Feature Magazine January 2022

Page 1


New Creekfront Precinct INSPECT NOW! * Quiet Narangba location * Mountain views

* 20m Frontage

* Elevated & breezy * Walk to Woolworths & schools

% GUARANTEED

OWNER-OCCUPIER

SALES

Welcome Home Call Cam on 3263 4977

narangbaheights.com.au


ON THE COVER: SHANE BOURNE Photo: Don Jones

"Fishability Queensland saved my life and that can’t be understated.” -Shane Bourne Hooked of Fishability Queensland. Page 8

Here are some of the stories you will find inside:

$250M AVAILABLE FOR LONGMAN PROJECTS

Jakub Novak: Mixing Pedal Power with Technology

Be The Difference, Make The Change

Bruce Highway 2022 Upgrade

APPLICATIONS FOR ROUND 6 of the the Building Better Regions Fund (BBRF) are now open, paving the way for new projects that our communities need and deserve to be funded and delivered from next year. Member for Longman Terry Young is calling on local councils and community organisations to start preparing applications for projects to receive a share in $250 million.

Know Your Drone Page 18

BE SEEN IN OUR NEXT EDITION: February 1, 2022 Booking and copy deadline:

January 25, 2022

ADVERTISING: For advertising rates, conditions and bookings please contact our team at ads@featuremagazine.com.au or Darren More on mobile 0416 430 792 or visit out website www.featuremagazine.com.au/advertise

EDITORIALS: Send all story ideas and articles to: editor@featuremagazine.com.au PUBLISHER Feature Magazine 07 3886 9040 PO Box 105, Narangba Qld 4504 EDITOR & ADVERTISING Darren More 0416 430 792 editor@featuremagazine.com.au

BUSINESS HOURS:

Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm

CONTRIBUTORS

Sheree Hoddinett Marnie Birch Monica Shanahan Moreton All Body Care Vanessa Bragdon Lawrie Smith Gabrielle Turnbull Rebecca Haupt Richard Lancaster Just Better in Care Don Jones

DISTRIBUTION:

Caboolture Morayfield Burpengary East Burpengary Narangba Kallangur Deception Bay North Lakes Mango Hill

DISTRIBUTION Caboolture, Morayfield, Burpengary, Narangba, Dakabin, Kallangur, Petrie, North Lakes, Mango Hill, Deception Bay and online at www. featuremagazine.com.au COPYRIGHT & DISCLAIMER No part of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher. The information in this magazine is for information purposes only. Feature Magazine and its editors, publishers and agents assume no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information, nor for any actions taken in reliance thereon. The information contained about each individual, event or organisation has been provided by such individual, event organisers or organisation without verification by us. The opinion expressed in each article is the opinion of its author and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Feature Magazine or it’s publishers. Therefore, Feature Magazine carries no responsibility for the opinion expressed thereon. INDEMNITY By advertising or submitting with Feature Magazine you agree to indemnify all participating contributors and supporting businesses such as graphic designers and printers against any claims. ABN 47 438 219 632

The BBRF supports economic and social infrastructure for the long-term benefit of regional communities. Funding the infrastructure and services that communities need for the future will create jobs and help them rebound strongly from the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding under Round 6 takes the Government’s total investment through the BBRF to $1.38 billion. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the Government is focused on ensuring our regions remain strong and grow into the future. “Regional Australians deserve the same services and opportunities that people in metropolitan cities have and the Building Better Regions Fund helps make this happen,” the Deputy Prime Minister said. “That’s why we’ve committed another $250 million for projects and initiatives that will transform communities, create new jobs and drive economic growth across regional Australia. “This will build on the 298 fantastic regional projects that shared in $300 million in funding under the last round of the Building Better Regions Fund. Local governments and eligible incorporated not-for-profit organisations can again apply for grants of $5,000 up to $10 million to cover 50 per cent or more of eligible project costs. Round 6 projects will be funded under two streams. The Infrastructure Projects Stream supports the construction of new infrastructure, or the upgrade or extension of existing infrastructure. The Community Investments Stream funds community development activities including, but not limited to, new or expanded local events, strategic regional plans, leadership and capability building activities. Applications close on Thursday, 10 February 2022.

www.featuremagazine.com.au

3


Jakub Novak Mixing Pedal Power with Technology Words: Sheree Hoddinett Photo: Contributed

CYCLING IS MORE than just hitting the road and pushing the pedals for Jakub Novak, it’s become his passion to help others with their own cycling abilities. A professional cyclist in his own right, Novak has now turned his attention to other athletes around the world as a performance cycling coach. While his own career is now a past memory, it’s the results and dedication he sees from his own clients that spurs Novak on to make a difference. A keen interest in cycling, with a love of mountain biking, is how Novak found his way into the sport as a teenager. Originally hailing from the Czech Republic in Europe, Novak made his way to Italy where he eventually had his potential discovered and he was picked to join the BMC Pro Racing Team. “It all feels like a long time ago,” Novak says of the early days leading up to the start of his career. “I started cycling when I was 14 years old and it was just something I liked to do. “When I was living in Italy, it was after about 4 years I was chosen to be a part of the BMC Pro Racing Team because they saw I had potential. They were one of the biggest teams in biking at the time. I was a teammate of Cadel Evans and other great riders.” Novak was just 24 when he stopped racing professionally and made the big move to Australia, a long held dream since attending the World Championships in Melbourne in 2011. After spending time living in Burpengary, Novak made the move to the city in mid-2021 after his partner was offered a job. The upside to his coaching role is it doesn’t matter where Novak is based. “My coaching is based remotely because with today’s technology I can talk directly with the client, even facetime with the athletes and I can see what they are doing on the bike,” Novak says. “There is special software that you can see what they do and analyse their performance. It’s allowed me to have multiple athletes around the world.” Through Pro Cycling Coaching, Novak works with 40 athletes, carefully allocating his time to ensure each program is tailored to the individual. “Due to the nature of the program for each person, I couldn’t work with 200 people as I just wouldn’t have time,” he says. “They are from multiple countries, of course mostly Australia, but also from the US, Singapore and the Middle East. But my goal is to primarily help Aussies.” Novak speaks highly of the athletes he works with including the likes of Jason McNulty and Alex Bogna. “Jason people might know from the Invictus Games,” Novak says. “I was really impressed by him actually because he is a veteran - his mindset and motivation is incredible. He’s had a break due to injury but I believe he will get back into it early in 2022. “I’ve also been working with a young rider by the name of Alex Bogna and he is only 19 but I would describe him as one of the biggest

4

talents in Australia for pro cycling. He was selected for training camp with a professional team that do Tour de France – UCI Pro Team Alpecin Fenix.” “The best thing about it is to see the results of athletes,” he says. “If I see someone like Jason winning, that would be my favourite thing. Also helping young riders who have no experience or even if they have experience and they win. And I hope in the future I can see them on TV more often in events like Tour de France, young riders like Alex or even Jason when he does Invictus Games, being able to see them is very rewarding.

With his passion of helping others shining through, Novak knows he’s making a difference whilst still managing a little bit of his own riding time, heading out on his bike once a week, but admits he loves a few other sports and exercises as well. “I also do surfing, that’s one of the big reasons I came to Australia - for the beach and surfing,” he says. But I also do a bit of tennis and running but it’s mainly surfing which is number two after cycling.”

Volunteer Grant Recipients MEMBER FOR LONGMAN Terry Young recently announced $127,711 in funding for the 42 local community organisations listed below, received as part of the Morrison Government’s $20 million Volunteer Grants round, to support the crucial role that they play within our community as Australia moves forward out of the pandemic. The 2021 Volunteer Grants provide organisations with grants of between $1,000 to $5,000 to help purchase equipment, train staff, carry out volunteers’ background checks or to re-imburse costs incurred while carrying out their duties. They can also be used to increase participation, promote awareness of volunteering opportunities, and adjust policies and procedures to strengthen safety. Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology Beachmere Area Network Group Inc Beachmere Classic Vehicle Club Incorporated Beachmere Community Association Inc. Blind Bats Inc Bribie Aquatic Community Events Bribie Island Football Club Bribie Island Rd Saddle Club Inc Bribie Island State High School P&C Burpengary Jets Netball Club Inc. Burpengary Pony Club Inc. Caboolture Historical Village Inc. Caboolture Living Hope Church of Christ Caboolture Meals on Wheels Caboolture Men's Shed Caboolture Warplane and Flight Heritage Museum Community Men's Shed Bribie Island Dakabin State High School Cattle Team. through the Dakabin State High School P&C Fishability QLD inc Friends of the Lagoon Creek Group Genies Netball Club Global Care Bribie Island Global Care Bribie Island HisHarvest

January 2022

In the Paws of Angels Inc. Meant to Rise Inc. Morayfield Community Uniting Church Moreton Bay First Aid Volunteers Inc. Moreton Bay Lions Australian Football Sports Club Mount Mee Historical Society Multicultural Association of Caboolture and Surrounds Inc. New Creation Christian Church LTD South East Queensland Wheelchair Rugby League St Peter's Conference Caboolture branch of St Vincent de Paul Society QLD The Caboolture Gem Club The Lions Club of Bribie Island The Rotary Club of Bribie Island Toc H Queensland Area Inc. Tropicana Classic Inc. Voices Choral Group Inc. Volunteer Marine Rescue Bribie Island Woodford Community Art Group Woodford Historical Society Inc.

Feature


www.featuremagazine.com.au

5


A GREEN SHIFT FOR 2022 MORETON BAY IS rewriting the planning rules so to deliver more greenspaces, transport and stormwater infrastructure across the region. The decision to amend Council’s Local Government Infrastructure Plan will see more than 100 hectares of new parkland created in growing urban areas like Griffin and Burpengary. Mayor Peter Flannery said the unanimous endorsement by Council was a high point to end the last Council meeting of 2021, and flagged a major green shift in 2022.

“The amended infrastructure extensive body of work done planning and infrastructure make sure that we take charge community wants and needs.

plan is an by council’s experts to of what our

“This is a massive change that will see the equivalent of 140 football fields dedicated as “These amendments will replace older plans new parks, playgrounds and open space for and means our infrastructure outlook is uplocals,” he said. to-date and reflects the projected growth and planning required for our region as well as the Mayor Flannery said in all, the amended standards of service and trunk infrastructure infrastructure plan would make sure there network planning. was not only appropriate open space, but also transport and stormwater infrastructure in the Following the announcement, infrastructure prioritised infrastructure areas - areas already planners will now conduct further detailed experiencing growth like Griffin, Burpengary planning to identify the specific parcels of and Redcliffe - and complemented proper land which will be earmarked for future planning being done for other growth areas infrastructure. across the region.

Expansion Plans for USC Petrie Campus

USC PLANS TO expand its Petrie Campus this year to provide more room for teaching, research, sporting activity and socialising.

years. The strong demand for university education in the region is clearly evident." said Professor Bartlett.

A development application to construct three new buildings on the site, near the Petrie railway station, during 2022 to open in early 2023. was lodged with Moreton Bay Regional Council in November 2021.

KIRK’s Director Richard Kirk said the buildings would incorporate significant environmental features and add to the sense of place of the university campus.

The buildings will be located opposite the campus’s large foundation building, adding a further 12,500 square metres to the existing floor space of 16,000 square metres. The proposed development has been designed by renowned architectural practice KIRK to include teaching and research spaces, administration offices, a carpark and sports facilities. USC Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Helen Bartlett said the expansion would be an exciting time for the University and the region. “The development will help accommodate the growing student population at USC Moreton Bay, which has exceeded expectations during the campus’s first two

6

“Most of the proposed building structure will be built from prefabricated engineered timber, providing a fast construction process and sustainable building solution,” said Mr Kirk. “Other environmental features will include areas of mixed-mode ventilation and highperformance facade designed with the aid of advanced digital tools.” There are over 60 undergraduate degrees on offer, across a wide range of disciplines. With its student population expected to reach 10,000 students by 2030, the campus will become landmark infrastructure for The Mill at Moreton Bay, which the council has planned as a sustainable, mixeduse community for residents, students, businesses and industries, and visitors.

