World Featherweight belt, after Daniella Smith who won the first Women’s IBF World title in Germany in 2011.

“Royal rampage would like to give as many New Zealand Boxers the opportunity and chance to stay here in New Zealand with boxing in Pro Bouts and secure opportunities (and belts) here at home”, she says.

An equally big draw-card is the appearance of American-born New Zealander Julius ‘The Towering Inferno’ Long, fighting Australian-New Zealander Willis Meehan.

Tickets are currently on sale at eventfinda.co.nz from $40.

These two events headline a night of boxing being promoted by Lisa Lewis under the title, The Royal Rampage. Also on the card are: Mexican-American Mia St. John, the current IBA and IFBA Lightweight Champion and former World Boxing Council (WBC) super-welterweight title holder. Known as “The Knockout” she is also a blackbelt in Taekwondo and a former model. Kiwi Michelle Preston will fight American Noemie “La Rebelde “Bosques. Preston is a formidable multidisciplinary fighter with several world titles to her name in kickboxing plus the 2007 WBA Oceania Bantamweight boxing title and the 2010 WBO Asia-Pacific Super Flyweight belt in boxing. Rounding out the bigger names is Michael Katsidis, an Australian former Olympic boxer and two-time former WBO interim lightweight champion who is one the comeback trail after retiring several years ago. Also featuring will be entertainers Donell Lewis, Derty Sesh and Mikey Mayz. The Royal Rampage is in support of Women’s Refuge.

Royal Rampage out to promote men's and women's boxing equally. Royal Rampage Promoter Lisa Lewis who came to first came to fame, or notoriety, streaking at Waikato Stadium says: “The reason I founded Rampage Promotions was to give boxers and want-to-be boxers, opportunities that other boxing promoters were not giving them. “This is why at the Royal Rampage event I have such a strong women’s card, not just because the charity is Women’s Refuge, but because boxing promoters tend to ignore female fights. Yet after the Holly Holm and Ronda Rousey it’s very clear female fighting is here to stay in a big way.

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Congratulations to Tim Livingstone, It's already been a big year for Tim Livingstone. In the 2016 New Years' Honours, UHY Haines Norton Director Tim Livingstone was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to business and the community. In February he succeeded the legendary Ross Dallow as chairman of The Trusts Arena - acknowledged as the finest sports and entertainment venue in New Zealand. Losing Ross the undisputed “father” of The Trusts Arena may, under other circumstances, have been a devastating blow, but the facility was extraordinarily lucky in having Tim available to step up to the role. There is a lot to know about what makes The Trusts Arena so good and fortunately having served on the board of the Waitakere City Stadium Trust since 2004, Tim has been part of an incredible, evolving success story that has very few peers world-wide. He now steps into the enormous shoes of the man who has shepherded the facility from an idea in the days of Waitakere City Council, to becoming first a reality and then to becoming an internationally respected multi-event facility that hosts some of the biggest events and acts the world has to offer.

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on community activities. During my time in the practice I’ve had involvement in various community projects, but one of the standouts has been The Trusts Arena. It was originally a $28m build with another $10m for the grandstand and this was completed on time and debt free. Another standout is the Lopdell House Development Trust. It was roughly a $20m build to refurbish the old Lopdell House and build the new Te Uru Gallery and again we brought that in on budget. Both of these Trusts have had a high calibre of dedicated Trustees who have been incredible to work with. I enjoy building things and creating things for the community, that’s been a great fulfilment. I’ve been fortunate in that my Partners at UHY have allowed me to follow my passion. I’ve been involved in the Portage Ceramic Trusts which bought the invaluable collection of Crown Lynn Pottery; to me this is a great community asset. Thanks to the dedicated efforts of avid collector and excavator Richard Quinn, we were able to acquire the collection from him. The collection now resides in a magnificent Ambrico building in New Lynn. Crown Lynn was a major employer at the time when I was growing up in West Auckland - they employed something like 500 people under the stewardship of Sir Tom Clark who was quite entrepreneurial and clever. Being involved in a project like that is also a joy. Projects such as The Trusts Arena, Lopdell House and the Portage Ceramic Trust are certainly legacy-type things. I was also involved with Sport Waitakere for 8-10 years. This is another fantastic community organisation that promotes changing lives and empowering people of all ages through sport and recreation.

