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OUR COROMANDEL 2017-2018

OUR

2017-2018

COROMANDEL MAGAZINE

STEAMPUNKING

Commemorating Thames’ industrial and pioneering history.

T h a m e s - C o ro m a n d e l D i s t r i c t C o u n c i l

WINTER WINNERS

From weddings to free family activities, why the coldest season can be one of the best.

TASTE THE COROMANDEL

Local food producers go organic and artisan.

Festivals, fairs, concerts, multisport competitions, rallying and much more. A guide of what’s going on around the Coromandel for the next 12 months.

There’s something here for everyone

The Coromandel - Good for your soul


At home on the Coromandel since 1960

/ 10 offices / 40 salespeople / 6 decades of local knowledge Cooks Beach

Coromandel

Hahei

Matarangi

Ngatea

33 Captain Cook Road

151 Kapanga Road

3 Grange Road

Shopping Centre

33 Orchard Road

07 866 5826

07 866 8900

07 866 3781

07 866 0322

07 867 7800

Paeroa

Pauanui

Tairua

Thames

Whitianga

54 Belmont Road

Shopping Centre

230 Main Road

556 Pollen Street

81 Albert Street

07 862 7888

07 864 8607

07 864 8968

07 868 6978

07 866 2373

www.richardsons.co.nz


Welcome

We hope you enjoy receiving this issue of Our Coromandel 2017-18. This year is the fifth year we’ve produced an annual magazine and we’re building on some of the features that saw last year’s issue shortlisted as one of five finalists from around the country in the Local Government New Zealand Excellence Award in community engagement. As in previous years, Our Coromandel 2017-18 is primarily targeted at those of you who live outside the district. If you’re one of the nearly 60% of our ratepayers who don’t live here permanently, we want you to visit more often, and for longer, so you can enjoy more of the lifestyle, events and natural beauty we have access to year-round. That’s why this year we’ve made a few changes to the magazine. We’re no longer calling it Our Coromandel Summer Magazine, or Summertimes for short; we’ve dropped the summer because we want to promote the Coromandel as a great place to live, work and play in every season.

Photo: John Sandoval Photography

In these pages you’ll find news and information about our Council, what Mayor Sandra has been up to, Council and Community Board information, updates on projects and event listings. Special to this year’s issue are our features on free things to do with kids outside the summer; educational, youth and business opportunities; locally produced food; Coromandel winter weddings; the newly expanded Hauraki Rail Trail, adventure racing, the local arts scene, health retreats, baches … phew! And more! This year is also pretty special because we’re marking the 150th anniversary of the opening of the Thames goldfields - so we’ve got a focus on heritage and the increasingly popular Steampunk the Thames Festival.

Thanks to our advertisers: Richardsons Real Estate, Tairua Marina, LJ Hooker, NZTA, Grand Mecure Puka Park, Whangamata Souvenir and Jewellery, Placemakers, Coastwood Homes/Lockwood Coromandel, Flooring First, TotalSpan, Palette Whangamata, Jennian Homes, Bayleys Real Estate, Whitianga Waterways, Coromandel Marine Farmers Association, Azimuth Development, Whangamata Real Estate, Winger Motors, Twentymans Funeral Directors, Richmond Villas, G.J. Gardner, House of Knives, Whangamata Ocean Sports, New Zealand Motor Caravan Association, Keith Hay Homes, Coromandel More FM, Waikato Regional Council, Smart Environmental, Harcourts, Pak’N Save. Our Coromandel also supports free advertising for: St John, Coromandel Helicopter Trust, Surf Lifesaving NZ, Safer Coromandel, Coastguard, Destination Coromandel, advertising of events and festivals in our events section.

November’s Steampunk Festival is a great example of how we’re using carefully allocated Council grants and the services of our District Events Coordinator to help roll out the red carpet, not the red tape, to event organisers. Making the Coromandel a year-round events destination is one of our Council’s economic development strategies. And we’re applying the same approach to businesses who wish to invest or relocate to the Coromandel. The hard work must be paying off because the local economy has been outperforming the national average, traffic flows are increasing and visitor spending reached record levels in 2017. We’ve continued to have overwhelmingly positive feedback on the magazine from readers around New Zealand and internationally, and this year you can be in to win a $500 petrol voucher by taking part in our survey to give us feedback on how we deliver Council news to you. See page 167 for more details or go to www.tcdc.govt.nz/survey2017 to complete the short survey. We’ve had greater success defraying the costs of producing the magazine with advertisers keen to support our publication, which allows us to provide free ad space for services such as Civil Defence and Emergency Management, St John, Surf Lifesaving NZ, Coastguard and the Coromandel Rescue Helicopter Trust. So, sit back and put your feet up, keep turning the pages, and enjoy.

The majority of Our Coromandel magazine is produced in-house by the Communications and Marketing department of the Thames-Coromandel District Council. Thanks to all our contributors who helped with providing photos, content and proof-reading support. Alison Smith (Hook and Arrow – alisonsmith@xtra.co.nz), Trudi Sheridan (trudiwords@gmail.com), Shaun Fay (shaun@besidetheseaside.co.nz), Leanne Penner, Nicole Crofsky, Felicity Jean, Charmian Nell. Cover photo: Delwyn Barnett (JDS Imagery) © Our Coromandel is designed by: Melissa McGregor, ModoDesign, melissa@mododesign.co.nz Printed by: PMP Limited, enquiries@pmplimited.co.nz For advertising information contact Warren Male warren@emale.me

Contact communications@tcdc.govt.nz

The TCDC Communications Team, from left: Michael Dobie (Communications and Marketing Officer), Amber Baker (Digital Communications and Marketing Assistant) Laurna White (Communications, Marketing and Events Manager), Kirstin Richmond (District Events Coordinator) and Rebekah Duffin (inset. Communications and Marketing Officer).


