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If Matthew Hawtin's artwork feels like a chill out room, pretty much anywhere in the world in the first half of the 1990s, that's exactly as it should be. Because what he was doing for much of that time was playing ambient music as a softer counterbalance the harder sounds of his brother Richie, a DJ whose elegant, furiously minimalist techno always seemed to have more to do with galleries than gurners. Matthew's art is a softer counterbalance to the excesses of acid house too: beautiful, geometric shapes in vivid colours, images that talk like sounds, pictures that sound like the machines talking, if indeed the machines had a soul. But perhaps in the hands of the Hawtin brothers, they do. Dom Phillips Editor Mixmag 1991 - 1996 Author 'SUPERSTAR DJ'S HERE WE GO' (Ebury/Random House)

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RED Gallery, Minus & {our history}, with support from Ontario Arts Council Present, 'Dimensions' by Matthew Hawtin. A one off London solo exhibition of this ground breaking Canadian artist. The exhibition will showcase work from 1993 to the present that was produced in conjunction with the world famous record labels Plus 8 and Minus, owned by the legendary Richie Hawtin. Original paintings, prints and sculpture will be shown that highlight their working collaboration over the years and give a unique insight into their relationship within the history of electronic music. Elements of repetition, symmetry, colour, textures and reduction are explored within the artwork of Matthew Hawtin, ideas that run parallel with the development and progression in the music releases of Plus 8 and Minus.

PARALLELS Symmetry, futurism, bleeding edges, infinitely repetitive layers, contrasting textures and hidden messages. These words that describe Canadian artist Matthew Hawtin’s paintings, prints and sculpture could easily apply to the music made by his brother, techno producer Richie Hawtin. It’s in this solo exhibition, showcasing some of the art Matthew has made in conjunction with his brother’s record labels Plus 8 Records and Minus Records, that we can see the parallels between the two mediums. Since he started making art linked to record labels in the early 1990s, 39-year-old Matthew has been steadily refining his work. The minimalism, clean lines, abstract concepts and layering that defines his work have been there since the beginning. “My work has slowly been minimalised and reduced,” he says. “I think that’s what any artist wants to do, whatever medium they work with. They want their work to be refined until it’s down to its pure essence; achieve an idea in its purest form, in a way.” The abstract shapes and colours on Matthew’s paintings for Richie’s F.U.S.E project, made in 1993, hint at his original ideas about symmetry and space. His concept for these pieces was to create 3D space on the 2D surface. Those paintings ended up becoming the artwork for his brother Richie’s ‘Dimension Instrusion’ album and 12” release, that he put out under his F.U.S.E moniker. Examine the work that follows these early pieces and you can see how Matthew’s minimal style and reductive aesthetic intersects similar points in the development of electronic music. The early days of putting paint on canvas have developed into the flowing futurism of

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his fiberglass-manufactured then hand-painted Torqued Panels series. Matthew’s methods of making art have become more advanced, his materials more refined and the process more technical in parallel with the technological advances in making electronic music. In this respect, this exhibition is the story of Plus 8 Records and Minus Records told visually. “A lot of the work I was doing was happening at the same time Rich was making his music but I didn’t set out to paint techno,” says Matthew. “Quite often with the artwork for a project neither Rich or I are sure which came first – the music or the art.” For a number of years the brothers had studios next door to each other, while they were both living in Canada. Richie would create intricate beats and rhythms in one room with just a wall separating him from what was going on in Matthew’s studio. That they influenced each other is undeniable, but in no way contrived. It’s this creative flow, running in parallel, that makes this exhibition so unique. Before they ever decided to create music or art, the two brothers spent their teenage years hopping across the river from their hometown Windsor, in Canada, to check out the sets of DJs such as Blake Baxter and Derrick May in Detroit nightclubs such as The Magestic, The Shelter and The Music Institute. It was 1988 and, music-wise, lines were blurred as to what a DJ could and would play in their sets

