Our Place Magazine Media Kit

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Our Place Magazine Media Kit


Our Place magazine celebrates our area and champions our locals. It draws in curious minds and introduces lesser-known businesses, movements and people — this rich mix of content all connected by the theme of community. It tackles design and architecture without sounding stuffy or elite, and offers a different perspective on subjects ranging from fashion, sport and music, to wellbeing, restaurants and bars. The contemporary and playful approach to design and photography captures the distinct spirit of our city. All the quality content is exclusively commissioned for each issue, and the monthly events calendar makes it a compulsory read for all locals. Available in print, digital and online — Our Place offers an original and stimulating view into what makes our place, our city tick.

Issue 33 April / May 21

Recipes from the Pepper & Me Cookbook

Issue 35 August / September 21

Issue 37Me Take Dec 21 / Jan 22

The Mad Dining Potter à la Plants Special Shannon Studio’s Novak: Copper Creating Artist Laurie Steer in Tauranga 3D Printed Safe Homewares SpacesIsaac with Weston Art

Issue Take39 Me Apr / May 22

The Beautiful Forms of Slab Ceramics KiaSummer’s Kaha Coolest Te ReoCocktail Māori! Recipes

Take Me

A Life in Music: Davey Beige Life in 1960s Tauranga

Take Me

Creatives from The Little Big Markets


Some of the brands that advertise with us

just as nature intended

35 Macdonald Street, Mount Maunganui

More than just a burger joint. MOUNT MAUNGANUI

6am since 1994

What does it take to serve a neighbourhood for over twenty years?

DINE, Bayfair Shopping Centre burgerburger.co.nz

Tāne Mā (NZ) Tiffany Singh (NZ) CEKS (NZ/Singapore) Nā ‘Anae Mahiki (Hawaii) Suzanne Tamaki (NZ) Hannah & Aaron Beehre (NZ) Kereama Taepa (NZ) Super Nature Design (China) Scott Brown (NZ) Ace Firers (NZ)

NEW STORE

Squidsoup (UK) Chin-En Soo (NZ) Brian Knep (USA) Jeanette Schäring (Sweden/NZ)

F E AT U R I N G 1 4 PROJECTS ACROSS 3 EXHIBITIONS:

A R T T H AT N E E DS YO U 24 FEB — 3 JUN

LIGHT TOUCH 31 MAR — 17 JUN WE SELL QUALITY SECOND HAND CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES.

RECYCLE

WE SELL THE ITEMS ON YOUR BEHALF. YOU GET 50% OF THE SALE

BOUTIQUE.

PRICE. SIMPLE AS THAT.

CO.NZ

BAYFAIR SHOPPING CENTRE, MAUNGANUI ROAD, THE MOUNT, TAURANGA.

Cnr Wharf & Willow St Downtown Tauranga Phone +64 7 578 7933 artgallery.org.nz

W H O S E WAT E R A R E YO U 14 APR — 15 JUL


Our Content

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Only child syndrome Kapua puts her watchfulness down to being an only child. Born in Tauranga to Charlie, a truck driver and mother Betty, a teacher (and later Assistant DP at Otumoetai intermediate for over 20 years), she says she was observant at a young age. “My mates weren’t children. I grew up with adults, many teachers and some soldiers who’d been to war. I was spoilt. My grandfather’s family are the Bennetts here in Tauranga from Wairoa Marae, my hapu is Ngāti kahu, but I spent every school holidays in Te Kaha being raised by my mother’s elder sisters - all teachers! It isn’t easy growing up with teachers.” Described as a quiet, obedient, artistic child, Kapua did ballet from age 4, liked to read and wasn’t athletic. “I came last, I was always trotting along at the back,” she chuckles. Artistic influences at the time included renowned carver and artist Cliff Whiting - whanau from Te Kaha - who visited her school. “He’s one of ours.” She was taught by famous writer, poet and educator Sylvia Ashton Warner at Bethlehem Primary. Plus, ballet was with well known dancer and teacher Undine Clarke. “It was through Undine that I was given much of my exposure to the arts as a child. She lived in Te Puna and I used to visit her beautiful home there. She was very focused on the arts and ballet and very Previous page: caption here. resciendero cus quaspe doluptaes con nos quam, nihic temqui ← Caption here. Ustiumqui culpari dio cum fugiasi taturis in et vellaccus a sendit aut que netur, non.