But that is only part of the Tim Livingstone story of contribution to West Auckland and West Auckland sport. He was there when the what became Sport Waitakere was established as a separate entity and for many years he made it possible for senior UHY Partner Kerry Tizard to provide professional services to the Don Oliver Youth Sport Foundation, from the time of its inception, both as a board member and as secretary and accountant.

Was it always your intention to become a business and community leader?

Tim has been a Partner at UHY for over 30 years, including 10 years as Managing Partner of the practice and President of the West Auckland Business Club, an initiative he was instrumental in developing more than 20 years ago.

I have a philosophy that we live in a country that has got some great assets and a great community. I could drive into my office in Henderson every day and drive out again every day and just do my job, but I like to give something back.

He is a member and Fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants (now Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand), having served as Councillor and as Chair of the National Public Practice Committee.

You've been one of the driving forces in the West Auckland Business Club for several decades now.

He is on various commercial Boards and Community Trusts and chairs the Audit and Risk and Remuneration Committees for some of those entities. Tim has been a Trustee of the Waitakere City Stadium Trust since 2004 and was Deputy Chair of Sport Waitakere among many other entities. He is passionate about supporting the culture and heritage of West Auckland, with active involvement in projects such as the Portage Ceramics Trust and the Lopdell House Development Trust.

The West Auckland Business Club has been going for 30 years and it was the creation of Dick Fielding who was an ASB manager in Henderson. He saw that West Auckland really had no business networking opportunities and went about developing a Club for networking. When Dick retired from the bank and moved out of the area I took over the WABC and built up a relationship with Waitakere Enterprise and subsequently ATEED. We signed a Memorandum of Understanding with them for event management and membership management services. Today the WABC has 3 sides to it:

In such a busy and varied career, what are some of your career highlights?

• Business After 5 (monthly business networking functions)

I guess I have been very lucky with my career. I enjoy what I do and one of the things I love doing is working

• Business Forums (breakfasts or luncheons with guest speakers) • Business Showcase (business expo forum)


New Zealand Order of Merit. We are also excited to be re-launching the West Auckland Business Hall of Fame which recognises iconic individuals who have contributed substantially to the region’s economy, business development, community and/or culture. The WABC aims to give back accumulated profits to the community and has donated over $50,000 to the West Auckland Hospice, the Salvation Army and lots of other West Auckland community charities.

Tell us about your time as Managing Partner at UHY Haines Norton. I managed UHY Haines Norton for 10 years and during that time we went through some significant changes and growth. We grew from a three-Partner to a six-Partner firm with the merger of Grant Brownlee’s and John Ballard’s firms. Some of the significant changes involved “corporatising” the practice: bringing in some of the corporate disciplines necessary to run a practice which was important. We also strategically decided to stay in Auditing and have a stand-alone Audit Partner. Another change was our affiliation with UHY international. When I first started in the practice there were three Partners and about seven staff. Today we’re a five-Partner practice with around 50 staff in three office locations. You don’t get that growth without fundamentally having good disciplines and I was fortunate to be a part of that and fortunate to be supported by five other very good Partners during that period of time. As I say, my career has been a very lucky career.

What challenges have you learned to overcome? I think the biggest challenge for me personally is I’ve never been very good at saying “no” and I end up taking on more and more work. This has placed enormous pressure on me at times, particularly when I was Managing Partner with one of the biggest fee bases in the practice

at the time. I would be working 6-7 days a week on a pretty regular basis and working until 10pm at night, often at home. So it did take a toll. Ten years ago I went through a health scare which was an ‘interesting’ experience; having always been in control of things, I was in a situation where my doctor had all of the control. Fundamentally, having gone through that experience I recognise that at times I was not communicating very well with clients. I was rushed and sometimes preaching from the pulpit rather than talking at their level and helping them to understand their business. I’ve learned how to delegate.