painting surface. On this, Matthew applied layers of paint. The artwork for ‘Once Again, Again’, released on Plus 8 in 2010, was adapted from Matthew’s 2008 Torqued Painting series. For the Torqued Panels series, Matthew’s idea was to remove the structure and just keep a curved painted surface. “I wanted the work to just kind of float,” he says. “I didn’t want the structure anymore, I just wanted pure surface. The Torqued Panels are basically fibreglass panels taken from a mould of a painting, sanded and primed in an automotive shop then covered in layers and layers of paint back in my studio.” All the artwork selected here is included because of its relationship to the record labels Plus 8 Records and Minus Records. All of the work has some connection with the labels, either as cover artwork, releases as part of the catalogue and some developed in conjunction to specific releases. But the links between the artwork and music go deeper than that. Does music inspire art, or does art inspire music? It’s somewhere in the symbiosis of the two that the answer lies. Claire Hughes

“We would listen to early Chicago house music, early Detroit techno and industrial-style stuff from bands such as Front 242,” says Matthew. “From those early days Rich and I always did things together. Combining my artwork and his music for the labels was something that just happened naturally, rather than a masterplan.” Matthew’s artwork for Plus 8 Records and Minus Records moves across mediums. The two prints he did for the Plus 8 catalogue in 1994 were silkscreen prints, measuring in at just under 12”x12”, designed to mimic the size of a piece of vinyl. Limited edition copies of those prints (100 each) were released with their own Plus 8 catalogue number. Next was the ‘Spatial Study’ print that Matthew made at the point when the Minus brand was solidifying, in the mid-1990s, at a point when minimal techno was at its zenith. Spatial Study was made as a companion piece to a solo exhibition of his work at the Circleculture Gallery in Berlin. Matthew’s installation of three-dimensional cubes that he exhibited for the ‘min2MAX Exhibition’ at the time were adapted to become the artwork for the same-name compilation that came out on Minus Records. Spatial Study became a limited edition print released with the double-pack 12” LP. The release of Matthew’s own compilation album project ‘Once Again, Again’ (a distillation of the ambient sets he’s played in the chillout rooms of Detroit techno parties such as Hardest, Spastik and Heaven and Hell since the 1990s) coincided with the beginning of what has developed into his most pioneering and abstract work to date. The Torqued Panels series is Matthew’s freshest, finest work; originating from the Torqued Paintings series he first created in 1997. Taking early ideas of twisting and curving lines to create 3D, architectural art the earliest Torqued Paintings were made by stretching canvas over custom-built stretcher frames with various depths at each corner. The result was a new picture plane quite unlike the usual flatness of the

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Artwork: Dimension Intrusion Acrylic on canvas 158 x 209 x 5 cm 1993 Release:

F.U.S.E. ‘Dimension Intrusion’

Catalogue No.: PLUS 8024 & WARP12 (Warp Records, UK) Description: Painting used as cover artwork for Plus 8 Records and Warp Records LP/CD release

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Artwork: Different Planes of Atmosphere Acrylic on canvas 140 x 190 x 5 cm 1993

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Release:

F.U.S.E. ‘Train Tracs’

Catalogue No.: Description:

WARP38 (Warp Records, UK) Painting used as cover artwork for Warp Records LP/CD release

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Artwork: Network Silkscreen print 29 x 29 cm 1994 Release: Matthew Hawtin ‘Networks’ Catalogue No.: Description:

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PLUS 8037 A silkscreen print released as part of the Plus 8 Records catalogue Limited edition of 100 prints, signed, titled and dated by artist

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Artwork: Blue Neuron Silkscreen print 29 x 29 cm 1994

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Release:

Matthew Hawtin ‘Blue Neuron’

Catalogue No.: Description:

PLUS 8048 A silkscreen print released as part of the Plus 8 Records catalogue Limited edition of 100 prints, signed, titled and dated by artist

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Artwork: Spatial Study Flashe & acrylic on wood panel 60 x 60 cm 2006

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Release:

Various Artists ‘min2MAX’ (compilation) LP/CD

Catalogue No.: Description:

MINUS 40 & MA1LE (print only) Print of ‘Spatial Study’ painting included in first pressing of LP release Additional limited edition of 100 signed, titled and dated by artist