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109

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Contents FEATURES 6 - 17

Looking out for local. Projects going on in your neighbourhood

23 - 29

Winter weddings on the Coromandel

30 - 37

Homes and baches

41-43

Building and planning information

45 - 47

Health retreats and spas

50 - 56

Doing business on the Coromandel

62 - 65

Our Aquaculture economy

76 - 85

Events

86 - 96

Thames 150 Goldfields commemorations

109 - 113

Education opportunities

126 - 133

Arts

134 - 141

Homegrown. Supporting local artisan food producers

158 - 161

Civil Defence emergency preparedness

STORIES 4-5

Mayor Sandra’s year in review

20-21

The Coromandel’s electric vehicle driving route

44

Lifemark, a tool for accessible-friendly homes

70 - 71

King of the Beach Hop. Meet Noddy Watts

73 - 75

Hayden Paddon on the Coromandel Gold Rush Rally of NZ

98 - 99

Commemorating Captain Cook’s visit to Mercury Bay

102 - 103

Searching for the elusive forest ringlet butterfly

107 - 108

Youth stories

116 - 119

Free stuff to do with kids

120

Coromandel walks update

122 - 124

Summiting the Pinnacles walk

143 - 144

Surf champ Ella Williams

146 - 148

Adventure and endurance racing

150 - 151

Freedom camping on the Coromandel

152 - 153

Cycling the new section of the Hauraki Rail Trail

Photo: Jim Rauch

EXTRAS 6

Your Councillors

40

District Plan information

48

Mercury Bay medical facility update

100

Coromandel’s WW1 Memorial Forests

104

Looking after our coastline

105

Cracking down on tree vandalism

106

Natural burial sites

155

Horses and dogs on beaches

156

Library news

157

Pool news

163

New rubbish compactors

164 - 166

Kerbside collection information

167

Survey competition


1 In a Syrian robe gifted by Emmi Rezk. 2 Supporting Steampunk the Thames. 3 ANZAC Day. 4 Mayor Sandra reading last year’s version of ‘Our Coromandel’ magazine.

5 5 March 2017 – Mayor Sandra getting her

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flu vaccination.

6 Front to back: Sarni Hart, Mayor Sandra, MP Scott Simpson and Will (Willie) Lochore at Thames Civic Centre with Coromandel Adventures bus on Coromandel Town to Rotorua launch 8 May.

2017-18

Sandra’s year in review

7 Showing support at the K2 Cycle Race in October 2016.

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Mayor Sandra doodled this frigate after being called “Her Warship”.

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8 Jason Tomsett from JCD Engineering (pictured left) speaking with Mayor Sandra at the CANDO expo August 2017.

9 Proud of Team New

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Zealand’s achievement and proud to be a Kiwi, donning lucky red socks with some of the Thames Community Board.


Well, what a year! We may have to change our name to the Coromandel Thrillseekers State Highway loop as weather dominated most of 2017, from April through to August, with an absolute deluge of rain.

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We had a Civil Defence Emergency declared, to ensure the preparedness of all Civil Defence personnel, communities and government agencies with public safety as the key priority. But that didn’t stop the hills from tumbling down with hundreds of slips both on and off our roads and State Highways. While we are the quintessential deck chair, good book, toes in the sand, soft breeze in the air, sun warm on the skin kind of place to be, we do need a reliable State Highway loop for access year-round. Sadly, when it comes to funding for more than basic maintenance, we miss out. We are a major visitor destination, but any consideration for additional central government funding to improve our Stage Highway network appears to be non-existent. We welcome your support in lobbying government agencies for greater funding for our State Highways (SH25, SH25A and SH26) as we renew our focus on the safety and resilience of access for us all around the Coromandel. We want everyone to be able to enjoy our many activities and events, which happen year round from our Beach Hops, Leadfoots and summer concerts and fairs through to our Coromandel Town Seafood and Whitianga Scallop Festivals and everything in between.

q Mayor Sandra and Garry Towler declared a civil defence emergency in April 2017.

w National Volunteer Week – Mayor Sandra helped out with lunch service at the Tararu Care Home in Thames.

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The last 12 months have been a rollercoaster ride for me – as I’ve got stuck in and travelled around the District meeting some truly fantastic people, groups and organisations – who are doing brilliant work here. Life flourishes, and no matter what the weather, we can still revel in the bounty that we are surrounded by. Yes, there are plenty of other beautiful places, but there is nowhere else I would rather be, than here, in the Coromandel.

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sandra.goudie@tcdc.govt.nz

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Your Councillors Sally Christie

Jan Bartley

Rex Simpson

Terry Walker

THAMES COUNCILLOR “Some of the things I’m most proud of over the past 12 months are the bus service trial in Thames, which is an amazing opportunity to increase options for all our residents – more social cohesion and connection and less cars, a winner in my view. Also I have been busy with developing relationships regionally so we can maximise services offered by our district health board, regional council and education providers in our area.” sally.christie@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

THAMES COUNCILLOR “Pavement improvements around Thames is something I’m particularly proud of seeing get done, because it’s something that is so important for public safety. One of the major pieces of work has been at the Tararu Corner, as a lot of people come from the Tararu rest home on mobility scooters heading into town.” rex.simpson@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Strat Peters

THAMES COUNCILLOR “The Thames 150 commemorations has been a huge success in my mind, in terms of galvanizing a whole range of groups, from history and heritage organisations through to the business communities and schools to celebrate what is uniquely special about Thames as a town – and there’s a lot more events going on until 2018. “ strat.peters@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Tony Brljevich