January 2022

One of Australia’s largest free music festivals, Blues on Broadbeach will be held 19- 22 May 2022 and is set to feature an incredible line-up of Blues artists whose careers are brimming with awards, accolades, and prestigious pedigrees. Road to Rodeo – An Isa Rodeo Experience will bring a taste of the legendary Mount Isa Mines Rodeo experience to regions across Queensland, featuring the signature ingredients of this iconic event including thrilling rodeo action and live Rodeo Rock, with Longreach the first in the series to kick off on Saturday April 30 and Sunday May 1, 2022. The new $4M regional tennis centre at Harris Avenue Sports Complex in Narangba will be officially opened on January 22nd which will include free tennis lessons and much more. Keep up to date with the Council’s Facebook page for more information about the open day. Grab your fellow team mates and join us for an exciting adventure of the Amazing Race!! Race around the Caboolture Historical Village, discovering clues, road blocks, u-turns, challenges and more in your quest to become the ultimate winners! Saturday 15th January to Sunday 16th January. For ticket prices and bookings visit http://wildcherryeventsbrisbane. com.au/event/amazing-race/ Open to Kids of all sporting abilities, the Discover Tri at the Lawnton Aquatic Centre has your family day out sorted. With a safe and supervised pool swim, bike ride on fully closed roads and run through the cheering crowds – your Kids will be beaming from ear to ear. Sunday 16th January 7:00am to 12:00pm. For more information visit https://discovertri. org/brisbane-north. Trivia expert and comedian Mike Van Acker brings his hilarious and interactive trivia style to this niche trivia event for a night of throwback fun. What do Friends, Seinfeld, Mad About You, Frasier, Will and Grace and The Simpsons have in common? They will all form part of the 90s sit-coms trivia on January 7 from 6:30pm to 9:00pm. For bookings and more information contact Caboolture Sports Club. Official opening of Deception Bay’s brand new $3.7 million community hall at Raymond Terrace, Deception Bay on February 16. The project involved demolishing the old building to deliver a brand-new events and meeting space for the community as well as a new home for the local Meals on Wheels. All members of the public are welcome to attend the opening. For more information visit the Council's website. IMAGINARIA is where technology and imagination collide and it’s at home in a purpose-built and enclosed playground underneath the Goodwill Bridge, next to the Queensland Maritime Museum at the top end of South Bank until January 31. The immersive experience features ten jawdropping rooms – eight of which are brandnew and exclusive to Brisbane. Suitable for all ages. Children under three years of age are free. Entry prices start at $28pp. Tickets via ticketmaster.com.au/imaginaria.

LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE!

Simply email details to editor@featuremagazine.com.au for consideration by our team.

Feature


Stay & Save Promotion Care Community

Leaders in aged care since 1966

With border restrictions being lifted, now could be the time for the carer to plan a break. During these uncertain times, we could all use a little extra support.

A short respite break at Sunnymeade Park provides a welcome change of scenery where you can relax, socialise with like-minded peers, participate in our community activities, or receive tailored support from our experienced aged care staff.

All you need to do is sit back and enjoy the leading aged care services and extensive lifestyle choices Sunnymeade Park Care Community has to offer. Offer valid until 31 January 2022, so you can take advantage of the holiday period.

Caring for someone can be physically and emotionally tiring. As a carer, it’s OK to want some time for yourself, and taking a break allows you to reduce your stress and recharge. Planning regular respite breaks and taking time out can help you to avoid carer burnout.

Enquire today

That’s why we’re offering one week of free respite care when you book a 21-day respite stay at Sunnymeade Park.

Resident Liaison Officer, Caron Groth, on 5495 4233 ext. 104 or by email at caron@sunnymeadepark.com.au

To book your respite stay, or for more terms and conditions on this offer and Sunnymeade’s other aged care services, please contact:

362-376 King Street, CABOOLTURE QLD 4510

Tel: (07) 5495 4233 admissions@sunnymeadepark.com.au

www.sunnymeadepark.com.au


Shane Bourne: Hooked on Fishability Queensland Words: Sheree Hoddinett Photos: Contributed

Shane Bourne is a great example of what can happen when you turn your life around. As someone who knows the extreme low points you can reach in life, Shane has felt the isolation that comes along with it. He credits a lot of the positive influence now in his life to Fishability Queensland and it’s being a part of this group which is earning him praise and admiration within the local community. It’s also the reason he’s the proud recipient of a Longman Volunteer Award.

Pawsome Cafe's Words: Marnie Birch

Told You So Café (TYS)

14 Discovery Dr, North Lakes @Toldyousocoffee

If you’re after a coffee shop with a warm relaxed vibe, strong community connections and baristas passionate about Sydney roaster Single O coffee in various brew methods, including cold drip, cold brew and filter and even a Coffee Soda, look no further than this pet-friendly café.

Above: Fishability Qld Group enjoying a recent outing.

SHANE FIRST BECAME a part of Fishability Queensland as a participant in 2019 and he soon found his way into the volunteering ranks before taking on the role of president. As someone who is in a wheelchair due to a bicycle accident as a teenager, Shane admits to experiencing some dark days in his life. “I was in a pretty bad place when I came across Fishability Queensland,” Shane says. “I was stuck in a rut….I was living in a granny flat at the back of my mum’s house, I hadn’t worked since 2010, so I was basically lying in bed for about 7 or 8 years doing nothing. “I had a bit of a self-harm attempt and then came across Fishability Queensland on Facebook and I reached out. Emma (Dyson – CEO) had to try about 4 or 5 times to call me and I wouldn’t answer the phone, that’s the type of space I was in at that time. I finally answered on her last try and I haven’t looked back since.” If you haven’t heard of or are unaware of what Fishability Queensland is all about, it’s a notfor-profit group that offers a range of socially inclusive fishing and outdoor recreational opportunities for those in the community who experience isolation, marginalisation and disadvantage. They encourage time out on the water in Bribie’s Pumicestone Passage and The Runaway Bay Broadwater, regular competitions as well as offering health and well-being group programs, including a men’s group organised by Shane. Being able to help others and make a difference in their lives is all part of the experience for Shane. “At the end of the day, all the participants we have, a lot of us tend to be going through the same stuff, we’ve all got the same struggles mental health wise,” Shane says. “I created that program for the men to let guys know they’re in a comfortable space, somewhere they can talk if they want to.

Offering simple yet unique treats, from Bella and Tortie, bagels, crumpets, gluten-free and vegan options, it is little wonder this café is sought out by locals. Locally made take-home products such as jams, BBQ rubs, sauces and hand-made gifts, complement the menu. Open from 6 am – 12 pm, plus TYS Thursdays featuring weekly food trucks from 5pm- 8pm. Watch out for their pop- “If they want to break down it’s fine. If you need up handmade Designer markets showcasing to have a chat, that’s what we’re here for. We’re not here just as fishermen, we’re also here as a independent artists and creators. support network, as life coaches.

“There have been times when I’ve come home and debriefed with Emma and I get emotional because you see the absolute joy and happiness in people that come out there and be a part of what we do.” Rocks Café

1000 Dohles Rocks Road, Griffin @RocksCafe Griffin

Throw the fishing line in water or a walk along the waterside boardwalk with your fur-baby before taking a break at this family-owned coffee shop with outdoor seating. Serving cold drinks and snacks and locally sourced A-grade coffee, morning coffee with your pup never looked better. Open from 5:30 am-5:00 pm Mon-Sun, the café also offers gifts for your fur babies.

8

Shane is very open about his life experiences and admits that if it wasn’t for joining Fishability Queensland, it’s very likely he wouldn’t be here today. “It’s changed my life…Fishability Queensland saved my life and that can’t be understated,” he says. “I’m a firm believer that if I didn’t come across the group I would be dead. “I’ve been a really keen fisherman all my life and I guess it was just something I was missing within my life…that whole social interaction

January 2022

Above: Shane receives award from Terry Young, MP

with people. Loneliness kills, it really does. That’s what we do, we try to stem the whole systemic effect of loneliness and being isolated and stuck in your house. We just try to get people to come out for a fish.” Being nominated for and receiving a Longman Volunteer Award was recognition that Shane never expected. “I was a bit chuffed and it meant a lot,” he says. “I don’t really do stuff with Fishability Queensland for myself. Maybe in the earlier days I did but having been with the group for a while and now more so as president, just seeing the happiness and joy that our events and programs bring to people, it means a lot to me. “Terry Young even came down to the marina to present my award, which was really cool. I’ve got to give Terry a lot of credit for even just taking the time to do that. He’s one of our big supporters and we’re a huge fan of what he does.” Member for Longman Terry Young has nothing but praise for Shane and commends him for all the work he does within the community. “I have met Shane on several occasions and he is a wonderful bloke who is very well liked within the Fishability Queensland family,” Mr Young says. “Despite having to overcome his own significant challenges, Shane is always there to help others. He has become an important member of our community and we are lucky to have him.” Despite all the good they do for the local community and beyond, Shane says the hardest part about running a not-for-profit group is finding support. “To keep doing the awesome stuff we’re doing and to keep improving people’s lives like myself, we really need support,” he says. “I’m so passionate about what we do because you shouldn’t be restricted from doing stuff because you don’t have money. The more support, the more help and the more volunteers we can get, the better. “I encourage anyone who needs to get out of their headspace, that just needs to escape from their own little world for a bit, give us call, flick us an email, come fishing. There is nothing better than getting out on the water and being able to forget about your problems for a day.” Visit fishability.com.au to find out more.

Feature



Be the Difference Make the Change Her own personal experience with domestic

violence is why Sue Droughton continues to be an active part of the Zonta Club of Caboolture. Words: Sheree Hoddinett Photo: Rebecca Haupt

IT’S THE PERSONAL experiences in our lives that help us make the foundations for our choices. For Sue Droughton this couldn’t be more true. Joining the Zonta Club of Caboolture was an easy decision for Sue and one she made without hesitation after experiencing domestic violence at the hands of her mother’s husband when she was a teenager. Now more than 23 years on from her first Zonta meeting, Sue is still very much ingrained in the club and will continue to make her contribution for many years to come. Sharing her personal experience seems to come naturally for Sue. As the daughter of a single working mother in the 1950s, Sue’s upbringing was a little different to most. She spent most of her younger years in boarding school but when her mother started a job as housekeeper in Ashgrove, Sue went to a local high school. At the end of her junior years, Sue’s mother announced she was getting married to a man who lived on the Gold Coast. “I was so excited, I thought it was going to be the best thing,” Sue says. “He was like a knight in shining armour. So we moved to the Gold Coast and then everything turned bad because he was no knight in shining armour, he was a domestic violence abuser. I had never experienced that before because I had been in boarding school, I had been protected from that sort of thing. “I had never been exposed to any sort of violence and I couldn’t work out what this man was on about. The abuse that was dished out to myself and my mother was just horrendous. Before I turned 16, I ran away. I left because I had no other choice. Because of this I was not able to have the education I so dearly wanted.” Going through something that most people will never encounter in their lives, is what ultimately made her decision to join Zonta, extremely easy. “A lot of people join because they want something to do or they want to make new friends and yes I did want to meet new friends,” Sue says. “The old trite saying is ‘I want to give back to the community’ and I know a lot of people do actually want to give back to the community and they give so much of their time. Over the years we have had members leave because they don’t realise the commitment. “For me, this is a lifetime commitment to help women and girls. But it wasn’t a case of that’s my passion in life, it was about empowering women not to tolerate domestic violence and encouraging education because education is power and freedom.” Sue openly admits she had never heard of the club until a local Beachmere artist by the name of Elizabeth Heber introduced her. “I was interested as soon as Liz started talking about Zonta but I wanted

Morton Bay Rental Crisis Worsens RENTAL AFFORDABILITY ACROSS Morton Bay is in crisis as two new reports point to the urgent need for the federal government to invest in social housing. According to SQM research, rents in Bribie Island rose by 4.3% while Donnybrook recorded a 16.4% increase in the past 12 months. The news comes as separate reports from the ACOSS/UNSW Poverty and Inequality Partnership and the Grattan Institute demonstrate how a combination of rising rents and lack of social housing have pushed more Australians into housing stress, homelessness, and poverty. The ACOSS/UNSW Poverty and Inequality

10

Partnership demonstrates the yawning gap left by federal inaction on social and affordable housing. Despite Victoria, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia stepping up to invest $10 billion over the next few years, only 23,000 new homes will be added to public and community housing stock even though 155,000 households are registered on social housing waiting lists and more than 400,000 households are in need of affordable housing. And the Grattan Institute shows how social housing has fallen from six per cent of all housing to less than four per cent since 1991. The decline means a greater proportion of low income households have to compete in the private rental market.