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Artwork: Untitled MDF & HPL 350 x 30 x 15 cm 2006

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Release:

Various Artists ‘min2MAX’ (compilation) LP/CD Additional layout & design by Jason Patterson

Catalogue No.: Description:

MINUS 40 Exhibition of artwork to mark release of min2MAX compilation and release of ‘Spatial Study’ print. Exhibition included one painting and three sculptures hosted at Circleculture Gallery, Berlin

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Artwork: Blue Zip Oil & acrylic on canvas 152 x 28 x 15 cm 2008 Blue Hover Oil & acrylic on canvas 60 x 81 x 21 cm 2008 Release: Matthew Hawtin ‘Once Again, Again’ Additional layout & design by Jason Patterson Catalogue No.: Description:

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PLUS 8107 CD Two paintings from the ‘Torqued Paintings’ series used as cover artwork for the ‘Once Again, Again’ release, an mix CD by Matthew Hawtin showcasing early ambient music from 1992 – 1995

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A Look Back Into My Future The story of the artwork on exhibit actually starts around 1988 during my final years at high school in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It was here I made the decision to go to York University in Toronto, encouraged by my art teacher and supported by my family, to study visual arts. Around the same time I was being introduced to a new type of music thru the Detroit radio shows of The Wizard (AKA Jeff Mills) and Duane ‘In-The-Mix’ Bradley. While The Wizard would play a scorching mash-up of techno, house, industrial and disco, Dwayne would play a thoughtful smooth mix of house music on his “midday” mixes as well as his weekend shows. These shows became a daily ritual for my brother Richard and I, igniting a passion for house and techno music and setting us both on career paths involving and pursuing creativity.

My artistic interests at the time were concerned with emotions, trying to portray an emotion visually, using a bright colour palette in an abstract style. I carried these ideas with me into university while also becoming interested in depicting illusionary space on the canvas surface, (though one might argue that this is the concern of most painters). Looking back it’s interesting to see that similar themes run thru my work even now, as I translate my perceptual experiences into something visual thru various mediums such as painting, drawing, and sculpture. The excitement, energy and originality of this “new” music encouraged my brother to start DJing, produce his own music and start the record label, Plus 8 Records (with John Acquaviva), all of which has carried him successfully into the history books of electronic music. For myself, I took an aesthetic route and the music was there to inspire and influence and perhaps helped shape the direction of my creativity. During the early 1990’s while I was studying at university I was also DJing at the Plus 8 party events in Detroit, but while my brother played in the main room I always played in the other room - the chillout room. Here, sitting on a stool for all-night sets I would play my own selection of music; a mix of beatless, thoughtful, experimental and sometimes epic ambient music. I can’t say I ever wanted to be a “DJ” like my brother, I simply wanted to play records and share the music I liked to who ever was willing to listen. These were formative times for my brother and I: we DJ’ed together, we lived together and we worked together. However, we did not create together even though our studios were side by side in the building we lived and worked. Yet clearly we influenced one another creatively. Did the art influence the music or the music influence the art? It’s probably a question that doesn’t need to be answered.

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Despite the physical connection of our studios I can’t say there was ever the attempt by myself to literally ‘paint’ the music I was hearing yet there is no doubt that the music I was listening to and playing, and the lifestyle I was living had an effect on the direction of my life and the progression of my artwork. It was a very pure period in my life, and also very concentrated and intense. When I look at my work over the years and delve deeper I can see the basic elements of electronic music are a tangible part of what I do visually. I have always believed in the organic nature of life, to just let things happen naturally and not force things. I also believe that our surroundings mould us into the people we are, thru the everyday life we take in by osmosis. In this way I can trace the development of my visual language with my own experiences in life, carried forward with music as a soundtrack. There is no doubt that the nature of my exterior landscape also played a part in my development. From the flat landscape of the Windsor/ Detroit and Midwest region, to the sprawling, desolate and, at times, decaying nature of the manufactured landscape. We lived in a bluecollar region with most businesses for the car industry or supporting the car industry. It was in these factories that I worked many summers, sometimes doing the same task and seeing the same parts over and over. Although many people find this type of work annoying and unfulfilling, I myself found it quite soothing and satisfying. There is something to be said for making an object again and again, to admire the perfection of the parts while trying to find the flawless efficiency in the process. I think the nature of repetition is a part of many artists’ creative process, and repetition and loops are the backbone of any electronic music production. It becomes apparent that the aesthetic style of my work has changed over the years, yet I view this as a natural development of the work as my own life has progressed and matured. In this way we can see a parallel story, in the changing styles of electronic music over the years, as the music has grown in popularity and it’s genres have multiplied into sub-genres to accommodate this growth and the different types of musical expression.