What are you looking forward to next? Ultimately I do want to be able to sniff the roses. Over time I will need to move into retirement mode. I think there does become a time in life when you need to pass the baton to younger talented people. That has to be done over a period of time. It’s difficult to be a good practitioner and keep up to date and keep your mind sharp and active if you’re only working part time. I use the athletic analogy that if you want to be good at what you do, you need to continue to train yourself and be quite focused on what you’re doing. Always be thinking of the clients. If you’re not going to properly look after them and give them good professional advice that is up-to-date and current then I think you’re selling your clients short. I never want to be in that position. For the next few years I will continue my involvement in the practice and business community. But there will come a time when I will need to start to back off. In the meantime it is business as usual!

On behalf of everyone here at The Trusts, we congratulate Tim on very deservedly becoming a member of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

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Rene Shadbolt, our 20th century Florence Nightingale The name Shadbolt is strongly linked with West Auckland. Maurice Shadbolt lived here as did Tim ‘the Mayor’ Shadbolt. But Shadbolt Park in New Lynn is not named for either of them, but for their relative Rene Mary Shadbolt MBE. She was “One of Ben’s”. Ben Shadbolt was the family patriarch who settled in Akaroa in the mid 1800’s and founded the dynasty that bears his name. Author Maurice referred to himself (and the descendants) in his autobiography, as “One of Ben's”.

Typical of the clan, Rene Shadbolt was never prepared to sit quiet when she saw social injustice. This resoluteness impassioned her to lead a small team of nurses to Spain to care for soldiers wounded in the in famous Spanish Civil War in 1936. The war was caused when a communist Government was elected in Spain and the army’s General Franco led an armed uprising to overthrow the Government. He was aided by Adolf Hitler’s Germany which practiced many of the warfare techniques that would be later used in World War 2. The Soviet Union backed the Government.

rples, New Zealand dbolt and Millicent Sha Isobel Dodds, Rene Sha the Spanish Civil War. nurses in Spain during

It was into this cauldron that 34 year old nursing Sister Rene led two other nurses, Isobel Dodds, a 22-year-old staff nurse from Wellington Hospital, and Millicent Sharples, aged 46. Before leaving they were detained for some hours by the New Zealand Police. When accused of being the secretary of a communist cell Rene replied that she'd 'never even been a secretary of a tennis club!' At considerable personal risk, the three nursed the wounded in Spain for the next 18 months, by which time the war was all but lost to Franco’s forces.

At the time, many people had endured the miseries of everyday poverty overlaid by the soul destroying deprivation of the Great Depression. At the same time, the rise of Adolf Hitler and his Nazis seemed horrifying to many. Democracy and our whole way of life seemed to be at the mercy of fascism and the only answer many could see, was communism.

Returning to New Zealand in January 1939, Shadbolt found it hard to find work because she’d been branded as 'dangerously political'. To compound her miseries, she was forced to abandon her German husband Willi Remmel who she married secretly during the war. He was denied entry to New Zealand and they never saw each other again.

While many would not become communists themselves, they were deeply offended by the civil war and Hitler’s intervention and from around the world men and women flocked to join or support the International Brigade in support of the democratically elected Spanish Government.

She eventually found work and briefly remarried. By 1949 she was matron of Hokianga Hospital, where she remained until 1967.

Communists, people who sympathised with communism and people who supported the communists in Spain were not popular with the authorities.

With Shadbolt Park named in her honour in 1942, Sister Rene Shadbolt remains the only New Zealander who served in the Spanish Civil War to have a memorial.

Thanks to the people of Hokianga she was made an MBE in 1969 and died in 1977.

