Page 1

The local paper for the Upper East Side POSTAGE DUE FOR BATTLING BELLA? ◄ P.22

WEEK OF APRIL

12-18 2018

DIGITAL DONNYBROOK ON 66TH STREET BROADBAND

A rendering of The Frick Collection’s reception hall, as conceived in a new expansion proposal, looking east toward the 70th Street viewing garden. Courtesy of Selldorf Architects

THE FRICK’S NEW VISION FOR ITS PAST REDESIGN The museum’s latest expansion proposal conceives of the viewing garden, formerly slated for eradication, as a centerpiece BY RICHARD KHAVKINE

The garden, after all, will stay in the picture. Almost three years after folding up expansion plans that had met vociferous opposition, The Frick Collection this week unveiled a design proposal that would add roughly 90,000 square feet to the museum for its exhibits and programming, education and conservation endeavors. Crucially, the proposal retains — and would restore — the museum’s 70th Street garden, whose prospective elimination in the Fifth Avenue institution’s 2014 expansion plans became a flashpoint for a coalition of residents, artists and preservationists. Opposition ultimately succeeded in getting Frick officials to retreat and start anew.

This new plan, conceived by Selldorf Architects, a New York City firm, would repurpose 60,000 square feet of the Gilded Age building and build 27,000 square feet of new space. The viewing garden off of East 70th Street is now envisioned as akin to a centerpiece, viewable from a reconfigured lobby, second-floor store, café and classroom, and elsewhere within the museum. The garden, created by the landscape architect Russell Page in 1977, will be restored by Lynden Miller, a renowned public garden designer who has worked on the Conservatory Garden in Central Park, Bryant Park and the New York Botanical Garden. As with the previous plan, this one attends to what Frick officials have said is a pressing need for more exhibition space both for its permanent collection and special exhibits. It also adds resources for programming, education and conservation, as well as visitor amenities and accessibility.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

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O OURTOWNNY.COM @OurTownNYC

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

Or how a plan to tinker with a streetlight on a crosstown block — to fast-track the city’s wireless technology — met a fierce pocket of resistance on the East Side BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

The history of New York City can be told in its humble streetlights: First, in the 1760s, there were oil lamps. By the 1820s, they were replaced by gas-fired lights. Then, in 1880, the first electric lights were introduced. Now, the municipal street lighting system is going through yet another defining transformation. In effect, it is being made over into a powerful digital device to usher in the next generation of internet connectivity. Not everyone is in love with the prospect. And on one Upper East Side block — where work crews within days are expected to reconfigure a lone cityowned standard light pole — the backlash has already begun. Thousands of lampposts and traffic poles are being outfitted with small wireless cellular antennas as telecom players tap into city infrastructure to fuel the turbo-charged growth of broadband and cellular services. The idea is to provide hyper-fast, super-reliable mobile coverage and sharply boost capacity in the run-up to 5G, the fifth-generation wireless system, that’s expected to be introduced citywide by 2020. Why place the new technology atop street furniture? The needs of 5G hardware differ from early-generation tech. Traditionally, cell towers were sited far apart, on hills, skyscrapers and apartment buildings. The delivery of the new high-speed wireless signals, by contrast, relies on compact equipment, more of it positioned closer to street level, and spaced out every 250 to 550 feet.

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings 14 Business 16 Real Estate 17 15 Minutes 25

“This is not like a microwave oven that you can simply turn on or off.” Rande Coleman, condo board president at Hardenbrook House

Bottom line: All of Manhattan is being rewired. Crowned with a 3.5-foot antenna attached to a utility pole, and featuring a high-tech contraption the size of a pizza box or suitcase, the units, installed over the past couple of years, almost never generate notice, fanfare or controversy. That’s changing now on East 66th Street. Residents of the crosstown block between York and First Avenues are alarmed that a streetlight at midblock is being reengineered to host a cellular antenna with no advance notice to the community, and directly opposite the entrance to a public elementary school. “We believe it’s a health hazard as the antenna will be emitting constant radio-frequency radiation 24/7,” said Anat Rosenberg, a writer and editor whose second-floor apartment overlooks the streetlight. “And we’re doubly outraged that they’ve been allowed to place the antenna in such close proximity to a school – with no notice of any kind to anyone,” she added. “The city is potentially jeopardizing the health of its smallest children.” Rosenberg, who describes herself as the “mom of two small kids who wants to live a quiet life without having an antenna in my living room,” is not alone.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

A new wireless cellular antenna mounted on a streetlight at the southeast corner of First Avenue and East 66th Street. It’s just down the block from another light pole, at 404 East 66th Street, where residents are trying to block the installation of an antenna across the street from an elementary school. Photo courtesy of Anat Rosenberg Jewish women and girls light up the world by lighting the Shabbat candles every Friday evening 18 minutes before sunset. Friday, April 13 – 7:15 pm. For more information visit www.chabaduppereastside.com

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APRIL 12-18,2018

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SCREENING FOR COLORECTAL CANCER HEALTH A gastroenterologist evaluates two procedures: colonoscopy and Cologuard BY PASCALE M. WHITE, M.D.

Dr. Pascale M. White with colonoscope. Photo courtesy of Mount Sinai Department of Medicine

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. In 2018, it is estimated that there will be 140,250 new cases of colorectal cancer in the United States. Current guidelines from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that patients who are at average risk for colorectal cancer should begin screening at 50 years old. The American College of Gastroenterology specifically recommends that AfricanAmericans begin colorectal cancer screening at 45 years old. The New York Citywide Colon Cancer Control Coalition (C5) was launched in 2003 to increase colorectal cancer screening via colonoscopy for all New Yorkers ages 50 and older. The efforts of this group produced an increase in screen-

ing colonoscopy rates in New York City from 42 percent in 2003 to almost 70 percent in 2014. Patients should be aware that there are different ways they can get screened, including colonoscopy and now Cologuard.

Colonoscopy Screening A colonoscopy is a procedure where an endoscope (flexible tube with an attached camera) is used to identify polyps in the colon. Polyps are abnormal tissue growths from the lining of the colon. Prior to the procedure, a patient is instructed to follow a special diet and drink a liquid laxative preparation that cleanses the colon. During the procedure, the gastroenterologist uses the endoscope to look carefully throughout the colon to find and remove polyps. After the procedure, the polyps are sent to the pathology lab where they will be identified as either benign or precancerous. Depending on the number and type of polyps that are removed, the gastroenterologist will recommend the time interval of your next colonoscopy. An advantage of having a colonoscopy is that if no polyps are found, the exam can be repeated in 10 years. If there is a lesion that appears sus-

picious during the procedure, it can be biopsied at that time and sent for evaluation as well. Another important advantage is that having a colonoscopy is both diagnostic and therapeutic, meaning that polyps can be detected and removed to prevent cancer. A disadvantage to having a colonoscopy is the risks associated with undergoing an invasive procedure. Certain barriers for some patients may include time away from work or the home, aversion to the bowel prep, and the need to have an escort home after the procedure.

Cologuard Screening Cologuard is a multitarget stool test that identifies abnormal DNA and human hemoglobin (blood) in the stool. A Cologuard kit is mailed to the patient’s home and they follow the directions to collect their stool sample. Once the kit is ready to be submitted, the patient will arrange for it to be picked up at their home where it will be mailed to a laboratory for evaluation. Advantages of this screening modality are that it is a non-invasive test, no laxative preparation is necessary, no special diets are required prior to collecting the stool sample, there is no time away from work or home, and there

is no need to arrange for an escort or transportation. A disadvantage of Cologuard may be the cost of the test because certain insurance companies may not cover it. If there is a negative result, the Cologuard test can be repeated in three years. However, if the Cologuard test returns positive, the patient will then have to take the next step and undergo a colonoscopy for further evaluation. Cologuard is only recommended for asymptomatic, average-risk patients who are 50 years of age and older. Patients who are having gastrointestinal symptoms (including abdominal pain and blood in the stool) or who have a personal history of colon polyps should not be screened with Cologuard. Overall, patients should be aware that colorectal cancer could be detected and prevented with appropriate and timely screening. While there are different ways of getting screened, the best test is the one that a patient commits to getting done. Pascale M. White, MD, is an assistant professor of Medicine and director of the GI Fellows Clinic at The Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

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APRIL 12-18,2018

3

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG STOLEN BICYCLES

CELL KNELL

Unfortunately, now that bike riding season is almost upon us, so is bike stealing season. In a recent incident, at noon on March 27, a 79-year-old man parked his $3,000 Cannondale outside the Cottage restaurant at 360 Amsterdam Avenue. When he returned his two-wheeler was gone. Then at 11:15 a.m. on Saturday, April 7, a 55-year-old man parked his bike outside 5 West 63rd Street and returned later only to find it missing as well. That bike was a Nashbar valued at $1,400.

With so many shoplifters at work, one AT&T store must wish their mobile phones weren’t quite as mobile. At 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 5, a 30-year-old man entered the AT&T store at 2066 Broadway and made off with two phones valued at $1,700.

STRIP RIP Perhaps one shoplifter is an exceptionally heavy consumer of teethstaining coffee or cigarettes. At 1:50 p.m. on Thursday, April 5, a 25-year-old

man entered the Duane Reade store at 2025 Broadway and shoplifted $1,500 worth of Crest Whitening Strips.

MISSING PURSE If you want to keep your purse, don’t keep it on the back of your chair in a restaurant! At 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, a 78-year-old woman hung her purse on the back of her chair in La Mirabelle restaurant located at 102 West 86th Street. When she next reached for her clutch, it was missing along with its contents, which included a wallet and credit cards.

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 19th district for the week ending Apr. 1 Week to Date

Year to Date

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

4

3

33.3

Robbery

4

3

33.3

33

21

57.1

Felony Assault

4

0

n/a

31

36

-13.9

Burglary

4

6

-33.3

51

55

-7.3

Grand Larceny

19

30

-36.7

353 344 2.6

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

7

7

0.0

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr


4

APRIL 12-18,2018

Our Town|Eastsider ourtownny.com

Useful Contacts

Drawing Board

POLICE NYPD 19th Precinct

153 E. 67th St.

212-452-0600

159 E. 85th St.

311

FIRE FDNY 22 Ladder Co 13 FDNY Engine 39/Ladder 16

157 E. 67th St.

311

FDNY Engine 53/Ladder 43

1836 Third Ave.

311

FDNY Engine 44

221 E. 75th St.

311

CITY COUNCIL Councilmember Daniel Garodnick

211 E. 43rd St. #1205

212-818-0580

Councilmember Ben Kallos

244 E. 93rd St.

212-860-1950

STATE LEGISLATORS State Sen. Jose M. Serrano

1916 Park Ave. #202

212-828-5829

State Senator Liz Krueger

1850 Second Ave.

212-490-9535

Assembly Member Dan Quart

360 E. 57th St.

212-605-0937

Assembly Member Rebecca Seawright

1365 First Ave.

212-288-4607

COMMUNITY BOARD 8

505 Park Ave. #620

212-758-4340

LIBRARIES Yorkville

222 E. 79th St.

212-744-5824

96th Street

112 E. 96th St.

212-289-0908

67th Street

328 E. 67th St.

212-734-1717

Webster Library

1465 York Ave.

212-288-5049

100 E. 77th St.

212-434-2000

HOSPITALS Lenox Hill NY-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell

525 E. 68th St.

212-746-5454

Mount Sinai

E. 99th St. & Madison Ave.

212-241-6500

NYU Langone

550 First Ave.

212-263-7300

CON EDISON

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212-460-4600

POST OFFICES US Post Office

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US Post Office

1617 Third Ave.

212-369-2747

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APRIL 12-18,2018

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Our Town|Eastsider ourtownny.com

New Affordable Condominiums for Sale 200 East 95th Street 95th and Third LLC, is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for 21 newly constructed Condominium units at 200 East 95th Street, New York, NY, 10128 Upper East Side Amenities: Lobby attendant, on-site resident manager, on-site laundry, children’s playroom, outdoor courtyard, resident lounge, grand salon, bike room, fitness room*, pool*, music room*, dog spa*, stroller valet* (*additional fees apply) Transit: Trains - Q, 4, 5, 6 and Buses – M15, M15-SBS, M96, M98, M101, M102, M103 & BXM1 No applLFDWLRQIHH‡1REURNHUœVIHH‡ 2ZQHU2FFXSDQF\5HTXLUHG‡ More information: www.housingpartnership.com This building is being constructed through the 421-A Program of the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development and the New York State Affordable Housing Corporation. Who Should Apply?