natural fit of what I was doing visually to what Plus 8 wanted aesthetically to represent the label. The most recent pieces in the exhibition are ‘Spark’ and ‘Stellar’ from the Torqued Panels series. In developing these new pieces I wanted to remove the physical structure of the Torqued Paintings and leave only the painted surface left hovering off the wall, like a futuristic floating plane devoid of gravity. The drawings for this new work will be introduced as Plus 8 cover art later in the year. When I compare these recent work with the paintings from 1993 I see similar elements and concerns; the bright colours, the notion of exploring 3-dimensional space on a 2-D surface and the sense of conveying something emotional thru the layering of paint into pure planes of colour. It’s interesting to note that to produce the new panels I came back to Windsor where this story first began. It was in Windsor that I found the right individuals to work with in order to push the work forward by using new materials, similar to how my brother uses new technology to push his music into new dimensions. Although nowadays I tend to have a more diverse music collection than in the past, the music I tend to use for thinking or in the studio is usually electronic, and the music that still surprises me is almost always electronic in nature. I think for many people who grew up as electronic music (and club culture) was emerging it will remain an important part of our life story. Perhaps this exhibition has been perfectly timed, in that what we see of my past work has been reflected and manifested in the work of my future. The development has been slow and methodical yet natural and it has been guided with a soundtrack of electronic music, which continues to evolve and constantly projects itself towards the future. Matthew Hawtin

Within this exhibition, ‘Into the Space’ and ‘Different Planes of Atmosphere’ are the earliest works. These appeared as F.U.S.E. album covers and along with the silkscreen prints for Plus 8 Records, hint at the technology of electronic music, of entering a soundscape amoungst the neurons and networks of life. In 2005, the work in the min2MAX exhibition explored a language of reduction and refinement thru cubic forms, just as the Minus record label summoned in a new wave of minimal music spearheaded by a younger generation of producers (many of whom had decamped from the Detroit area to Berlin). For my first musical release in 2008, the Once Again, Again ambient DJ mix on Plus 8 Records, I used my own artwork for the cover, the paintings ‘Blue Zip’ and ‘Blue Hover’ from the Torqued Paintings series. This seemed fitting given that the musical selection was taken from my early 90’s DJ sets and the paintings were a re-visiting of an earlier painting series I had put aside for a few years. The recent drawings used for 2011 Plus 8 Records 12” releases came at a time when the label was looking for a new visual language and I was exploring a new visual style for a new series. Once again it seemed a

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Artwork: Untitled Study Krylon on paper 20 x 30 cm 2010 Release: Ambivalent ‘Jackson’ Additional layout & design by Jason Patterson Catalogue No.: PLUS 8118 Description: Studies on paper used as cover artwork for Plus 8 records 12” and digital releases

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Artwork: Untitled Study Krylon on paper 20 x 30 cm 2010 Release:

Layo & Buswacka! ‘Storm & Stress’ Additional layout & design by Jason Patterson

Catalogue No.: PLUS 8119 Description: Studies on paper used as cover artwork for Plus 8 records 12” singles and digital releases

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Artwork: No Sudden Movement Watercolour on paper 20 x 30 cm 2011

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Release:

Gaiser presents VOID ‘No Sudden Movements’ Additional layout & design by Jason Patterson

Catalogue No.: Description:

