Birds of Western Downs

Page 1

BIRDS

OF WESTERN DOWNS Queensland, Australia


WELCOME TO WESTERN DOWNS To Rockhampton

WANDOAN

To Roma

MILES CHINCHILLA

JANDOWAE BELL

WARRA

KAIMKILLENBUN

To Surat

GLENMORGAN

TARA

MEANDARRA

DALBY

To Toowoomba and Brisbane

To Goondiwindi

Only three hours from Queensland’s capital, the Western Downs is an easy escape from fast paced city life. This is Big Sky country where days unfold under vast, wide open skies before the sun sets in vivid splendour and a blanket of stars appear in the clear nights. Discover country towns, rich with pioneering history and friendly local characters. Vibrant and distinctive festivals are truly special celebrations of what makes this region so special. Our country landscapes, national parks and freshwater lakes provide natural settings for camping and all kinds of outdoor adventures, from bush walking to bird watching, fossicking for petrified wood, gliding, waterskiing and much more. Join in the action of the Chinchilla Melon Festival; experience a grand night of opera in the grounds of the magnificent Jimbour House; watch the camels racing at Tara’s Festival of Culture and Camel Races or immerse yourself in country-style fun and vintage twist at both the Back to the Bush Festival in Miles and the Jandowae Timbertown Festival. Visit www.westerndownsqueensland.com.au for detailed information about the Western Downs.

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TIPS FOR BIRDWATCHING

When you are starting out, it is best to become familiar with the birds that live in your garden, the local park, on walking routes and at holiday spots. In this way you will soon become aware of the range of common species associated with each site, seasonal changes through the year, the breeding residents, regular migrants and occasional visitors. With practice, you will begin to recognise different species, and eventually you will notice that each has its own way of life. By gradually expanding your horizons, and birdwatching in new places, you will see more and more different species. Holidays to different parts of Australia or overseas will never be the same again. About 800 different species of birds have been recorded in Australia. Some are unmistakable, but others are a little more difficult to identify. Luckily, most of the hard work of identification has already been done. Publications such as field guides are books with colour illustrations of all Australian birds, with notes on how to identify them, and other information, such as their distribution, calls and habits. With a little practice, they are easy to use, and essential whenever you have seen an unfamiliar bird. A range of Apps are also available for your digital device.

BIRDING RANGE

A birding range is the area where a bird species can be found during its lifetime and includes areas where individuals or communities may migrate or live permanently. Every bird on the planet has its own unique geographic range. Cockatoos for example are native only to Australia. Some species have a wide range, while others live in a very limited area. Several factors determine a bird’s range including climate, food and water sources. When a bird’s water or food source disappears or alters, they must find another source, extend their range, or risk extinction. When the climate changes (from drought to flood) ranges can move, shrink, or grow.

BIRDWATCHING ON THE WESTERN DOWNS

The Western Downs is a wonderful place to go birdwatching because birds are everywhere you look. Our region is proud to host at least 342 species that migrate annually or live here. Our birds are not just in the forests, bushy ridges And woodlands, but also along the banks of the Condamine River, narrow winding creeks and lagoons. Farmlands with cultivation paddocks (dry or irrigated) and crops ready for harvesting provide habitats for a range of birds also. Our roads, verges, farm infrastructure and urban buildings also provide a habitat for a diverse range of bird species. Watching birds can take on many different forms. For most people it is a relaxing pastime which allows them to head out into the fresh air and visit places they may not usually go. Some enjoy the freedom of solitude it can provide while others see it as a social experience, meeting with people who share a common interest. For others it is the lure of the chase which ignites their passion. Still others look upon birds as environmental indicators and use them to understand how the natural world is faring. Whatever drives Western Downs birdwatchers, almost all agree — they like watching birds to appreciate their beauty and freedom, and because it’s enjoyable.

Western Downs Habitat

Six habitats play host to birds of the Western Downs. These can be roughly defined as Woodland, Heathland, Forest, Rainforest, Soft-scrub, Wetland and Savannah. Most birding sites in the region cover two habitat types if they are based around water which most are.

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DALBY AND SURROUNDS To Bunya Mountains

WARRA W

re go

Rd and stock rout

Hw y

Bunya Hwy

ar

Dalby-Jandowae

To Chinchilla and Miles

Thomas Jack Park on the Warrego Highway, right in the heart of Dalby is the perfect place to stop for a wander through beautifully landscaped gardens, relax by the lily pond and listen to the tranquil sounds of the waterfall (bird watching opportunity).

e

While in Dalby, take a peaceful stroll along the picturesque Myall Creek Parkland Walkway to the Dalby Golfcourse where you will see a great variety of water birds, often nesting on the Island near the Edward Street Weir.

DALBY MYALL CREEK

Built on the black soil plains of the northern Darling Downs, Dalby is the regional hub of the Western Downs and a hive of rural enterprise.

W

ar

re go

KUMBARILLA LAKE BROADWATER

H

w y

To Toowoomba and Brisbane

The area of flat open farmland between Dalby, Warra and Jandowae features cultivation and River Red Gums along creeks. The Brigalow Belah Scrub corridor along Nine Mile Stock Route crosses Jeitz Road at Trumpeter's Corner and is a great location for spotting the Painted Honeyeater as it searches for the Mistletoe Flower of the Brigalow tree. The Warra Weir and Condamine River near Warra also provide places to spot Honeyeaters and the White Throated Nightjar.