Individuals or households who meet the income requirements listed in the table below may apply. Qualified applicants will be required to meet additional selection criteria. General preference will be given to New York City residents

A percentage of units is set aside for people with disabilities: x Mobility (5%) x Vision/ hearing (2%) Preference for a percentage of units goes to: x Residents of Manhattan Community Board 8 (50%) x Municipal employees (5%)

Eligible buyers should have [10%] of the purchase price available for down payment. Please note that the quoted sales prices, maximum household income, asset limit, HWFDUHHVWLPDWHGDQGDUHVXEMHFWWRFKDQJH EACH BUYER MUST OCCUPY 200 EAST 95TH CONDOMINIUM AS THEIR PRIMARY RESIDENCE. ANY PROSPECTIVE APPLICANT WHO CURRENTLY OWNS OR PREVIOUSLY HAS PURCHASED A RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IS INELIGIBLE.

Bedrooms

Studio

1 bedroom

2 bedroom

125% AREA MEDIAN INCOME (AMI) UNITS

The estimated sales prices, unit sizes, and income requirements are as follows:

8QLWV$YDLODEOH

Household Size*

5

1 person

Total Annual Income 5DQJH Minimum – Maximum**

1 person 5 2 people 2 people

11

3 people

4 people

$ 79,333 - $ 83,500 $ 81,500 - $ 83,500 $ 81,500 - $ 95,500 $ 93,500 - $ 95,500

Asset Limit*** ($166,950 + required down payment amount)

0RQWKO\&DUU\LQJ Cost (est.)****

Estimated Prices

$202,620-$204,210

$2,000.00

$356,700 -$372,600

$2,200.00

$339,500-382,600

83 $2,200.00

$339,500-382,600

$2,600.00

$366,300-$427,000

$2,600.00

$366,300-$427,000

$200,900-$205,210 $200,900-$205,210 $203,580-$209,650

$ 93,500 - $ 107,375

$203,580-$209,650

$ 93,500 - $ 119,250

$203,580-$209,650

$2,600.00

$366,300-$427,000

* Subject to occupancy Criteria ** Income guidelines subject to change; larger down payments may allow for lower minimum incomes. *** Asset limit subject to change **** This monthly payment includes Com Charges, R.E Taxes, Principal and Interest assuming a 10% down payment, 30yr fixed rate mortgage @ 4% rate. How Do You Apply? DOWNLOAD ONLINE: wwZKRXVLQJSDUWQHUVKLSFRP/200east95th/ To request an application E\PDLOVHQGDVHOI-addressed envelope to: 200 East 95th Condo, c/o +RXVLQJ3DUWQHUVKLp Development Corporation, 242 West 36th Street, 3rd floor, New York, NY 10018. Only send one application per development. Do not submit duplicate applications. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified. Completed applications must be returned by regular mail only (no priority, FHUWLILHGUHJLVWHUHGH[SUHVVRYHUVL]HGRURYHUQLJKWPDLOZLOOEHDFFHSWHG) to a post office box number that will be listed on the application. ,QIRUPDWLRQDOVHVVLRQVZLOOEHKHOGRQ: April 4, 2018 and April 18, 2018 from 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm at Our Lady of Good Counsel â&#x20AC;&#x201C; St.Thomas More Church, 230 East 90th Street, New York, NY 10128. Seminar attendance is not mandatory to purchase at 200 East 95th Street When is the Deadline? Applications must be postmarked May 17, 2018 :KDW+DSSHQV$IWHU<RX6XEPLWDQ$SSOLFDWLRQ" After the deadline, applications are selected for review through a lottery process. If yours is selected and you appear to qualify, you will be invited to an appointment to review your documents and to continue the process of determining your eligibility. Appointments are usually scheduled from 2 to 10 months after the application deadline. You will be asked to bring documents that verify your household size, identity of members of your household, and your household income. This advertisement is not an offering. It is a solicitation of interest in the advertised property. No offering of the advertised units can be made and no deposits can be accepted, or reservations, binding or non-binding, can be made until an offering plan is filed with the New York State Department of Law This advertisement is made pursuant to Condominium Policy Statement No. 1, issued by the New York State Department of Law, file number CD15-0238. Sponsor: 95th and Third LLC, 805 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022. EspaĂąol

Presente una solicitud en lĂ­nea en nyc.gov/housingconnect. Para recibir una traducciĂłn de espaĂąol de este anuncio y la solicitud impresa, envĂ­e un sobre con la direcciĂłn a: [ENTER ADDRESS]. En el reverso del sobre, escriba en inglĂŠs la palabra â&#x20AC;&#x153;SPANISH.â&#x20AC;? Las solicitudes se deben enviar en lĂ­nea o con sello postal antes de [ENTER DATE IN SPANISH].

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Ë&#x2039;̨̯Ě?Ěź ̨̪Ě&#x201D;Ě&#x152;ĚŻĚ˝ Ě&#x161;Ě&#x152;Í Ě?ĚŁĚ&#x2013;ĚŚĚ&#x203A;Ě&#x2013; ̸Ě&#x2013;ĚŹĚ&#x2013;Ě&#x161; Ě&#x203A;ĚŚĚŻĚ&#x2013;ĚŹĚŚĚ&#x2013;ĚŻ, Ě&#x161;Ě&#x152;Ě&#x153;Ě&#x201D;Ě&#x203A;ĚŻĚ&#x2013; ĚŚĚ&#x152; Ě­Ě&#x152;Ě&#x153;ĚŻ: nyc.gov/housingconnect. ĘŞĚŁÍ ĚŞĚ¨ĚŁĚąĚ¸Ě&#x2013;ĚŚĚ&#x203A;Í Ě&#x201D;Ě&#x152;̨̌̌Ě?̨ ̨Ě?ĚťÍ Ě?ĚŁĚ&#x2013;ĚŚĚ&#x203A;Í Ě&#x203A; Ě&#x161;Ě&#x152;Í Ě?ĚŁĚ&#x2013;ĚŚĚ&#x203A;Í ĚŚĚ&#x152; ̨̹̭̭̥̼̏ Í Ě&#x161;̟̥Ě&#x2013; ̨̯̪̏Ě&#x152;Ě?̯̽Ě&#x2013; ̨̥̌Ě?Ě&#x2013;ĚŹĚŻ Ě­ ̨Ě?ĚŹĚ&#x152;̯̟̼̌ Ě&#x152;Ě&#x201D;ĚŹĚ&#x2013;̨̭̼ ̨̪ Ě&#x152;Ě&#x201D;ĚŹĚ&#x2013;Ě­Ěą [ENTER ADDRESS]. ĘťĚ&#x152;Ě&#x161;Ě&#x152;Ě&#x201D;ĚŚĚ&#x2013;Ě&#x153;̨̨̭̯̏̌Ě&#x2013;̨̥̌Ě?Ě&#x2013;ĚŹĚŻĚ&#x152;ĚŚĚ&#x152;ĚŞĚ&#x203A;ĚšĚ&#x203A;ĚŻĚ&#x2013;̨̭̣Ě?̨ â&#x20AC;&#x153;RUSSIANâ&#x20AC;? ĚŚĚ&#x152; Ě&#x152;ĚŚĚ?ĚŁĚ&#x203A;Ě&#x153;̨̭̥̼ Í Ě&#x161;̟̥Ě&#x2013;. ĘŻĚ&#x152;Í Ě?ĚĄĚ&#x203A; Ě&#x201D;̨̣Ě&#x2122;ĚŚĚź Ě?̟̯̽ ̨̪Ě&#x201D;Ě&#x152;ĚŚĚź ̨̣̌Ě&#x152;Ě&#x153;ĚŚ Ě&#x203A;ĚŁĚ&#x203A; ̨̯̪̏Ě&#x152;Ě?ĚŁĚ&#x2013;ĚŚĚź ̨̪ ̸̨̪̯Ě&#x2013; (̨̭Ě?ĚŁĚ&#x152;̨̭̌ Ě&#x201D;Ě&#x152;ĚŻĚ&#x2013; ĚŚĚ&#x152; ̸̨̨̪̯Ě?̨̼ ̯̚Ě&#x2013;ĚĽĚŞĚ&#x2013;ĚŁĚ&#x2013;) ĚŚĚ&#x2013; ̨̪Ě&#x161;Ě&#x201D;ĚŚĚ&#x2013;Ě&#x2013; [ENTER DATE IN RUSSIAN].

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Kreyòl Ayisyien Î&#x201D;ĎłÎ&#x2018;έĎ&#x152;Ď&#x;Î?

Aplike sou entènèt sou sitwèb nyc.gov/housingconnect. Pou resevwa yon tradiksyon anons sa a nan lang Kreyòl Ayisyen ak aplikasyon an sou papye, voye anvlòp ki gen adrès pou retounen li nan: [ENTER ADDRESS]. Nan dèyè anvlòp la, ekri mo â&#x20AC;&#x153;HATIAN CREOLEâ&#x20AC;? an Anglè. Ou dwe remèt aplikasyon yo sou entènèt oswa ou dwe tenbre yo anvan dat [ENTER DATE IN HAITIAN CREOLE].