MINUS 115 Cover artwork for CD release of VOID project by Gaiser

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Artwork: Spark Acrylic on fiberglass panel 162 x 131 cm 2011

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Release:

upcoming

Catalogue No.: Description:

tbc Artwork from the ‘Torqued Panels’ series to be used as cover artwork for Plus 8 Records 12” singles and digital releases in 2012

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Artwork: Stella Acrylic on fiberglass panel 162 x 125 cm 2011

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Release:

upcoming

Catalogue No.: Description:

tbc Artwork from the ‘Torqued Panels’ series to be used as cover artwork for Plus 8 Records 12” singles and digital releases in 2012

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RED Gallery In April 2010, we took over 1-3 Rivington Street, then a near-derelict building, empty for a year and a half, and made it into one of the London’s most exciting cultural hubs. We are a collective of creative individuals and organisations striving to bring together art, music and film via many varied cultural events, forging/cementing local, national and international collaborations/partnerships. With RED QUARTERS we offer low-cost space to artists and Internet start-ups. We host exhibitions, live art, live music and club events, literary soirees, symposiums and film screenings. We also provide with MATERIAL a bookshop and are able to publish our own books. Under the ‘{ourhistory}’ banner we curate large-scale gallery shows (currently touring internationally) covering subjects as diverse as the history of acid house and the future of art in the East End, with exhibitions such as ‘20 years of Acid House’, ‘East End Promise’ and ‘East Pop’. We are a self-funding creative enterprise, independently run relying neither on private nor public backers. One of our guiding principles is to work with, and seek input from the local artistic and creative communities, to build new business models and strengthen local, national and international ties in order to further our vision of an expansive artistic culture. Ontario Arts Council The Ontario Arts Council programs help individual artists, collectives, galleries, festivals and other organizations to bring the best in visual art to audiences across the province. Exhibition Assistance funds professional visual artists, craft artists and media artists who present work at a confirmed, upcoming public exhibition. In fulfilling its mandate, the OAC serves one of the most diverse cultural, racial, linguistic and Aboriginal populations in Canada. Through its programs and services, the OAC supports artists, organizations and communities across Ontario, and welcomes all forms of artistic expression and practice. Minus Since 1998, Minus has been the home base and canvas for Richie Hawtin and a small family of like-minded artists, producers and DJs hailing from the America’s and Europe. Hawtin’s Plastikman and Concept projects established the label at the start while inspiring a new generation of producers to join his side, creating one of the most close-knit collectives in electronic music today.

With an extensive catalog and roster, Minus is home to both underground club hits and artistic vanguards within electronic music. Special events, tours and label showcases take the “Minus” sound around the world with artists performing at clubs and festivals nearly every weekend. Minus remains active online through it’s website, bringing fans in closer with podcasts, social media updates, video journals and a growing interaction with the community online and on the road, a dedication that was established early with the Canadian born, Plus 8 Records.

Thanks Special thanks to my brother unwavering belief, to my Mum “liberal” as we were growing their understanding, support

for his ongoing support, guidance and & Dad for their support and for being so up and to Amy, Cecilia and Simone for and love.

Thanks to the following people for their ongoing friendship and support: Philip, Marlene, Nadine, Bryan, Katrin, Vicki and the entire Minus/Clonk family, Jason Huvaere, Sam Fotias, Chuck Flask, Jason Clark, Brian & Nadia Bannon, Carrina Gaffney, Laura Käding, Tim Price, Chris McNamara, Dean Carson, JoAnne Fishburn, Inge Laursen, Brian & Lauren, Pepe & Steve, Tosh Cooey and Seth Hodder. Many thanks to Ernesto & Yarda for the invitation to exhibit at RED Gallery. In memory of Chris Lawson (1972-2011) – artist, friend and all-around music lover. RED Gallery would like to thank the following people for their support; Juan Leal, Barbara Klein, Giuseppe Percuoco, Charlotte Michelle 11th, Greg Kontratone, Matt Learmouth, Katrin Schlotfeldt, Liam O'Hare, Claire Hughes, Ben Turner, Jon Gaiser, Oli N, Claus Voigtmann, Isis Salvaterra, Paul Anderson. {ourhistory} would like to thank the following people for their support. Matthew Hawtin, Nick Winter and Caroline O'Connor at Ronco, My wife Colette Bowens and my gorgeous children Oscar and Aoife Bowens – Leal, Lucy Andina & Alecksi Leal. My brother and Brand Manager Juan Leal & Lola Ruby, Lisa Loud for all her invaluable help, Claire Griffin, All at Minus, Ben Turner, Jason Kedgley and Tomato, Paul Sakoilsky, Giuseppe Percuoco, Charlotte Michelle 11th, Greg Kontratone, Yarda Iamjarring for Keeping Calm and Carrying On and the RED gallery team, Claire Hughes and Dom Phillips.