Rugby Club revitalisation passes milestone at Shadbolt Park You may recall our November 2015 story about Westie Pies owner Stefan Crooks’ one man drive to revitalise the New Lynn Suburbs Rugby Club? That journey has taken another major step with the recent opening of a changing rooms and toilet facility thanks to a partnership between the club and the Whau Local Board. The facility at Sister Rene Shadbolt Park houses six changing rooms with showers, four toilets (two of which are wheelchair accessible). One toilet will be open for the public to use during the day between 7am and 9pm. The remaining toilets will be opened as required for sports activities.


The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards celebrate 30 years as NZ's finest Thirty years ago in 1986, representatives of the Waitakere Licensing Trust approached the Waitakere Central Community Arts Council with the suggestion that WCCAC should create an annual awards for the visual arts. It was a good idea. This year The Trusts Waitakere Art & Sculpture Awards celebrates its 30th anniversary as the most prestigious arts and sculpture competition in New Zealand. WCCAC is celebrating by having among other events, a “mini Trusts exhibition” in the first three days of April. This will feature the best work of the regular local artists who attend WCCAC regularly to learn of practice their art. Entrants will be drawn from ‘Bella’s Artists’, watercolourists, the Special Needs Group and Photographers. These works will be on display at the Corban Eastate Arts Centre from 1 April through 3 April. Two of the judges, painter Lisa Posmyk and painter/potter Ted Kindleysides, have a 28 year history with WCCAC. This Huia couple have been exhibitors almost since day one of the main Trusts event. The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards will also be back again this year, although shifting to coincide with the school year. Co-ordinator Diane Costello says that with the inclusion of youth categories for the first time in 2015, organisers learned several valuable lessons. One was the breathtaking quality of work from some of the young artists. “There as one piece of sculpture that was so outstanding that the judges wanted to make it the overall winner of the entire competition. Unfortunately the rules didn’t allow that but it goes to show what talent there is in our community and what our young people are capable of,” she says. The eventual overall winner was a German artist with an international reputation, now living on the West Coast of the South Island, so to be considered alongside her is a tremendous compliment. “The other lesson was that because one week of the exhibition was in the school holidays, schools couldn’t easily

organise school visits, which they would have loved to do,” Diane says. This year the dates will be move slightly to fall within the school year.

proud sponsor

Diane says she and WCCAC supporters who include Linda Cooper, president of the Waitakere Licensing Trust and an Auckland City Councillor, are planning ways to enhance the youth section, as well as expanding the main The Trusts Art & Sculpture events to celebrate 30 years setting the standard for New Zealand. For several years The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards have attracted over 400 entries from all over New Zealand, some of them being of the very highest quality that could hold their place internationally. This a far cry from 140 works 30 years ago. In those days, the Awards were for arts only with sculpture being added later. The main exhibition works were displayed at the Waitemata Autos showrooms which meant the company had to move all the vehicles from the showroom to enable the art to hang around the walls. The balance of the works were displayed in the “art room” in the former Henderson Borough Council offices which now house the West Wave/Waitakere Recreation Centre complex. In 2003 the event moved to the recreation centre itself, before finally moving to the Corban Estate Arts Centre where WCCAC is now based. The Trusts Art & Sculpture Awards Exhibition is in October and is open to all artists working in oil, acrylic, pastels, watercolours, ink, pencil, crayon, gouache, charcoal, pen, chalk, collage, mixed media, print-making and sculptures.

What is Waitakere Central Community Arts Council? WCCAC is a not-for-profit community organisation dedicated to encouraging and supporting as many people as possible to participate in some form of art. This ranges from grassroots to professional level artists, and those with special needs. For information about the programmes please go to www.waitakerearts.com

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Jazz in the Vines raises $18,000 for Hospice West Auckland Hospice West Auckland is more than $18,000 better off after a “loved up” Valentine's Day Jazz in the Vines fundraiser held in brilliant weather at Oratia's Artisan Wines Vineyard. Attendees were serenaded by the heartfelt and soulful voice of Leza Corban & Friends and the Parisian chic of French Toast and tucked into antipasto platters, fine wines and picnics.