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Î&#x201D;ĎłĎ&#x201D;Ď Î§Ď&#x;Î?Î&#x201D;ĎŹÎ&#x;Ď&#x;Î?Ď°Ď Ď&#x2039;[ENTER ADDRESS]Ď°Ď&#x;Î&#x2021;Ď&#x2122;ϧÎ?ϭϧĎ&#x2039;Ď­Ď&#x2122;ĎŁÎłÎ?Ď?ĎŁÎŁĎłĎ&#x2018;ϭέĎ&#x2026;ĎŁĎ?γέÎ&#x192;ˏϲĎ&#x2014;έϭĎ&#x;Î?Î?Ď Ď Ď&#x;Î?Î?΍ϭϣϧĎ&#x;Ď­ĎĽĎźĎ&#x2039;ĎšÎ?Î?ÎŤĎŹĎ&#x;Î&#x201D;ĎłÎ&#x2018;έĎ&#x152;Ď&#x;Î?Î&#x201D;Ď?Ď Ď&#x;Î&#x17D;Î&#x2018;Î&#x201D;ĎŁÎ&#x;έÎ&#x2014;Ď°Ď Ď&#x2039;Ď?ϭΝΣϠĎ&#x;nyc.gov/housingconnectϲϧϭέÎ&#x2014;Ď&#x203A;Ď&#x;ĎšÎ?Ď&#x160;Ď&#x2014;Ď­ĎŁĎ&#x;Î?Ď°Ď Ď&#x2039; .[ENTER DATE IN ARABIC]Ď?Î&#x2018;Ď&#x2014;ΊϳέÎ&#x2018;Ď&#x;Î?ĎĄÎ&#x2014;ΧÎ&#x2018;Î&#x17D;ĎŹĎŁÎ&#x2014;ΧĎ­Î&#x192;Î&#x2022;ϧέÎ&#x2014;ϧϚÎ?Ď&#x2013;ĎłÎ­Ď ĎĽĎ&#x2039;Î&#x2022;Î&#x17D;Î&#x2018;Ď Ď Ď&#x;Î?Î?ÎŤÎ&#x17D;ϣϧĎ?Î&#x17D;γέÎ&#x2021;Î?Î&#x;Ďł ."ARABICÎ&#x201D;ĎŁĎ Ď&#x203A;Î&#x201D;ϳίϳϠÎ&#x;ϧϚÎ?Î&#x201D;Ď?Ď Ď&#x;Î&#x17D;Î&#x2018;Î?Î&#x2014;Ď&#x203A;Î? ËŹĎ&#x2018;ϭέĎ&#x2026;ĎŁĎ Ď&#x;

Mayor Bill de ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ć?Ĺ?Ž͝ HPD Commissioner Maria Torres-Springer


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APRIL 12-18,2018

Our Town|Eastsider ourtownny.com

“A vacancy tax, premised on a flawed set of assumptions, will punish owners further and do nothing to address vacancy.” REBNY President John H. Banks

MAYOR FLOATS RETAIL VACANCY TAX BUSINESS Could a fee on empty storefronts reduce vacancies on Manhattan retail corridors? BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Mayor Bill de Blasio waded into the policy debate over how to address persistent storefront vacancies in Manhattan retail corridors by endorsing a controversial policy intended to incentivize landlords to rent out empty spaces more quickly. In a recent interview with WNYC’s Brian Lehrer, the mayor said he is “very interested ... in fighting for a vacancy fee or vacancy tax which would penalize landlords who leave their storefronts vacant for long periods of time in neighborhoods because they’re looking for some top dollar rent but they blight neighborhoods by doing it.” “I think there should be a penalty if a landlord does that,” de Blasio said. “That’s something we could get done through Albany.”

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The mayor has yet to put forth a detailed proposal, but similar policies have been implemented and explored outside New York in recent years. In 2014, San Francisco adopted an ordinance requiring landlords to register vacant storefronts with the city within 30 days of a space becoming vacant. If the storefront is not occupied within 270 days of registration, the landlord is required to pay a recurring annual fee of $711. Failure to register can be punished with penalty fees of more than $6,000, but a recent report found that in spite of this threat, the penalty is rarely imposed and compliance among property owners is low. In all of San Francisco, just 25 vacant storefronts were registered with the city in 2016 — “clearly an understated amount,” according to a January 2018 report prepared by a city analyst. A retail vacancy tax in New York City would face opposition from the real estate industry and would likely require approval from the state. The Real Estate Board of New York swiftly panned the

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idea in the wake of de Blasio’s comments. “The City’s retail environment is going through a transition primarily due to macro-market forces, like Amazon, and increasingly unfriendly local regulations,” REBNY President John H. Banks said in an emailed statement. “Property owners take a substantial financial hit when they are unable to secure a tenant. A vacancy tax, premised on a flawed set of assumptions, will punish owners further and do nothing to address vacancy.” A retail vacancy tax would take aim at one specific condition that can lead to long-term vacancies — landlords holding properties empty until a tenant willing to pay their asking rent comes along — but speculation is just one of the reasons storefronts become and stay vacant, which can differ by neighborhood and individual storefront. The city does not comprehensively track retail vacancies or their causes. Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, who is supportive of a vacancy tax in principle, has advocated for better

data collection by city agencies as a first step. “Unless we quantify the problem before, during and after we attempt to enact a solution, how will we be able to assess our success and how to best proceed in combating commercial vacancy in our neighborhoods?” Brewer said at a City Council hearing in December. A December City Council report outlines other potential policies intended to reduce the vacancy rate in Manhattan retail corridors, including one idea to offer a tax abatement or subsidy to landlords willing to enter into leases with renewal riders setting a maximum threshold for rent increase. Meantime, the retail leasing market has shown signs of a correction. Average asking rents dropped in 13 of 17 highprofile retail corridors tracked by REBNY from fall 2016 to fall 2017, the most recent data available. Price reductions decreased by 25 percent on Bleecker Street in the West Village, by 15 percent on Broadway in SoHo, and by 16 percent on Columbus Avenue on the Upper West Side.

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APRIL 12-18,2018

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APRIL 12-18,2018

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to ourtownny.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

ON FURTHER REFLECTION BY BETTE DEWING

“Look up already — from your iPhones” is what Archbishop Timothy Dolan recently said on that big device — the tube. Which itself often needs much looking away from, even from G-rated sporting events. But in essence, the archbishop said, look up from those devices, to allow time for reflection about things that matter, what’s happening outside your own world, or as one Protestant confession prayer repents“about things left undone.” Incidentally, this may

well relate to the forthcoming May 13 sermon by Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church’s new senior pastor, Jenny McDevitt, entitled“Don’t forget to look up.” But about things left undone or unseen really by those who look down a whole lot — except we all better look down when crossing the washboard-like cross streets. Now there may be a law not to walk and look down at a device to save life and limb, but the archbishop meant to save — what? Well, reflection, he said. Some undoubtedly likely to

bring people together. And doesn’t the city around us need big time reflection — not least those washboard streets? And looking out city bus windows is a great way to reflect on city conditions – by far the best traveling way to see the neighborhoods we pass - preferably from a pokey bus window. W-h -a-a-t? Yes, I said pokey. Pokey is safer and better to see what‘s going on out there. Ah, a brief sidetrack to recall how once people did look out the window when not reading a newspaper — ah, newspapers, a uniting as well as an educational force. Both newspapers and window views are needed to tell us what’s really happening out there. And let’s reflect about that.

But too few of us saw, let alone acted, about more and more empty storefronts out there - the places that supplied everyday needs and other retail shops and restaurants, once affordable and in wondrous profusion. Now there are also more empty faith group buildings. Oh you know what I mean — it’s been said here countless times – all these people gathering places which make this city so livable and connected. And don’t forget accessible. If the Americans with Disability Act only somehow covered this basic life need. But advocates for elder and disabled persons should do some serious reflection, especially with the rapidly growing 85-plus citizenry. But every age group should be re-

flecting, if especially young people, about how connected and yes, multigenerational communities are also safer ones. It takes a village and that really takes reflection and action. But for starters, action is easily taken on these and other basic needs, by calling elected officials and community boards whose numbers are listed in this paper’s Useful Contacts column. As Archbishop Dolan and Pastor McDevitt remind us, “Reflect” and “Don’t forget to look up!” Hey, and maybe attend faith group services after the Easter and Passover season. And this column again reminds, “It can be done if enough us try.” dewingbetter@aol.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR CYNTHIA NIXON’S RUN Cynthia Nixon is a superb actress, and a fierce advocate for a number of issues, including LGBT rights and education (“Cynthia Nixon’s Gubernatorial Gambit,” March 22-28). And yes, she is a New Yorker from a humble background. Unfortunately, none of this qualifies her to be governor. We do not know whether she knows how to balance her own checkbook, much less a $100 billion budget. She has not even run her own production company, so there is little reason to believe she could run a state government with over 200,000 employees. And while she has some legitimate understanding of many issues facing those in New York City, there is no reason to believe she knows or understands any of the issues facing the other one-half of the population of New York State. Your suggestion (and others’ comments) that the mere fact that she is a woman is reason enough for her to run is as absurd as the fact that she is a celebrity. (And haven’t we had enough of that?) What is saddest about Nixon’s quixotic run for governor is that when she loses to Cuomo (probably massively), it will make it harder for her to run for a more local office — which is where she should have started if she is serious about spending the rest of her life in politics.

I do not agree with all of Cuomo’s positions, and I know that I don’t like him as a person. But on balance, he has done more good than bad. As political consultant Hank Sheinkopf notes, “[He]’s passed gay marriage, stopped fracking, and enacted the toughest gun laws in the country” (among many other things). So for me, it is less the need for a “stellar argument” to vote for Nixon as it is the need for a “stellar argument” to vote against Cuomo.

Ian Alterman Upper West Side CRACKDOWN ON E-BIKES? Thank you for your front page article, “NYPD E-Bikes Crackdown Continues” (March 22-28). I’ve yet to see any evidence that the “crackdown” has even begun. Until the 311 answering personnel have a pre-ordained place to put caller complaints, we will never see any action. That is, unless someone gets run over and seriously injured. This is a 311 tactic learned from the previous administration. If residents can’t report it, the City can’t track it. There are real problems. E-bike drivers don’t identify themselves as from any particular restaurant(s). No name tags. City safety reps need to visit each restaurant and take an inventory of

All that remains of the Café Éclair is this fragment of its old sign, which hangs in the office of Landmark West! Photo: Courtesy of Landmark West! delivery bikes. Note: even if e-bike riders wear tags to identify the restaurants, residents will be loath to turn in their source for tasty takeout. Until something is done, keep your eyes open in the back of your head. They’ll be coming at us up and down already crowded sidewalks. Making dogs crazy. The faster they make their deliveries, the faster they can get back and reload.

Hugh G. Upper East Side REMEMBERING CAFÉ ÉCLAIR I moved to the Upper West Side in 1970. Discovered the Café Éclair before very long (“Secrets of the Café Éclair,” March 15-21). Needless to say, I remember the delicious desserts and coffee. But what has remained with me

to this day is a lesson owner Alexander Selinger gave my friend and me one evening. He came over to our table and told us that when placing a knife or spoon into a jar of jam, jelly or preserves, one must make sure it is clean — not having been used to spread butter or cream cheese first. Otherwise, he said, you are contaminating the contents of the jar and it will spoil sooner. I don’t remember exactly why he approached us with the friendly advice, but I’ve kept it in mind ever since, and after reading your article, I contacted my old friend, and he said he too has always remembered to do what we were told way back then. Thanks for reminding me again.

Richard Barr Upper West Side

My favorite memory of the Éclair restaurant was walking there in 1978 with my late first wife Karen and my cousin David Lehrman. “They make wonderful Napoleons there,” said Karen. “Oh?” asked David. “Do they leave out the bony part!”?

Leonard J. Lehrman Valley Stream, NY Loved your article! My German refugee parents lived in Wilmington, Delaware. My memories of visits to Fort Washington to see their childhood friends and gorge on pastries from Eclair will not leave me. I long for a re-creation of the Hazelnut Torte. Any ideas where to find their recipes?