DEPUTY MAYOR AND COROMANDEL -COLVILLE COUNCILLOR “Projects I’m proud to see going through in the past 12 months for my ward includes the establishment of Hauraki Road bike park, Coromandel Town Centre guidelines, developing bus shelters and new footpaths in Manaia and Long Bay Road, providing support for Colville water supply, Coromandel Motorhome friendly town (first on the Coromandel) and the new netball courts at the Coromandel Area School.” tony.brljevich@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

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SOUTH EASTERN WARD COUNCILLOR “I’ve been a Councillor since 2007 and my motivation continues to be representing the views and best interests of all residents, ratepayers and visitors to our region. This year I’m pleased to see the Tairua Wharf upgrade become a reality, sealing of Wentworth Valley Rd imminent and discussions for a community Marae, with adjuncts of the Arts Collective, Community Patrol, Men’s Shed and Lions looking promising. Meanwhile the Mangrove Management Bill before Parliament promises to eliminate many years of community frustration and financial waste with, to date, minimal outcomes.” jan.bartley@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

SOUTH-EASTERN WARD COUNCILLOR “In my first year as a Councillor I’ve loved representing our local communities and district wide ratepayers in supporting good infrastructure and prudent management of budgets. We’re focused on ensuring our district has the basic infrastructure for all ratepayers and visitors, while providing the projects to allow a “My Kind of Easy” place for relaxation, enjoyment and community connection. We live in a beautiful District, I live in the Paradise Coast on the eastern seaboard, so please come and sample its beaches, bush and beauty. You can join me on the beach, bring a chair, a book and of course a hat.” terry.walker@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Tony Fox

MERCURY BAY COUNCILLOR “At a community level there’s so much being done around coastal management, along with finding solutions to infrastructure challenges through significantly increased visitor numbers in spots like Hot Water Beach, Hahei and Whangapoua. I get great personal satisfaction from being able to help constituents with their concerns and issues. For the average person, it’s not always easy to find your way through the policies of local government. I don’t claim to be an expert in this particular area but being able to crystallise an issue and get the right people to resolve it is always very satisfying. tony.fox@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Murray McLean

MERCURY BAY COUNCILLOR “Mercury Bay is the fastest growing part of the Coromandel with approximately half the building consents issued by our Council in this ward. I believe we, as a team, elected members and staff, have been responsible and forward thinking in looking after our community. While maintaining core infrastructure and planning additions, additional facilities such as footpaths, boat ramps, dune planting and many other activities have been undertaken to enhance our community. I am fortunate to play a part in a team that is making it happen.” murray.mclean@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

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Looking out for

Local

Meet your local Community Board members who have been busy over the past 12 months working with our Council staff on projects around your neighbourhood.

Here’s a snapshot of what’s been going on… 7


Thames Community Board Area projects

PORRITT PARK The Powerco Skate Park is complete and being well used by a whole age range of kids. We worked with skaters on the design of this family-friendly skate and scooter park and a new water fountain and drinking bottle filler have been installed thanks to the sponsorship of Veolia – our Council’s water services contractor. The design allows easy access for users in wheelchairs and has two dispensers to fill water bottles.

THAMES COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTRE Construction on this indoor multi-sport facility is expected to be finished in late 2017. The gymnasium is for the joint use of Thames High School and the community and has financial backing from our Council, Thames High School, corporate sponsors and community fundraising. With the existing high school gym, it makes a twocourt facility that will meet tournament requirements for netball, basketball, gymnastics and many other popular sports. www.tcdc.govt.nz/thamessportsfacilities

THAMES CENTENNIAL POOL The Centennial Pool at Taipari Park was built in the 1960s and is nearing end of life. We’ve brought forward $53k from the 2017/18 budget for a feasibility study into a sub-regional aquatic centre.

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THAMES WAR MEMORIAL MONUMENT RESTORATION The war memorial in Thames is unmissable: it towers on a hill overlooking town and is a prominent reminder of the sacrifices made by our nation’s World War I generation. Thanks in part to a Lotteries Grant of approximately $60k, the Memorial’s been restored with lighting installed in time for Anzac Day 2017. The Monument can now be picked out in appropriate colours at different times of the year. www.tcdc.govt.nz/thameswarmonument

THAMES CONNECT A new website is up and running, to share community information, resources and skills, thanks to funding by the Thames Community Board and Inlet Ltd. www.thamesconnect.org.nz


Your Thames Community Board Diane Connors (Chair)

“I’m extremely proud of our community, particularly the young people of Skate Revolution Crew, who worked with Council to deliver a great new skate and scooter park in the middle of town mid-2017. I remember initial talk about it being located out the back of town somewhere (out of sight, out of mind) but always believed it should be located somewhere highly visible and easy to access. Riders spend hours perfecting their tricks and we should be giving them somewhere to show off their talents. I championed this project for years and with much patience and perseverance we now have a brilliant facility, designed in conjunction with the end users. It is very well used by guys and girls aged from 2 to 25 plus I’m so pleased our Board was able to provide a space for our local young people and visitors – they are out in the fresh air, being physically active, socialising and off their phones!” diane.connors@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Catherine Croft (Deputy Chair)

“I’ve enjoyed getting to know areas of our community I hadn’t met before. It’s been an absolute privilege to find out what is important to them, so I can represent them fairly. This has been going to community events, and committee meetings, hearing about what people are concerned about, but also excitingly what they want to see in the future for their community.” catherine.croft@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Mike Veal

“The real gratification for me comes when we reach an agreement for a ‘tangible’ project to happen. Some examples include upgrading our CCTV camera system, funding towards the Hauraki Prospectors Association, for their working steam engine and Steampunk and the build of the new Thames Community Recreation Centre and Porritt Park Skate Park. Although these projects were well underway before my time, I like knowing I was involved in some final details. I look forward to being involved in more of these type projects, of which there are plenty in the pipeline.” mike.veal@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Lester Yates

Lester has worked in Thames for the past 50 years. This is his third term with the Thames Community Board. lester.yates@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

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Coromandel-Colville Community Board projects

COROMANDEL TOWN TRAFFIC IMPROVEMENTS Two stakeholder forums have been held to consider options to improve traffic flow in the town centre - including vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian traffic.