Each year Hospice West Auckland must fundraise approximately 60% of its total budget to provide specialist care to its patients and their families/whanau in West Auckland.

To learn more about Hospice West Auckland and how you can help please visit www.hwa.org.nz.

Jazz in the Vines is generously sponsored by Davis Funerals, Artisan Wines Vineyard, iTicket and supported by a range of suppliers that help ensure the amount raised is maximised. These contributions plus the sale of more than 400 tickets and things such as platter sales, on-site donations, silent auctions and a pop-up hospice shop all contributed to the success of the day. This year's event was bigger than ever and prompted Bryan and Pat Heron, supporters from the early years and local philanthropists, to enthuse over how good and established the event has become. Hospice West Auckland Chief Executive Barbara Williams says that thanks to the generosity of our Jazz in the Vines supporters, sponsors and suppliers, “we’re able to provide free palliative care to the people of West Auckland. Every day I see the lengths our supporters go to make a difference, and I thank them for it.”

The crowd gest into the act at Jazz in the Vines.

. French Toast bringing a touch of Paris


Dave Dobbyn and The Black Seeds Headline Titirangi Festival Of Music Two knockout concerts headline the 11th Titirangi Festival of Music between 8 and 10 April. The Black Seeds are first up at the Titirangi War Memorial Hall on Friday 8 April. Also on the bill is renowned DJ Manuel Bundy. Then on Saturday 9 April is the legendary Dave Dobbyn and band, with support from Hopetoun Brown. Collaborations this year include Te Uru, West Auckland’s own purpose built art gallery in the heart of Titirangi Village. Te Uru will host two significant performances on Friday 8 by Acapollinations, led by Tui Mamaki, and master musician Arli Liberman. Classical music will also be well represented when the APO appear for the first time at the Festival to perform a selection of Beethoven pieces. Family-friendly free music in such events as Village Day on the Saturday will be provided by local musicians, an art-workshop trail, marching bands and street performers from noon until early evening.

See The Black Seeds performing live

on Friday 8 April.

The Festival is supported by the generous sponsorship of several local businesses and funding from the Waitakere Ranges Local Board and The Trusts Community Foundation. Tickets are now on sale at Titirangi Pharmacy and through www.titirangifestival.com


icons

of the

Her name is Mary. Her surname is Ama but most people call her Maryama. Nobody knows why, she certainly doesn't. Perhaps people just like the way Maryama flows. She laughs, it doesn't matter as long as people know that her passion is building a positive Pacifika community. If they know her name, they know they can come to her for wisdom, comfort, teaching or for help. This not just idle motherliness. Since her arrival from the Cook Islands as a young secretary in 1970, Mary has given her life to building Polynesian heritage and culture here, helping Pacific Islanders grow a strong community in what is essentially a foreign and very bewildering country. Her reflex to help others has influenced the allocation of housing, the management of households. It has helped generations of Islanders to adapt to their new homeland; has led the massive outpouring of Pacific Islands arts and crafts, and most recently, has been generating better, and Award winning, outcomes for Pacific Islanders in our prison system. The name Mary came from her English whakapapa; dating back to a Pakeha New Zealand great-grandfather, George Robson Crummer about whom Te Papa is currently making a documentary. George married a Mary who arrived on the ship, the Mary Shepherd. His sister was Mary Louisa. She can trace the surname Ama back to Savea, founder of the Samoan