Judy Perlman Manhattan Valley

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EMPOWERING ELDERS THROUGH TECH GRAYING NEW YORK Senior Planet in Chelsea assists those over 60 with digital skills to improve their lives BY ASHAD HAJELA

The sunlight ďŹ&#x201A;ashes through a large window into the highceilinged center in Chelsea. Computers sit in a corner opposite the reception area of a well-lit room. This is the headquarters of Senior Planet, a project under the non-profit Older Adults Technology Services, affectionately referred to as OATS. Senior Planet opened five years ago and is trying to empower people over the age of 60 with technology skills to achieve a goal or better their lives. Senior Planet is a flagship program of OATS, which has been operating since 2004. Membership is free. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to create an environment in here where it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel difficult to interact with the technology. It is supposed to feel very open and free and communal,â&#x20AC;? said Alex Glazebrook, the OATS Director of Technology. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People who come here really are driven to use technology to change something in their lives.â&#x20AC;? Senior Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs include computer basics from

using a mouse to browsing the Internet. One program, Team Senior Planet, is more advanced and focuses on health and wellness â&#x20AC;&#x201D; teaching members how to use ďŹ tbits, for example. These members are taken to gyms around the boroughs where trainers coach them. Such activities are part of Senior Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ve content areas: financial security, advocacy, social engagement, creativity and health and wellness. Content about senior dating also appears on the Senior Planet website. In light of the Cambridge Analytica Facebook scandal, however, Senior Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job has recently become more difficult. Members were skeptical of technology to begin with, and the scandal only makes the situation worse. Facebook is sending over guest speakers to talk about privacy on social media. Senior Planet has links with many large tech companies including Facebook, Google and Dropbox to provide extra programming for seniors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re kind of cool,â&#x20AC;? said Glazebrook. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Companies want to work with us.â&#x20AC;? One of Senior Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most interesting programs is called Startup, which focuses on providing members with digital skills to lay the foundations for a business. Senior Planet

only focuses on the basics like social media, making websites and connecting PayPal to these websites. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do coding,â&#x20AC;? said Glazebrook. Carol Ballantyne, a member of Senior Planet originally from Trinidad, joined to explore the possibilities for online business and has also been part of the Startup program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe we seniors have a lot to give back,â&#x20AC;? she said, citing the organization as a platform that helps her do so. Senior Planet has had its success stories. Cindy Riley, a longtime member and a Jamaican immigrant, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a fear of technology anymore.â&#x20AC;? Glazebrook also reflected on â&#x20AC;&#x153;an older adult ... here who was facing evictionâ&#x20AC;? about two years ago. The person he mentioned did not have enough income to keep living in her home. She used to be a journalist, so Senior Planet recommended that she use ELance, a site where writers go to make pitches. If the people on the site like the pitch, writers win bids for contracts. This womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prominence on ELance made her enough money to keep paying her rent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is what technology can do to empower some,â&#x20AC;? said Glazebrook. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all about.â&#x20AC;?

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APRIL 12-18,2018

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EDITOR’S PICK

Tue 17 LAURIE ANDERSON IN CONVERSATION WITH NEIL GAIMAN Kaufman Concert Hall, the 92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave. 8 p.m. $40+ 212-415-5500. 92Y.org Renaissance woman Laurie Anderson continues to be prolific as a composer, filmmaker, artist and performer. Her recent film “Heart of a Dog” was a moving meditation on stories, life and death, and she won the first award for Best VR Experience at the 74th Venice International Film Festival. Join her in conversation with celebrated author Neil Gaiman for a wide-ranging conversation on creativity and Anderson’s exciting future projects.

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Thu 12 Fri 13

Sat 14

COMMUNITY FORUM: HOMELESSNESS IN NEW YORK CITY

LUNCHTIME LECTURE: VIEWING ART IN THE 1820S

▲ VOLUNTEER GARDENING

Ramaz School, Heyman Auditorium, 125 East 85th St. 6:30 p.m. Free Join members of the Health, Seniors, and Social Services Committee of Community Board 8, along with elected officials and community members, at a forum on homelessness in New York City. What is being done, and how can you help? 212-758-4340 cb8m.com

Mount Vernon Hotel Museum and Garden, 421 East 61th St. 12:30 p.m. Free with admission Before the age of art museums, where did New Yorkers go to view art? Discover New York’s 19th century early exhibition halls, display practices and rotundas, which welcomed the same kind of patrons who visited the Mount Vernon Hotel, at this stimulating lunchtime lecture 212-838-6878 mvhm.org

Carl Schurz Park 86th St. at East End Ave. 9:30 a.m. Free Join neighbors and friends and pitch in at this local event. The Carl Schurz Park Volunteer Gardeners are an adult group that meets monthly to work in the park. Students or children who wish to participate must be accompanied by adults or parents who work along with them. 212-459-4455 carlschurzparknyc.org


APRIL 12-18,2018

Our Town|Eastsider ourtownny.com

Photo: Peter Adamik, via WikiMedia Commons

Sun 15 Mon 16 Tue 17 SUNDAY SALON SERIES: FILM

▼ ‘YEAR OF THE MAD KING’

Park Avenue Armory 643 Park Ave. 1:45 p.m. $25 Acclaimed Australian immersive artist and film director Lynette Wallworth hosts an afternoon salon exploring the power of emerging interactive technologies in film. View Wallworth’s award-winning virtual reality film “Collisions” and “Still Walking Country,” as well as a presentation and Q&A with the artist in the historic Veterans Room. 212-616-3930 armoryonpark.org

Drama Book Shop 250 West 40th St. 5-7 p.m. Free Actor Antony Sher will join Greg Doran, artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, in conversation to discuss “Year of the Mad King: The Lear Diaries,” Sher’s account of researching, rehearsing and performing what has been called the “Everest of acting.” 212-944-0595 dramabookshop.com

ALBERTINE BOOK CLUB: ‘COMPASS’ BY MATHIAS ENARD Albertine 972 Fifth Ave. 7 p.m. Free Come discuss Mathias Enard’s internationallyacclaimed novel “Compass,” winner of the Prix Goncourt in 2016, The book follows Franz Ritter, an insomniac musicologist, who takes to his sickbed with an unspecified illness and spends a restless night drifting between dreams and memories, revisiting the important chapters of his life. 212-650-0070 albertine.com

Wed 18 ▲ INTERSCHOOL ORCHESTRAS OF NEW YORK GALA CONCERT The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College 215 East 68th St. 7 p.m. $25 InterSchool Orchestras will celebrate 46 years of making music with young musicians with an eclectic evening program. Proceeds go to supporting this inclusive, ensemble-based music making program, comprised of six youth orchestras and two symphonic bands. 212-410-0370 isorch.org

“NE

OBLIVISCARIS”

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Janette Beckman with Dorothea Lange photo. Photo: Anne Kristoff

APRIL 12-18,2018

Nobuyoshi Araki Polariods. Photo: Vikki Tobak

WALKING THE PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW After the transporting AIPAD experience, exhibitions go on at some city galleries BY ANNE KRISTOFF

Adama Delphine Fawundo’s “Intersections.” Photo courtesy of the artist

I spent an afternoon being transported from Broadway and Canal in 1984, to Chicago in 1949, to Memphis in 1968. Nepal, Okinawa, Cape Town. I saw Muhammad Ali boxing underwater, Frida Kahlo “acting clownish,” and The Beatles having a pillow fight. I stood before a mountainous wave as it was about to swallow me whole and beneath a towering sequoia covered in snow. All of this, and much more, was on view at Pier 94 at the 38th edition of The Photography Show, one of the few art shows in the world dedicated to photography as a medium. It is presented by the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD). The show ran from April 5-8 and featured 96 galleries and over 30 book sellers from 14 countries and 49 cities. There were three special exhibitions including, “A Time For Reflection,” curated by Sir Elton John, and “All The Power: Visual Legacies of the Black Panther Party,” curated by Michelle Dunn of the Photographic Center Northwest.

While this year’s edition of The Photography Show has wrapped, you can still view many of the works at galleries around New York, including two of the picks listed below. A Nobuyoshi Araki solo retrospective will be on view at The Museum of Sex through the end of August, and Adama Delphine Fawundu will be included in “Refraction: New Photography of Africa and Its Diaspora,” which opens at Steven Kasher Gallery on April 19. I walked the show with legendary subcultures photographer Janette Beckman and Vikki Tobak, photo curator and author of “Contact High,” a forthcoming book about hip-hop contact sheets. Among their picks for “Best in Show:”

Nobuyoshi Araki “Dead Reality” (Little Big Man Gallery and Polaroids at Komiyama Books)

Tobak: Nobuyoshi Araki is a either a genius or a master pornographer, depending on who you ask. To me, he’s both, in the best sense. Little Big Man Gallery has shown his work extensively and honors the Japanese photobook tradition with this series “Dead Reality.” These images of scenes, ruined by developing the prints in boiling fixative, speak to his dedication to analog tradition and also themes of death and destruction. He’s a prolific pho-

tographer who has produced thousands of photographs over the course of his career. Meanwhile Komiyama Books has a portfolio of Araki’s Polaroids of flowers as well as female muses in sexualized poses of “Kinbaku,” Japanese traditional rope bondage. Sex, death, life. Araki is all of those things.

Dorothea Lange, “Towards Los Angeles, Calif.” 1937 (Richard Moore Photographs)

Beckman: Ever since I read the “Grapes of Wrath” by John Steinbeck as a kid ... I always had this image of America and the dusty roads stretching into the nowhere, because you don’t get those vistas in Europe. It’s the dust bowl era. It’s so atmospheric. It looks like they’re carrying all their belongings and they’re heading towards California on a dusty road and there [are] no houses or anything in sight. It’s a really deep picture. Very soulful. It’s a silver gelatin print, not a digital print, and it has all these beautiful mid-tones, blacks and grays that you don’t normally see because everything now, with digital, is so hyper-contrasty and the colors are all turned up and everything is on this kind of hyper plane, as if you’re listening to music with no bass and no treble. It’s a certain pitch. Whereas this has so many waves and tones.

Adama Delphine Fawundu “Intersections” (Steven Kasher Gallery)

Tobak: Delphine started her career photographing the male-centric hip-hop world in the early 90s and those early photos are some of my faves. Her new work shows how she has evolved as a fine artist pushing the boundaries. She is one of the founders of “MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora,” a publication committed to establishing and representing a collective voice of women photographers of African descent. LaToya Ruby Frazier “Woodlawn Street, Braddock, PA” 2010 (Steven Kasher Gallery) Helmut Newton “Rue Aubriot, Yves Saint Laurent, Paris Collections” 1975 (Staley Wise Gallery)

Beckman: I didn’t know who LaToya Ruby Frazier was but I was attracted to the image because it’s a gorgeous, strong woman on the street. Steven Kasher told me that it was an homage to the Helmut Newton photo that was hanging nearby. I was blown away by the synchronicity of the two photos hanging near each other. I just love strong, beautiful women on the street.