The district of Kumbarilla is bordered by the KoganCondamine Road, Kumbarilla Lane and the Moonie Highway. The Poplar box and open grass country features lagoons along the Condamine River, some swamp areas and Brigalow Belah scrub country with various waterbirds, Honeyeaters and Parrots. Dalby is a great place to base yourself to explore the southern and western areas of the region. Some of the secondary roads are gravel so it is important to drive to the conditions and look out for livestock and wildlife. Dalby's local economy includes beef, cotton, sorghum, wheat and broadacre crops such as chickpeas and mung beans. In fact the Dalby Regional Saleyards are one of the nation's most significant cattle market facilities.

HABITAT DALBY/JANDOWAE STOCK ROUTE Savannah/Woodland

LAKE BROADWATER Forest/Wetland

MYALL CREEK Water way

WARRA

Cultivation/Open Plains/ Scrub

KUMBARILLA Forest/Swamp/ Open Grassland

SUGGESTED BIRDING SITES

Dalby, Jandowae stock route, Lake Broadwater, Myall Creek, Warra and Kumbarilla.

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Myall Creek


BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

BLACK DUCK

LAUGHING KOOKABURRA

DUSKY MOORHEN

SUPERB FAIRY WREN

BLUE BONNET

CRESTED PIDGEON

Lake Broadwater Conservation Park

Lake Broadwater Conservation Park protects the only natural lake on the Darling Downs. Waterbirds and wildlife are drawn to the shallow lake and find refuge in the surrounding vegetation. The lake precinct was a focal point for local Aboriginal people and later teamsters and early settlers. Surrounded by cypress pine, eucalypt and brigalow open woodland, the shallow lake is listed in the Directory of Nationally Important Wetlands and is an excellent example of a semi-permanent freshwater lake in an area where these are rare. The lake fills only after heavy rains and when full is up to three to four metres deep. Picnic under river red gums, relax and enjoy the wildlife and wildflowers. Watch waterbirds nesting on the ‘neck’ of the lake from an elevated bird hide. More than 230 species of birds have been recorded at the park. Stroll along the two-kilometre track connecting the two camping areas or take the five-kilometre (return) self-guided drive. With easy access to water, tracks and recreational facilities, Lake Broadwater a great spot to relax and to appreciate nature.

Lake Broadwater Conservation Park

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BUNYA MOUNTAINS AND BELL

To Kingaroy

BUNYA MOUNTAINS

To Jandowae

BELL To Toowoomba

KAIMKILLENBUN To Dalby

Travel east from Dalby across farming plains, cultivation and open grasslands to Kaimkillenbun, a farming township with the longest name. Here you can spot the Open Plain birds of prey such as Kestrels, Wedgetail Eagles, Brown Falcons and the Black Shouldered Kite - just to name a few. Follow the Ironbark ridges onto Bell and you will pass the Koondaii Dam, the town's water supply and a great spot to see water birds. Local roads around Bell including Sunnyvale, Walkers Creek, and Woodlawn Road are also great bird watching locations. On the drive to the Bunya Mountains, you will traverse through the soft scrub area of the Myall Creek, where you may spot White-winged Chough, the rare Ground Cuckoo Shrike and the Apostle birds. If you are lucky you may also see the "scratchings" of the Black-breasted Button Quail or hear the noisy Pitta bird. If you are traversing the Mountain from the township of Maidenwell you may see the brightly coloured male Regent Bowerbird fly across the road in front of you.

If you are travelling up the mountain from the Kumbia side, take a detour into Burtons Well campground, where the large Grass Trees when in flower attract a number of Honey Eaters to the spikes. Across the road from Burtons Well, the Mt Kiangarow Track takes you to the highest peak of the mountain on the western side where you will walk through rainforest and vine scrub. When out walking you will see lots of pigeons, including the topknot, white-headed species and brown cuckoo and Emerald doves. Bunya Mountains Outlook

HABITAT KAIMKILLENBUN

Grasslands/Cultivation/Softwood Scrub

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BUNYA MOUNTAINS

Moist Rainforest/Dry Rainforest/Grasslands/Open Forest/Woodland


BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

KING PARROT

WONGA PIGEON

BAR-SHOULDERED DOVE

CRIMSON ROSELLA

SATIN BOWERBIRD

REGENT BOWERBIRD

TOPKNOT PIGEON

EASTERN YELLOW ROBIN

GREEN CATBIRD

AUSTRALIAN MAGPIE

WEDGE-TAIL EAGLE

APOSTLEBIRD

Bunya Mountains Walking Track

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CHINCHILLA AND SURROUNDS Chinchilla is an easy 80km drive west of Dalby, along the Warrego Highway, along the vast wide open broadacre and cotton farming areas of the region. Chinchilla is a mixed resource town with cattle grazing, timber from the nearby Barakula Forestry, Melon growing and more recently the Resources Industry and Energy sector featuring the Kogan Creek Power Station, Coopers Gap Wind Farm and three major Solar Farms.

BARAKULA STATE FOREST To Mundubbera

OLD MAN LAGOON To Miles

ROUND WATERHOLE

CHARLEYS CREEK

CHINCHILLA

W

ARCHERS CROSSING

ar

re go

Hw

y

To Condamine

To Dalby

CHINCHILLA WEIR

Producing 25 percent of the country's watermelons, Chinchilla features the bi-annual Melon Festival with a range of interesting watermelon related sporting style competitions and entertaining street parade. Fossickers from around the world come in search of much sought after "Chinchilla Red" petrified wood. A Department of Resources Fossickers Licence must be purchased either on-line or from the Chinchilla Visitor Information Centre, along with a permit to fossick on either of the two allocated sites located on private property's just south-west of Chinchilla. While you are at the Information Centre, ask for a copy of the Western Downs Visitor Guide which provides maps and information on Drive Trails in the region enabling you to explore the history, art and culture, flora and fauna and significant landmarks such as the Condamine Bell, Leichhardt Monument, the Big Melon, Wild Dog Barrier Fence and Possum Park, just to name a few.