The musical and live experience of the Minus sound is a varied and unique mix of minimal techno, heralding influences from the past with a strong sonic focus on the future, and always integrating technology. A specific design aesthetic is present through the broad catalog of vinyl, CD, DVD and digital releases, accented with special packaging, limited editions and special promo products.

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Framing By The 4Th Corner Parallels Text By Claire Hughes Promotional Video By Barbara Klein Published in Great Britain by {ourhistory} 2012 culthist.com Images/graphics/text Š by Matthew Hawtin mhawtin.com Design by Kedge @ Tomato tomato.co.uk Printed in Great Britain by WDP Ronco The right of Matthew Hawtin to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by him in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. A catalogue record for this Act is available from the British Library. All rights, including translation, reserved. Except as permitted by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior written permission of {ourhistory}. This book is published on the understanding that the author is solely responsible for the statements made and opinions expressed in it and that its publication does not necessarily imply that such statements and/or opinions are or reflect the views or opinions of the publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure that the statements made and the opinions expressed in this publication provide a safe and accurate guide, no liability or responsibility can be accepted in this respect by the author or publishers.

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About {ourhistory} Often it’s those inconvenient stories, ones that might challenge society’s sense of tradition and inevitability that find themselves beyond history’s footnotes. {ourhistory} projects are about giving voice to some of the stories which didn’t make the cut. We currently have six ongoing projects, all historically marginalized and each underpinned by a spirit of collective non-conformity. OUR CULTURAL HISTORY EAST END PROMISE “A STORY ABOUT CULTURAL MIGRANTS 1980 — 2000” THE BIG SOCIETY — DDR KUNST AUST SCHWEDT EAST POP (West London — Berlin — Edinburgh) 'SPIRIT OF IBIZA 89' A PHOTOGRAPHIC JOURNEY BY DAVID SWINDELLS THE RED PROJECT At the root of the {ourhistory} projects was the fundamental realization that many of our own predecessors, the people who helped establish the creative community in Shoreditch and Hoxton, Berlin and the Lower East side in New York had become invisible or had been forgotten. They broke rules, defied prejudices and championed ideas that we still benefit from today, but it’s a contribution which is rarely if at all recognized – even by its benefactors. “Our Cultural History” (2008) is a project looking at the Acid House scene – a melding of cultural attitudes and influences that in many ways exemplified a collectivist response against the consumer-centred mainstream of the 80’ and 90’s. The then Tory Government’s Criminal Justice and Public Order Bill in 1994 - an attempt to inhibit the explosion of what became known as rave culture - merely achieved the opposite effect and affirmed the scale of it’s significance within society as a whole. “Our Cultural History” was launched at the London/ Newcastle art space in the heart of Shoreditch, transferring to Selfridges London as part of the ARTCORE show. Our Cultural History has been an international success with openings in Tokyo, Beijing/Shanghai & Ibiza and a forthcoming show in Berlin. Launched in August 2011 “East End Promise 1985-2000 ‘Analogue Generation loss” charts those people and events through story-telling, film, photography and other contributed material to the re-generation of Shoreditch in East London. We came to realize that enlivening these memories in a tangible way bought a sense of context and legacy into the consciousness of the generations currently creating today’s East London. We also came to recognize that many of these experiences related to a larger set of events and a wider cultural landscape — but again predating the online revolution, they too remained untold.