COROMANDEL CITIZENS’ HALL STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES Because Coromandel Town has a unique artistic and heritage character that’s highly valued by the local community some guidelines have been developed following input and feedback from the community. At its August 2017 meeting the Board endorsed the guidelines, which looks at things like street furniture design, vehicle and pedestrian routes and parking. The guidelines have no regulatory or legislative status but provide informational reference and resource for any planning or development activities that take place within the town.  www.tcdc.govt.nz/corostreetscape

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Plans for the Barry Brickell Memorial Performance Stage proposed for Hauraki Reserve are well underway as is an upgrade to the Coromandel Citizens’ Hall. The stage and surrounds would be a tribute to the Coromandel potter, railway builder, conservationist and author who passed away in January 2016. The Board has funded the consultation, design and planning requirements to the consenting stage. This is a collaboration between the Board and the community, with the community partner at this stage being the Driving Creek Railway Arts and Conservation Trust. Meanwhile plans to refurbish the Hall are well advanced. The main hall will be repiled, the eastern wall replaced to return it to its original configuration. www.tcdc.govt.nz/corohallproject


Your Coromandel-Colville Community Board Peter Pritchard (Chair)

HANNAFORD’S WHARF An application to the government’s Tourism Infrastructure Fund has been supported by the Board, which if successful will help with improvements to this Wharf, which is used by the Auckland ferry, recreational and charter boat users. The application is for road sealing, signage and a visitor shelter. Meanwhile the Board is also looking at parking bylaws around Hannaford’s, as well as continuing to support the Park and Ride being developed at the Mussel Kitchen. An announcement on the successful applications to the Tourism Infrastructure Fund will be in late 2017/early 2018.

HAURAKI ROAD BIKE PARK A pump track for cyclists at the former landfill site at Hauraki Rd will be up and running by the end of summer 2018 thanks to the efforts of the Spirit of Coromandel Trust and volunteers and financial support from the Board. The track is a component of a bike park that will be available for public recreational use and which has been a long-time goal of the Trust. The pump track will resemble the one in Thames on Moanataiari Creek Rd (pictured).

“In the past 12 months we’ve been able to secure a long-term solution for access to water for the Colville Community, and to also aid their amazing Social Services team towards achieving further progress of the Colville Community Facilities Projects. Another project nearing completion is recognising the traffic parking issues around the Hannaford’s Wharf, where our Board has helped facilitate the sealing of the access and turnaround area, and are assisting with the development of a Park and Ride facility.” peter.prithcard@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Jan Autumn (Deputy Chair)

“Before I was elected to Board this term, I was part of a group that met regularly with Council representatives to help develop the Streetscape design and implementation guidelines within the Heritage Zone of Coromandel Town. In the last six months this has been achieved, so it’s been very satisfying to have been instrumental in seeing it finalised and adopted.” jan.autumn@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

John Walker

John is serving his eighth term on the Board, with six of those years as Chair. John was awarded the Queens Service Medal in 2012 for his services to the community and says it was one of his proudest moments. john.walker@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Keith Stephenson

“I look back with a proud heart at the bike park (on Hauraki Road) starting to get some traction with the support of the community and the general interest of the kids in the concept of having their own bike park in Coromandel. The other thing is having planted thousands of kauri trees as a result of the Great Cranleigh Kauri Run. We get a tree from Kauri 2000 for each contestant in the run and a lot of the runners come for a planting day in the winter. We’ve been planting the kauri from Waikawau to Coromandel Town along the route of the run and the first trees we planted are really well established now.” keith.stephenson@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

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Whangamata Community Board projects

WILLIAMSON NIB KERB PARK

PROGRAMME The First Phase of the nib kerb programme has been completed with the final two streets (Beverley Terrace and Hinemoa Street) finished in August 2017. The Community Board are planning to start Phase Two of the programme in 2018/2019. This programme is to install mountable or flush kerbs (so people can still drive over the kerbs and park on the road berms) while retaining the “beach” feel of the town and not build more footpaths.

WHANGAMATA BEACH ROAD PLAYGROUND UPGRADE The new playground is now a popular attraction in Whangamata and is being well used now throughout the entire year.

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Over the past 10 years the use of Williamson Park has grown substantially, which includes playing host to an increasing number of events over the peak summer season and into the shoulder months. The Park has been rejuvenated with the removal of up to 100 old pines and introducing native coastal planting, a new boardwalk and a car park redesign. Meanwhile resource consent is being drafted to look at hosting events over a 15 – year period and should be lodged by the end of 2017. This consent (which will be publicly notified) will also cover existing traditional events to ensure that they can continue to run in the future.  www.tcdc.govt.nz/williamsonparkrc

STORM DAMAGE Several significant weather events in early 2017 (including Cyclone Cook which saw a civil defence emergency declared for the Coromandel) significantly impacted Whangamata and surrounding areas. The cost to the ward is still being calculated but is upward of $1M in repair and remediation work, including repairing significant slip damage at Onemana.