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dynasty of paramount chiefs bearing the hereditary title of Malietoa. That makes her royalty in Polynesian society. Growing up, she was surrounded by arts. Her grandmother was an expert in Tivaevae, the traditional Cook Island quilt; the “ultimate gift” and it was a skill and passion that Mary carries on to this day. Thanks to her grandmother’s leadership, arts, fabrics, weaving, tivaevae, song, dance and knowledge of the culture, were all strands that madeup family life then and through Mary, are alive here in today’s Pacific Islands community. Thanks to her grandfather, Mary’s childhood was a case of going to school to learn and coming home to learn. Although he discouraged speaking Cook Islands Maori, in all other things he valued knowledge, even to the extent of making Mary a wooden querty keyboard on which she could learn to type. At the time she muttered behind grandfather’s back. Today, on returns home, she visits his grave and thanks him. Thanks to her grandfather’s dictum that to lead is to serve, even as a child she understood that her family was blessed compared with others and she would take food to other families. It was the beginning of a lifetime in service to the people she loves with all of her enormous heart. Thanks to him and his keyboard, also, when she left school, she was able to become a private secretary in the Cook Islands Parliament. With this background, she emigrated to Henderson to become a proud and passionate Westie. Years later, she went on to work as Pacific Islands art advocate with Waitakere City Council. In this capacity, she founded the Pacific Islands Arts and Cultural Centre at the Corban Estate Arts Centre, with its now famous Mamas. The Mamas create Pacific islands art, crafts song, dance and teach their skills to hundreds of school children every year. They’re also teaching them to prisoners with considerable success. But that gets ahead of the story. In 1970, she took officework at Victoria Knitwear. Within six months she was forewoman in a multi-cultural workplace with many migrant women. Mary found herself learning to empathise with all cultures and to understand the difficulties of being a stranger in a strange culture. She went on to the Housing Corporation where, as a part-Maori with Ngati Whatua ancestry, she facilitated a partnership with Ngati Whatua in which the iwi donated land at Kaukapakapa for the state to build homes on it. It was a very early example of a government institution working in sympathy with Maori culture.

Mary Ama and the Mamas teaching weaving at AUT Manukau Campus.

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She moved on to WINZ where she could help people on a wider base than just housing. Again, she brought cultural

Mary Ama,


Mary Ama understanding. The shy, older, Pacific Island women intimidated by the system, would come in to the open plan offices saying that they had an appointment with Mary. They usually didn’t but Mary would always validate them by calling out such things as “I’ll be with you soon, Mama.” With such a large group of “clients” Mary really expanded her networks and learned who was “out there” and who could do what. They, in turn, blessed her for the help she gave them.

With this huge platform on which to stand, Mary Ama took up her role at Waitakere Council and membership of the unique Pacific Islands Advisory Board. Messages went out through the networks, the Pacific Island Arts and Cultural centre was created, albeit in an unorthodox way. Mary just moved into one of the old winery sheds at “Corbans” and “set up shop”. She didn't have permission, but such was the success they're all still there twenty years later, making stuff and teaching stuff. Among their many achievements is the tons of recycled plastics they work their way through to create a multitude of woven articles. This year 3M is sending them all their waste for converting into arts.

Mary Ama with Hon Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga, MP for Maungakiekie.

Then came the approach to work with prisoners at Springhill Corrections Facility near Hamilton. Mary and the Mamas, whose median age is around the mid-70’s, pack-up their resources each week and head off to Huntly and the Pacific Creations programme where they teach prisoners their heritage and culture, arts and crafts, song and dance. Their vision is to create a sense of self-worth and of belonging in the prisoners that is largely lacking. It is yielding results. The work produced by the programme has been exhibited at Parliament and last year was rewarded with the Arts Access Corrections Community Award. This goes with Creative New Zealand’s Pacific Heritage Art Award, to Mary Ama and the Mamas, in 2012. It is no surprise that the unstoppable Mary Ama sits of the Creative New Zealand funding panel. Oh and there was one thing her beloved grandfather got wrong. Mary decided to learn her own language despite his opposition. As a result she became the first legally licensed Cook Islands interpreter in New Zealand.

Mary Ama, Dame Rosie Horton and the Mamas.

icon of the West, the West salutes you.