January 2022

“The housing market is brutal and bruising for anyone on a low income right now. Housing should be a basic right, but it’s turned into a sadistic, high stakes competition. “It’s good to see state governments try to step up, but the truth is, only the Federal Government has the fiscal firepower required to make a significant difference in reversing the decade of decline in social housing investment. The states can not be left to try and do it themselves.” “The record rent rises across the country shows that there really is no time to lose. We are in the midst of a crisis. The Federal Government needs to take action now.”

Feature


to know more,” Sue says. “I went along to an information night and found out everything I needed to know. The predominant thing about Zonta is it’s all about protecting women and girls and particularly against domestic violence and I knew this was where I wanted to be, so I signed up and joined that night. “I knew I couldn’t help my mother and she couldn’t help me but I’m damn well going to help somebody else in the future.” Zonta Club of Caboolture president Karen McNab has been a part of the organisation for 10 years and joined to support women and girls in the community through service and advocacy. She speaks very highly of sue and her contributions to Zonta.

The World According to Kate

“I admire people like Sue who have given selflessly to others for such a long time,” Karen says. “Sue lives and breathes the vision of Zonta and always puts up her hand to help others. Sue provides me with a role model to guide me through my journey helping others in our community.” It looks like 2022 is shaping up to be a bigger and better year for Zonta with lots of plans already underway. “2022 will be like a new beginning for Zonta, with hopefully a reduction in the COVID risk in our community,” Karen. “2022 will see the club refocus on raising funds to support the programs run by community groups, together with advocacy about local issues. The clubs first event will be an International Women’s Day luncheon in March to celebrate the achievements of women in our community with Jenny Woodward as our keynote speaker. We will go on to hold a fashion parade, trivia night and be at Bunnings barbecues. “The Zonta Club of Caboolture is also leading a state-wide advocacy to raise awareness of forced and underage marriage in Australia.” There is a little more to Sue, than just being a part of Zonta. She is a loving wife to husband Richard (married for over 40 years), a mother to 4 and she has the joyous role of grandmother to 6 grandchildren, all of them she speaks very fondly of. Along with spending time with her family and friends – her greatest joy, Sue is also learning to play Bridge and likes a game of Mah-jong too. Because of how important her family is to her, Sue has spent most of this year in downtime, due to her husband’s cancer diagnosis and all her commitments, she felt herself burning out. “In March I decided to take the rest of the year off, just to reconnect with me. I had almost burnt myself out completely,” she says. “But I’m looking forward to getting back into it in 2022.” But of course with Zonta a big part of her life, Sue couldn’t pass up the opportunity to talk about some of the biggest achievements she’s seen throughout the last 23 years. “As a club, we have achieved so much,” she says. “One thing I loved that we did was helping to raise the money for a Dragon Boat for Dragons Abreast Bribie Island in 2008/09 and then about 4 years later they needed a second boat. This is unfortunate because needing a second boat means they had more women who are survivors of breast cancer.” Other achievements include but are not limited to: • The Banksia Award – given to girls in Year 11 as an encouragement award to keep doing their best. • Involved with Alta-1 Caboolture – a school for those who haven’t quite fit in as well in the mainstream school system. • A $1000 education bursary to encourage girls to continue with their education. • A program called Be Brave that has been implemented into local high schools. • Breast cushions for women recovering from breast cancer. • We assist with yearly funds to RUBY - Rise Up Be Yourself, run by the Caboolture PCYC. • Last but not least, International Women’s Day, their biggest event of the year to celebrate women and what they can achieve. “With Zonta, we aren’t hands on, but we look for the best projects to support and assist,” Sue says. “That is the job of our service committee to review the request and ascertain whether it will fit in with Zonta Caboolture and Zonta International guidelines.”

Even Faster Broadband in Longman LONGMAN RESIDENTS ARE set to benefit from access to ultrafast broadband with NBN Co announcing a sixth tranche of suburbs and towns that will become eligible to upgrade to NBN’s Fibre to the Premises (FTTP). “This next stage will see another 200,000 premises eligible, many of which are in the Longman electorate, which will drive significant benefits to the community,” said Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP.

“Households and businesses in towns like Caboolture and Narangba will be able to access NBN Co’s fastest internet plans of up to 1 gigabit per second, on demand by 2023. I expect more suburbs will follow in the future.” Mr Young said. For more information on the new towns and suburbs, visit www.nbnco.com.au/corporateinformation/media-centre/media-statements/ nbn-co-announces-200000-more-homes-andbusinesses-to-become-eligible-for-nbn-fibregrades-releases-Q1-FY22-financial-results

Member for Longman Terry Young said towns For more information on the NBN, go to www. and communities across the region would nbnco.com.au benefit from being able to access to ultrafast broadband.

TODAY’S WORLD SEEMS to have an endless list of ways to enhance beauty – temporarily or permanently. Whilst these ‘enhancements’ are available for both men and women, it would appear that in the everyday community, such as the one I live in, women take up the opportunity almost daily whilst men are still a little cautious. It's not just a dating thing. You can’t seem to be able to pick up your groceries today without being knocked out by someone’s false eyelashes that are obnoxiously long or being repulsed by the botched spray tan or botox job. Does the everyday male really find this attractive? Lets use the dating scene and see what happens when we turn the tables. Ladies, you are dressed up nicely out with the girls and spot a guy who ticks all your boxes. Tall, handsome, great hair and appears to have a good character. As he comes your way you see his dreamy eyes and sculpted chest. Even his tattoos are tasteful, and you find him 100% sexy. The two of you back to his place and as you sit nervously on the lounge, he heads to the bathroom. You can’t help but notice the door open a slither, and you are mesmerised as you watch him ‘slip into something more comfortable’. First, he removes his expensive hairpiece revealing a balding hairline. Next, he takes out his colour contact lenses and false teeth plate, revealing a heavily coffee stained smile. His fake earring is removed along with his phony tattoo sleeves. He kicks off his shoes and drops about 10cm in height. Finally, as he removes his shirt, he removes his fake abs uncovering a glowing, hairy chest fit for only the best computer nerds. What do you do? No doubt most would run, somewhat repulsed at the concept. Not only do you run, but you also text all your girlfriends, telling them the whole ordeal and how dare he lie to you like that! I mean, if he is going to lie about his appearance, is his name even real? Perhaps he is perve, and you’re lucky to get out there just in time? Girlfriends naturally agree. With the power only girlfriends have, every girl within reach would soon know of this guy and avoid him. Yet, what did he do exactly that many women don’t do every day? What if he turned up to work like that? What would you think if you were served at the cash register by an ‘enhanced’ male? ‘Enhanced’ women are so ordinary now that society has given them their own slang: Barbie, plastic. If women want to be accepted and found to be sexy by men for this look, isn’t only fair that women should be willing to find ‘enhanced’ men sexy? I can only imagine what a man must think when he sees all the ‘bits’ of his dream girl that aren’t real. Perhaps we should just call it all what it is – FAKE.

www.featuremagazine.com.au

11


Neurodiversity At Work

Play Your Part in Reshaping Queensland's Cultural Heritage Laws

THE DEPARTMENT OF Education is to be the first Queensland government agency to undertake a neurodiversity recruitment program that targets the strengths and talents of a diverse workforce, focusing on people who are neurodiverse.

QUEENSLANDERS ARE INVITED to have their say on a review of the state’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage laws. Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Craig Crawford said it’d been nearly 20 years since the implementation of the Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act 2003 and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage Act 2003.

Traditional recruitment processes have often failed neurodiverse job seekers and so, the department has looked for new ways to assess skills and abilities in people that may otherwise have gone unnoticed. A new assessment centre does things a little differently, using practical activities including problem solving and working collaboratively within a team environment.

“We want to make sure we have modern and effective cultural heritage laws for the benefit of all Queenslanders,’’ Mr Crawford said. “We’d especially like to hear your thoughts on ways First Nations people — as custodians of cultural heritage — can take a lead role in cultural heritage management and decision-making.”

Emma Sellars (pictured) is one of the first new recruits through the program, recently beginning her role as an Administration Officer.

Queensland’s cultural heritage laws provide a framework to protect and conserve cultural heritage – with more than 51,000 locations recorded across the state.

'When I have applied for previous jobs, I did not reveal my neurodiversity as I was concerned I would be judged on it. I felt that employers would attribute my mistakes to my neurodiversity,' Emma says.

“We are home to two of the oldest living cultures on earth,’’ Mr Crawford said.

' This program helps lift a social stigma around people with neurodiversity and shows that we have strengths and weaknesses like everyone.'

“We need to modernise the legislative framework responsible for preserving the ancient cultural heritage of Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland.

Those strengths are, of course, varied and different for everybody but neurodiverse thinkers often lead the way when it comes to innovation, design thinking, pattern recognition and problem solving.

“Initial feedback in 2019 and 2020 provided a solid basis to inform options for further review.

For Emma, she cites her particular strengths from her neurodiversity as being a strong sense of empathy, ('It allows me to connect and understand people better'), her strong memory ('I remember details easily') and an excellent attention to detail ('It enables me to see errors or pick up mistakes that others may have missed').

“Now, we’d like to receive your feedback on our proposals for Queensland’s cultural heritage laws for the future.

“We want to achieve the right balance between protecting and conserving our state’s rich cultural heritage while achieving positive outcomes for Aboriginal, Torres Strait and non-Indigenous Emma’s manager, Slavica Crnic, says Emma is 'proactive, innovative, great Queenslanders.” at absorbing and retaining information and she’s solution driven'.

The department’s ‘All Kinds of Minds’ (AKOM) team also has an ongoing support system in place, with new recruits offered regular meetings with an AKOM team member, a Neurosmart Mentor, and manager and team training for the new employees colleagues.the support offered by her team helps neurodiverse employees gain confidence and navigate their roles, particularly in team relationship building, organisational skills and managing their work/life balance.

To have your say on the proposed changes to Queensland’s cultural heritage laws, please visit: www.qld.gov.au/ CulturalHeritageActsReview or call 1800 469 166 for options on how to get involved. The closing date for feedback is 31 March 2022.

Better Price Transparency for Funerals

PLANNING A FUNERAL for yourself or a loved one is set to become easier for Queenslanders with stronger consumer protection rules to ensure better price transparency in the funeral industry. From 1 July 2022 funeral directors will have to display an itemised price list on their website and at their premises. They will also need to display the price of their least expensive package for consumers wanting a simple funeral. Additionally, consumers will be able to request a cost-itemised quote before entering an agreement to carry out the funeral. The funeral director will have to provide the information within 48 hours, unless a longer period is agreed, or before the agreement is entered into, whichever happens first.

“Organising a funeral is an extremely emotional time and an often-stressful process. Unfortunately, this can be made more stressful when information on funerals costs and products is not clear or easy to understand,”

12

said Attorney General and Minister for Justice Shannon Fentiman.

will make it easier for Queenslanders when organising a funeral.