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Your Whangamata Community Board Ken Coulam (Chair)

“The big issue we’ve faced in the past 12 months is the flooding resulting from three severe weather events in a very short time. The water table is dropping and hopefully the town will return to normal for summer 2017-18. Let’s just hope next winter doesn’t deliver too much rain. I’m also pleased to see the improvements at Williamson Park as well as the Beach Rd playground being well used by the community.” ken.coulam@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Ryan Thompson (Deputy Chair)

This is Ryan’s second term with the Community Board. Ryan works as a teacher in Whangamata and is involved in adventure racing including trail running and cycling. ryan.thompson@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Kay Baker

“Over the past 5 months I have been in constant contact with Sports Waikato to try to find a way forward to get our swimming pool here in Whangamata covered so that we would have an all year round facility. I have received the quotes and am now starting a feasibility study with Sports Waikato’s help. It would be a great asset if we can get this done.” kay.baker@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Evelyn Adams

“This the first time I’ve been involved in local government and it’s been a huge, eye-opening experience, because there’s so much work that needs to go on in the background by Council to get work done. I feel so very privileged to have been voted into this Board and to hear from our local community as to what we need to look at now but ahead over the next 10 years. It’s very exciting to see where Whangamata and the surrounding areas is aiming for the future. Once again thanks for having faith in your local board and know that anytime you have an idea or an issue we are here to listen and work on your behalf.” evelyn.adams@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

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Tairua-Pauanui Community Board projects

TAIRUA WHARF Since its original construction (mid 1860s), the wharf has been rebuilt 4 times, the most recent in 1963. This latest refurbishment in 2017 saw the demolition of the old wharf and a new wharf built,and pontoon installed. and the existing wharf pontoon refurbished. The existing ramp was widened and extended to improve launching at low tide and two new 30-metre floating pontoons were added on. The facility wharf was is open to the public from October from July with the official opening 30 September 2017. www.tcdc.govt.nz/tairuawharf

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ROYAL BILLY POINT This boat ramp redevelopment including a new pontoon and replacement of the existing wharf pontoon at Pauanui kicked off in July 2017, with $65,000 allocated towards design and consenting costs. A further $490,000 has been allocated in the 2018/19 financial year towards construction. The Community Board will be seeking a further $510,000 through the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan for the 2018/19 financial year for construction.

PARADISE COAST BRANDING A community-led initiative, supported by the Whangamata and Tairua-Pauanui Community Boards, in conjunction with Experience Pauanui, Tairua Information Centre and Enterprise Whangamata. The core purpose of branding the South-Eastern Ward (made up of three main towns, Pauanui, Tairua and Whangamata) to create a united umbrella brand, enabling the private sector to promote themselves as a bigger commercial area to the tourist industry and bring awareness to the domestic market. A free ‘toolbox’ of marketing material has been put together for business community use.


Your Tairua-Pauanui Community Board Bob Renton (Chair)

PAUANUITAIRUA TRAIL The Board has helped with financial support to enable the Hikuai District Trust to successfully complete 4.2km of a walk and cycle trail which when finished completely will connect Tairua and Pauanui. The trail currently comprises 80m of boardwalk, 7 bridges and 15 donated named seats. A resource consent application for the next section of the Trail (Duck Creek to Hikuai) was lodged with Waikato Regional Council in May 2017. www.pauanuitairuatrail.org.nz

“This term we’re really starting to focus on infrastructure, which will see the upgrade of theTairua/ Pauanui reticulated drinking water standards to the 2008 DWS. At a local level our Board is continuing to focus on a prudent financial management policy delivering one of the lowest rate increases for the 2017/18 Financial Year, while still maintaining and replacing existing local assets, like the new Tairua Wharf.” bob.renton@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Warwick Brooks

(Deputy Chair) “I’ve been working hard in the Tairua community, meeting with many organisations and groups to see how we are promoting our area. For me it’s about getting alongside these associations and their many dedicated people here in Tairua, encouraging them to work with our Board and Council in their endeavours to make our community ‘The Place’ to holiday and to reside in.” warwick.brooks@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Sarah Campbell

“My first year has been an absolute learning curve. I went into the elections with a clear focus on rebranding the South-Eastern Ward (Pauanui, Tairua and Whangamata) to create a united umbrella for businesses to promote themselves as a bigger commercial identity to the tourist industry and bring awareness to New Zealanders of the great recreational lifestyle, arts and heritage that can be enjoyed with family and friends in our slice of paradise. This work is on-going with amazing support coming in from business and community leaders who are all proud to start calling the South-Eastern Ward, Paradise Coast” sarah.campbell@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Brent Turner

Brent has lived in and out of Tairua for over 60 years, from Tairua School, to finishing at Thames High School when the Kopu-Hikuai road opened in 1967. In 1968 he began building houses and since 1980 he has owned and operated several businesses around Tairua. brent.turner@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

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Mercury Bay Community Board projects

WHITIANGA TOWN CENTRE UPGRADE The first stage of the construction will start in April 2018 and will be an upgrade of Albert St (from Hannan Rd to Campbell St) including a plaza on Taylor’s Mistake. Stage Two will be from the plaza, down and along Taylor’s Mistake, the Esplanade and playground through to the Whitianga Wharf. www.tcdc.govt.nz/whiticentreupgrade

KAIMARAMA CEMETERY The Ferry Landing Cemetery is nearing capacity so we have started work on a new site being developed off SH25 out of Whitianga. It will be called the Kaimarama Cemetery, which is the historic name iwi and early settlers of the district used for the area surrounding the new cemetery site. The next phase is sealing the main access access road, an entrance way and building berms for burial plots. A gateway entrance was erected late 2017. www.tcdc.govt.nz/kaimaramacemetery

PROPOSED CYCLEWAY STRATEGY FOR MERCURY BAY The development of a strategy to look at cycleways, bicycle-friendly routes and related infrastructure to support cycling around Whitianga and then the wider Mercury Bay has been approved by the Board. The first step will be looking around the Whitianga township area at opportunities, while talking to a variety of interested parties and stakeholders.