APRIL 12-18,2018

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RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS MAR 28 - APR 3, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Numero 28

1431 1 Avenue

A

Tasti-D-Lite

1310 1st Ave

A

Beach Cafe

1326 2 Avenue

A

Butterfield Market

170 East 70 Street

A

The New Amity Restaurant 1134 Madison Avenue A Gotham Pizza

1667 1 Avenue

A

Chipotle Mexican Grill

1497 3 Avenue

A

La Pulperia

1626 2nd Ave

Grade Pending (11) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Inase Sushi Restaurant

1586 1 Avenue

A

Bagel Bobs On York

1641 York Ave

A

Le Viet Cafe

1750 2nd Ave

A

Pinocchio Ristorante

1748 1 Avenue

Grade Pending (18) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Yummy Sushi

1758 1 Avenue

A

Noche De Margaritas Restaurant

1726 2 Avenue

A

Akami Sushi

1771 1st Ave

A

Chinatown Restaurant

1650 3rd Ave

Grade Pending (49) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Tobacco use, eating, or drinking from open container in food preparation, food storage or dishwashing area observed. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

The Weir

1672 3rd Ave

Grade Pending (27) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Yeti Spice Grill

1764 1st Ave

A

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CENSUS 2020: 4 KEY QUESTIONS FOR NYC the House of Representatives are apportioned to each state based on the results. The city and state use the data to determine where to direct resources and project future needs for infrastructure, education and other critical areas. “In order for any government to provide services it has to know who it’s serving,” said Marisa Lago, director of the New York City Department of City Planning. Census data is also used by the federal government in determining how to distribute funding for programs among the states. “The federal government funnels $53 billion to New York state through programs that are dependent upon the census,” Lago said, noting that population-based formulas govern funding allocations for a diverse array of federal programs, including school breakfasts for low-income students, funding to support people with disabilities and homeland security.

POLITICS City officials weigh in on citizenship status and other challenges for the count BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

The 2020 U.S. Census is still two years away, but New York City’s preparations for the decennial count have already begun in earnest. Focus on the census has been amplified in recent weeks in response to concerns that the potential inclusion of a question about citizenship status could depress turnout among the city’s 3.2 million immigrants. City officials detailed the most significant census-related issues facing New York at an April 3 forum hosted by CUNY Journalism School’s Center for Community and Ethnic Media. Four key questions:

What’s at stake? The census aims to count every resident of the country every ten years and is mandated by the Constitution. Seats in

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

Graphic: NYC Department of City Planning

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APRIL 22, 2018 ALL DAY (7 AM–8 PM) Free with Museum admission and for Members

From early-morning yoga in the Cullman Hall of the Universe to performances that include John Luther Adams’ Become Ocean by The Chelsea Symphony and “The Umbrella Project” by Pilobolus in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, visitors can enjoy a Museum-wide festival of art, science, and culture in honor of Earth Day. Renowned artists and scholars join Museum scientists on special Museum tours for critical conversations on sustaining the beautiful planet we call home. Visitors can also see pop-up performances by Fela!’s Abena Koomson-Davis, Martha Redbone, Ashley Jackson, and the Secret Drum Band; view films and art installations, and more. EarthFest is made possible by OceanX, an initiative of the Dalio Foundation, as part of its generous support of the special exhibition Unseen Oceans and its related educational activities and public programs.

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Business

WHERE TO SHOP FOR FUN AND HEALTH FOOD Four Manhattan go-to places for nutritious and well-sourced groceries BY LIZ RICHARDS

When I first moved to New York, the question I got most often from friends and family back home was, “Where do you do your grocery shopping?” The assumption was that I had to stock up at Whole Foods, whose prices can be steep for a millennial grad student/ waitress/aspiring writer, or wait endlessly in line at Trader Joe’s. Don’t get me wrong, I love both of those places. The occasional splurge on raw almonds from Whole Foods or a leisurely day out at Trader Joe’s are two of my favorite ways to spend time. But for day-to-day food shopping, it’s essential to have a few go-to places for fast and affordable groceries that are nutritious and sourced well. Here are a few of my favorite spots:

4th Street Food Co-Op This Lower East Side gem has been a hidden staple of the community for over forty years. In recent years, they’ve gone completely vegetarian,

CENSUS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 Why is NYC a challenge for census takers? “Urban areas — and in particular, poorer urban areas — are notoriously hard to enumerate properly,” Lago said. J. Phillip Thompson, Deputy Mayor for Strategic Policy Initiatives, said that the city conducts extensive outreach efforts to engage communities that might otherwise not participate in the census. “I think New York is always undercounted, and one reason is that we have a large number of doubled-up households in New York City, and those folks are scared to report to the landlord [that] they’re on the lease,” Thompson said. Suspicion among immigrant populations of submitting personal information to the government, homelessness, language barriers and informal housing arrangements like illegal basement dwellings and subdivided apartments are a few of the challenges facing census enumerators, who

but not vegan. That means that they are the perfect not-so-secret shop for organic produce that is locally sourced whenever possible, a robust selection of bulk grains (plus two different coffee roasts, a variety of snack mixes, flours, cocoa, and more), herbal teas, oils and a few packaged organic snacks. It is a small and modest space, but packed with all of the essentials for your cupboard. The best part about the 4th Street Food Co-Op? Unlike most food co-ops throughout the city, they are open to the public. They accept both working and non-working memberships (which come with proportional discounts) but any and everyone is welcome and encouraged to shop there.

in the area and the presentation is one of the best. It’s easily accessible from Union Square or Fifth Ave, and is an all-around great place to shop.

C-Town The name sounds like C-Town should belong to a big chain grocery store, and that’s because it does, kind of. With hundreds of locations sprinkled throughout NYC, it is one of the largest independent grocery stores around. It’s almost too big to fall into this category. However, C-Town does carry options that are organic and locally sourced. Stores are clean and inviting, and with a membership rewards program that mimics corporate grocery stores, C-Town is a convenient and affordable place to shop.

Garden of Eden A fixture of Union Square, Garden of Eden is a prime destination for NYU and New School students because of its locale — and a student discount in light of slightly higher prices. Walking into this store feels like walking into an open market. The produce is bountiful, beautifully displayed and very well-maintained. The store has a wide selection of breads, meats and cheeses. They also have a food bar, baked goods and sushi. Garden of Eden is one of the largest local grocery stores

are tasked with counting individuals regardless of their legal or residential status. “The census doesn’t care about the legality of where you live, it just wants to know where people live,” Lago said.

What steps does the city take to ensure an accurate count? Demographers within the Department of City Planning work closely with the U.S. Census Bureau to disseminate the census to as many residents as possible. The starting point for the distribution of census forms is a list of addresses compiled by the Census Bureau, which the city works to bolster. “The census is mailed to addresses,” Lago said. “If the Census Bureau doesn’t have your address, you’re never going to get the form and you don’t have the possibility of being counted.” The city sends staff into the field to search for addresses not included in the list provided by the Census Bureau, looking for signs of residences in commercial districts and other nonresidential areas, which might include

Zabar’s No list of favorite local grocery stores would be complete without this legend. The world-famous establishment has called 80th and Broadway home for generations and is still a great place to shop. Better known for their coffee, deli classics and overall cultural significance, Zabar’s is also a wonderful grocery store. The deli is superior, boasting an unbelievable display of packaged meats, soups, salads and more. The produce is clean

extra doorbells or satellite dishes. “We are able to report back to the Census Bureau around 100,000 additional addresses,” Lago said. After the census officially kicks off in March 2020, the Department of City Planning will work with the Census Bureau in real time to monitor response rates and request that resources be directed toward increasing engagement in areas where undercounting is suspected. “We as a city and other urban areas are always going to be tougher to enumerate than a wealthy suburb,” Lago said. “This year though, we have the additional overlay of a federal climate that is hostile to immigrants, coupled with the citizenship question.”

If the citizenship question is included, will undocumented immigrants be at increased risk of deportation by participating in the census? On March 26, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross directed the Census Bureau to include a question about respondents’ citizenship in the 2020 Census. “Prior decennial census sur-

Into the shopping cart at the 4th Street Food Co-op. Photo: Liz Richards and well-stocked. Zabar’s bagels and breads department is extraordinarily fresh. Not only is this a community staple and a one-of-a-kind experience, it’s also a fun and fully functional grocery store for Upper West Siders. The city is full of options for gro-

veys of the entire United States population consistently asked citizenship questions up until 1950, and Census Bureau surveys of sample populations continue to ask citizenship questions to this day,” Ross wrote in a memo on the decision. The Justice Department requested that the question be included on the grounds that it would help enforce the Voting Rights Act, but critics have said it is intended to decrease immigrant turnout and impact congressional apportionment. Thompson called the Voting Rights Act explanation “entirely specious.” “This seems to be nothing else than a partisan political move aimed at cities like New York and other cities with large immigrant populations, to try and bolster one political party’s power over another,” Thompson said. New York City was home to 3.2 million immigrants as of 2015 — 38 percent of the city’s total population — an estimated 750,000 of whom were undocumented. Roughly one million households in the city include at least one undocumented person. Census data is aggregated and ano-

cery shopping. It’s easier here than anywhere to shop locally, affordably, responsibly and — most important — deliciously. In every corner of the city there are fun and fresh places to shop to stock our cupboards and fuel our busy lives. Happy eating!

nymized, and individual responses are subject to strict confidentiality protections. The city will work to inform immigrant communities of these protections and combat the misconception that citizenship data could be used by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to target immigrants for deportation. “ICE has its own data,” said Bitta Mostofi, acting commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs. “They know where immigrant populations live,” Mostofi said. “They don’t need to rely on the census for that information. This is more about the chilling effect and fear that it is intended to perpetuate and less about, frankly, their need for such information — they have that.” City officials will focus on educational efforts to inform immigrants that completing the census does not put them at increased risk. “I think the intent of including the question is to drive immigrants underground, and the best way to fight that is actually to stand up and be counted and to resist that effort to try and make immigrants invisible,” Thompson said.


APRIL 12-18,2018

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APRIL 12-18,2018

Our Town|Eastsider ourtownny.com

Serena Dykman as seen in “NANA.” Courtesy of First Run Features

A GRANDDAUGHTER BEARS WITNESS FILMS In a new documentary, director Serena Dykman retraces her grandmother’s story of survival in Auschwitz and how past atrocities can shape our future BY ALIZAH SALARIO

Every film about the Holocaust reminds us to never forget. Very few articulate what it takes to always remember. “NANA,” (First Run Features) the debut feature film from Serena Dykman, documents her journey as she and her mother Alice retrace her grandmother’s story of survival, from her childhood in Poland to Auschwitz, where she was forced to be a translator for the “Angel of Death” Josef Mengele, to her postwar life in Belgium. Dykman, who was raised in Paris and Brussels and graduated from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, says she knew she wanted to make the film when she finally read her grandmother’s memoir, the day after the Charlie Hebdo attack in January 2015. “I didn’t realize what she lived and what she stood for, and the activist that she was. I think the combination of being in Paris during that time [of the Charlie Hebdo attack], and reading the memoir made me very angry to see that people like my grandmother did such amazing and important work, but so many survivors are already gone and can’t do that

job anymore. I just felt like I had to do something about it,” says Dykman, who was eleven when she lost her grandmother. Three and half weeks later, Dykman began shooting “NANA.” At first, she says, people were skeptical; it was very hard to be taken seriously as a 22-year-old woman tackling the Holocaust. Dykman focused on making sure that her grandmother’s story was told from a transgenerational perspective, alternating from her grandmother to her mother to herself. Then, after filming, Dykman got an unexpected boon. She began receiving footage from all over the world of her grandmother, the Polish-born Maryla Michalowski-Dyamant. After the war, Michalowski-Dyamant had devoted her life to sharing her story, repeatedly sitting down for televised interviews and even returning to Auschwitz to educate visitors. Her testimony became part of her survival, and it boomeranged back to her granddaughter. Dykman wound up with nearly 100 hours of her grandmother’s testimony, which she juxtaposes with interviews and footage of her own trip to Auschwitz. Michalowski-Dyamant is compelling on camera, and her testimony is by turns lifeaffirming and humorous, bonechilling and incomprehensible. She recalls thanking the guard who tattooed a number on her arm because she understood this meant she would be allowed to live. She describes the fear that infused her every interaction with Mengele, then

calls him a very handsome man. Her testimony captures both the barbarism and selfless sacrifice that humans are capable of, and it comes together in a pastiche of different B-roll segments artfully spliced into a seamless narrative. The effect of fragmentation is powerful: Michalowski-Dyamant told her story again and again and again, and yet could never capture the totality of her experience. For the skeptics, Dykman’s youth is in fact one of the film’s strengths. This is a story of Holocaust survival, but it is also a master class in transmission. The first image of the film is a home video clip of a newborn Dykman, cradled by her mother as her grandmother looks on. Through her testimony, Michalowski-Dyamant projected the past into the future, transcribing it onto today’s pages darkened by new shadows of authoritarianism and fascism. NANA’s story is now Dykman’s story, and, the film seems to suggest, it must be ours, too.