HABITAT CHINCHILLA WEIR

Wetland/Woodland

CHARLEYS CREEK

Wetland/Forest

OLD MAN LAGOON

Wetland/Woodland

ROUND WATERHOLE

Wetland/Woodland

BARAKULA STATE FOREST Forest

BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

WHITE WING CHOUGH

RAINBOW LORIKEET

PINK-EARED DUCK

8

WHITE FACED HERON

PLUMED WHISTLING-DUCK

GREAT EGRET

SCALY-BREASTED LORIKEET

ARCHERS CROSSING

Wetland/Woodland


SUGGESTED BIRDING SITES

Chinchilla Weir, Charleys Creek, Old Man Lagoon, Round Waterhole, Barakula State Forest.

Chinchilla Weir

OTHER THINGS TO SEE AND DO Archers Crossing

Located on the Condamine River, about 6km from Chinchilla, Archers Crossing (South) is a peaceful location for spotting waterbirds along this tree-lined arm of the Condamine River.

Chinchilla Botanic Parkland

Archers Crossing

This parkland, that was named Australia's Park of the Year in 2020, incorporates the prehistoric flora and fauna native to the area, the region's Aboriginal cultural history and the towns railway heritage connection with the early Western line. Take a walk through the parkland and look up into the old dead Box trees - you may spot nesting Galahs. Be inspired by the demonstration garden or stroll along the Ephemeral Creek which mirrors the banks of nearby Charleys Creek. Enjoy a splash of water when the showpiece watermelon fills up and empties in the custom built watermelon water play area

Chinchilla Botanic Parkland

The much-loved Chinchilla Weir is a great spot to enjoy the outdoors, have a picnic or camp for a minimum of two nights. This facility has recently been upgraded to include a camp kitchen, two new electric Barbacues and picnic table settings. Twelve powered sites are available. This is a perfect spot to watch the sunset and of course the prolific bird life which nest on the inland Island of this section of the Condamine River.

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MILES AND SURROUNDS GURULMUNDI STATE FOREST

Miles was originally named Dogwood Crossing and was established on a track blazed by the explorer, Ludwig Leichhardt in 1884.

To Wandoan

DOGWOOD CREEK

Warrego

To Roma

COLUMBOOLA COUNTRY

POSSUM PARK

Hwy

CHINAMAN’S LAGOON

To Chinchilla and Dalby

MILES

h

ic Le

GIL WEIR

dt

r ha

y w

H

Miles is a great town to base yourself for birdwatching with a variety of the Woodland, Wetland and Forest areas around picturesque permanent lagoons, creeks and the Gil Weir. Varieties of Waterbirds can be found around the edges of lagoons blooming with waterlilies. Spring is the best time to visit the Gurulmindi State Forest which covers an area of around 13,000 hectares and is located north-east of Miles. There you will find an abundance of small birds amongst the wildflowers and heathland shrubs. Miles is the centre of a native wildflower region extending north to the Great Divide. In the heart of the Western Downs, the region has diversified primary production, and successful mining of Bentonite Clay. The beautiful Dogwood Creek highlights the beauty of Miles, particularly in September when the waterlillies bloom in abundance.

To Tara

CALIGUEL LAGOON

HABITAT CALIGUEL LAGOON

Wetland/Woodland

DOGWOOD CREEK

Wetland/Forest

CHINAMAN'S LAGOON Wetland

GIL WEIR

Wetland/Forest

GURULMUNDI STATE FOREST Forest/Heathland

SUGGESTED BIRDING SITES

Columboola Country, Possum Park, Caliguel Lagoon, Dogwood Creek, Chinaman’s Lagoon, Gil Weir, Gurulmundi State Forest

Chinaman's Lagoon

10


BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO

HARDHEAD

AUSTRALIAN BUSTARD

RED-RUMPED PARROT

COCKATIEL

AUSTRALIAN PELICAN

GREY CROWNED BABBLER

Caliguel Lagoon

Caliguel Lagoon is located 7km south of Condamine and is named after an early pastoral run in the area. A long narrow stretch of water forms this lagoon which is a peaceful and tranquil location not only for birdwatching, but the beautiful sunrise and sunsets are perfect for photography. The recent facility upgrade to Caliguel Lagoon makes it an attractive spot to not only picnic, enjoy the beautiful sunrise and sunset, waterski, but for camping and caravanning. There are a number of new shelters with picnic table settings, a camp kitchen, a free-standing electric barbecue and eight powered sites.

Caliguel Lagoon

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TARA AND SURROUNDS

Chin c

hilla

Tara

Rd

To Chinchilla

TARA set

Sun

THE GUMS

at Sur

To Meandarra

y Wa

l nta me lop oad R

e Dev

TARA LAGOON To Dalby

Follow the Sunset Way and you will pass through the town of Tara, via the Moonie Highway. Tara is literally ‘off the beaten track’ and that’s just how the locals like it. When you arrive in town, drop into the Tara Information Centre to chat to a local about what to see and do. Enjoy the Lagoon Parklands featuring Settlers Park and the Walk of Remembrance Garden. The Lagoon offers a cool respite and it serves as the local fitness precinct complete with outdoor gym. You can picnic by the water’s edge, fish, cycle or take the interpretive walk to see an abundance of birdlife. Native flora and fauna displays are abundant throughout the region, and among these you can spot some rare species. The eastern third of the region also supports Queensland’s best examples of ironbark, spotted gum and cypress pine trees.