eccentric.” After a stint at private boarding school Queen Victoria in Auckland (a Te Kaha tradition for the women in her family) and her final year at Tauranga Girls, Kapua was accepted into Wellington Polytechnic Design school in 1969. It was there she fell in love with photography. “I was so lucky to study design with such excellent teachers,” she enthuses. ”People like Bill Bush who taught me how to draw properly and [pioneer of design education and award winning printmaker] Don Ramage. It was there I learned how to take black and white photos, how to develop and use a dark room, all the techniques.” She used Nikon and Canon cameras, preferring the Canon for black and white. “With these types of cameras you can manipulate your image, letting in more or less light as you take the photo, or in the dark room. But I have to say that in my dreams I wanted a Hasselblad, after all it went to the moon!”

‘Stole my land, now leave my soul’ It was in the seventies that Kapua first took photos of ordinary people in Wellington’s streets, as well as self-portraits and photos of Māori activists. “I went to watch the protests [like the Nga Tamatoha protest in 1972] and photographing the people there was my way of protesting too. I thought, good on you fellas. I sat with them [people like Tama Iti and John Ohia] and let them talk, while I listened. I’m a good listener and I always had my camera there.” Seen as the beginning of the Māori renaissance, Kapua says even her mum joined in the hikoi with Dame Whina Cooper in 1975, carrying Kapua’s daughter Ani on her back. 4

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Jordan Griffin & Shinji Mizuno

Safety in the shallows By Sam Cummins

Survival strategies for your next family gathering. xx avoid awkward famiy gatherings.

As told to Megan Raynor Photography by ilk

This column was going to be about the inverse relationship between gluten, pork and property values at the Mount. That was until I had a particularly enjoyable family summer holiday. My family came to our house this year, and everyone stayed for a few days. My house (it’s actually owned by the bank), my rules. In deference to my long-suffering wife, once the whanau were fully gathered, I laid down the rules. One rule. Keep it shallow. No need to watch the kids shallow. NZ reality TV shallow. No Trump, Israel, politics, parenting advice, dietary advice, vegan evangelism. Nothing. I love my family, they’re generous, engaged and empathetic. They also hold opinions. Everybody does. Only my family hold Opinions. The capital O is being kind. They hold these like a drunk holds a 7 per cent Cody. Which is a poor analogy, because they only thing they like to do more than hold an Opinion, is to share it! Luckily these Opinions are only on trivial matters like politics, religion, economics and parenting. Not to mention the current faves of sugar, salt, “screen time”, dairy and animal rights. And all these Opinions differ. This of course, can be highly entertaining, and fertile ground for the troll and walk away. “Would anyone like a cuppa, and how about Lorde cancelling Tel Aviv.” I’m slowly learning that it’s not worth it. The conversation inevitably goes south, the voice levels go north, tempers flare. Google gets consulted. Degrees are slandered. “Who cares if you have an MA in English Lit, it’s worth less than passing fifth form maths.” Etc. Vibe killed. Worst of all, it always ends in an email from my Mum. They are all the same: “It was so lovely to see you at