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BOAT RAMP IMPROVEMENTS

PUBLIC TOILETS UPGRADE There have been several new public toilets either built or improved within Mercury Bay, to cater for increased visitor numbers. At Hot Water Beach there are now toilets at the Bull Paddock car park while at Hot Water Beach main car park the toilets have been upgraded.

A plan to improve existing boat and wharf facilities around Whitianga over the next few years is being investigated as part of a new Boat Ramp Strategy for Whitianga. It also takes into account the current and future needs of the wider Mercury Bay boating community. www.tcdc.govt.nz/mbboatramps


Your Mercury Bay Community Board Paul Kelly (Chair)

“I’ve been heavily involved in the upcoming Mercury Bay 250 Cook commemorations, which behind the scenes has involved developing relationships with central government and other councils around the country. I’m also fortunate to have been able to forge good friendships with our local iwi Ngati Hei through this project. I’m also extremely pleased to see the Whitianga Town Centre upgrade come to fruition after many years of planning.” paul.kelly@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

HISTORIC FERRY LANDING UPGRADE The Historic Ferry Landing is one of the oldest working stone wharves in the Southern Hemisphere. We have just completed a total refurbishment of the wharf including restoring the structure, footpath and entrance area as well as new lighting and signage. www.tcdc.govt.nz/oldferrylanding

Rekha Giri-Percival

(Deputy Chair) “This is my first term working in local government and it’s been thoroughly enjoyable, with many interesting conversations and deciphering of some gnarly three letter acronyms along the way. Instances of tree vandalism have really disappointed me over the past year and to combat that our Board organised to replace some of those trees – with more to come I hope! Alongside the new plantings are large signs which give the history of the planting and spells out we will not tolerate destruction of our trees. Other projects like finalising the designs for the playground upgrade and starting the dialogue with the community for an ungraded skate park in the town centre are also exciting. rekha.percival@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Deli Connell

“In my second term as a Community Board member I’ve focused on support and advocacy work for local youth, to get them engaged in community matters, and help provide a better understanding of what local government work involves. Conservation and biodiversity issues are also forefront for me as we preserve and enhance what is so special to the Coromandel.” deli.connell@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

Bill McLean

“Highlights for me have been dealing with coastal erosion projects, the hugely popular the upgrade of the Old Ferry Landing Wharf and surrounds and the establishment of a new cemetery. Seeing the Town Centre upgrade start to happen is also pleasing. To add in the overdue category is storm water management at Sarah Avenue in Whitianga, which we are pushing to progress. There are many other projects ‘on the books’ and given the way Mercury Bay is growing, I see that the work flow will continue, for all the right reasons.” bill.mclean@extranet.tcdc.govt.nz

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ChargeNet CEO Steve West charges his EV at the launch of the Thames fast charger in September 2016.

Have EV will travel Distance is no longer an enemy to electric vehicle (EV) driver s, on the Coromandel , thanks to a net work of fast charging stations located at strategic points around the State Highway 25 loop.

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he Coromandel EV Scenic Touring Route puts much of the district within reach of EVs, with fast chargers at Thames, Coromandel Town, Whitianga and Tairua. The Thames charger went live in September 2016 and Tairua was operational early in 2017. The Whitianga and Coromandel Town chargers should be live in October 2017. The potential for a fifth fast charger in Whangamata is being investigated. Our Council and the Thames Community Board worked with Charge Net NZ and Powerco to install the Thames charger. Funding from the Government’s Low Emission Vehicles Contestable Fund, administered by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority, provided $175,000 to cover half the cost of the other three chargers. Charge Net NZ, Powerco, and our Council provided the other 50%.

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The user-pays fast DC charger units provide an 80% charge in 10 to 25 minutes and can be accessed via an RFID card, which drivers tap against the charging unit to activate, or via a smart phone app. To sign up to the system, go to the Charge Net NZ website www.charge.net.nz With fast chargers already in Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga, and more planned for elsewhere in the Waikato, the Coromandel is well within range of much of the EV-driving population of New Zealand. “We are looking at the bigger picture in terms of promoting the beauty of the Coromandel and renewable energy use and electric vehicles support that approach,” says our Strategic Relationships Co-ordinator, Daniel McGrath. “We have local EV owners, plus many people in Auckland, Hamilton and elsewhere who have holiday homes here are switching to EVs and we

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Coromandel EV Scenic Touring Route Thames Library carpark 503 Mackay St

An EV driver’s perspective “These fast chargers are a game changer for the Coromandel. A lot of EV owners are still getting their confidence around driving distances but the network here will be a real magnet for EV drivers from Auckland and elsewhere, knowing that they can get around here and recharge quickly. The chargers will also give locals the confidence that an EV is a real alternative. Most people charge their EVs at home overnight, but if you forget or you’re going across the Coromandel, you’ve now got a quick recharge at hand. The variety of EVs on the market has grown considerably in the last year with new models becoming available. The manufacturers are struggling to keep up with demand.”

Tairua 6 Tokoroa Rd Whitianga 2 Lee St Coromandel Town 44 Woollams Ave Whangamata Potential charger being investigated

John Leenman, Thames EV owner

want to help accommodate them on the Coromandel,” Mr McGrath says. “We wanted to attract those people to the Coromandel to use their electric vehicles without them worrying about not reaching our most popular tourist spots.” There are also 11 other publicly available chargers in the Coromandel listed on the www.plugshare.com website, with more on the way. Most of these are in motels and campgrounds but two are at cafes. They’re not as fast as the ChargeNet stations though, taking about five hours for a charge.