“Funeral homes often bundle goods and services into a package without any accessible pricing information or clearly stating which of these are required and which are optional extras.

“This legislation is crucial in ensuring consumers are making informed choices during a difficult time and aligns with The Australian Funeral Directors Association’s mission to improve funeral industry standards nationally,” Mr Steer said.

“Greater price transparency will reduce confusion for consumers who are making decisions at a vulnerable time in their lives. It also means that consumers will not be left with an unexpected hefty bill after the service. There will be no hidden costs.” General Manager QLD Funerals InvoCare (which owns and operates 12 brands in Queensland including George Hartnett Metropolitan Funerals, White Lady Funerals and Simplicity Funerals), Mandy Pengilly welcomed the announcement of the new regulations.

The Attorney-General said the next step is the drafting of a new regulation in early 2022. “The regulation will commence in mid-2022, to allow Queensland funeral businesses time to get ready for the changes and transition their business practices so they are providing price information for consumers,” she said. The Office of Fair Trading will administer the new regulation.

Divisional Councillor, QLD Division of the Australian Funeral Directors Association, Rowan Steer said increased pricing transparency

January 2022

Feature


Escape, Relax, Unwind... Where it's all about YOU!

Hair Removal / Body Sugaring Facial Treatments Spa Treatments Spa Packages Spray Tanning

Shop 2 / 1004 Anzac Avenue, Petrie

(next to Dominos Pizza on Petrie Roundabout)

07 3889 1907

www.pureaquadayspa.com.au

MOTMOT COFFEE & EATS

MotMot - Coffee & Eats is the source for specialty coffee in the heart Petrie and very convenient to the station. MotMot offers a range of dining possibilities including all-day brunch, fresh juices, smoothies & more. Open Weekdays 6am to 1pm and Weekends 7am to 1pm.

Ph: 0492 826 236 5/6 Whites Road, Petrie @MotMot.Coffees

www.featuremagazine.com.au

Shane King MP - Proudly Supporting Local Businesses

Pure Aqua Day Spa

13


Paper Straws for Aussie Juice Boxes ALDI Australia is the first Australian supermarket to announce it will replace all plastic straws in its drinks range with a paper version in a bid to remove more than 40 million plastic straws annually. ALDI IS PROUD to announce it is the first supermarket in Australia to introduce paper straws on beverage cartons, most notably the humble and nostalgic juice box, or “popper”. The pilot scheme, and subsequent nationwide rollout, to drop the plastic popper straws is expected to divert 18 tonnes of single-use plastic from landfill annually – that’s 2 kilos per hour! While the juice popper has been a staple of Aussie recesses since the 1980s, it has also contributed to more than 140 billion plastic straws ending up in Australian landfill over the past 40 years. ALDI customers in select NSW stores can see the new-look, paper straw sporting Westcliff Tropical Fruit Drink packs this month, with a nationwide rollout of paper straws across the whole beverage carton range set to occur in 2022. “Juice boxes are a regular in kids’ lunchboxes and we are exceptionally proud to start offering poppers with less plastic at the same low price. Parents on a mission to reduce household waste and their environmental impact can now have peace of mind knowing the drink in their child’s lunchbox contains less plastic, and they aren’t sacrificing convenience or worrying about any impact to their back pockets,” said Dan Warner, Buying Director for Drinks at ALDI Australia. “It’s crucial to us to deliver the best quality at the most affordable prices. When we can do that, make a change that benefits the planet and doesn’t cost our customers more, it’s a no-brainer.” A plastic straw is used on average for 15-20 minutes, but it can take up to 200 years to degrade! This announcement follows ALDI Australia’s industry-leading decision in 2020 to remove single-use plastic tableware from sale in stores, saving 322 tonnes of plastic from landfill, as well as replacing plastic-stemmed cotton buds with a paper-stemmed version. A move recently followed by other major supermarkets this year. This announcement means ALDI has achieved its commitment to remove problematic and single-use plastic from its product range, and ensures a new generation of Aussie kids will grow up with paper straws in their hands.

means assessing every single component of the supply chain and finding all the ways we can make a positive change,” continued Mr Warner. The new straws have gone through extensive quality assurance testing and measured highly in both integrity and durability. The paper straw is able to puncture packets and maintain a strong shape without softening. The existing drink cartons are recyclable and while the sleeve around the straw will remain plastic in the interim, it is able to be recycled through soft plastic recycling programs like REDcycle. The paper straw program forms part of ALDI’s goal to reduce the amount of plastic used in packaging across its own-label range by 25% by 2025. ALDI’s Plastics and Packaging commitments are just some of several sustainability initiatives in place across the business and its supply chain. By 2025, ALDI aims to send zero waste to landfill, which includes a goal to achieve zero food waste sent to landfill by 2023. This year the supermarket also announced it is 100 per cent powered with renewable electricity. ALDI’s 2020 Plastics and Packaging Progress Report can be viewed here. A lot of work, planning and innovation by ALDI’s supplier business partners went into delivering this initiative. The change in packaging for the pilot scheme juice boxes will be achieved with the support of its Australian-based supplier business partner, Tru Blu Beverages. “This action is an important step for ALDI and is made possible through the tireless work of our Australian based business partners who also want to make a real difference in plastics reduction,” continued Mr Warner. “We want to provide every Australian with a quality product at an affordable price and strive for environmentally sustainable manufacturing and packaging solutions,” said Peter Brooks, CEO, Tru Blu Beverages. “Much like us, ALDI has a focus on eradicating unnecessary plastics across the whole supply chain. Every piece of plastic removed from the environment, no matter how small, is a positive change and actions like this can have a big impact.”

“Responsibility is one of ALDI’s core values, so when we say we are taking steps to contribute to a more sustainable future, we don’t cut corners to get there. We challenge ourselves to be bold in our commitments, and that

14

January 2022

Two women, allegedly involved in vaccine fraud at Kippa-Ring last month have been charged. It will be alleged a 28-year-old North Lakes woman paid a 20-year-old woman cash to receive a COVID-19 vaccination on her behalf on December 10. The women were charged with one count each of attempted fraud and fraud and were both granted police bail. The pair will appear in Redcliffe Magistrates Court on January 4. After more than 30 years of dedicated service to the Royal Australian Air Force, Australia’s fleet of F/A-18A/B Classic Hornets has been farewelled, to make way for the fifth-generation F-35A Lightning II fighter. A team of conservation experts will venture to Australia’s remotest Antarctic outpost to carry out works on the relics of our first Antarctic expedition. One hundred and ten years since Douglas Mawson set sail from Hobart, the 2021/22 Mawson’s Huts Foundation expedition will spend five weeks in one of the harshest environments on earth in a bid to ensure the survival of the wooden huts they left behind. A new series of podcasts to engage the community to learn and understand more about Islam and Muslims has been started by Muslims Down Under. It will help to create relations and clear any misconceptions one might have about Muslims of Australia and the world as a whole. Those interested in the podcast can find it at www.muslimdownunder. buzzsprout.com. The Sydney Kings and Sydney Uni Flames have joined Reclaim the Game and will reject sports betting sponsorships and advertising, in a first for Australian basketball. Reclaim the Game is a partnership program to counter the normalisation of sports betting and advertising in sport and to raise awareness of gambling harms. The program helps fans to enjoy sport, free from betting advertising and sponsorships. HIV self-tests were made available in Australian pharmacies mid-last month as a critically important additional tool to help people know their HIV status. The devices will retail for $25 each. Initially, they will be available at Serafim’s pharmacy at Taylor Square in Sydney and the 777 pharmacy network in WA before coming to other pharmacies this year. NDIA has launched the my NDIS app – a new mobile phone application for self-managing National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participants. Participants, nominees and child representatives who self-manage their NDIS plan can use the app to view their self-managed budget as well as make and manage claims on the go. The free app is now available for download to both Apple and Android devices. The Dayboro Public Pool is set to score its own aqua pad complete with tipping bucket, creating a new ‘bucket-list’ item for visiting and local families. Moreton Bay Regional Council has awarded a tender for the design and construction of a zero-depth splash pad at Dayboro’s public pool to replace the old toddler pool built in the 1960s.

Feature


Solar Installation | Air Conditioning All Residential and Commercial Work 'With over 25 years experience in the industry, turn to Karma Electrical for advice on all of your energy solutions. For affordable and reliable Repairs, Inspections and Installations contact Karma Electrical.' Call Michael on

0409 260 974 karmaelectrical17@gmail.com on

r Innovati

Powered fo

ECL 69471

www.karmaelectrical.com.au

Monday 17 January 2022 10am-11am • Doors open 9am Tickets on sale at mbrc.qld.gov.au/MSEC Find us on Facebook! Scan the QR code or search on Facebook

Morayfield Sport & Events Centre

www.featuremagazine.com.au

15


BRUCE HIGHWAY 2022 UPGRADE The Bruce Highway - Pine River to Caloundra Road Smart Motorways (Stage 2) project will deliver additional Smart Motorways technology along a 60km section of the Bruce Highway between the Pine River and Caloundra Road. This will further expand the network of Smart Motorways technology that has been operating on the Bruce Highway southbound between Uhlmann Road and the Pine River since 2015. Smart Motorways technology manages traffic in real-time to reduce stop-start travel, improve safety, and offer more reliable travel times. It can include ramp signals, variable speed limit and message signs, vehicle detection systems and CCTV cameras. These systems work together to deliver safer, smoother, and more reliable travel times for motorists. The $105 million project is jointly funded by the Australian and Queensland governments on an 80:20 basis. Investment ID 371378. The business case was completed in November 2020. Detailed design for the Smart Motorways Stage 2 project was completed in August 2021 and construction is due to commence in early 2022, weather and construction conditions permitting. As part of the detailed design phase, some early construction activities were undertaken, including minor earthworks and some electrical works required for the installation of wireless traffic sensors (WTS) at selected locations on the Bruce Highway and at strategic locations on other parts of the adjoining network. These WTS use Bluetooth technology that anonymously identify individual cars as they pass a sensor location to monitor travel times, traffic flow and speed. These additional sensors will provide the coverage and resolution necessary to accurately monitor the performance of the highway in real-time. Some key features include ramp signals at highway entry ramps to manage traffic entering the highway, variable speed limit signs to notify motorists of speed limit changes in response to an incident or changes in road conditions, and variable message signs to communicate with motorists about changes in road conditions.

16

Whether it’s your first time or your fifth time, here are a few tips, hints and tricks that may just help you get started and hopefully ready for the first day of the school year. •

Book covers are amazing! If you want to contact your books, go ahead but to save on time, book covers are the way to go! And yes they come in scrapbook and small book sizes too!

Get everything as early as possible because if you leave it too late, things do sell out.

Book packs organised through your school are super convenient. If you missed the cut-off, remember this option for the next school year.

If your school has a Facebook page, keep an eye out for anyone selling unused items or second-hand options like a dictionary. This can save you a few dollars as well.

Name label stickers. These come in multiple sizes and are great for naming books, lunch containers/drink bottles and even pencils! Follow or get on email lists for name label companies and order what you need when they have specials or a sale.

Sew/iron-on name labels are also great for hats, bags, jackets and jumpers.

Check to see if your school has a second-hand uniform page and keep an eye out for bargains as most parents sell towards the end of/beginning of each term.