HABITAT TARA LAGOON Wetland/Woodland

Located on the edge of town, Tara Lagoon is part of Undulla Creek and host to a serene camping ground with great facilities including toilets and showers, barbecue areas with seating and shelter and powered sites. A pathway along the water’s edge provides a tranquil walking or cycling track and ample opportunity to enjoy the impressive native parrots and birdlife that collect in the eucalypts. A feature of the Tara Lagoon include the 150m boardwalk over water with viewing platform and seating.

Tara Lagoon

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BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

MASKED LAPWING

PHESANT COUCAL

YELLOW-BILLED SPOONBILL

LITTLE CORELLA

SINGING HONEYEATER

STRAW-NECKED IBIS

ZEBRA FINCH

HABITAT THE GUMS RESERVE Wetland/Forest

The Gums Reserve

Located on the Crossroads of the Surat Development Road and the Leichhardt Highway, west of Tara, the Reserve is located behind the cemetery and includes an ephemeral lagoon surrounded by open forest and mixed flora. A highlight of this lagoon is the White-bellied Sea-eagle. You will also spot Egrets, Spoonbills and Miner birds, to name a few.

The Gums Reserve

13


MEANDARRA AND GLENMORGAN

MYALL PARK BOTANIC GARDEN

Condamine Meand

arra Rd

To Condamine

GLENMORGAN To Surat

Su rat

MEANDARRA

De ve lop

THE GUMS RESERVE

Rd

HANNAHFORD To Tara

Mea nda rra Ta

lwo od

Rd

me nt al

To Westmar

HABITAT MYALL PARK BOTANIC GARDEN Native Bushland/Brigalow Belah Woodlands

Meandarra is the hub of a prime production area of broad-acre farming, cattle, and sheep and Brigalow Creek in the town is a popular fishing, and camping spot and is popular for a picnic when the waterlilies are in bloom. Meandarra is home to an extensive display of military equipment. The fascinating display is on a local property. On the property is also a native wildlife preservation programme that offers excellent opportunities to observe and photograph a diverse range of flora and fauna. Stop off at the Leo Gardon Apex Park where free electric barbecues and picnic facilities can be used amongst pleasant surroundings. Meandarra is in the heart of the Brigalow Belt of Queensland with numerous soil and vegetation types, thereby providing some favoured locations for feeding, roosting and nesting. Much of the Brigalow Belah scrubs of this region have been cleared over the years to make way for farming and cultivation, hence bird species have changed to adapt to the changing conditions. You can still find stands of Brigalow scrub, Woodlands and Acacia thickets in the south of the region all laden with bird species such as parrots, treecreepers, dollarbirds, owls and woodswallows. There are Grassland and restricted areas of Spinifex while Watercourses and the Wetland swamps with Melon Holes are home to egrets, herons, spoonbills, ducks and brolgas. Other bird watching areas around Glenmorgan include the Hannaford Scientific Reserve at the junction of the Surat Developmental Road and Old Coomrith Road for a good variety of woodland birds. In addition the Eringibba National Park which can be accessed via the Windermere Road, 1km east of Glenmorgan features scrub areas which are good for small birds and there is also a good variety of woodland birds.

Myall Park Botanic Garden

The township of Glenmorgan is located on the Surat Developmental Road and just 7km north of the town is the Myall Park Botanic Garden. This 132ha botanic garden is known as the home of the Gordon hybrid grevilleas and arid, semi-arid and dry tropical species of Australian trees and shrubs. With over 190 species of birds recorded within the garden this is a birdwatcher's paradise. The abundance of nectar-producing plants attracts a variety of Honeyeaters and a bird hide on the watercourse attracts about 50 species of waterbirds. Many woodland birds can be found around the timbered margins of the lake and nesting in the fringing River red gums, while small birds can be found in the natural grass areas. There are flora and fauna lists available from the on-site gallery and gift shop.

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Bird Hide at Myall Park Botanic Garden


BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

AUSTRALIAN WOOD DUCK

PIED CURRAWONG

COMMON BRONZEWING

STRIPED HONEYEATER

PEACEFUL DOVE

SPINY-CHEEKED HONEYEATER

BLACK-SHOULDERED KITE

"Brigalow Birds"

A handy resource to have on your bird-watching adventure is the Brigalow Birds book - which features birds of Myall Park Botanic Garden, just outside Glenmorgan and the surrounding region. This text is a field guide to the bird species found in this part of the Queensland Brigalow Belt and with numerous soil types and vegetations, there will be favoured locations for feeding, roosting and nesting. The Book is $25 and available from the Chinchilla Visitor Information Centre and Myall Park Botanic Gardens, Glenmorgan.

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WANDOAN AND SURROUNDS To Taroom

dt ar H y w

WANDOAN

hh

Jac

WATERLOO PLAIN

d

nR

oa

nd

Wa

ic Le

n kso

To Miles

The quiet wheat and cattle town of Wandoan is the perfect stopover between Miles and Taroom as you travel along the Leichhardt Highway. The Waterloo Plains Environmental Park is a Wetland area which features a small lagoon filled with water reeds where a variety of water birds fee. The surrounding forest trees are home to finches, wrens and the occasional crow. The Wandoan Heritage Trail will lead you to more than 20 points of interest including the Juandah Historical Site, featuring informative panels about the Soldier Settlers and Leichhardt. Visit O’Sullivan Park to meet a local hero and you’ll find the statue of Mick the dog that saved his master’s life after he fell from his horse on Juandah station. Mick ran home for help with a message scratched on a tobacco tin tucked under his collar. The recently opened Avenue of Honour, a pathway within O'Sullivan Park celebrates Wandoan's rich history and contribution to the 103 families who came to the town through the Soldier Settler Scheme. The recent rose garden plantings along the walkway will provide new habitats for a variety of small birds.