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ELECTRIC FUTURE? EV use is growing and there are now more than 3,000 battery electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles currently registered in New Zealand. This is only 0.1% of the country’s total private car fleet, but that number could grow much higher. The government has a goal of increasing the number of EVs on our roads to 64,000 by the end of 2021. They plan to do this by pushing the uptake of EVs in government car fleets, exempting EVs from the Road User Charge and other initiatives. In fact, the EECA’s 50% contribution to three of the Coromandel’s fast charging stations is part of the government’s commitment to encourage EV uptake. The government is doing all this because it believes increasing EV use will help us meet our Paris Agreement obligations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30% of 2005 levels by 2030. The BusinessNZ Energy Council thinks it possible that the number of EVs in the country could rise to 470,000 by 2030, making a key contribution to reaching the Paris Agreement carbon emissions targets. And, according to Stanford University economist Tony Seba, almost all petrol vehicles will be off the road by 2030, replaced by electric vehicles in a transportation revolution (follow the rethink.com link in Find out more for more on Tony Seba’s forecast). l

“WE WANTED TO ATTRACT THOSE PEOPLE TO THE COROMANDEL to use their electric vehicles without them worrying about not reaching our most popular tourist spots.”

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Winter Weddings The Coromandel is a short drive from some of New Zeal and’s l argest cities and with a rel axed l aid-back atmosphere it offer s the perfect location to hold your wedding.

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e have a wide selection of ceremony and reception venues, accommodation facilities and planning services, which all have the expertise to help make your day perfect. Choosing a wedding date is one of the first and most important decisions you’ll make in planning your big day, however getting married in the Coromandel will be the perfect celebration whatever time of year you choose.

Getting married in the cooler months can definitely be a blessing – it could save you a significant amount as most venues classify April through to October as their ‘off-peak’ season and as such most offer a discount to encourage winter weddings. It will also be the quiet season for other suppliers like photographers, accommodation and florists so you’ll find them a lot easier to book. There are many additional benefits for an off-peak wedding such as planning your wedding in a much shorter timeframe because more

23 Photo: Felicity Jean Photography www.fleaphotos.co.nz


Photo: Felicity Jean Photography www.fleaphotos.co.nz

“Winter is often overlooked but it can be an

vendors are available. Shortly after the Coromandel due to their prime peak-season head along to the Wedding location and are only available during enchanting season giving you the ability to Shows in Auckland, Hamilton and the off-peak period. By planning Tauranga to meet the vendors, often a winter wedding, you’re far more you can book just a couple of months likely to secure the venue you want, in advance. when you want, without peak season Winter is often overlooked but it prices. Being indoors for your offcan be an enchanting season giving peak wedding pulls everyone closer, you the ability to create a wedding and tends to have a more intimate with a magical, romantic atmosphere. feel and personal touch. With heart Likewise, an autumn day in the Coromandel can often be relied upon warming menus, mulled wines, snuggly throws, cosy log fires, endless for a clear bluebird sky with just a touch of winter’s crispness in the cocktails, creamy hot chocolates and fairy lights – these bring people air. Imagine walking along one of the Coromandel’s idyllic beaches together creating a relaxing vibe for all. Brides tend to spend a lot of amongst a backdrop of autumn’s stunning natural rustic colours. money on candles and lights, but with it not getting dark till after 9pm Finding the perfect wedding venue can be a daunting task. There is in the summer, they often aren’t fully appreciated. In the off-peak season, a huge range of styles and options available on offer throughout The having this lighting will really help to create a romantic atmosphere. Coromandel. From fine dining with exquisite cuisine to seaside à la There are fewer public holidays during the cold months – which is ideal carte service there are plenty of picturesque and relaxed settings to host if you’re planning a multi-day event, as your guests’ accommodation your reception. Wedding venues quickly become booked solid through options are likely to be plentiful and more budget-friendly. Furthermore, summer months, which means your dream venue may be unavailable your wedding is unlikely to clash with your guests’ own holiday-weekend for a year or more. The local surf clubs are a popular venue across the plans. Why not make it easy for your guests, especially those coming

CREATE A WEDDING WITH A MAGICAL, ROMANTIC ATMOSPHERE.”

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from afar who’ll be requiring accommodation. Accommodation for the wedding guests is particularly easy in the off peak period with many holiday homes available to rent on book-a-bach and other such websites. We suggest you add a simple note on the footer of your invitations recommending they view www.thecoromandel.com for all their travel requirements. You may also like to create your own wedding itinerary including all the services you’ll be using for your wedding. This can be developed on the trip planner page of www.thecoromandel.com and then all you need to do is insert the link on your invitations, your guest will then know where everything is with contact details and directions. No matter how thoroughly you plan, there’s always a chance mother nature will have her own agenda. Most brides’ biggest fear for off-peak weddings, after having a  no-show groom, is likely  the forecast. Rain. Photo: Felicity Jean Photography www.fleaphotos.co.nz Photo: Nuance Photography & Videography nuancephotography.co.nz

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Photo: Nuance Photography & Videography nuancephotography.co.nz Photo: Felicity Jean Photography www.fleaphotos.co.nz Photo: Nuance Photography & Videography nuancephotography.co.nz