If it’s your first time sending a preppie off on the start of their schooling journey, stay strong and be excited for them. You can expect a few tears, could be theirs or yours! Or both! So pack a few tissues. As the countdown narrows towards the finish line (first day), you’ll hear the collective sigh of parents who have busily been preparing for this moment. Good luck! - Sheree Hoddinett

January 2022

Feature


W

NO

N E P O

Wh Where virtual i t l fun f becomes reality! y VIRTUAL GOLF | RACING CAR SIMULATORS ARCADE GAMES | BAR | CAFE | FUNCTIONS

OPENING HOURS OPEN

CLOSE

LAST BOOKING

MONDAY

10am

9pm

8pm

TUESDAY

10am

10pm

9pm

MEDNESDAY

10am

10pm

9pm

THURSDAY

10am

10pm

9pm

FRIDAY

10am

11pm

10pm

SATURDAY

10am

11pm

10pm

SUNDAY

10am

9pm

8pm

*Open 11am-5pm on Public Holidays

GOLF SIMULATOR HIRE - Members Price PLAYERS

30 MINS

60 MINS

90 MINS

2 HOURS

$17

$30

$55

-

2 PLAYERS

-

$35

$55

$75

3-4 PLAYERS

-

$55

$80

$110

4-6 PLAYERS

-

$70

$110

$140

SINGLE PLAYER

• 4-6 players can book a maximum of 3 hours for $205 (total) • Groups of 6+ need to book 4 weeks in advance - $15 per person/per hour

To book please call (07) 3142 1555 or visit playitcentral.com.au Find us at Corner of Hasking Street and, Beerburrum Rd, Caboolture QLD 4510


Clinical Trial of Treatments for Abnormal Blood Lipid Levels USC CLINICAL TRIALS is partnering with Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to assess potential new treatments for abnormal blood lipids. Abnormal blood lipids is a condition in which unusual levels of triglycerides and certain types of cholesterol are found in the blood. The condition is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, which can lead to heart attacks, strokes and circulatory issues and often occurs without symptoms. In 2020, USC Clinical Trials participated in a

phase 1 study for one of these treatments, which was trialled in people with severe hypertriglyceridaemia (triglyceride levels are more than three times the normal level).

Participants will be required to follow a stable diet for two weeks and have been on approved cholesterol-lowering medication for at least four weeks.

The centre is now progressing to phase 2 studies and is seeking people with abnormal blood lipids levels to register their interest to participate in studies looking at the wide spectrum of elevated lipid levels.

The study will involve up to 16 clinic visits over a 54-week period and may involve up to two separate injections of the study medication.

Adults with known or suspected abnormal blood lipids are invited to take part in the study.

Know Your Drone Australians are flying drones in record numbers. Here are the rules you need to know now, before you take-off.

Those interested in participating can find more information at www.usc.edu.au/trials

You must not fly your drone higher than 120 metres (400 feet) above ground level. You must keep your drone at least 30 metres away from other people. You must only fly one drone at a time. You must keep your drone within visual line-of-sight. This means always being able to see the drone with your own eyes (rather than through a device, screen or goggles). You must not fly over or above people or in a populous area. This could include beaches, parks, events, or sport ovals where there is a game in progress. Respect personal privacy. Don’t record or photograph people without their consent – this may breach other laws. If your drone weighs more than 250 grams, you must fly at least 5.5 kilometres away from a controlled airport, which generally have a control tower at them. Use a drone safety app to find out where you can and can’t fly. Remember, you must not operate your drone in a way that creates a hazard to another aircraft, person or property. You must only fly during the day and you must not fly through cloud or fog. You must not fly your drone over or near an area affecting public safety or where emergency operations are underway. This could include situations such as a car crash, police operations, a fire or firefighting efforts, or search and rescue. If you're near a helicopter landing site or smaller aerodrome without a control tower, you can fly your drone within 5.5 kilometres. If you become aware of manned aircraft nearby, you must manoeuvre away and land your drone as quickly and safely as possible. If you intend to fly your drone for or at work (commercially), there are extra rules you must follow. You will also need to register your drone and get a licence or accreditation For more information and helpful tips on buying, maintaiing and using a Drone visit casa.gov.au

TOYS AND CLOTHING items were among the most frequently reported items by the Unitywater's 17 sewage treatment plant operators in 2021, with false teeth, a TV remote, a rubber python and a screwdriver being other eyebrow-raising finds. The United Nations World Toilet Day, observed annually on November 19, was designed to encourage people to spare a thought for the value of their loo. The UN campaign draws attention to the fact that toilets – and the sanitation systems that support them – are underfunded, poorly managed or neglected in many parts of the world.

18

January 2022

The most bizarre items found at the sewage treatment plants were: • • • • • • • • • •

Car keys False teeth Children’s’ toys Pet toys TV remote Clothing (including a floral dress, socks, jeans, rubber thongs) Fishing lures Jewellery Plastic python Screwdriver

Feature


www.featuremagazine.com.au

19


How To Avoid Paying Too Much For A Home Vanessa Bragdon

Cornerstone Home Loans

Knowing what a property is worth is central to avoiding paying too much for it.

Set a benchmark Comparing nearby properties that have sold recently is the best way to assess an acceptable price for the property you are looking at and provides a valuable bargaining tool when you are negotiating with a seller or agent. Make sure the properties are comparable, with a similar land size and number of bedrooms, so you aren’t measuring apples against oranges.

FINANCE

Keep in mind current market conditions The property market is always changing, so doing this research once and sitting on it for a few months will offer little help. Going to open homes and auctions regularly will give you insight into the current state of the market and how much certain properties are going for. Having a chat to the local real estate agents can also be beneficial in gathering market information and property perspective. Expand your search A good tip is to look at properties in the suburb next to the one that you want. Often neighbouring suburbs can be more affordable

and still keep you in the approximate location Don’t exceed your financial capacity of choice. Even if a lender approves you for a particular Bring in the experts loan amount, it doesn’t mean you have to accept it – a higher loan amount means higher interest If you budget allows a buyer’s agent can be charges over the life of the loan, increasing the worth their weight in gold. Buying a home is total cost of the property purchase, so only ever one of the biggest financial decisions you will commit to a loan that you can afford alongside make and having an expert on board can help your current income and real expenditure. navigate the pitfalls and potentially save you When calculating figures for the price of a thousands. home, ensure you also budget for maintenance and repair costs, as well as any other expertise Form a finance perspective, having a broker you may require in the purchasing process. onside is key to getting the best deal – they will search out the best loan for you and make sure it is one that you can afford. They can also help Do you have a finance question? Ask Vanessa! Email editor@featuremagazine.com.au you get pre-approved prior to house hunting.

Date Claimers for Moreton Bay Art Lovers Gabrielle Turnbull Art So Lively

Hi, my name is Gabrielle Turnbull and this is my first monthly column in Feature about the Arts in the Moreton Bay region and Arts generally, State, Nationally and Internationally as well.

THE ARTS

I’ve called my column, `The Arts`. Although I’m a visual artist and an arts teacher, I will be writing about as many aspects of the Arts that I can find to write about and that’s where you can play an important part. If you have or know of a local performance, an arts event, an exhibition or a local arts story then please send me the details at………….. Now it’s on with the show so to speak!

20

The Abbey Museum on Old Toorbul Road Caboolture comes up with unique ways to entertain us. Witness, knights doing battle in shining armour and damsels in distress. They also have some great gift ideas . You can have your very own Regency or Victorian teddy bear made at the Abbey with its own numbered Certificate of Creation. There are more great gift ideas. Go to onlineshop@ abbeymuseum.asn.au Moreton Bay Regional Libraries have really planned for a bumper 2022 Season. Here are a couple of events for you to consider. If you want more: moretonbay.qld.gov.au/libraries Coil Weaving: Join talented woman Wakka Wakka woman Kristine Ellis and learn to make a raffia basket using traditional techniques. Caboolture 5433- 2000 January 18.

Art Journaling: Create art with local artist Brisbane’s QPAC is considered Venue Numero Carissa Belham and leave with a useful journal. Uno by many of Queensland theatre going Strathpine 3480 6698. February 1. aficionados. And it opens 2022 with an impressive number of stage musicals. Between At your local library they have a Summer January and February 10 you can catch, `An Reading Club and it’s free to join. Either join American in Paris` [remember Gene Kelly?], at your library or online at moretonbay.qld. `Defying Gravity`, `An Evening with Anthony gov.au/src Read as many books, mags, comics Warlow` and the blockbuster `Frozen`. or games between December 21 and February 2022 and you can qualify for a weekly prize. QGOMA, QPAC’s close relative has an interesting free exhibition running at present, right through At my Art So Lively Arts Academy at Redcliffe to November 2022.Its called `Get Up, Stand Up` (pictured above) I’m continuing the `Kids 5 Years and features some great indigenous art. Plus` very popular holiday workshops again this year. They will run from Friday December 10 That’s All Folks for this Edition. onwards. Each workshop is unique and runs for 3 hours and the kids love them.$50 a head with Gabrielle. multiple family discounts. Ring me on 0477 Do you have an art question? Ask Gabrielle! 002545 for details. Email editor@featuremagazine.com.au

January 2022

Feature


Free customised property reports For your target property or suburbs. Budget guidance Understand how much you can afford. Changes to your home loan Refinance, top up, switch or restructure your loan to suit your changing needs. Scenario planning Create a repayment plan to achieve your goals.


Love Oily Skin

bacteria that leads to the appearance of spots, that can translate to Acne, and that is why people dislike oily skin so much.

This article is for all of you friends that struggle with a shiny or greasy appearance, large pores, Monica Shannahan La Bella Day Spa + Clinic skin that feels and looks thick or rough and of course the unsightly enemy- pimples or blackheads.

So let’s examine 3 steps that we can do to help our skin when we experience this: 1. Rebalance the sebum production 2. Guarantee a matte effect: We can do this by choosing a specific line of skin products, which dries and reduces visible marks on the skin, smooths and evens out skin texture, guaranteeing a day-long shine-free complexion.

The reason why we experience this symptom is because our sebaceous glands in the skin produce too much sebum or better said a bad quality sebum.

BEAUTY

The pilosebaceous unit, which is simply the structure of our hair into the skin, is where we can find the sebaceous gland. This structure is present everywhere in our body besides the palms of our hands and the soles of our feet where we don’t have hairs. The function of this little gland is to secrete sebum. Sebum is the waxy, oily substance that protects and hydrates the skin and also lubricates the hair so the hair can shed and grow again. So oily skin is not as bad as many think. Oily skin has often had a bad connotation but in reality, is a positive attribute in the skin. Why? Well oily skin is usually thicker and a smoother, it is more resilient to the sun and enjoys more natural sun protection, is slower to show signs of ageing being more resistant to wrinkles. And hear this ladies, this type

of skin requires a smaller amount of skin care products. The key is to strike a balance between having too much and bad quality sebum or oil and maintaining your skin’s moisture. Excessive secretion of sebum may be stimulated by different factors which may be external such as pollution, temperature, stress, or internal such as aging causing hormonal imbalances.

Here some active ingredients that do that: • Cucurpita pepo (pumpkin): provides proteolytic enzymes for an effective scrub action and cell renewal stimulation. • Avocado: for preventing activity by the enzyme 5-alfa, thought to be responsible for the increase in sebum secretion. • Absorbent micro-powder: mineral particles that absorb excess sebum. • Ananas Sativus (Pineapple): helps the keratolytic action to combat skin thickening. • Salix alba: It has an anti-inflammatory, soothing and exfoliating action.

This altered condition of the complexion leads 3. Smooth skin texture: We can do this with to hyperkeratinisation of the corneal layer as specific in salon treatments like exfoliations and a self-defence mechanism and the growth peelings. of bacteria. Excessive secretion of sebum combined with skin thickening blocks the follicles in the skin, clogging pores that may Do you have a beuaty question? Ask Manica! become comedones (blackheads) or microcysts Email editor@featuremagazine.com.au (whiteheads). This results in the spreading of

Poor Movement Patterns Vs Weak Muscles

The Moreton All Body Care Team

Often people are told they have weak muscles or weak joints, and this is the reason why they may be experiencing pain.

Although this may be true, there are several other reasons wherein the muscles can contribute to pain or discomfort. One of these reasons may be poor movement patterns, which often gets confused with weakness.

