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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? PHYSICAL, OCCUPATIONAL AND SPEECH THERAPY words | BRANDY CENTOLANZA

Therapy is often a part of the recovery process for patients who are impacted by a long-term illness, injury, or other medical condition. So, what are the types of therapy treatment available for patients, how are they different, and what does each entail?

PHYSICAL THERAPISTS Physical therapists (PT) are licensed healthcare professionals who help patients alleviate pain and improve or restore mobility, usually without medications or surgery. PTs work with individuals who have mobility challenges related to a wide variety of conditions including but not limited to: Alzheimer’s Disease, Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, Autism, Scoliosis, Parkinson’s Disease, and Cancer. Those who suffer from balance problems or other chronic conditions may also require physical therapy. Patients who have injured their jaw, wrist, arm, shoulder, hip, back, knee, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon, or some other muscle may also seek services from a PT in order to resume normal activity with as little pain as possible. PTs work with patients in hospitals, private practices, outpatient clinics, schools, sports and fitness facilities, work settings, nursing homes and other environments. They create individualized treatment plans and techniques for patients who may be suffering from pain or limited movement due to injuries, and also work to

According to the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. (AOTA), OTs often accommodate children with disabilities in school or social situations, help individuals recovering from injury regain their skills, and provide support and services to senior citizens experiencing physical and cognitive changes. Each patient has a customized treatment program to improve their ability to perform daily activities, with OTs also offering guidance and support to family members and caregivers. OTs can also, for example, assist clients with hobbies such as playing the guitar or knitting; help them return to work after an injury or chronic illness; and learn how to cook or drive again after a stroke.

SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS Speech-language pathologists are trained individuals who help diagnose and treat patients with such disorders and other ailments related to speech that can affect both children and adults. Certain patients may need treatment for various speech and language disorders. Speech challenges could occur when a person is unable to produce speech sounds correctly or fluently, or has problems with his or her voice or resonance. Other patients, meanwhile, may have troubles understanding a language when someone speaks, or have difficulties expressing their own thoughts, feelings or ideas. Speech-language pathologists also work with patients who have issues with social communication. These include patients on the autism spectrum as well as those who may have suffered a traumatic brain injury. Cognitive-communication conditions include difficulties with organizing one’s thoughts or having trouble remembering things, paying attention, or solving problems. These are often the result of a stroke, brain injury, or dementia. Patients who suffer from a stroke, have just had surgery, or sustained another illness or injury may have challenges with feeding and swallowing and need a speech-language pathologist to assist with these needs as well. Roughly half of speech-language pathologists work in educational settings, providing services to students particularly in preschool and elementary schools. Speech-language pathologists may also work in hospitals or other healthcare environments to treat patients with cognitive-communication and language disorders and/or swallowing problems.

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What's the Difference?

The main difference between occupational therapy and both physical therapy and speech pathology is that patients need an occupational therapist (OT) to help them function with their everyday tasks (their occupations). OT and OT assistants help patients of all ages participate in daily activities, and can work with patients in their own homes, or at work or school.

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active lifestyles.


PHYSICAL THERAPY

2017 PHYSICAL THERAPY RESOURCE GUIDE

the Bernese

Mountain Dog

BRINGS A DIFFERENT APPROACH TO

PHYSICAL THERAPY words | BRANDY CENTOLANZA photography | TERRI ISENHOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

A certified pet therapy dog, Bella’s unique skills help patients at UVA-HealthSouth Rehabilitation Center in Charlottesville recover from injury or illness. It’s a Thursday and patients at UVA-HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital are in the middle of their daily therapy session. But this is no ordinary one. Today, Bella, a nine-year-old Bernese Mountain dog and her owner, Tina Gaines, are making a visit. Bella is a certified pet therapy dog that provides assistance to patients at UVA-HealthSouth as they undergo physical, occupational, or speech therapy. “Bella is a nice distraction for patients,” said Gaines. “When she is here, she helps take their minds off of concerns, worries, or pain for a while. She brings comfort to the patients.” Bella was certified six years ago through Therapy Dogs International, a national volunteer organization that qualifies dogs to be used in therapy. Gaines has been bringing Bella by UVAHealthSouth on a weekly basis to spend time with the patients ever since then. Anne Faulk, who has been receiving therapy treatment since suffering from a stroke in May, looks forward to seeing Bella each week. 4

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“I am a dog person, so it is nice to see her,” Faulk says. “I enjoy her. Bella has a very calming effect on people. I think pet therapy is a positive thing. Dogs can lift people’s spirits and make them happy. Being able to pet the dogs makes people feel better.”

Those who work with the patients at UVA-HeathSouth agree that dogs like Bella are an invaluable addition to their therapy sessions. “Patients with balance challenges can try to reach down to pet a dog, and that is more enjoyable than trying to reach for a cone or some other target,” points out Sarah Kauk, a physical therapist at UVA-HealthSouth. “Patients can also walk with therapy dogs, brush their fur, talk to them, or simply revel in the animal’s presence.” Roughly 25,000 dogs of varying breeds and their handlers, or owners, are registered through Therapy Dogs International. To qualify, dogs must be at least a year old with a sound temperament. The dogs undergo a series of tests and evaluations, which include health and behavioral exams. Dogs are evaluated on how well they interact with people who use service equipment such as wheelchairs or crutches. “Bella has always been very calm, easy-going, and well-behaved, so I knew she would qualify,” says Gaines. “Therapy dogs should enjoy meeting strangers and be tolerant of the different sensations in a hospital, the different smells, noises, and equipment, because that can be stressful for a dog.”