HABITAT WATERLOO PLAIN Wetland

BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

WHISTLING KITE

PIED BUTCHERBIRD

YELLOW RUMPED THORNBILL

16

CHANNEL-BILLED CUCKOO

GREY FANTAIL

WHITE-NECKED HERON

LITTLE BLACK CORMORANT


Waterloo Plain Environmental Park

OTHER THINGS TO SEE AND DO Juandah Historical Site

Juandah Historical Site

Juandah Historical Site is a truly unique slice of history. This is the original site of the Juandah Head-Station, the heart of a settlement which later became known as Wandoan. At full running capacity, Juandah Station employed up to 80 stockmen to run up to 50,000 head of cattle. Some of the original buildings from its time as a flourishing enterprise are still standing, including the old Juandah Store. Built in the 1850s, the store contains a room that later became the first school room for the area. Various rooms and remnants of the original homestead and other structures are carefully signposted at their original sites. The Juandah Historical Site also hosts a Folk Museum of local heritage items and social history.

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JANDOWAE AND SURROUNDS INVERAI ROAD

Jandowae features two bird trails - take a drive along the Inverai Road through open farming plains and cultivation where the Painted Honeyeater can be found in the corridors of Brigalow trees and softwood scrub - particularly in the Spring. To Kingaroy

JANDOWAE CONNECTION ROAD

owa Jand

e Co

nne

n ctio

Rd

To Chinchilla

JANDOWAE

JANDOWAE DAM g

Kin

If you traverse the Jandowae Connection Road and head towards Chinchilla via the Canaga Creek Road or Lower Jinghi Road, this open Belah Forest country features creeks lined with River Red Gum and Poplar Box and Ironbark.

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eR

wa

do

an

yJ aro

In this area you can spot Emus and a variety of Honey Eater birds, just to name a few.

INVERAI ROAD

JANDOWAE DAM

To Dalby

On the eastern side of Jandowae the dam is great spot to picnic and see waterbirds over a great spance of water.

HABITAT JANDOWAE DAM Wetland/Woodland

JANDOWAE CONNECTION ROAD

INVERAI ROAD

Open Plains/Brigalow corridors

JANDOWAE CONNECTION ROAD Wetland/Woodland

If spending some time birdwatching in Jandowae, why not stay a night or two at the Jandowae Caravan Park. A quiet friendly and spacious country caravan park with great amenities, right in the heart of town. You may also like to enjoy a picnic while birdwatching at the Jandowae Dam with its great spanse of Water.

Jandowae Dam

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BIRDS YOU COULD DISCOVER

PAINTED HONEYEATER

DARTER

GREY TEAL

RUFOUS WHISTLER

EMU

NANKEEN KESTREL

RED-WINGED PARROT

OTHER THINGS TO SEE AND DO Jandowae has so much to offer the visitor. Be sure to come and stay for a while. Take a picnic at the historic Athlone Cottage (circa 1890). Discover the northern end of the worlds longest fence, the Dingo Barrier fence. Jandowae is home to the TimberTown Festival held in June biennially, the weekend is packed with family friendly activities, including street parade, art show, live music yabbie races, and so much more.

Athlone Cottage

Dingo Barrier Fence

TimberTown Festival

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Great Egret

BIRDING CHECKLIST

20


001 CASSOWARIES 001

Emu

002 DUCKS, GEESE AND SWANS 199

Magpie Goose

204

Wandering Whistling-

205

186 

Plumed Whistling-Duck 

217

214

203

202

200 948

208 212 211

210 213 215

003 008

009 011

Blue-billed Duck Musk Duck Freckled Duck

Black Swan

062

060

Pacific Black Duck

 

 

Australasian Shoveler  Grey Teal

Chestnut Teal

Pink-eared Duck Hardhead

   

PHEASANTS, FOWL AND ALLIES

Australian Brush-turkey  Stubble Quail Brown Quail

Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe Great Crested Grebe

005 STORKS 183

Cotton Pygymy-goose 

004 GREBES 061

Australian Wood Duck  Northern Mallard

Black-necked Stork

 

  

180

178

181

182

Glossy Ibis

Royal Spoonbill

188 185

  

Yellow-billed Spoonbill 

007 HERONS AND BITTERNS

White-faced Heron

Australasian Little

Egret  189 187

White-necked Heron Eastern Great Egret

197

Cattle Egret (Eastern)  Nankeen Night-Heron

 

Black Bittern

Australasian Bittern

008 PELICANS 106

Australian Pelican

059

Eurasian Coot

013 CRANES

Pied Cormorant

Great Cormorant

Australasian Darter

10 OSPREY 241

Eastern Osprey

234

Pacific Baza

233

Letter-winged Kite

230 231

229 228

226 218 221

Black-shouldered Kite  Square-tailed Kite

Black Kite

Black-breasted Buzzard  Whistling Kite

Spotted Harrier

White-bellied Sea Eagle  Swamp Harrier

Brown Goshawk

 

220

Grey Goshawk

223

Red Goshawk

224 225

Collared Sparrowhawk  Wedge-tailed Eagle Little Eagle

011 BUSTARD 117

Australian Bustard

012 RAILS, CRAKES AND COOTS 046 045

050

049

Buff-banded Rail Lewin’s Rail

Baillon’s Crake

 