- insert family event - I’m sorry things got a bit heated. We’ll just have to agree to disagree. I have attached an article on screen time/sugar/salt/msg that you all have to read. It’s from Harvard. It clearly shows I’m right and you’re wrong. Love you lots, Mum.” Keeping it shallow worked a total charm. It wasn’t easy, we flirted with the edge. There was the odd “Guardian reading libtard” call, a brief dalliance with the Tax Working Group and the bold, but totally true, assertion that Labour hates poor people (who’s Jimmy Barnes?). But this was overshadowed by much-enjoyed conversations about children, fuel economy, my brothers weird shaped head (under-rotated as a baby), the price of tasty cheese and the weather. No-one cares about what you think or the number of peer reviewed articles that prove you are right. They’re not changing their mind and neither are you. There is no point. Why bother. Take to Twitter and share your wonderful, insightful, nuanced opinion. Maybe you’ll get retweeted by Kim Hill or the Don himself. Validation awaits. Or take to Facebook and pick a fight about big dairy with an old soon-to-be-ex-friend from school. Signal that virtue, baby. But if you value your relationships more than the need to state the obvious fact we need “a quota on cows, you mouth-breathing Luddite!”. Then I suggested you try swimming in the shallow end of the pool. To prove that it works, it’s been 10 days since everyone left, and no email from dear Mother. Success!!

P.S. Love you Mum.

What’s Up Drinks All Round

Great coffee, food, booze need to kick any winter b that the Tauranga Coffee There’ll be all your favou that want to geek-out ca attend workshops, and th great brews. Plus, there’l Brewing Co bar, deliciou Real Rad Food and Oh B 10am–6pm, Our Place Tau → Door sales $17 , ticket

Light Fantastic The return of Winter Nights Winter Lights will see Tauranga Waterfront transformed into a twinkling winter wonderland. Interactive light installations include Sweep by Alexandra Heaney (pictured), which was created for Vivid Sydney and consists of 100 illuminated acrylic tubes, standing four-metres tall. Local lighting

artist Sam Emerson will also bring a city wall to life with an animated outdoor projection. Plus, there’s free glow-in-thedark face painting, Tango performances at 7pm on Friday and Saturday nights, and a range of food trucks. This free event runs 6-10pm, 13-16 July.

→ More details, eventfinda.co.nz

Try Your Hand Mount Pottery are running a Pottery Day Retreat on 22 July in Mt Maunganui with potters Jaime Jenkins and Laurie Steer. Expect a practical class — they will demonstrate their methods, and you will make your own pots using pinching, coiling and slab building techniques, plus learn the histories of these ancient methods. All levels welcome — advice will be tailored accordingly. Price $250, including all materials, and a vegan lunch and dinner. → To book, pottingretreat@gmail.com

Eddies & Elspeth and The LightRoom photos: Erin Cave

Of Two Minds

Illustration by Stephen Kirkby

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with hand gestures. “I was trusted because I was one of the whanau and I was fortunate that my people allowed me to record them.”

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The origins of screenprinting are fairly punk rock, so Christian’s foray into the industry should come as no surprise. “I used to do the graphics for my friends’ band shirts and built a few connections with the local screenprinter along the way. I was offered a job straight after high school and was hooked. Being able to print my own stuff was awesome, I’d rock up to youth group every week in a new t-shirt!” Sally grew up in Cambridge, went to Wintec in Hamilton and then finished her Bachelor of Design in Auckland. Although they lived in different cities, she’d crossed paths with Christian a few times when they were at high school. “I loved Auckland, but after growing up on a farm, I missed the slow pace of smaller towns. I decided to move to the Mount – which is where I ran into Christian again while getting some products printed for work. I definitely remembered him. He always stood out.” “And not just because of the eyeliner I used to wear, back when I was a bit more in the scene,” laughs Christian. “Teenage guys can be really attention seeking but Christian was never like that,” says Sally. “He was always so kind. When I saw him again after all these years, I thought he’d grown up alright!” Christian liked what he saw too and the pair started dating. Fast forward to today, they’ve been married three years. “Money was a little tight after a C