HEALTH

An example of this may be when you hear someone say, “I have been told my glutes are weak and that’s why my low back/hip is sore”. In fact, most of the time, this person’s glutes will be strong enough for most activities of daily living which allow them to sit to stand, walk and step up etc.

22

A poor movement pattern does not always mean the muscle is weak. It often means that the appropriate muscles are not engaging or activating at the correct time or in the correct way. The strength of the muscles may be fine, however if they do not turn on to support the appropriate structures this may lead to pain or discomfort. Poor movement patterns can affect people during day-to-day activities as well as during exercise and sports. Fortunately, poor movement patterns are not permanent and can be improved. Techniques

such as cueing, facilitation and feedback can be used during activities and exercise to retrain the muscles. The emphasis of these exercises are more co-ordination and control rather than strength.

you are participating in physical activity you may benefit from a consult with a physiotherapist.

A physiotherapist can assess the area of the body as well as the task that may be giving you discomfort. Your physiotherapist can also Sometimes it can be difficult to assess a poor provide you with the right exercises as well movement pattern by yourself. Pain and as the right cueing and facilitation to get the discomfort can also be very complex and involve muscles working correctly. several systems. If you have been experiencing Do you have a health question? Email us at pain during an activity you perform or when editor@featuremagazine.com.au

January 2022

Feature


What is Sports Massage and the Benefits? Words: Lorinda Beattie @ Zen Chi Holistic Wellness Centre

Sports Massage is as its name suggests is routinely used for anyone that exercises to help improve flexibility and performance while preventing and/or treating injuries. It works by stretching tight muscles, stimulating inactive muscles, and improving the condition of the soft tissue. Focusing specifically on sports related injury means the therapist can apply techniques to support you exercise more efficiently and prevent some of the common ailments that go with exercise. Your treatment will be tailored for the sports that you participate in. Treatments can be backed by researched, scientific studies to show their efficacy in treating a variety of conditions including acute injuries, complex chronic problems, and many other physical and mental issues. And are highly effective at resolving pain and getting you moving with ease quicker. Using tissue mobilization, stretching, deep tissue and remedial massage techniques along with the use of heat therapy and cupping sports massage is beneficial for: • Improving flexibility and performance • Reducing and Preventing Muscle Soreness • And regular massage can prevent injury Whether you are a professional athlete, gym junkie, regular sports participant or just someone who likes to keep fit, our Remedial Sports Therapists can support you. Book your Sports Massage today by contacting Zen Chi Natural Therapies and Wellness on 0734822549.

www.featuremagazine.com.au

23


Tech Tips For Seniors Susanne Jones Just Better Care

Connectedness enhances older Australians’ wellbeing and has a positive effect on their physical and mental health.

Helpful tips from BE Connected:

SENIORS

Yet while Australians aged 65 and over are willing to learn and add new digital skills that enable them to live a better life, they also recognise that new technologies can help facilitate this. Research shows that 44 per cent of people aged over 65 years experience social exclusion, which is twice the rate of exclusion for other age groups.

1.

Choose a strong password that only you will know.

2.

Keep your antivirus software up to date.

3.

Use secure Wi-Fi networks and avoid using public Wi-Fi for banking or credit card transactions.

4.

Think twice before sharing on social media and be sure to keep your personal information private.

5.

Make secure payments online, look for the padlock symbol and ‘https://’ in the website’s address bar.

Further, at least 10 per cent of senior Australians suffer from loneliness or social isolation, a number that has failed to drop over the last two decades. Shaping Connections is a research program co-created by RMIT University’s School of Economics, Finance and Marketing, and the University of Third Age (U3A). The program was set up to better understand how technology use supports seniors’ connectedness and enhances social inclusion and participation.

Unsurprisingly, these typically revolve around safety; however, the problem is compounded by what many seniors see as a lack of volunteers to help them cross the digital divide. The results also showed that seniors who went looking for advice often faced serious obstacles, with many noting their own families often displayed a ‘can’t be bothered explaining’ attitude.

your older friends and relatives gain confidence in using digital technologies.

The group’s chief investigator, Dr Torgeir Aleti, says while the project is ongoing, findings so far indicate that while seniors recognise that new technologies can help them develop supportive and rewarding relationships with their families, there are barriers around the perceived risks of using the internet, smartphones, email and social media.

Dr Aleti says while these hurdles are not easily overcome, there are other ways you can help

Do you have a Seniors question? Ask Susanne! Email editor@featuremagazine.com.au

Seniors benefitted from collective computer classes, such as those held at the University of the Third Age, seniors’ computer clubs and local libraries.

Surprisingly, YouTube also turned out to be one of seniors’ biggest allies for learning new digital Follow-up interviews with older Australians skills as it allowed them to search for content revealed that explaining new apps and and watch at their own pace as many times as constantly evolving technologies to someone needed, he says. who isn’t a digital native can carry a lot of emotional tension, Dr Aleti says.

A Moment Of Reflection

FAMILY

It’s true that I don’t often take the time to think about the good stuff. I know there’s plenty of it. Well, I like to hope there is anyway. I always find Sheree Hoddinett a way to highlight everything that goes wrong instead. Thanks negative brain! But there are two little people in my life that I should probably recognise as massive achievements. They do undertake a lot of questionable behaviour at times, but otherwise they’re mostly good kids, when they want to be of course! Admittedly, I’m not always the best mum to be around either. But no one is perfect right?!

24

It’s no secret I’ve never really been nailing this mum gig. Yes, I am my own worst enemy on that front, but there is a lot of truth to it. Lately I’ve been struggling a bit more than I probably care to admit. Both as a mum and in life in general. I don’t say this because I want everyone to feel sorry for me. In fact, the complete opposite, to show that it’s okay to talk about our failures and weaknesses, even if it doesn’t always paint us in the greatest light. I often talk (and joke) about swearing at my girls. I know, it doesn’t make me the greatest parent and I really should stop it, but as always, it’s easier said than done. Lately, it’s felt even trickier as they have found all the buttons to push. It certainly doesn’t help when they throw the swear words right back at me too. It’s actually kind of funny (occasionally, okay a lot of the time!), but I know I shouldn’t encourage that either! I’ve been reminded I’m supposed to be the parent, but it’s tricky when they absolutely nail the context, haha!

As I continue to navigate my way through this crazy world of parenting, one of the things that it’s getting harder to get used to is their growing independence. That feeling where they no longer need as much of me. Sometimes they still do, other times they don’t. I know it’s all part of growing up, but man it can be a bitter pill to swallow. While they are definitely thriving (I think…I hope?!), I’m still here to provide guidance as best I can, swearing and all! Look being a parent is no joke (it can be funny though, both for you and the kids), but at the moment I’m sure we can all do with as many laughs as possible. I’m certainly not complaining here, but a few days of home schooling this past week has well and truly shown me that I was never destined to be a teacher, so luckily it’s

January 2022

not the career path I ever wanted. How my best friend and many others like her can manage to keep it together in a classroom full of kids and not lose their you know what, I will never know. I take my hat off to you all. I think I’ll definitely stick with the writing, haha! I guess despite all my rambling…yes I know I’m very good at it….it’s important to know that it’s okay to not be okay and have bad moments as a parent. We all make mistakes and no one is perfect. If you are or think you are, good luck to you but I’m proud to admit I’m hopeless and clueless at the best of times, but I fumble (yell, swear and all the rest) my way through as best I can. I know I’m never going to be the perfect mum, but to my girls, I can only hope they see me as the best mum they’ll have…ever!

Feature


TERRY YOUNG MP

Federal Member for Longman Please contact my office if you need help or referrals with: Centrelink and Immigration and Medicare Visas NDIS and Aged Care NBN and Communications Federal Grants Unit 7, Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510 07 5432 3177

terry.young.mp@aph.gov.au

terryyoung.com.au

TerryYoungMP

Authorised by T. Young, Liberal National Party of Queensland, Unit 7, Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510.

www.featuremagazine.com.au

25


A Liveable Suburb For The Future for screening. This species has a unique ground cover form with a scrambling, weeping habit, fittingly named ‘Cousin It’ of the Adams Family TV fame. You will see ‘Cousin It’ cascading down retaining walls, over rocks and making dense carpets over the gardens. This interesting hardy plant does not mind what soils to grow in, provided there is full sun, moisture and good drainage.

LANDSCAPE

VIEWPOINT: Welcome to a brand new year, and back to living almost normally once again. As we all know Lawrie Smith AM our region is growing very Landscape Architect rapidly with new residential developments being created everywhere you look. Many of them are exploring new ways to accommodate our expanding population that offer opportunities for enjoying diverse lifestyles in the regions natural environments. You may have driven past one on Anzac Avenue just east of North Lakes.

26

Next time stop and investigate ‘Capestone’ at Mango Hill East, a new suburb of some 2,000 contemporary design homes, surrounding a huge lake and park system that effectively knits this new community closely together. Families of all ages are attracted to come and live very comfortably and conveniently in this rapidly growing suburb. This is an excellent example of a planned suburb for the future. NEW LAKESIDE PARKLAND TO EXPLORE The focus of ‘Capestone’ is the central 13 hectare saltwater lake set within extensively planted informal parklands with picnic facilities, linked by more than 1.5km of walking paths and bikeways. Walk right around the lake, stop on the way at a playground or for a quick workout at the fitness park. Then, at the lakeside café enjoy breakfast or afternoon coffee before exploring further. The best time to visit is

early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the reflections and sunshine glinting over the lake.

Several other local plants are worth considering for these specialised conditions – Small plants: Swamp Banksia - Banksia robur, River Lily Crinum pedunculatum, Climbing Guinea Flower - Hibbertia scandens, Trees: Coastal Aspen - Acronychia imperforata, Moreton Bay Ash Corymbia tessellaris, Tuckeroo - Cupaniopsis anacardioides, Cottonwood - Hibiscus tiliaceus.

PLANT OF THE MONTH: Casuarina ‘Cousin It’ Like many other residential areas fringing the wetlands of Moreton Bay, the site of ‘Capestone’, has difficult soil conditions due to the naturally high levels of salt and acid sulphate chemicals which many plants do not tolerate. The soils in this development have been carefully modified to ensure the specifically selected trees and shrubs will thrive around the central saltwater lake and perimeter parkland. Native plants that grow naturally in these conditions have been used extensively. One of the most common local trees is the Swamp Oak Casuarina glauca an erect conifer like specimen with deep green fine thread-like foliage, ideal

January 2022

Do you have a gardening question? Ask Lawrie! Email editor@featuremagazine.com.au

Feature


The Last Word

Grants Open For Our Veteran Community THE 2021-22 ROUNDS of the Veteran and Community Grants and Supporting Younger Veterans Grants are now open for applications. Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Defence Personnel Andrew Gee said the grants deliver valuable funding to local community organisations providing activities and services that support the wellbeing of veterans and their families.

enable social connections and improve wellbeing. “These grants will help improve and expand existing services, build capacity for future projects, and raise awareness of the issues facing local veterans. “I meet regularly with many ex-service organisations and have enormous respect for the critical role they play in providing mateship, advocacy and support.” Grants of up to $50,000 are available for local, community-based projects and activities. A small number of grants of up to $150,000 are also available for projects that deliver wellbeing support services and activities of broad scale benefit to the veteran community. The Australian Government is investing $32 million this financial year alone in grant programs to help the many groups that provide complementary services to our veterans. The 2021-22 grants rounds are now open online through the Community Grants Hub and close 20 January 2022. For information about how to apply for grants online, see the Community Grants Hub website: www. communitygrants.gov.au.