 

Australian Spotted Spotless Crake

018

Little Button-quail

Button-quail

019

014

175

016

Button-quail

Red-chested

Painted Button-quail

Button-quail

Black-breasted

STONE-CURLEWS

Bush Stone-curlew

(Thick-knee)

STILTS AND AVOCETS

147

Banded Stilt

(White-headed)

146 148

Pied Stilt

Red-necked Avocet

017 PLOVERS 137

143 145

144 132 135

133

018 170

Pacific Golden Plover Red-capped Plover

 

Inland Dotterel

Red-kneed Dotterel

Black-fronted Dotterel  Banded Lapwing

Masked Lapwing

 

PAINTED-SNIPES

Australian Painted

Snipe  171

Comb-crested Jacana

020 SANDPIPERS AND SNIPES 

Red-backed

019 JACANAS

Crake  051

Brolga

013

015 

Black-tailed Native-hen 

014 BUTTON-QUAIL

017

10 A KITES, HAWKES AND EAGLES 232

055

117

Little Black Cormorant 

101

097

009 A DARTERS

Swamphen

Little Pied Cormorant 

096

Australasian

Dusky Moorhen

100

099

058

056

009 CORMORANTS AND SHAGS

222

Australian White Ibis 

Straw-necked Ibis

196

219

006 IBISES AND SPOONBILLS 179

192

(Rufous) 

Duck  216

977

Intermediate Egret

168 152 153 151

159 158

Latham’s Snipe

Black-tailed Godwit Bar-tailed Godwit Little Curlew

Marsh Sandpiper

    

Common Greenshank 

21


154 157

162 163 161

021 173

Wood Sandpiper

Common Sandpiper

111

110

109

023

Red-necked Stint

025

BARN OWLS

Curlew Sandpiper

250

Australian Masked Owl 

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper 

Australian Pratincole 

Silver Gull

Australian Gull-billed Caspian Tern

042 039 031

032

030

044 025

023 021

207

337

339 338 341

342

242

028 NIGHTJARS

PIGEONS AND DOVES

White-headed Pigeon  Brown Cuckoo-Dove

Pacific Emerald Dove

Flock Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing  Crested Pigeon

Spinifex Pigeon

Squatter Pigeon Diamond Dove

Peaceful Dove

Bar-shouldered Dove Wonga Pigeon

Wompoo Fruit-Dove Superb Fruit-Dove

Topknot Pigeon

Oriental Cuckoo Pallid Cuckoo Brush Cuckoo

Fan-tailed Cuckoo

Black-eared Cuckoo

330

      

   

318

032 KINGFISHERS 319

322

22

Azure Kingfisher

324 325

329

239

236 237

Sacred Kingfisher

Brown Falcon

Australian Hobby Grey Falcon Black Falcon

Peregrin Falcon

Black-Cockatoo

271

Little Corella

272

270

Galah

  

Long-billed Corella

(Pink Cockatoo)

Major Mitchell Cockatoo

274 Cockatiel 281

280 282

286

294

Australian King-parrot 

Red-winged Parrot Crimson Rosella Eastern Rosella

Pale-headed Rosella

    

   

Australian Ringneck

309 295

296 302 254 256 258

260 261

Greater Blue Bonnet Swift Parrot

Red-rumped Parrot Mulga Parrot

Budgerigar

Turquoise Parrot

     

Rainbow Lorikeet

Musk Lorikeet

Scaly-breasted Lorikeet  Little Lorikeet

Double-eyed Fig-parrot

(Coxen’s) 

036 PITTAS 352

Noisy Pitta

036 A BOWERBIRDS 

(Mallee/Barnardi) 

310

Red-backed Kingfisher 

033 FALCONS AND CARACARAS

297

Rainbow Bee-eater

267 Yellow-tailed

288

Forest Kingfisher

032 A BEE-EATERS

Glossy Black-Cockatoo 

035 PARROTS

Laughing Kookaburra  Kookaburra

Black-Cockatoo

323 Blue-winged

265

Cockatoo 

Pacific Swift (fork-tail)  Dollarbird (Oriental)

Australian Owlet-

Needletail

269 Sulphur-crested

334 White-throated

345

030 SWIFTS

238

nightjar 

326 

029 OWLET-NIGHTJARS 317

Nankeen Kestrel

034 COCKATOOS

273

Nightjar 

031 ROLLERS

White-throated

Shining Bronze Cuckoo  Pacific Koel (Eastern)

Spotted Nightjar

335

Horsefield’s Bronze-

Little Bronze-Cuckoo

Tawny Frogmouth

Rose-crowned

Fruit-Dove

331

235

347

Southern Boobook

027 FROGMOUTHS

Cuckoo  344

Barking Owl

024 CUCKOOS 336

246

Powerful Owl

Black-Tern

White-winged

043

313

Spotted Dove

036

Eastern Barn Owl

Eastern Grass Owl

240

264 Red-tailed 

989

034

248

Greater Sooty Owl

Whiskered Tern

033

252

Pheasant Coucal

026 OWLS

Rock Dove

029

253

249

957

028

Channel-billed Cuckoo 

349

Tern  112

348

022 GULL, TERNS AND SKIMMERS 125

677

Green Catbird

679

Satin Bowerbird

684 680

Regent Bowerbird Spotted Bowerbird

   

037 AUSTRALASIAN TREECREEPERS 558

White-throated

Treecreeper


561 555

White-browed

Treecreeper Brown Treecreeper

038 AUSTRALASIAN WRENS 529 532

536

541 535

Superb Fairy-wren

640

585

645

646 603 641

634 635

605

 