Myths & Misconceptions

Research shows that pet therapy has several benefits for patients, both physically and mentally. According to PAWS for People, an organization focused on the healing power of pet therapy since 2005, being surrounded by animals can lower blood pressure, improve cardiovascular health, reduce physical pain, lessen depression and anxiety, assist with speech and communication issues, and motivate people to recover faster. While it is mostly dogs that interact with patients, other animals can also be used as part of treatment, including cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, llamas, donkeys, and miniature horses, according to Pet Partners, another national organization that certifies animals for therapy purposes.

“Patients with balance challenges can try to reach down to pet a dog, and that is more enjoyable than trying to reach for a cone or some other target. Patients can also walk with therapy dogs, brush their fur, talk to them, or simply revel in the animal’s presence.” SARAH KAUK, PT A physical therapist at UVA-HealthSouth

In addition to UVA-HealthSouth, Bella, who was trained for basic obedience as a puppy and has several AKC Obedience titles along with her therapy certification, has also visited with students at local elementary schools during reading programs. “Having a therapy dog is very rewarding,” Gaines said. “Bella makes a huge difference for individuals who need her. I also get a pleasure out of the visits and enjoy chatting with the patients and the staff at the hospital.” Those at UVA-HealthSouth agree. “It’s very therapeutic to be with dogs,” concludes Kauk. “The patients are more engaged and relaxed. It’s good for the staff too. It’s good for everyone. No one wants to be in a hospital, but when Bella comes by, she really brightens everyone’s mood.”

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EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR Sarah Kauk, PT with UVA-HealthSouth in Charlottesville.

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C H A R LOT T E S V I L L E & S H E N A N D OA H VA L L E Y

Advanced Center for Physical Therapy

Autumn Care of Madison Madison | 540.407.8049

Charlottesville | 434.295.4473

Bridgewater Retirement Community

Crozet Speech & Learning Center Crozet | 434.298.4599

Bridgewater | 540.828.2550 Avanté at Harrisonburg Advantage Physical Therapy and Sports Performance Harrisonburg | 540.434.1200 Harrisonburg | 540.437.7585 Weyers Cave | 540.234.8800

Waynesboro | 540.433.2791

Bridges Wellness & Physical Avanté at Waynesboro

Therapy Consultants, LLC Charlottesville | 434.465.4257

Dogwood Village of Orange County Orange | 540.672.2611

Waynesboro | 540.949.7191

Envoy of Staunton Brookdale Harrisonburg

Albemarle Health & Rehabilitation Center Charlottesville | 434.422.4800

Balanced Chiropractic and Physical Therapy Charlottesville | 434.293.3800

Brookdale Staunton Staunton | 540.325.2747

Albemarle Therapy Center Charlottesville | 434.979.8628 Waynesboro | 540.941.5501 * Pediatric Services Only

Appalachian Physical Therapy, Inc.

Staunton | 540.886.2335

Harrisonburg | 540.574.2982

Harrisonburg | 540.433.2623

Barren Ridge Physical Therapy Fishersville | 540.949.5383 Waynesboro | 540.627.5030

Bethesda Physical Therapy & Wellness, Inc.

Carilion Clinic Outpatient Therapy – Lexington Lexington | 540.458.3211

Heritage Hall – Lexington Lexington | 540.464.8181

High Gear Physical Therapy

Staunton | 540.213.1320

Harrisonburg | 540.209.8977

Harrisonburg Health and Rehabilitation Center

Cedars Healthcare Center

Charlottesville | 434.282.5361

Charlottesville | 434.296.5611

Blue Ridge Physical Therapy Atlantic Sports & Rehabilitation

Horizons Physical Therapy, PC

Lexington | 540.463.5888

Charlottesville Health and Rehabilitation Center

Charlottesville | 434.978.4915

Blue Ridge Rehabilitation Associates, Inc.

Charlottesville | 434.978.7015

Jennifer Grove, PT

Charlottesville | 434.973.5031

Augusta Health Therapy Services Fishersville Out-Patient 540.932.5935 In-Patient 540.332.4010

Augusta Nursing and Rehab Center

Body Ease Physical Therapy Lexington | 540.464.5005 Staunton | 540.337.1999

Waynesboro | 540.951.1682

Charlottesville Pointe Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center Charlottesville | 434.973.7933

Staunton | 858.349.1862

Connections Achievement and Therapy Center Charlottesville | 434.529.6248

Staunton | 540.887.8007

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Kings Daughters Community Health and Rehabilitation Center Staunton | 540.886.6233

Bodymind Bodyshape, PLLC

Fishersville | 540.885.8424

Augusta Physical Therapy

Waynesboro | 540.949.7706

Brian P. Lambert, PT Charlottesville | 434.977.6700

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Life Care Center of New Market New Market | 540.741.8041


ICON KEY Physical Therapy Out – Patient

Speech Therapy

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Physical Therapy In – Patient

Occupational Therapy

Facilities listed in this guide were obtained through online search engine research using related specialty services terms. If your facility is not listed, it is because it did not appear in the results.