“Recent grant funding has gone to a wide variety of support programs including wellness weekends and care packages for Defence members, fishing and sporting activities and even off-road racing,” Minister Gee said. “I recently had the opportunity to catch some waves with veterans from previous grant recipient, the Veteran Surf Project at Gerroa in New South Wales, and saw firsthand the truly remarkable positive impact it’s having for local veterans. “Their program brings veterans together, gets them talking, gets them active and gives them something to look forward to each week. It can be literally life changing for some of those who participate. “With this latest round of funding, I hope we can support many more groups like this. “We want to see applications for practical projects and activities that support safe, accessible environments for veterans and their families to

www.featuremagazine.com.au

27


PUZZLES

SOLUTIONS ON PAGE 30

SUDOKU #64 MEDIUM

HARD

Puzzle 14 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

Puzzle 14 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.73)

7

3

8

1

4

6

3 1 2

9

8

6

4

8

9

7

5

1

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Tue Jan 5 06:27:02 2016 GMT. Enjoy!

2

3

1 4 6 9 11 12 13 18 19 21 24 28 30 31 32 35 37 38 39

8 9 10 11

12

15

16 17

21

18

22

23

19

25

26 27 29

30

31

32

35 37 38 39

28

7 9

6

8

1

5 7

33

36

Finance Columnist: Vanessa ____ (7) Back to ____ (6) First Aid ____ are needed by MBFAV (10) Rents in ____ increased in the past year (10) Crunchy Chicken ____ (7) Feature writer ____ Hoddinett (6) ____ Queensland (11) You must only fly ____ Drone at a time (3) New laws ensure a better ____ price transparency (7) ____ Pools (7) Peace of Mind Kindy's new name (9) Bruce Highway 2022 ____ (7) AKOM stands for All ____ of Minds (5) FTTP stands for Fibre to the ____ (8) Aside from cycling, Jakub enjoys ____ (7) Sunnymeade ____ (4) CommBank Burpengary Branch Rep: ____ Pritchard (7) Discover ____ (3) New Clinical Trials for treatment of abnormal blood ____ (6)

Down

20

24

28

8

Across

5

7

14

3

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Tue Jan 5 06:28:27 2016 GMT. Enjoy!

4

6

13

1 5

6

6

6

6

9

1

9

CROSSWORD 1

6

4

7

8

6

4

2 7

4

8

3

5

9

8

5

2 5

3 1

1

5

1

5

8

7

34

1 2 3 5 7 8 10 11 14 15 16 17 20 22 23 25 26 27 29 31 33 34 36

January 2022

Don't miss MSEC's ____ Show (6) Monica shares tips on ____ Skin Care (4) New Column for 2022: The ____ (4) Volunteer Grant Recipient (10) Get really great ____ at BOQ North Lakes (5) Plant of the month (8) Oxmar's ____ precinct (10) Found in sewage treatment plants: False ____ (5) ____ Droughton (3) On the Cover: Shane ____ (6) Pure ____ Day Spa (4) ___ Petrie Campus to Expand (3) Zen Chi: Escape, ____, Rejuvenate (5) ____ Living (8) ____ Café (5) $250m Available for ____ Projects (7) State Member for Morayfield: ____ Ryan (4) Embracia is located in Woodford and ____ (10) The Amazing ____ (4) Chat ____ (5) Kate discusses people who are ____ (4) A ____ shift for 2022 (5) Aussie Supermarket Putting Paper Straws on Juice Boxes (4)

Feature


CABOOLTURE SPORTS CLUB With three dining outlets, there’s something for all taste buds & budgets at Queensland’s 2019 & 2020 Club of the Year. Choose from The Mill Restaurant, Laneway Café or Tempo Lounge & Bar. Open Daily from 10am Ph: 5497 9711 19-27 Station Rd, Morayfield www.cabsports.com.au @cabsports

No Bake Milo Balls

Super easy Milo Balls are always a winner with the kids! Just 4 ingredients and 10 minutes prep time is all it takes to make these delicious little lunchbox snacks. Ingredients: 250 g plain sweet biscuits cookies (like Arnotts Marie) 100 g (1 cup) desiccated coconut 45 g (1/3 cup) Milo powder or any malted milk powder 395 g sweetened condensed milk full fat Extra desiccated coconut to coat Method: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Crush the biscuits in a food processor until they resemble fine crumbs. Place into a large bowl. Add the coconut, Milo and sweetened condensed milk, and mix to combine. Roll into heaped teaspoon-sized balls and then roll to coat in the extra coconut. Store in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 7 days

Milo Balls will freeze in an airtight container for up to one month. Source: www.bakeplaysmile.com

www.featuremagazine.com.au

29


Brisbane Bar Tide Times BRISBANE BAR – QUEENSLAND LAT 27° 22’ S LONG 153° 10’ E Jan 2022 Times and Heights of High and Low Waters

Critically Speaking

Time

JANUARY m

0210 0846 SU 1524 2047

0.31 2.55 0.54 1.90

16

0234 0912 SU 1557 2118

0.26 2.67 0.47 1.88

17 0248 0924

0324 1001 MO 1651 2213

0.23 2.73 0.43 1.87

18 0325 1000

0412 1050 TU 1742 2304

0.24 2.74 0.43 1.87

19 0401 1034

0459 1136 WE 1829 2353

0.29 2.68 0.45 1.86

20 0438 1109

0.38 2.58 1913 0.50 TH

21 0515 1143

0042 0631 FR 1304 1956

1.84 0.50 2.44 0.56

22 0554 1218

1.82 0.65 SA 1348 2.27 2038 0.60

23 0039 0636

0227 0815 SU 1432 2121

1.81 0.79 2.10 0.63

24 0128 0725

1.83 0.92 MO 1523 1.94 2209 0.64

25 0225 0826

1 2 3 4

5

6 0545 1221 7

8 0132 0720 9

10 0329 0918 0436 1033 TU 1620 2300

1.89 0.98 1.81 0.63

m

0.47 2.39 0.69 1.75

0.44 2.43 MO 1601 0.66 2125 1.78 0.42 2.46 TU 1638 0.64 2200 1.82

0.41 2.47 WE 1713 0.63 2237 1.85 0.41 2.47 TH 1746 0.62 2315 1.87 0.45 2.45 1821 0.61 FR 2356 1.88

0.51 2.40 SA 1857 0.61

1.88 0.59 SU 1255 2.33 1934 0.60

1.89 0.70 MO 1337 2.22 2016 0.59 1.91 0.80 TU 1429 2.08 2107 0.59

1

16

1

16

1

16

2

17

2

17

2

17

3

18

3

18

3

18

4

19

4

19

4

19

5

20

5

20

5

20

6

21

6

21

6

21

7

22

7

22

7

22

8

23

8

23

8

23

9

24

9

24

9

24

10

25

10

2258 0.76

2247 0.67

0557 2.04 1238 0.97 FR 1800 1.57

0549 2.25 1239 0.79 SA 1804 1.68

26

1.99 0453 0.97 1108 WE 1724 1.73 TH 1646 difficulty rating 0.53) 2352 0.60 2315

2.07 0.88 1.83 0.55

12 0003 0654

0.73 0008 0700 2.15 SA 1336 0.86 SU 1349 Puzzle 14 (Medium, 1918 1902 1.63

27

0.62 2.39 0.65 SA difficulty 1.79

0606 2.23 1237 0.80 FR 1802 1.78

0100 0741 SU 1421 1951

0.66 2.26 0.77 1.71

0.52 2.52 0.53 1.90

0149 0823 MO 1501 2030

0.57 2.35 0.69 1.80

0231 0901 TU 1538 2108

0.50 2.42 0.64 1.87

27

0635 2.11 1300 0.91 TH 1826 1.70

2

1

8 13

4

6

3 28

7

3

9

6

5

4

2

1

0042 0723 FR 1355 1920

0.56 2.23 0.82 1.70

0022 0712 SA 1353 1915

0.49 2.40 0.68 1.79

0127 0810 SU 1456 2018

0.42 2.55 0.56 1.84

0225 0901 MO 1549 2115

0.34 2.66 0.47 1.90

4

3

2 14

7

8

5 29

9

9

7

5

8

2

6

3

8

4

15 9

3

7

30 1

5

5

6

1

2

9

4

8

7

2

4

1

3

31 8

6

1

8

7

6

5

9

2

0128 0806 SA 1442 2007

0.51 2.32 0.74 1.72

MEDIUM

13

7

1

14

4

2

5 28

6

9

6

2

0342 1032 FR 1555 2157

1.96 1.06 1.47 0.91

0411 1114 SA 1646 2235

0614 2.08 1304 0.87 SU 1840 1.62

0.70 U 2.37 0.58 B 1.89

0113 0737 TU 1420 2003

0.58 2.45 L 0.49 2.03 E

0209 0823 WE 1501 2047

0.49 2.48 0.44 2.15

0257 0904 TH 1538 2127

0.44 2.46 0.42 2.24

3

813 1

4

928

7

4

5

8

3

0030 0706 MO 1348 1926

0.78 2.19 0.77 1.76

1

5

914 7

6

229

4

8

7

9

5

6

1

3

3

1

8

4

615 5

2

730

5

7

3

2

1

8

9

4

5

1

4

9

8

7

2

3

631

8

6

2

4

1

3

9

7

5

6

0123 0749 TU 1428 2006

0.66 2.30 0.67 1.88

The Bureau of Meteorology gives Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2021, Bureau of Meteorology warranty of any 6 5 no 3 9 1Predictions 7 kind 4 whether 3 7 9 5 6 2 4 8 1 Datum of is Lowest Astronomical Tide express, implied, statutory or otherwise to thetime (Time Zone UTC +10:00) Times arein in respect local standard availability, accuracy, 6 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)currency, New Puzzle 17 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50) 3 difficulty 0.68) Puzzle difficulty rating 0.73) Moonrating Phase Symbols Moon14 First Quarter completeness, quality or reliability of the information or 1 5 2 that 9 the 7 information 6 6 3 7 4will be fit 7 2 1 5 6 1 3 7 5 9 8 4 4 8 2 3 9 8 2 3 1 6 for any particular purpose or 7 8 6 will 5 not 8 infringe 1 9 2any 2 9third party 3 4 9 3 8 5 2 8 4 2 1 7 7 9 6 6 5 1 4 7 5 1 Intellectual Property rights.

HARD

2 7 4 2

1 6 8 4

6 6 9 4

5 9 3 1

8 3 3 9

4 7 7 2

5 5

9 3

3 9

4 1

8 3

7 4

5 8

The Bureau's liability for any loss, damage, cost or6expense 1 5 9 from 7 use 3or reliance 8 6 7 of, 1 resulting on, the information is entirely 4 2 2 8 9 5 1 4 8 excluded. 3 Copyright tidal 7 6 6 2 5 of3 4 the 2 7 9 prediction tables is vested in the Commonwealth of Australia 2 4 5 9 3by the 9 National 1 6 2 5 represented Tidal Centre, Bureau of Meteorology.