(Variegated)

Purple-backed Fairy-wren Red-backed Fairy-wren  White-winged

Red Wattlebird

Spiny-cheeked

Honeyeater

Striped Honeyeater Noisy Friarbird

Little Friarbird

Regent Honeyeater

    

Blue-faced Honeyeater  Noisy Miner

Lewin’s Honeyeater

Yellow-throated Miner 

614 Yellow-faced

608

Honeyeater

 

Honeyeater

Honeyeater

Honeyeater

617 White-eared

580

583

579

578

597

598

594

591

(Myzomela)

Scarlet Honeyeater Crimson Chat

Orange Chat

White-front Chat

 

Spotted Pardalote

976

Striated Pardalote

570

Red-browed Pardalote 

Honeyeater

Honeyeater

Honeyeater

White-throated White-naped

546

547

546

705

Woodswallow

Woodswallow

Black-faced

Dusky Woodswallow Little Woodswallow Grey Butcherbird Pied Butcherbird

Australian Magpie

Scrubwren

046 CUCKOO-SHRIKES AND TRILLERS

Speckled Warbler

494 504 465

454

463 453

White-browed

Large-billed Scrubwren  Weebill

Brown Gerygone

Western Gerygone

  

White-throated

Gerygone  476

481

484

Brown Thornbill

Inland Thornbill

 

Chestnut-rumped

Buff-rumped Thornbill  Yellow-rumped

Thornbill  470

443 445

Yellow Thornbill

Striated Thornbill

Southern Whiteface

  

Grey-crowned Babbler  White-browed Babbler 

043 LODRUNNERS 434

Australian Logrunner 

044 WHIPBIRDS AND QUAIL-THRUSH 421

436

Honeyeater

438

Eastern Whipbird

Cuckoo-shrike

425

White-bellied

428

429 423

430 431

Quail-thrush

Chestnut-breasted

    

549

Barred Cuckoo-shrike  Cuckoo-shrike

Common Cicadabird

White-winged Triller

Ground cuckoo-shrika  Varied Triller

047 SITTELLAS

Varied Sittella

048 AUSTRALO-PAPUAN BELLBIRDS 419

Crested Bellbird

049 WHISTLERS AND ALLIES 416

Crested Shrike-tit

401

Rufous Whistler

398

408

Golden Whistler

Grey Shrike-thrush

050 FIGBIRDS AND ORIOLES 671

Spotted Quail-thrush

Pied Currawong

424 Black-faced

432 

White-browed

488

Painted Honeyeater White-fronted

545

694

042 AUSTRALASIAN BABBLERS

Brown-headed

Masked Woodswallow 

Woodswallow

 

544

Scrubwren

Honeyeater Honeyeater

White-breasted

466

Black-chinned

543

700

493 Yellow-throated

471

White-plumed

045 WOODSWALLOWS, BUTCHERBIRDS AND ALLIES

702

041 AUSTRALASIAN WARBLERS

Eastern Spinebill

565

Fuscous Honeyeater

Brown Honeyeater

Pied Honeyeater

040 PARDALOTE

486

623 Grey-fronted

448

Black Honeyeater

Thornbill 

619 Yellow-tufted

635

450

475

Singing Honeyeater

613

586

449 

Fairy-wren

502

Splended Fairy-wren

039 HONEYEATERS 630

589

Australasian Figbird Olive-backed Oriole

051 DRONGOS 673

Spangled Drongo

052 FANTAILS 362

Rufous Fantail

   

 

23


361

364

Grey Fantail

Willie Wagtail

053 MONARCHS 373 375

365

366 369 415

054 692 691

930

Black-faced Monarch Spectacled Monarch Leaden Flycatcher Satin Flycatcher

Restless Flycatcher Magpie-lark

CROWS AND JAYS

Torresian Crow Little Crow

Australian Raven

392

058 LARKS 648

059 SWALLOWS AND MARTINS

   

675

  

Paradise Riflebird

057 AUSTRALASIAN ROBINS 377

380 381

384 385

24

Jacky Winter

Scarlet Robin

Red-capped Robin Rose Robin Hooded Robin

359

    

(Hosfield’s)

Tree Martin

Fairy Martin

524

779   

061 GRASSBIRDS AND ALLIES 509 508 523

522

Rufous Songlark Brown Songlark Tawn Grassbird

Little Grassbird

   

Silvereye

(Eurasian)

991

Common Blackbird

065 FLOWERPECKERS Mistletoebird

066 OLD WORLD SPARROWS 995

House Sparrow

067

WAXBILLS, MUNIAS AND ALLIES

653

Zebra Finch

661

Plum-headed Finch

655

662

Double-barred Finch Red-browed Finch Diamond Firetail

    

Chestnut-breasted

Mannikin 

Cisticola  574

Bassian Thrush

657

Golden-headed

062 WHITE-EYES

Common Myna

Russet-tailed Thrush

652

061 A CISTICOLAS AND ALLIES 525

(European)