Lewis Pelvic Floor Therapy Charlottesville | 434.960.4434

Pivot Physical Therapy Charlottesville | 434.245.6472

Sentara East Rockingham Health Center Elkton | 540.713.4100

Louisa | 540.967.2250

Martha Jefferson House Charlottesville | 434.293.6136

Sentara RMH Bridgewater PT Plus Physical Therapy and Wellness Center Afton | 540.456.6222 Charlottesville | 434.984.0303 Crozet | 434.823.7628 Waynesboro | 540.943.0078

Bridgewater | 540.828.7115

Sentara RMH Orthopedic Center Harrisonburg | 540-689-4500

Charlottesville – Forest Lakes 434.202.2830 Charlottesville – Pantops 434.817.4100 Culpeper | 540.727.0737 Orange | 540.672.2709 Palmyra | 434.589.9588 Ruckersville | 434.985.2288 Zion Crossroads | 540.832.3061

2017 Resource Guide

Palmyra | 434.5107301

Louisa Health & Rehabilitation Center

Spectrum Physical Therapy

Staunton Physical Therapy Staunton | 540.213.0345

Morningside of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.971.8889

Move Better Physical Therapy Charlottesville | 434.817.0980

Move Medical Massage & Sports Therapy, LLC Charlottesville | 434.989.0170

Passages Physical Therapy Charlottesville | 434.979.5559

Performance Place Sports Medicine

Rehab Associates of Central Virginia 1406 Greenbrier Place Charlottesville | 434.327.1616 www.racva.com • Pre and Post-Surgical Rehabilitation • Dry Needling • Neck and Back Pain • Spinal Rehabilitation • Manual Therapy • Hip and Knee Pain • Shoulder and Elbow • TMJ / Jaw Pain • Balance Training / Fall Prevention • Worker’s Compensation

Sentara Timber Way Health Center Broadway | 540-901-0800

Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital – Outpatient Services Charlottesville | 434.654.8333

Summit Square Retirement Community Waynesboro | 800.586.5499

Sunnyside Retirement Community Harrisonburg | 800.237.2257

Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital – Inpatient Services Charlottesville | 434.654.8370

Synergy Rehab and Wellness Verona | 540.416.0530

Shenandoah Nursing and Rehab Fishersville | 540.324.2420

The Center for Hand and Physical Therapy Harrisonburg | 540.638.2478

Charlottesville | 434.220.0805

Small Talk Speech & Therapy Center Phoenix Rehabilitation and Health Services, Inc.

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Charlottesville | 434.481.3524 * Pediatric Services Only

The Colonnades Skilled Rehabilitation Center Charlottesville | 434.963.4198

Charlottesville | 434.295.4473

Select Physical Therapy Charlottesville | 434.328.4900

Physical Therapy @ acac Albemarle Square 434.817.PT4U (7848) Crozet | 434.817.4283 Downtown Charlottesville 434.817.4276

South River Rehabilitation & Performance Waynesboro | 540.290.4531

The Laurels of Charlottesville Charlottesville | 434.951.4200

Staunton | 540.886.4510 Waynesboro | 540.943.4510

The Legacy at North Augusta Staunton | 540.416.0341

Sentara East Market Street Health Center Harrisonburg | 540.564.5666

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The Speech and Language Center, PLLC

Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community

Harrisonburg | 540.437.4226

Harrisonburg | 877.506.4952

UVA-HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital

Wampler and Associates Rehabilitation Harrisonburg | 540.434.9267

Charlottesville | 434.244.2000

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Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center

UVA-HealthSouth Sports Medicine and Hand Therapy Charlottesville | 434.243-0311

WEBSITE FOR EVEN MORE HEALTH RESOURCES!

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UVA Health System Acute Care Rehabilitation Services – Adults

Fishersville | 540.332.7000

Winslow Savage, OTR Charlottesville | 434.293.3948 * Pediatric Services Only

Wolfe Speech Therapy Plus Staunton | 540.885.7774 * Pediatric Services Only

Charlottesville | 434.924.2653

UVA Health System Outpatient Rehabilitation Services – Adults

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Charlottesville | 434.924.5700

UVA Health System Rehabilitation Services – Pediatrics Charlottesville | 434.924.0123 434.924.5146 (Call for general questions on therapy programs)

UVA Transitional Care Hospital

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Charlottesville | 434.924.8245

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Virginia Hand & Rehabilitation Services

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Staunton | 540.885.1177

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Physical Therapy Resource Guide from the Jul/Aug Edition of OurHealth Charlottesville & SV  
Physical Therapy Resource Guide from the Jul/Aug Edition of OurHealth Charlottesville & SV