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FLAGSHIP HALF PAGE

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Raise a glass to our 100th Birthday The Babich family have been making wine in New Zealand since 1916. To mark its centenary, Babich Wines is sharing 100 stories from the family archives online and at points of sale around the world. Pour yourself a glass and share a story, below is a selection of some of their unpublished tales.

STORY

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Experience matters, even for a horse For the first few decades, horses provided the power for ploughing the Babich vineyard. But by the late 40s there were only two horses left; Old Bob, an aging half-Clydesdale who liked to take his time, and Trigger, a younger gelding who had energy to burn. Like a good winemaker, experience had taught Bob a few things. When the two horses were yoked together for the bigger jobs, the older horse cleverly made sure he was half a step behind young Trigger, letting his smaller work mate take most of the load.

STORY

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Henry is family, but he's not exactly human Meet Little Henry. He’s Italian, a pump who started working at the Henderson winery in the early 1960s. He's a Manzini, which was close enough to composer Henry Mancini for the name to stick. Little Henry's got an older brother, Big Henry, who’s been promoted to the company’s state of the art winery down in Marlborough. And just like most of the people they work alongside at Babich Wines, they’ve been around long enough to be considered part of the family.

STORY

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No matter where we've gone, all roads lead back home Babich Wines is an international success story, enjoyed in more than 45 countries, and served in the finest restaurants from New York to Shanghai. But no matter how far our wines travel, they all start from the same place.The family have been on Babich Road for over 100 years, before there even was a road. Every shipment that leaves the winery, leaves from the same address that the family purchased in 1911. The same address that Peter and Joe Babich have shared for their entire lives.

STORY

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Like the sound of vinyl, sometimes it's just better done the old way. Technology has allowed the wine industry to make huge leaps forward since the 1960s but, in recent years, many winemakers have shifted back to older ways of doing some things like wild ferments and organic horticulture. Like lovers of vinyl record, they find that the traditional, artisan approach can deliver a richness of quality that's missing from many modern wines. And speaking of quality, and classic vinyl, the Henderson Valley produced more than great winemakers. Peter Posa, one of New Zealand's first great rock'n'roll exports, was another great local success story.

When you purchase any bottle of Babich wine during February or March from West Liquor stores, you go into the draw to win lunch with the Babich family, a tour of the winery at Henderson valley and a private tasting with the winemakers.

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TRYMONTEITHS ME RISK FULL FREEPAGE Buy ANY pack of Monteith’s Beer or Cider and if it’s not to your taste, you can have a new one on us. Includes any Monteith’s 6 pack, 12 pack of beer or cider. See monteiths.co.nz for full details. Guarantee starts 1st March 2016. While vouchers last.

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Te Atatu Kite Day a great success Several thousand people turned up again to the Henderson Massey Local Board’s annual Kite Day on Sunday 21 February, filling the sky with some of the most imaginative and impressive kites yet seen on the Harbourview - Orangihina reserve in Te Atatu.

This ever popular event was held as usual against the backdrop of one of New Zealand's most stunning Waterfront views. From this month this stunning park is host to the eagerly anticipated Harbourview Sculpture Trail that opened on Saturday 5 March with a dawn ceremony.

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Major General Sir George Richardson - a forgotten war hero Speak of Charles Upham VC or Willia Apiata VC and many people will know immediately that you’re speaking of a New Zealand war hero. But, almost nobody remembers Sir George Spafford Richardson.