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We harnessed a similar energy to the collective spirit of that movement to create an evolving exhibition. Using experientially based material such as flyers for clubs and warehouse parties, record sleeves, Tshirts and logo’s, Our Cultural History posits the view that despite the previous lack of documentation, rave and dance culture have a deeper creative and social resonance than the often chronicled eras of the hippy movement and punk rock. It was perhaps acknowledging that sense of cultural resistance which motivated Dimitri from the Berlin-based super club Tresor to provide us with the inspiration for the third ourhistory Project – The Big Society: DDR Kunst Aus Schwedt. Here the forgotten landscape is both physical and ideological; it’s an ongoing creative dialogue with an unassuming industrial town called Schwedt located at the farthest point of Germany’s eastern border. Dimitri saw the towns’ public art as a revelation and a challenge. Despite the mass migration of its young to Berlin and other metropolitan cities in Germany, the towns’ walls and institutions still betray the optimism and vision of the municipality’s own forgotten youth. What in 50’s and 60’s Eastern Germany was considered to be a vision of the Big Society now stands for something far more human and relevant to a wider viewer across the whole of Europe. It wasn’t long before Dimitri connected with the Red Gallery and an exhibition exploring past and present ideas surrounding social and cultural collectivism was created with the city of Schwedt in East Germany at its centre. EAST POP a continuation of East End Promise, is a living document of what is happening now and gives exposure to art and design collectives who have used their strength as groups of creative individuals to produce dynamic exhibitions, live art events, products and publications. Now in its 2nd year, The Red Project continues to deliver on our ‘cultural house sitting’ remit, having transformed an empty property into one of the Capital’s landmark creative spaces. RED is designing a cultural blueprint. Drawing on previous cultural experiments, we see ourselves as part of the great tradition of creative migrants who have moved to metropolitan areas such as London's East End, in an attempt to build long-term sustainable business strategies. To date in the last 18 months we have already joined forces/collaborated with artists such as: Kid Koala, Radio London Salon with Calvin Harris, Gavin Turk, Soundcloud, magazines: i-D and art collectives including: House of Fairy Tales, Soul Clap, Wolf & Lamb, Adam Dant, Noriko Okaku, Le Gun, onedotzero, Bo Ningen; Institutions such as: Camberwell and Kingston Colleges of Art; East End Film Festival and Rough Trade (East), to name few. Recession and beyond we remain committed to regeneration and creativity in the heart of London’s East End and beyond. We are actively searching for other suitable premises, and always seeking out ideas and projects to consolidate our business model. We are now in dialogue with, and seeking suitable business partners who share our vision.

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Each of these projects is ongoing, existing through a call-and-response process: a continual exchange that often turns audience into participant, providing a context for wealth of previously marginalized visual and oral memories. Like Our Cultural History and East End Promise, The Big Society speaks of possibility and of alternative worldviews – ideas and experiences which in many ways allow us to examine current events in new and surprising ways. Spirit of Ibiza ’89 project/exhibition and publication is about primarily archiving the summer of 1989. Ku and Amnesia are still open-air parties and Ibiza, a little island in the Mediterranean off the coast of Spain, is dictating the evolution of the club scene around the world. British and Italian DJs and promoters had found the island and the Balearic sound was beginning to infiltrate their consciousness. Dave Swindells, the nightlife editor at Time Out for over two decades, captured one of the most important summer’s in the island’s history, ‘Spirit Of Ibiza ‘89’ is a must see collection for any lover of Ibiza. The book is available now published by ourhistory and the exhibition of these cultural shots has been critically acclaimed by the Dance music Press both in the UK & Ibiza. Each of the {ourhistory} projects have tours and off-site shows in place, while online the dialogue grows and evolves even further.

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MATTHEW HAWTIN DIMENSIONS SHOW CATAGUE  

Produced by {ourhistory} for Matthew Hawtin's first solo exhibition, at the RED Gallery in East London, Feb 2012. Catalogue design by Jason...

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