IF YOU GO WHEN: April 13-19 WHERE: Cinema Village 22 East 12th St. SHOWTIMES: 1:15, 4:30, 7:00, 9:15 TALK: The Friday & Saturday 7 p.m. shows will be followed by a Q&A with director Serena Dykman


APRIL 12-18,2018

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The rich are not all that different from you and me. I know, how dare I disagree with F. Scott Fitzgerald, but that was my takeaway after reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laura & Emmaâ&#x20AC;? by Kate Greathead. Set on the Upper East Side between 1980 and 1995, this debut novel introduces us to 30-something trust-fund baby Laura, who grew up in a brownstone on East 65th Street between Lex and Third. Her daughter Emma is the product of a one-night stand, the account of which I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spoil. (Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a doozy.) I was ďŹ rst drawn to the book based on the single-motherraising-her-daughter-in-thecity plot because it mirrored my own upbringing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; almost. I grew up in the Bronx. I had envied life in Manhattan as far back as elementary school. In fourth grade I told my mother we should move here. As often was the case when I asked for something without factoring the cost, she gave me a curt, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford it.â&#x20AC;? Before the construct of the conceive-believe-receive mantra became commonplace (or even existed, at least in my outer borough), I put it into practice by telling all my friends that we would be moving downtown, as we Bronxites called Manhattan, figuring that saying it would very well make it so. In turn, they told their mothers, who stopped mine the following Saturday when she was out and about doing her chores. They asked when we would be moving as well as what our new parish would be. Startled and embarrassed, my mother made her way home, no doubt to kill me. I guess, however, the trek up Fordham Road weighed down with her many grocery bags and packages of house supplies exhausted the ďŹ ght out of her. When she entered the apartment the best she could do was, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stop telling stories.â&#x20AC;? I read Greatheadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book with

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:PSL"WF#UXOSEUI4Ut www.logosbookstorenyc.com interest thinking I would get a glimpse into the more glamorous life I wished I had led but found surprisingly my second reason to embrace this novel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laura & Emmaâ&#x20AC;? is perhaps the ďŹ rst book about monied Upper East Siders that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reminiscent of a typical galas/private jets/Van Cleef & Arpels episode of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gossip Girl.â&#x20AC;? There are no shopping sprees at Bergdorfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; Laura hates that activity and is quite proud of her dowdy wardrobe. The superintendent is the de facto doorman of her 96th and Lex building, which the realtor described as â&#x20AC;&#x153;across the street from Harlem.â&#x20AC;? Lauraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not very social and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ t with the other UES moms, letting Emma watch TV, eat junk food and befriend the homeless man who camps out on their corner. Although Laura wants ostensibly to distance herself from her blue-blooded roots, she still gives in to the pull of her privilege. They may live in a nondoorman high-rise, but they reside in the penthouse with the requisite terrace. Emma attends the same private school as her mother did. Laura works at a museum that was once her great-grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mansion. The place is also used for events and Laura pulls strings with the board of directors to become its wedding planner.

She gets paid a full-timerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salary even though she works part time and takes summers off to enjoy the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Buzzards Bay summer home and to be with her daughter. She counters this by volunteering at a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homeless shelter. Laura and her brother vie for the favor of their forbidding father in order to get bigger shares of the trust, which Laura swears are not for her but for Emma. While Laura has one foot in the rarified world she grew up in and the other in the less pretentious one sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s created, Emma becomes a free spirit, rejecting her private school legacy, its students and, as teens do, her mother as well. I connected with the evolution of Laura and Emmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship, not just as it related to the one I had with my mother, but more so as it parallels the one I have with my own UES free-spirited daughter, Meg. The best part is that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laura & Emmaâ&#x20AC;? laid to rest the vestiges of my childhood FOMO, and that living in Manhattan is no guarantee of a glamorous life; and it shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re enjoying the one youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got. Lorraine Duffy Merkl is the author of the novels â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back To Work She Goesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fat Chick,â&#x20AC;? from which a movie is being made.

Wetherby-Pembridge School Education Evenings Wetherby-Pembridge School is pleased to announce a series of Education Evenings. Tuesday 24th April, 6:00 - 7:30PM George Davison â&#x20AC;&#x153;Children and summerâ&#x20AC;? George P Davison has been head of Grace Church School since 1994 and serves on the Advisory Board of Wetherby-Pembridge School.

Wednesday 6th June, 6:00 - 7.30PM Barnaby Lenon â&#x20AC;&#x153;How to be a succesful parentâ&#x20AC;? Barnaby Lenon is Chairman of the Independent Schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Council, has been a governor of nine schools and was Headmaster of Harrow for 12 years.

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ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

Jacob and His Twelve Sons: An Interfaith Perspective

SUNDAY, APRIL 15TH, 2PM The Frick Collection | 1 E. 70th St. | 212-288-0700 | frick.org A panel of faith leaders discusses the Jacob story as told in Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. The afternoon is in conjunction with the special exhibition Zurbarán’s Jacob and His Twelve Sons: Paintings from Auckland Castle, on view through April 22 (free with museum admission).

Why Buddhism Is True with Robert Wright

TUESDAY, APRIL 17TH, 6:30PM Asia Society | 725 Park Ave. | 212-288-6400 | asiasociety.org Best-selling author Robert Wright’s newest book combines evolutionary psychology and the latest in neuroscience to back the philosophies of Buddhism. Catch him in conversation on meditation and more with ABC News Anchor Juju Chang ($40).

Just Announced | Be the Change You Want to See in 2018

FRIDAY, APRIL 20TH, 7PM 92nd Street Y | 1395 Lexington Ave. | 212-415-5500 | 92y.org On the National Day of Action to Prevent Gun Violence in Schools (the anniversary of Columbine), Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney will introduce a night of activism that includes “the Millennial Oprah” Cleo Wade and former Bernie Sanders press secretary Symone Sanders ($35).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

FRICK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The proposal, as before, would convert a suite of secondfloor rooms into gallery space for the permanent collection. Those rooms were formerly living spaces for the industrialist and art collector Henry Clay Frick and his family, the original occupants of the mansion, which was built by Carrère and Hastings in 1914. The conversion of the second floor, currently offices and meeting areas that have never been open to the public, would add nearly one-third more exhibit space to the museum. Access to the second floor will be via either a new bank of elevators or a new staircase. The original mansion’s main staircase will also open to the public for the first time. The proposal also envisions an education center and group entrance, to be built between the museum’s main building and its reference library. The construction portion of the project is budgeted at $160 million. Pending approvals from the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission and the Board of Standards and Appeals, construction would start in 2020 and last roughly two years, said Heidi Rosenau, a museum spokesperson. The Frick’s 1,400 objects, including paintings by Goya, Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Constable and Velázquez, could be exhibited elsewhere in the meantime. “We are working that out,” Rosenau said. “We are explor-

A rendering of The Frick Collection’s reception hall as conceived in a new expansion proposal. To the left are the museum’s permanent galleries and to the right is the 70th Street viewing garden. At far rear, is a proposed special exhibition gallery. Courtesy of Selldorf Architects ing options as we speak.”

Preserving intimacy The museum abandoned its 2014 plans, which included a six-story addition on the 70th Street garden’s footprint, in June 2015 after residents and then a coalition of artists and others denounced it as intrusive and counter to one of the Frick’s most alluring qualities — its intimacy. Although museum officials at the time disputed that notion, this proposal doubles down on the Frick’s singular grace and elegance. “Our proposed design is the result of an unwavering commitment to maintaining the intimate experience of viewing art at the Frick that is unique and special to many — myself

included,” Annabelle Selldorf, the architecture firm’s principal, said in a statement accompanying the Frick’s press release on the plan. One of the previous plan’s most prominent detractors, New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman, applauded this latest incarnation. “So much of what seemed in 2014 problematic about the earlier Frick plan when I pleaded with the museum to go back to the drawing board has been addressed here,” Kimmelman wrote on Twitter. “Frick admirably listened,” he wrote. Selldorf’s proposal “preserved what’s great about Frick and fixed what wasn’t, mostly backstage. The process worked.” Henry Clay Frick, who began collecting paintings seriously about 20 years before building the mansion, had always intended for the home and his collection to open to the public. The mansion was converted into a museum and opened in 1935. This expansion and renovation would be the first comprehensive such effort since then, museum officials said. The project is Selldorf’s second involving a 1914 home by Carrère and Hastings on Fifth Avenue’s Museum Mile: The firm also reconfigured the former William Starr Miller House, at 86th Street, into the Neue Galerie New York. Betty Eveillard, the chairperson of the Frick’s Board of Trustees, said in the press release that, together with Selldorf, “the Frick has set forward a plan that graciously ushers our institution into the twentyfirst century while preserving our Gilded-Age grandeur and a sense of tranquility.”