Today Major General Richardson lies in the Soldiers' section of Waikumete Cemetery largely unremembered even though he was perhaps our first genuine hero from World War 1. He was a man who gave an immense amount to the cause of soldiers in war, to Returned Servicemen, particularly the disabled, after the war and even to this city which he served as deputy-mayor. Thousands of people travel every year along Richardson Road, in Mt Roskill, without knowing that it was named for this great man. His rise in the ranks of the military marks him out as highly unusual. In an age, when a simple Private couldn’t expect to rise “above his station”, Richardson enlisted, at the age of 18, as a gunner in England’s Royal Regiment of Artillery in 1886 and finished his career as a Major General. His rise was meteoric especially for those peace time days. Within five years of enlisting, he was a Staff Sergeant gunnery instructor and recommended to train New Zealand artillery. Eight years after that, he been promoted captain in the New Zealand Militia and chief instructor of artillery services. He married Caroline in 1892 and was considered too valuable to be allowed to serve in the Boer War of 1899 1902. By 1912 he was a Major and was sent to Staff College in England. A year later, grieving the loss of his son, also a soldier who was run over by a gun carriage, Richardson was appointed as New Zealand’s representative on the Imperial General staff in London at the War Office. This office managed all of Britain’s military affairs across the entire world. With World War 1 looming, he helped Bernard Freyberg to form the Royal Naval Division, became its chief of staff

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and led 25,000 of its men in the unsuccessful defence of Antwerp, Belgium. Overrun by the German advance he narrowly evaded capture and after further service in France returned to England as a Lieutenant Colonel in November 1914. Assigned to refit the Royal Naval Division for Gallipoli, he landed with his men on that fateful day, 25th April 1915. As in Belgium, he was lucky to escape alive eight months later, when the trawler on which he was leaving Gallipoli, was severely shelled by the Turks.

Promoted to Brigadier General and awarded the CMG (Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George) he became Deputy Adjutant and Quartermaster-General of the British Salonika Force (XII Corps) in Greece before returning to London in March 1916 as General Officer Commanding the New Zealand Division in the United Kingdom and representative to the War Office. That month also he was honoured by France with the Croix de Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur in March 1916. He took a special interest in both the education and health of his soldiers. In an age when soldiers were cannon fodder, he created a scheme to provide education, vocational training and curative treatment for returning soldiers. Calling on his battlefield experience he reorganised medical care into four categories, one each for: hospital cases; men convalescing; men between convalescence and fitness; and men sufficiently recovered to be trained for active service. Richardson returned to New Zealand as a Brigadier General, early in 1919, taking charge of administration at General Headquarters in Wellington. Besides his CMG and Légion d'Honneur, he was decorated Companion of the Order of the Bath, Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) and Croix de Guerre from Belgium. He was also mentioned in despatches three times for outstanding service and bravery. Six years later, he was made Sir George, Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.


In Wellington, he soon impressed with 'untiring energy, tact and perseverance'. Colonel F. J. Fox rated him 'as smart as it is possible for a man to be'.

Putting his formidable organisational skills to work, he chaired the post war Reconstruction Committee for the defence forces and was a member of the Air Board, established in 1920 to administer aviation. Promoted to Major General he was appointed in 1923 to the first of two terms as administrator of Western Samoa which had been confiscated from Germany. For the rest of his life he worked tirelessly for returned servicemen, especially the disabled. In 1932, with 12,000 unemployed ex-soldiers in New Zealand, he campaigned for a policy to help returned servicemen in their lifetime. Included was provision for the burial of ex-servicemen who died destitute and would only get a pauper’s grave. He was president (and later patron) of the Auckland Returned Services Association and founder/patron of the Remuera Returned Soldiers Social Club in 1932; chairman of the Soldiers’ Civil Re-establishment League in Aucklan; patron and Dominion Representative of the Old Contemptibles Association. He was matched that with civilian service as a member of the Community Sunshine Association for eight years and President of the Auckland Advisory Council of the National federation of Permanent Health Camps. In May 1935 and again in 1938 he won election to the Auckland City Council becoming deputy to Mayor Sir Ernest Davis and died suddenly in office on June 11th 1938, aged 71. Said Mr J. W. Kendall, president of the Auckland R.S.A: “His epitaph may well be, The Soldiers’ friend. He did everything he could for the returned men.”

Sir George Spafford Richardson with Malietoa and Mata'afa, Mulinu'

Lest we forget Next month Our West will feature a complete list of all ANZAC day services and parades in West Auckland on 25 April. 17


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