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Ok, so it doesn’t instantly roll off the tongue, but you’ve got to admit ‘plastisol’ is a pretty funky word. “It’s a bit of a mouthful for some people but plastisol is such a common term for us - it’s one of the main inks we use to print,” says Christian Biedrowski, owner of Plastisol Beach screenprinting in the Mount. “The name came around when I launched the business back in 2016 and needed to register for GST,” he explains. “I had to come up with a name for the paperwork, and was drawing graphics for the logo and listening to the Gorillaz album Plastic Beach at the time. Suddenly I thought ‘Plastisol Beach’ - I liked the idea of saying I worked at the beach even though it’s an industrial warehouse!” Technically, Christian and his wife Sally do work their magic from a warehouse, but it’s a beautiful one. Think sandy?? aesthetics with hints of blue, giant walls of paint in every possible colour and an array of custom-built, high-tech and grunty-as-hell equipment. Their signature palm tree logo also adds to the workshop’s cruisy, coastal vibe. “It took me a long time to realise that the palm tree was coming out of a screen - I thought it was just a rectangle,” Sally laughs. “Christian is such an amazing illustrator and a bit of a perfectionist, so I guess the logo was bound to have a deeper meaning!”

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German sausages thentic vibe. ted Rueben sandwich. pairs really well and Red Leicester

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Story by Laura Tuck

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The hardworking duo behind local screenprinters Plastisol Beach are known for their attention to detail, appetite for experimentation and all-round mad skills.

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1. Salt should make up 2-3% of the kraut; a good rule of thumb is 1 tablespoon per 1kg of cabbage. Salt helps prevent the cabbage from spoiling, but too much prevents the lactobacilli critters from thriving. 2. I use 1.5L Fido jars (which generally fits about 1 medium-sized cabbage per jar and fit perfectly in the fridge door). This brand of jar lets the CO2 out as the pressure builds during the first fermentation period but doesn’t let any oxygen in. I’ve bought cheap jars and the batches have spoilt from the oxygen getting in. Fido jars are available at Mitre 10 Mega, Gourmet Trader in Gate Pa or online: arthurholmes.co.nz/. 3. The fresher the cabbage, the more juice the salt will draw out. An older cabbage might need a gentle pound with a potato masher or something like that. This cabbage brine helps keep the oxygen away, so the more the better. 4. If it browns at the top (when oxygen causes spoilage) or if it has any sign of mould, discard the batch. 5. Experiment with flavours! We really like the traditional flavour and versatility of caraway kraut, but you could include kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, sliced chillis, grated ginger, cumin

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The Fine Print

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Fermenting Tips

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New Kid on the Bloc

The Mount cafe scene ge there’s now a lot more th The latest opening is Edd sharing the same beautif Bakery is the first bricks-a and Kayden Jacobsen’s m Nichola’s mille feuille (“no square”), sausage rolls, a Parlour, by Joel and Kate spin on brunch with “pha sweet potato pancakes. → 2a Terrace Ave (cnr Ma

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The Human Face Story by Sarah Nicholson

Rolph Hediger used coffee and ink to create the compelling portraits for his show For Theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven. The series was driven by the artist’s love of meeting vastly different people and telling their stories. 46

Of Two Minds

Noel Cimadom & Kim Smythe

As told to Casey Vassallo Photography by ilk

Twelve years ag met Kiwi model powerhouse hus Cambridge and in Tauranga. The Jacinta (6).

Noel: Kim used to alwa name on Sunday aftern her dog in the park with just split up, kind of, bu dog together. She came and ordered a pizza call radicchio, which we hav – it’s radicchio and Italia sausage. She asked me said, ‘Oh, you like it spi moment. Her family is or Cambridge. I loved the Munich. I think her fath we were here visiting, a on the boat fishing. I did I was in for, but I really So we moved to Cambr just starting to evolve. T we did. That’s where we six-seven years ago. I think Kim and opposites. She can look a concept together. The similar in is we’re impu That’s how we ended up She’s very sensi that’s what she does in o the revamp of [Cambrid in April, and for me the up with a concept easy t we don’t have to close t long. About three days b said ‘I’m going to distre


Our Place in numbers

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