APRIL 12-18,2018

Networking against a network The center of opposition to the pending installation is the Hardenbrook House, a normally staid red-brick condominium at 404 East 66th Street with 13 floors and 250 residents in 150 apartments. The light pole is nine feet away from its front door on the south side of the street. A few yards away, on the north side of the street, sits P.S. 183, the Robert Louis Stevenson School, at 419 East 66th Street, which teaches 550-plus students, from pre-K to fifth grade, in 28 classrooms. Some of the school’s parents and teachers were described as distraught. “The brains of young kids aren’t developed yet,” said Rande Coleman, the president of Hardenbrook House’s condo board and a real estate broker who’s lived in the building since 1976. “People with small children don’t want them exposed to potentially dangerous electromagnetic fields, and residents don’t want radiation right next to our building,” Coleman added. “This is not like a microwave oven that you can simply turn on or off. This is a 24-7 operation.” Neighbors say they were alerted to the project when work crews with jackhammers began preliminary site work, including micro-trenching under the sidewalk, at 7 a.m. on March 24. Other crews returned over the next three weeks, and a city franchisee, ExteNet Systems, confirmed it would install the antenna at some point in April. Despite neighborhood fears, the American Cancer Society contends there’s “very little evidence” to support a connection between cell towers and cancer risk. Still, 180 scientists and doctors from 35 countries in 2017 called for a moratorium on the rollout of 5G until potential hazards could be fully researched. The city says there is zero cause for alarm: “The great majority of installations are only noticed by New Yorkers when their cell service improves, and we’re happy to work with the community to answer their questions and assuage concerns,” said Stephanie Raphael, a spokesperson for the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications. Known as DoITT, the city agency that handles technological upgrades says there are “no health or safety hazards

related to this pole or the other light pole installations across the city.” It says all pole installations are in “strict compliance with federal standards.” But federal precedence curbs city clout. Not only does the Federal Communications Commission set safety and emissions standards, but the city is also “preempted” from making siting decisions “based on perceived health or safety concerns,” DoITT documents show. The agency confirmed no advanced notice was provided on 66th Street before work on the light pole began, saying the installation “did not require any notifications.” In a statement, DoITT said it is “happy to conduct radio-frequency testing on this pole in particular to assuage any specific concerns once construction is completed.” But Hardenbrook House residents are seeking to block the project. They circulated a Change.org petition, urging Mayor Bill de Blasio to “Stop the Installation of a Cellular Antenna Opposite PS 183!” So far, their 104 signatures include the building’s superintendent, a doorman, two of three condo board members and several parents at the school. Community Board 8 is watching closely, said Will Brightbill, its district manager. “CB 8 expects the city and franchisee to be in compliance with all federal, state and local laws to protect the safety of Board

8 residents, tourists and New Yorkers citywide,” he said. Options appear limited. Occasionally, that’s proved vexing for East Side City Council Member Ben Kallos, an attorney who’s studied legal issues involving wireless. Residents are seldom exercised about mobile phone safety, he said, but every so often, they’ll express concerns about cell antennas positioned above their apartments. “I have spent more time than I care to admit researching the case law surrounding the placement of antennas in response to these concerns — only to be frustrated by the federal preemption permitting placement anywhere subject to limited zoning restrictions,” Kallos added. As a result, unbeknownst to most New Yorkers, a vast network of 1,611 cellular antenna units has been assembled on Manhattan street poles, with 1,209 of them sited on avenues and intersections. More recently, 402 have been placed on cross streets, DoITT data shows. “I am by no means a technophobe,” said Omer Berger, a software developer and Rosenberg’s husband. “But the burden is on the city to prove this technology isn’t harmful to my family — rather than on me as a taxpaying citizen to prove that it is harmful.” invreporter@strausnews.com

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POSTAGE DUE FOR BATTLING BELLA? COMMEMORATION First, a Greenwich Village street was named for Congresswoman Abzug, and now, her friends, family and supporters launch a new campaign for a postage stamp in her honor BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

Fiery, feisty and feminist. Brainy, blunt and belligerent. A principled radical, an outrageous agitator, a notorious confrontationalist. And letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be blunt: A nuisance, a thorn in the side, even a pain in the ass. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to imagine that Bella Abzug â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who gleefully wrote being called â&#x20AC;&#x153;tough, noisy, a man-hater, impetuous, uppity, rude, profane, brash, overbearingâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; would quibble with a single one of those descriptions. But above all, as she wrote, too, she was also a â&#x20AC;&#x153;very serious woman,â&#x20AC;? a fact no detractor could ever deny. And now, 20 years after her death, the self-described â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jewish mother with more complaints than Portnoyâ&#x20AC;? is getting some of the accolades she so richly deserves. On March 29, Bank Street off Greenwich Avenue, a few doors away from the Greenwich Village home where she had lived from the 1960s through the 1980s, was officially co-named Congresswoman Bella S Abzug Way. And even as preparations were underway for the ceremony, an old friend and fellow feminist, Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, was ďŹ ring off a letter to Postmaster General Megan Brennan, the ďŹ rst woman to hold the post, with a new proposal: Print an Abzug commemorative stamp to honor a tireless champion of women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her success breaking down barriers for women in politics inspired generations of young people,â&#x20AC;? Maloney wrote on March 23, and she recalled Abzugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous declaration, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place is in the House ... the House of Representatives.â&#x20AC;? One of her greatest breakthroughs, Maloney wrote, was

Bella Abzug, wearing her trademark hat, declares her candidacy for mayor in 1977. She lost in the Democratic primary to Ed Koch. Photo: Copyright Š Diana Mara Henry / www.dianamarahenry.com that she â&#x20AC;&#x153;empowered countless women to run for office, engage in politics and civic life, and join the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movement in pursuit of equal rights and opportunity.â&#x20AC;? Known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Battling Bella,â&#x20AC;? Abzug was ďŹ rst elected to the House in 1970 and served from 1971 to 1977 in a district that included the Upper West Side, Chelsea, Hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen and Greenwich Village. With her trademark hat and take-no-prisoners style â&#x20AC;&#x201D; she was the first person in Congress to call for the impeachment of Richard Nixon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; she made scores of powerful enemies. Yet to the surprise of colleagues she alienated, she also proved a remarkably effective legislator. Abzugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landmark bills included the Freedom of Information Act, to bolster transparency and accountability in government, and Title IX, which guaranteed equal protection for men and women in higher education. In 1976, she became the ďŹ rst woman to run for the U.S. Senate from New York, and in 1977, she became the ďŹ rst woman to vie for mayor, though she lost both times, to Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Ed Koch respectively. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She had a huge impact on the nation as a civil rights lawyer, feminist leader, and the first Jewish congresswoman in modern times who was one of the most progressive, doeverything representatives in the history of Congress,â&#x20AC;? said Liz Abzug, her daughter and the founder of the Bella Abzug Leadership Institute at Hunter College.

Noting that her mother was born in 1920, which was also the year of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, giving women the vote, Abzug said that, ideally, a stamp could be timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of both events. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cutting it close. Though the Maloney letter is a critical first step, and the U.S. Postal Service is traditionally responsive to Congressional requests, supporters have not yet submitted a formal proposal to the USPS Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stamp Advisory Committee, which is needed for the stamp-selection process to move forward. Typically, due to the time required for research and review, ideas for stamp subjects are supposed to be received at least three years prior to the proposed issuance, according to USPS guidelines â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it was up to the will of the people, there would be a stamp,â&#x20AC;? Liz Abzug said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be realistic, she was as left and progressive as you can get within the Democratic Party, and this guy [Donald Trump] is a maniac, and he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like women, so it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be easy.â&#x20AC;? Asked if the stamp proposal can be expected to encounter political headwinds in the Trump administration, Maloney said by email, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t become a political trailblazer without getting under some peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skin.â&#x20AC;? While Abzugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advocacy might have seemed radical at the time, issues like her support for LGBT rights and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights have become more mainstream, she said.


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SUSTAINING CINEMA IN THE CITY The deputy director of the Film Society of Lincoln Center on fostering his passion BY ANGELA BARBUTI

Eugene Hernandez has been to so many film festivals he’s lost count. “When you go, they often give you these little plastic badges that you wear around your neck and for over 25 years, that’s the one keepsake I have from each of my festivals. They’re in boxes, in my closet, hanging up on hangers. There’s hundreds of them,” he said of the mementos that grace his Hell’s Kitchen apartment, the same one he moved into in 1994 when the California native started work for ABC TV. His penchant for film began during his student days at UCLA, attending screenings at the university’s student union. Hernandez would eventually run the office that scheduled programming there. Once in New York, the world of cinema opened up to him in a different way. “I was intrigued ... because, it turns out, a lot of my favorite movies were made in New York ... ‘Paris is Burning,’ ‘Do the Right Thing,’ ‘Metropolitan.’ There were so many movies that were so important to me that were rooted in New York. So I had this cinematic view of the city.” His job at ABC was in walking distance form the Film Society of Lincoln Center, and he would frequently

attend screenings there on his way home. IndieWire, the online film publication he started in 1996, was born from his growing passion. Now, as deputy director of the Film Society, Hernandez cultivates his dedication to the art every day. Besides running the Film Society’s day-to-day aspects, he oversees special events and programs, including a dozen film festivals a year, and serves as co-publisher of the institution’s magazine “Film Comment.” Hernandez is now gearing up for The New York Film Festival, the Film Society’s biggest event, which starts in late September and run through midOctober. He’s also planning its most important fundraising event of the year, the Chaplin Award Gala, scheduled for April 30, at which Helen Mirren will be honored.

Have you always been a movie buff? I became more focused on movies during college. I went to UCLA. As a student, I just started watching movies on the weekend at the Student Union. Screenings were like a dollar or two dollars. So I just started experimenting and watching movies I had never heard of, the kind of movies you watch on college campuses like “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” or “Blue Velvet” or John Waters movies. Those were the typical college campus in the ‘80s midnight movies. And I think it was these kinds of movies you would watch with 1,000 people in an

auditorium that had this communal movie-going experience that changed my perspective. And when I started seeing movies coming out of the Sundance Film Festival in the late ‘80s, early ‘90s, like “Poison” or “Paris is Burning,” “Reservoir Dogs,” those are the kinds of movies that really opened me up to independent film.

Tell us about the beginnings of IndieWire. I was in New York working for television, but had this growing passion for movies. I have to mention the place I work now because it’s integral to the story of IndieWire. Down the street from ABC is Lincoln Center. And I just started going to movies at the Film Society because it was on my way home from work. There was just so much happening in New York in the early to mid-90s in independent film production. So the idea for IndieWire was born out of creating a publication that would champion new filmmakers and films. It was a startup, with no funding and no investors.

Did you ever think the site would grow into what it is today? I couldn’t have imagined that it would become anything, because I didn’t imagine it as anything more than a passion or a hobby. It wasn’t meant to be a company. Through the support of the film community here and other filmmakers, it grew, and eventually I left my job at ABC to work

on it full time. We gott a point in the early 2000s where we e couldn’t even afford an office. There were three of us. We were all working from home and having our work meetings eetings at Starbucks and sending our ur mail to a post office box. We struggled; gled; the dotcom crash happened in n the late ‘90s and the seccond dot-com crash happened in 2007. We finally had to get an investor, and we sold the company to Ted Leonsis and Steve Case, the guys who started AOL. A nd t hat was what really stabilized the company. It’s in such a great place now, owned by Jay Penske at PMC.

You are started at the Film Society as director of digital strategy. What are some initiatives you’ve worked on so far that you’re most proud of? I am, without question, most proud of these new initiatives that I feel really enrich the mission of the organization. We re-energized an education program here. In the history of this organization, which will be 50 years old next year, education was a key program very early on. From the very beginning, it took filmmakers into local schools. It took Martin Scorsese into high schools. It brought students to Lincoln Center to watch movies. So we brought that back because when we opened the film center in 2011, we realized that it was an opportunity to re-engage the city and the Upper West Side and Lincoln Center in our mission. So I started organizing free events, free talks. I’m very proud of the free events that we do in our film center all the time and daily during the New York Film Festival, because sometimes people just needed to be invited in.

Who is a memorable person you’ve met through your career?

Eugene Hernandez, deputy director of the Film Society of Lincoln, with the film director Sofia Coppola. Photo: Mettie Ostrowski

The first person that came to mind was John Waters, and I think it’s because, as I mentioned, his films were so important to me as a college kid. He was just doing something totally different in Baltimore and I found his movies just so outrageous, funny and totally distinctive. So when I came to the Film Society, one of the first programs I was thrilled to collaborate on with my colleagues and our director of programming, Dennis Lim, was a complete retrospective of John Waters’s films on the occasion of his 50th year making movies. So we had John

Photo: Getty Images here at Lincoln Center and showed every single movie, including his short films and stuff from his personal collection. Movies he had stored in his attic in Baltimore, and he lives here in the West Village as well. He’s a huge cinephile; he comes to movies here at the Film Society. By way of Baltimore, he’s such a unique New Yorker.