780

564

Australian ReedWarbler

998

Common Starling

064 THRUSHES

White-backed Swallow  Welcome Swallow

063 STARLINGS 999

060 REED-WARBLERS AND ALLIES

056 BIRDS-OF-PARADISE 686

357

360

White-winged Chough  Apostlebird

358

Australasian Bushlark

055 AUSTRALIAN MUDNESTERS 693

Eastern Yellow Robin

068 647

WAGTAILS AND PIPITS

Australian Pipit


ENDANGERED AND VULNERABLE BIRDS OF THE WESTERN DOWNS

223 RED GOSHAWK (Osprey, hawks and eagles)

236 GREY FALCON (Falcon)

Location: All of region

Location: Western areas

017 BLACK-BREASTED BUTTON QUAIL (Crake, Rail, Gallinule)

161 CURLEW SANDPIPER (Waders)

265 GLOSSY BLACK COCKATOO (Cockatoo, Corella)

270 MAJOR MITCHELL COCKATOO (Cockatoo, Corella)

Location: Bunya Mountains

170 PAINTED SNIPE (Wader)

039 SQUATTER PIGEON (Pigeon, Dove)

Location: All of region

Location: All of region

Location: All of region

309 SWIFT PARROT (Parrot, Rosella)

248 POWERFUL OWL (Owls)

603 REGENT HONEYEATER (Honeyeater)

Location: Chinchilla

Location: Bunya Mountains

Location: Dalby

Location: All of region

Location: Western areas

265 PAINTED HONEYEATER (Cockatoo, Corella)

Location: Dalby, Bell, Chinchilla, Jandowae

261 COXEN'S FIG PARROT (Cockatoo, Corella)

Location: Bunya Mountains

25


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT BIRDING

For information about specific locations and to learn about what other bird watchers have sighted in our region, we recommend you visit the eBird website ebird.org/australia/home or download the app for eBird Australia.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS • • • • • • • • •

Bernice Seton, local Western Downs bird watcher Southern Queensland Country Tourism (ATDW town information) www.birdlife.org.au www.nationalgeographic.org www.ebird.org/australia Brigalow Birds Educational Project (book) Going Bush with Chinchilla Nats (book) Lake Broadwater (book) www.birdsqueensland.org.au

Chinchilla Field Naturalist's Group

" Birdwatching is an awesome hobby as well as beneficial to our health and happiness."

Bell Birdwatching Group

The Chinchilla Field Naturalist's Group meet monthly to partake in flora and fauna excursions of the region, assist with scientific research and document and preserve information related to the southern Queensland region. An annual bird watching get-together is hosted every January on the Australia Day long weekend at the Bunya Mountains with bird watchers from other areas also welcome. The group has produced a number of flora related books over the years, and the "Urimbirra" newsletter is published six times a year. For more details on this group's meetings and monthly field trips, contact Heather Mason via email - riverdellbluewren@hotmail.com.

26


BERNICE SETON As an Honorary Life Member of Birds Queensland, Bernice Seton refers to the Bunya Mountains as an "an amazing inland Island of birds, trees and vegetation." From the verandah of her Bell farmhouse, Bernice enjoys picturesque views across the Origional Sym’s family property - once a dairy farm, when first settled in the mid 1870s, (still a family grazing property) now held by the fourth and fifth generations of the family, to the soft scrub foothills of the Bunya Mountains. Natural history has always been an interest for Bernice, having helped organised children’s nature activities in the Bunya Mountains years ago. More recently, Bernice with the encouragement of Bell resident, Ruth Storey, formed the Bell Birdwatching Group, a social group with a keen interest in the outdoors, and in particular identifying bird species of the region and surrounding countryside. Comprising around 30 people, the group meet on the third Friday of each month, and in car convoy equipped with UHF radios, birding books, telescope, binoculars and cameras, set off for a days organised adventure. Breaks for morning tea and lunch allow the group to collaborate and record bird specie’s sightings in the Bell Birding Group Checklist, which can be found in their monthly newsletter and report. Each year in January, the group spend a day bushwalking in the Bunya Mountains and enjoying the rare bird species common to that area. The Bell Birdwatching Group have played host to many visitors from around the country and welcome anyone who appreciates nature and would like to discover a new place or learn about the fascinating world of birds. For information on the Bell Birdwatching Group: Contact Bernice Seton on 0427 631 080 or email bunyabirds1@bigpond.com

Yellow-tuffed Honeyeater

Notice

This publication endeavours to showcase the birding opportunities of the Western Downs. Please check with local Visitor Information Centres for local road information and other tips. When bird watching do not enter private property without authority of the landowner. Information in this publication has been sourced from various sources including local birding enthusiasts. Whilst every effort has been made to verify information, the Western Downs Regional Council is not responsible for any inaccuracies that may occur.

27


Experience Western Downs

D

F I

www.westerndownsqueensland.com.au westerndownsqueensland experiencewesterndowns

VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRES Dalby

Visitor Information Centre Thomas Jack Park Warrego Highway (07) 4679 4461 dalby.vic@wdrc.qld.gov.au Jandowae

Community and Cultural Centre Corner George and High Streets (07) 4679 4480 jandowae.ccc@wdrc.qld.gov.au

Chinchilla

Visitor Information Centre Warrego Highway (07) 4660 7291 chinchilla.vic@wdrc.qld.gov.au Bell

Visitor Information Centre Bell Bunya Community Centre 71 Maxwell Street (07) 4663 1087 bellbunyacommunitycentre@gmail.com

Miles

Visitor Information Centre Miles Historical Village Museum Murilla Street (07) 4627 1492 miles.vic@wdrc.qld.gov.au Tara

Customer Service Centre 19 Fry Street (07) 4678 7804 info@wdrc.qld.gov.au

Wandoan

Visitor Information Centre O'Sullivan Park Zupp Road (07) 4627 5227 info@wdrc.qld.gov.au Moonie

Rural Transaction Centre Corner Moonie and Leichhardt Highways (07) 4665 0189 moonie.rtc@wdrc.qld.gov.au