8 5 6 1

1 8 3 9

2 7 4 4

5 1 8 8

6 3 7 6

9 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.48) 6 difficulty rating 0.67)

9 7 7 8 30 6 4 2 1

8 6 5 8

6 9 3 3

2 1 9 7

5 4 7 2

1 5 4 9

4 8 1 5

2 9 8 6

5 7 4 9

6 3 9 8

9 4 3 3

7 6 6 1

3 1 5 2

1 5 7 7

8 2 2 4

9 3 2 2

5 8 6 7

7 4 3 1

4 7 8 9

1 2 7 6

2 5 5 4

8 6 9 5

3 1 4 3

6 9 1 8

6 4 8 7

7 3 4 1

9 8 1 2

5 6 7 4

2 5 6 9

3 7 9 8

1 9 2 3

8 2 5 6

4 1 3 5

5 9

3 5

2 6

1 2

8 1

4 3

6 8

9 4

7 7

Puzzle 17 20 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.45) Puzzle difficulty rating 0.69)

4 8 9 3

6 1 1 7

8 2 5 9

9 7 3 6

7 9 6 1

2.20 0.83 1.61 0.77

0001 0641 MO 1331 1913

3

9

2348 0.74

2230 0.96

0518 1213 MO 1800 2346

2.05 0.86 1.66 0.86

0613 2.30 1259 0.54 TU 1853 2.01

0506 1.98 0533 2.27 0616 2.15 0055 0.66 1205 0.98 1231 0.71 1301 0.74 0706 2.32 1735 1.51 SU 1809 1.73 TU 1850 1.82 WE 1345 0.48 rating 0.51) Puzzle 15 (Medium, difficulty B R A G D O N A 2.15Srating C H0.52) O O 2321 0.88 1941

8

2

15

0120 0758 MO 1445 2016

25

10

2103 0.75

11 26 11 26 Puzzle Solutions 12 27 12 27

11

12 0540 1151

25

2041 0.85

1.96 0.87 1.94 0.58

26

Local Time

At the age of twenty I found MARCH APRIL exciting Time tea. m It was an Time m Time m Time m discovery, Time m Time m as two years previously I had 0312 0.44 0209 0.56 0313 0.48 0339 0.44 0317 0.29 0219 0.42 left my parents African home, Richard Lancaster 0937 2.47 0829 2.39 0906 2.37 0941 2.40 0949 2.71 0847 2.60 0.60 0.43 1531way 0.45around half the 0.60 Cryptic Critic WE 1613 travelled TU WE 1504 SA 1536 0.38 TU 1637 FR 1610 0.42 2044 2.00 2138 2.39 2145 world 1.95 and landed 2203 2.30 2204 1.96 2105 2.01 on an island paradise known originally then Ceylon 0252 0.47 0350 0.40 as Serendip, 0417 0.48 0359 0.45 0405 0.27 0310 0.35 0905 2.45 2.50 1015 2.30 0945 2.32 2.71time of1012 0930 2.62 and1034 at the my arrival there, Sri Lanka. Latterly 1540 0.53 1720 0.42 TH 1647 0.56 SA 1638 0.43 SU 1612 0.35 WE I also tea in 2.01 India. WE Over1613 the0.42 next TH decade 2238 2.34 2122 2.11 2221 2220 2.48 2249 planted 2.00 2148 2.10 and a half, I learned the secrets associated with this 0428whose 0.39 Latin 0355 0455 0.54 0445 0.47 0449 0.30beverage 0.33 0333 0.42 mysterious name was Camellia 1115 2.65 1045 2.51 1011 2.59 0941 2.47 1045 2.19 1026 2.22 sinensis. How the small 0.53 leafed China variety 1759 0.44 0.42 produced TH FR 1720 TH 1648 FR 1615 0.47 SU 1704 0.45 MO 1645 0.35 2332 2.02 2229 2.16 2201 2.20 2300 2.06 2313 2.35 2302 2.53 a different brew to its larger leafed Assam cousin. The differences and0.37 Oolong0415 tea. 0.41 0531 0.38 between 0506 Black, 0.42 Green 0435 0530 0.62 0531 0.52 1116 2.05 2.53 2.47 help relieve 1047 2.51 1016 2.46 1107 2.09 The1154 properties in1118 tea that stress, aches 0.48 1752 array 0.51 of FR 1721serious 0.44 illnesses. FR SA 1647 0.43 MO 1729 0.49 TU 1720 0.39 and1834 pains andSA a vast other 2339 2.09 2346 2.33 2347 2.53 2306 2.19 2241 2.27 I learned the best ways to help the plant grew into 0605 0.72 0014 2.02 0545 the 0.49machinery 0514in0.44 0455 0.43 0621 0.60 a healthy bush, how a tea factory 1146 1.91 0612 0.50 1152 2.39 1121 2.39 1051 2.39 1153 1.93 converts the picked two leavesSAand a bud leaf, 1750 0.47 green TU 1755 0.56 WE 1757 0.47 SA 1230 2.38 SU 1824 0.51 SU 1719 0.42 into an 0.53 acceptable dried black crunchy powder-like 1907 2343 2.20 2320 2.32loose. The Dutch, the Russians and the rest of Europe substance and most importantly how to manage0537 and 0.50embraced so much0035 so that 0055 2.00 0020 2.10 0550 0.55 0020tea, 2.27 2.48it becomes the drink of motivate upwards0626 of several thousand hard-working in European coffee and the drink of the 0.58 0718 houses 0.69 0653 0.65 1152 2.24 1128 2.27choice 0643 0.82 1229 2.27 1245 1.76 was the most popular 1304 2.20 1816 0.51 1750 0.44 1218 1.76 SU MO sprayers and SU MO other WE pickers, pruners, weeders and the wealthy. In the midTH1700’s tea 1940 0.59 1857 0.53 1841 0.58 1824 0.65 jobs around a tea plantation. drink in the American colonies, but a King George 0139 1.97 0104 2.10 0019 2.18 0001 2.33imposed 0130 2.39 put pay to that with 0059 tea 2.19 tax on the colonists 0726 0.91 0737 0.81 0714 0.70 0627 0.68 0621 0.60 0829 0.76 I also learned about the plant’s1223 pedigree and the Boston Tea Party contributing to the demise 2.07 TU 1206 2.11the famed TH 1257 1.62 MO 1341 2.01 TU 1309 2.10 MO FR 1353 1.64 fantastic history that cup 0.57 of tea has. To 0.49of tea and resurrection its rival coffee. 1900the 0.77 1823 2015 0.64 1935 our 0.56humble1844 1937 of 0.70 be precise, a Chinese emperor Shen Nung in 2737 BC 0145 2.10 0158 2.09 0057 2.14 0046 2.31 0230 1.94 0238 2.31 discovered pot 0.72Next to0822 water, still the 0813 leaves 0.82 that had 0.99Tea is 0947 0706blown 0.82 into a 0712 0830 0.95that some 0.77world’s most favoured 1359 a1.92 1350 China 1.51 producing 1250 1.92drink 1422 1.82 of boiling water splendid drink.1.88 But the FRwith WEmade TU 1254 WE crafty TU SA 1518 1.60 the greatest quantity of 2023 0.61 1947 0.88 1913 0.65 1901 0.56 2057 0.70 2055 Chinese anxious to keep the tea a secret, locked it away black tea, some 2 ½ million 0.80 tonnes with India coming for0332 the next years.2.09 The Japanese were the 0140 next 2.26second.0245 0138 2.07 1.92 20000305 2.02 2.27 produce tea, among Worldwide 640354 nations 0943 to1.05 1101produced 0.72 0753 0.95its drinking 0815 0.83them Australia, 0.91 and elevated 0944 1.01 nation discover0930 its delights which first tea in Queensland 1519 1.66 TH 1508 1.75 1332 1.71 TH 1347 1.74 1514 1.45 SU 1645 1.68 WE WE SA to an art0.75 form, almost religion. In1949 15600.74 a Portuguese Coffee 2151 2226edges 0.81 out tea as Australia’s 1951 0.66in 1884. 2128 a0.66 2059 0.97only just gent named Jasper de Cruz came across the magical favourite hot drink with its rating of about 52% of the 0447 2.28 0428 2.14 and medicinal 0230 2.00 benefits 0247 0403 1.99 brew and1.96 promoted its taste to 2.21 tea0509 drinkers 1115 1.05 1205 0.63 each drink an average 1108 0.90 0857 1.04 0941 0.88population. 1111 Aussie 0.96 the1638 European all hell cups tea a week. 1.57 market. 1.66 there-on 1509 1.61of 10 1654of 1.52 TH MO 1756 1.84 FR 1637 From TH 1427 in1.55 FRbroke SU FEBRUARY

0335 0941 WE 1531 2208

11

3 (Medium,

Time

0144 0820 SA 1459 2021

2022

TEA AND ME

2 3 3 4 5 6 1 5 January 2022 8 2 4 5 2 8 7 4

B

0046 0.74 I 0704 2.25 V O 0.63 L WE 1344 1933 1.98

313 2

5

9

7

4

0139 0746 R TH 1423 2015 A

Y

0.63 2.33 0.53 2.13

0149 R 0751 UTHN1423 T 2023

428 7 8

1

4

9

2

1

115 5

8

2

S

0236 0830 FR 1458 D O2101 N

614 8

7

6

9

6

1

2

0.57 2.24 0.42 2.35Y N

5

9

5

7

3

330 2

6

4

6S H3 E 9R E8 E 4 3 4E 7 9 E 8

5

0227 T 0827 E FR 1500 2057

0.54 C 2.37 0.45 R 2.27

229 3

0.60 2.29 0.44E E 2.27

0319 0907 T SA 1528 2137

0.57 2.16 0.42N E 2.41

1

8I R S 3 H 4A B 6R V 7 D E 1S 5T

L

1 5 7 C O8 O K

U 9 R S 2 I 6 N I 9 3 I L I T Y

K T 8 1 6 5 4 2 7 F I S H A B 5 A 7 9 R 6 U1 3 O8 2 4 U Q O N E F U N E R A Puzzle 15 18 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46) difficulty rating Full Moon Quarter S Puzzle U N Last R 0.69) E 2A 6 4R I1 1T 2 8Y 5 6K7 7I N9 5 D4 3U L3 9 I C L8 A2 O E A M 9 9 3 4 6 6 2 1 1 3 5 5 4 7 8 8 7 A V C B X 7 5 5 3 8 9 9 8 3 4 4 6 2 1 1 2 6 7 R E K U P G R A D E 1D 1 7S 7 4R 5 6 4 9A2 8 3 3 8 5 9 2 K I N6 D9 5 4 2 2 9P 8 3 3 7C6 1 7 8 5 6 1 4 P R E M I S E S E S U R F I 8 3 6 8 3 7 4 9 5 1 2 4 9 2 7 6 1 5 R N A O 6 8 1 6 2G 3 5 2 4 5 3 P1 7 A9 9R K7 8 4 I N 4 2 9S H5 5A 1 7N N7 8O9 6N 8 1 L6 2 E4 3 3 T R I3 8 7 R 1 2 9 6 D 4 5 1 7 9 4 6 8 2 3 5 Y L I P I D S

L L I O N G M A N G R E E N

Puzzle 18 21 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.60) Puzzle difficulty rating 0.67)

2 8 3 1

8 4 1 2

9 7 6 5

6 1 7 4

1 6 2 7

5 9 4 3

4 3 5 8

3 5 Feature

7 2 9 9

8 6


LOCAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY To advertise call 07 3886 9040 or email ads@featuremagazine.com.au

9

9 9

SAFETY

CHEC K

AGED CARE SERVICES

FUNERALS

All Plumbing & Gas Works ks Maintenance Alterations Renovations New & Old Homes

Call today

FREE Quote

Your Local Just Better Care team can offer the support and advice you need to get started.

LANDSCAPING

CARPENTRY

ELECTRICAL

LAWYERS

www.featuremagazine.com.au

RENOVATIONS

31


KIDS SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM Register now at www.burpengarycommunityclub.com.au SUN 16 JAN Kid's Eat free Night with every main adult meal purchased. Magician show Tickets - $25pp | 5pm-5:45pm

MON 17 JAN Spy Kid Detective Party Includes official spy training with Clue and Riddle Hunt, Code Cracking, spy gadgets + more! Tickets - $25pp | 5pm-7pm

WED 19 JAN Live Caricature Artist A live caricature artist will draw a portrait of your child (optional to bring your pet as well) Tickets - $30pp | 10 minute allocation between 3:30pm-6:30pm

FRI 21 JAN Dinosaur Fossil Hunting Includes lots of fun themed games such as digging for dinosaur fossils and making fossils. Tickets - $25pp | 5pm-7pm

SAT 22 JAN Princess Party Interactive story time + musical/dance along with princess character. Tickets - $25pp | 4:30pm-5:30pm

SUN 23 JAN Kid's Eat Free Night with every main adult meal purchased.


Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.