You were honored on Out Magazine’s Out100 list. What did that recognition mean to you? When I was included, I was invited to stand alongside Christine Vachon, another really amazing and influential New Yorker. She’s arguably the leading independent film producer in the city. She produced “Poison,” and films by so many other filmmakers that I’ve grown to respect and gotten to know in New York. So when the magazine asked me to stand alongside her for a photo for their Out100 issue, it was just a tremendous honor, because she is someone whose work as a producer has had such a dramatic influence on me personally. We stood there as representatives of an entire film community, an entire LGBT community in New York, a creative community here, and of so many amazing filmmakers who Christine has produced or I’ve been able to interview or champion or celebrate, both at IndieWire and now at Lincoln Center.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to ourtownny.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor V I A J Z N D R S W Q Q H A O

M R U F G M U I L G P O K A D

U Y Z S I J L B N J L H J H G

B R T U J V N T I T A N I U M

Z E M Q E Q Q W C U T G I G R

N B B R A S S E K B I W T P H

S E B M L E S C E C N I S M O

T I T V O G O X L O U J X I D

E C X C G P O F Q P M Z C D I

E E X O P S A L I I R O N K U

L E K E U E F S D S C K Q L M

L O R T A X V I S Z I N C E X

The puzzle contains the following 15 words. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

O N H X P A L U M I N U M Z Q

Aluminum Brass Cadmium Copper Gold Iron Lead Nickel Platinum Rhodium Silver Steel Titanium Tungsten Zinc

ANSWERS N

U

L

N O W N

K

A

E

53 47

48

49

54

G

50

G O

39 34

E

E

E

R

B

P

A

K

30 26

27

S

35

S

U

P

D E

S

T

1

2

3

P

23

T

I

4

N

Y

R

12

5

I

U

37

A

A 6

L

I V

44

R E

45

N

D

38

A

U

B O A

L

A I

32 20

A 46

Y

E O

15

R

R O

S

T

P

E H

19

A

11

S

29

22

A

18

C O M A O

R

A

L

52

N

43 40

E T

E

51

T

T

14 10

K O

42

31

K

A 21

17

T

36

L 28

I

T

41

55

Y M

33

G H E

24

S

25

Y A

U

16

B

N

E

13

7

L

T

E 8

Y

F 9

E

S E B M L E S C E C N I S M O

T I T V O G O X L O U J X I D

E C X C G P O F Q P M Z C D I

E E X O P S A L I I R O N K U

L E K E U E F S D S C K Q L M

L O R T A X V I S Z I N C E X

O N H X P A L U M I N U M Z Q

6 4

9 5 3

2

4 2

1 8

6

7

1 7

9 3 5

8

1 7 8 5 3 9 6 4 2

8 6 5 9 4 1 3 2 7

7 3 1 2 5 8 4 6 9

4 2 9 6 7 3 5 8 1

3 8 4 7 9 5 2 1 6

2 9 6 8 1 4 7 5 3

5 1 7 3 6 2 8 9 4

27 Exude 28 Pizzazz 29 Belonging to a lady 33 “I did it __ way” Frank Sinatra 35 Drenched 36 “Tea for ___” 37 Roman pot 38 African antelope 42 Gumbo 44 Exclamation of acclaim (Italian) 45 Cupid’s back up 46 Statutes 47 Cut off 48 Four-stringed apparatus 49 Afternoon siesta 51 Lessen gradually

E G F M G J U A J C A Q E G A

N B B R A S S E K B I W T P H

58

W L I C K W G T C H D L X D M

Z E M Q E Q Q W C U T G I G R

55

B R T U J V N T I T A N I U M

52 Old Italian coin 53 Passable 54 Venus or Mars 55 Assert 56 Moxie 57 Collar a suspect 58 Pompous fool Down 1 Bulletin board item 2 Covered walkway 3 Magnificence 4 Homer Simpson’s neighbor, __ Flanders 5 Purple flower 6 Settle, a concern (3 words) 7 Money in Moldova 8 Want a lot 9 Newt 11 Solomon islands locale 13 Marshy stream 18 Query 20 ___ system (re: blood) 22 Sergeant’s order 24 “Good grief!” 25 ___ tsu massage 26 Exist

4

46

U Y Z S I J L B N J L H J H G

Across 1 Cookbook abbr. 4 Nada! 7 Caustic substance 10 Perched on 12 Pitching measure 13 “Where’s the __?” 14 Big sleep 15 Home Depot promotes it 16 Broadway’s Mame 17 Certain sorority woman 19 Postpone 21 Stars and Stripes land 23 Orchestra instruments 26 Penetrate (2 words) 30 Reef dweller 31 Summer wear 32 Intent 34 Religious celebration period (2 words) 39 Famous 40 Crack, so to speak 41 Reliable (2 words) 43 Type of orange 47 Aqua-___ 50 __ and Tina Turner

45

M R U F G M U I L G P O K A D

57

44

V I A J Z N D R S W Q Q H A O

56

43

7 3

E G F M G J U A J C A Q E G A

54

9

7

Level: Medium

51

8

W L I C K W G T C H D L X D M

53

2

3

6 7

S

50

9

S

49

4 2

O W

48

42

5

38

40 41

1

V

39

6

9

A

37

1

58

36

33

2

A

35

32

1

4

B

31 34

25

29

30

47

24

1

6

B

28

23

9

R

22

20

7

A

27

19

5

N

16

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

O

15

9

57

13

18 21

26

12

8

Y

17

7

P

14

6

A

11

5

E

10

4

K

3

SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

P

2

CROSSWORD

O

Eastsider 1

APRIL 12-18,2018

Our Town|Eastsider ourtownny.com

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APRIL 12-18,2018

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED

MASSAGE

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF COOPERATIVE APARMENT SECURITY PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: By Virtue of a Default under Loan Security Agreement, and other Security Documents, Karen Loiacano, Auctioneer, License #DCA1435601 or Jessica L Prince-Clateman, Auctioneer, License #1097640 or Vincent DeAngelis Auctioneer, License #1127571 will sell at public auction, with reserve, on April 25, 2018, in the Rotunda at the New York County Courthouse, 60 Centre Street, New York, NY 10007, commencing at 1:15pm for the following account: Ingrid Gherman, as borrower, 3,224 shares of capital stock of The Forum Owners Corp. and all right, title and interest in the Proprietary Lease to 343 East 74th St, Apt. #19B, New York, NY 10021 Sale held to enforce rights of National Cooperative Bank, N.A. fka NCB, FSB, who reserves the right to bid. Ten percent (10%) Bank/Certified check required at sale, balance due at closing within thirty (30) days. The Cooperative Apartment

27

Our Town|Eastsider ourtownny.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every effort to avoid mistakes in your classified ads. Check your ad the first week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the first incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classified ads are pre-paid.

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

will be sold “AS IS” and possession is to be obtained by the purchaser. Pursuant to Section 201 of the Lien Law you must answer within 10 days from receipt of this notice in which redemption of the above captioned premises can occur. There is presently an outstanding debt owed to National Cooperative Bank, N.A. fka NCB, FSB (lender) as of the date of this notice in the amount of $590,831.44. This figure is for the outstanding balance due under UCC1, which was secured by Financing Statement in favor of NCB, FSB recorded on August 23, 2005 in CRFN 2005000472950. The UCC1 was re-filed in favor of NCB, FSB on May 17, 2017 in CRFN 2017000186289 and then re-filed in favor of NCB, FSB on February 27, 2018 in CRFN: 2018000067946. Please note this is not a payoff amount as additional interest/fees/penalties may be incurred. You must contact the undersigned to obtain a final payoff quote or if you dispute any information presented herein. The estimated value of the above captioned premises is $1,040,000.00. Pursuant to the Uniform Commercial Code Article 9-623, the above captioned premises may be redeemed at any time prior to the foreclosure sale. You may contact the undersigned and either pay the principal balance due along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by National Cooperative Bank, N.A. fka NCB, FSB. and the undersigned, or pay the outstanding loan arrears along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by National Cooperative Bank, N.A. fka NCB, FSB, and the undersigned, with respect to the foreclosure proceedings. Failure to cure the default prior to the sale will result in the termination of the proprietary lease. If you have received a discharge from the Bankruptcy Court, you are not personally liable for the payment of the loan and this notice is for compliance and information purposes only. However, National Cooperative Bank, N.A. fka NCB, FSB, still has the right under the loan security agreement and other collateral documents to foreclosure on the shares of stock and rights under the proprietary lease allocated to the cooperative apartment. Dated: March 1, 2018 Frenkel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP Attorneys for National Cooperative Bank, N.A. fka NCB, FSB 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706 631-969-3100 File #01-084099-F01 #94388

PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF COOPERATIVE APARMENT SECURITY PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: By Virtue of a Default under Loan Security Agreement, and other Security Documents, Karen Loiacano, Auctioneer, License #DCA1435601 or Jessica L Prince-Clateman, Auctioneer, License #1097640 or Vincent DeAngelis Auctioneer, License #1127571 will sell at public auction, with reserve, on April 25, 2018, in the Rotunda of the New York County Courthouse, 60 Centre Street, New York NY 10007, commencing at 1:00pm for the following account: Eric Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg, as borrower, 144 shares of capital stock of 310 East 70th Street Apartment Corp. and all right, title and interest in the Proprietary Lease to 310 East 70 St, Unit 6E, New York, NY 10021 Sale held to enforce rights of Citibank, NA, who reserves the right to bid. Ten percent (10%) Bank/Certified check required at sale, balance due at closing within thirty (30) days. The Cooperative Apartment will be sold “AS IS” and possession is to be obtained by the purchaser. Pursuant to Section 201 of the Lien Law you must answer within 10 days from receipt of this notice in which redemption of the above captioned premises can occur. There is presently an outstanding debt owed to Citibank, NA (lender) as of the date of this notice in the amount of $279,274.82. This figure is for the outstanding balance due under UCC1, which was secured by Financing Statement in favor of Citibank, N.A. recorded on September 16, 2005 under CRFN 2005000517302. Please note

this is not a payoff amount as additional interest/fees/penalties may be incurred. This sale is subject to a first lien held by Astoria Federal Savings and Loan. You must contact the undersigned to obtain a final payoff quote or if you dispute any information presented herein. The estimated value of the above captioned premises is $1,069,000.00. Pursuant to the Uniform Commercial Code Article 9-623, the above captioned premises may be redeemed at any time prior to the foreclosure sale. You may contact the undersigned and either pay the principal balance due along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Citibank, NA. and the undersigned, or pay the outstanding loan arrears along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Citibank, NA, and the undersigned, with respect to the foreclosure proceedings. Failure to cure the default prior to the sale will result in the termination of the proprietary lease. If you have received a discharge from the Bankruptcy Court, you are not personally liable for the payment of the loan and this notice is for compliance and information purposes only. However, Citibank, NA, still has the right under the loan security agreement and other collateral documents to foreclosure on the shares of stock and rights under the proprietary lease allocated to the cooperative apartment. Dated: March 16, 2018 Frenkel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP Attorneys for Citibank, NA 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706 631-969-3100 File #01-080833-F00 #94490

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