Do you get upset and cancel your wedding? Definitely not! Choosing the best professional suppliers in the Coromandel will ensure you need not feel at the mercy of the elements. Rain can make your wedding day a highlight, not a hassle; in fact, rain can make for some beautiful wedding photos. Most cultures even view rain on the big day as a sign of good luck. Originally from Whitianga, Nuance Photography and Videography couple, Aaron and Kyla Davenport, know Coromandel weddings like the back of their hand and love the off-peak season. “Getting married on the Coromandel is a dream come true and one of the greatest decisions you will ever make. The Coromandel offers golden beaches, gorgeous islands, majestic cliffs, waterfalls and  caves. A little rain enhances this natural beauty on the Coromandel. We’ve noticed due to the warm tropical weather, sometimes in the peak season there is a risk, like this year, of Cyclones. You can’t beat a sunny winter’s day in the Coromandel, and trust me, there are plenty of them,” they say. “When we meet to discuss the big day with our clients, we advise them not to panic if it rains. We remind them that in the movies, to make it look like its actually raining, they use huge monsoon buckets with

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Whangamata Surf Club – Arrow Florist & Gifts.

extraordinary amounts of water. The truth is it’s hard to detect rain with a lens. This is the good news. It very rarely rains all day and as long as we can keep our equipment dry you will get mostly rain-free photos. We utilise your bridal party, umbrellas (which make for great props) and get out and do it. Never underestimate a good videographer and photographer.” Be excited about rain on your wedding day and use it to your advantage. Not only can rain create a romantic backdrop and dreamy atmosphere, but a bit of rain also gives the opportunity for creativity with your everlasting photographic memories. It’s no secret that overcast, cloudy skies make for ambient, flattering lighting, and if you’re lucky, you have the chance of magical rainbows and a pot of gold appearing. Clouds form an epic dramatic backdrop and it is much easier than on a harsh sunny day. You don’t have to worry about squinting from the harsh sun and no sunburn. An added bonus is it’s not every day that you have an army of people prepared to hold your umbrella. Plan ahead and find umbrellas that suit your bridal look and theme. Another advantage to off-peak weddings is being able to embrace gorgeous fabrics deemed too heavy for summer. Stay warm by wearing sophisticated silk or a heavy lace dress with sleeves. Also add a shrug

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which essentially gives you two looks. “Wedding flowers that are in season will be far more affordable than those that are not in season,” says Jessica Mulrennan, owner of Arrow Florist and Gifts.  “As the hellebores and dusky pink proteas start to really pop through the lush foliage of your bouquets, we are reminded that winter weddings are anything but dull,” she adds. The Coromandel is also a great spot for Hens and Stag Do’s. With numerous outdoor pursuits for entertainment; a round of golf, great walks, fishing charters, stand up paddle boarding, surf lessons, yoga, or simply enjoy the relaxing beach environment with a spot of shopping, lunch, craft beer, wine and cocktails at the local bars. If pampering is more your thing, there are plenty of wonderful beauty parlours to choose from across the Coromandel. What better place to kick back in the cooler months than the hot pools? The Lost Spring in Whitianga offers a special paradise of therapeutic natural thermal spring pools with poolside service. Enjoy delicious Pacifica cuisine at our onsite Restaurant, and pamper yourself with massage therapies and beauty treatments at The Lost Spring Day Spa. Honeymoon destinations on The Coromandel include beautiful lodges, boutique accommodation, iconic kiwi baches and bed and breakfasts, all surrounded by stunning beaches, bushclad ranges and laidback communities. Escape to The Coromandel for a romantic weekend, it’s sure to be good for your soul! Photo: Photography by Kylie Rose and flowers by Arrow Florist and Gifts

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Unforgettably beautiful and glorious year round, the Coromandel offers endless locations for your special ceremony. From pristine rainforest backdrops to barefoot on the beach, dream wedding destinations don’t come better than on The Coromandel. There are a range of venues available that can cater to varying numbers and to a variety of budgets, here are our top 10 picks in no particular order: • T angiaro Kiwi Retreat, Port Charles – www.kiwiretreat.co.nz/weddings • B ushland Park Lodge and Retreat, Whangamata www.bushlandparklodge.co.nz • V illa Toscana, Whitianga – www.villatoscana.co.nz/weddings • S tone Terrace Weddings, Hot Water Beach – www.stoneterrace.co.nz • M ercury Bay Estate, Cooks Beach – www.mercurybayestate.co.nz • L eadfoot Ranch, Hahei – www.leadfootfestival.com/weddings

Photo: Arrow Florist and Gifts

• G rand Mercure Puka Park, Pauanui – www.pukapark.co.nz/weddings • Th e Lodge, Pauanui – www.pauanuilodge.com • T e Kouma Harbour Cottages, Coromandel – www.tekoumacottages.co.nz • F light Club Ballroom, Whitianga – www.flightclubballroom.co.nz If you’re planning to get married on any of the beaches or reserves in the Coromandel, or looking at hiring one of our halls, you will need to contact us and make a booking. Our beaches, reserves and halls are popular venues so be sure to book early to avoid disappointment. Some of our reserves do not allow marquees so contact our customer services team to find out more phone: 07 868 0200 or email: customer.services@tcdc.govt.nz. l

More information If the thought of planning your wedding sounds a little too much why not employ the expertise of a wedding planner? If you’re keen to tackle the challenge yourself, be assured there are many services such as makeup artists, florists, hairdressers, caterers and celebrants, all available in the Coromandel. For more information on weddings in the Coromandel see: • www.thecoromandel.com/travel-planning/weddings. • www.weddingscoromandel.co.nz. • www.experiencepauanui.co.nz/weddings. • You can also join the newly formed ‘Coromandel Wedding Vendors’ group on Facebook.

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H O ME S

F E ATURE

The Bedford Bunch’s Bach Nestled down a quiet cul-de-sac, one back from the expansive white stretch of Matarangi Beach, is Mark and Diane Bedford’s home away from home.

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he two-storeyed, four-bedroom property is the third place the Tauranga couple have owned at one of the Coromandel’s more popular holiday destinations, and was built to cater for the couple’s growing brood. Between the pair they have six grown-up children, two grandchildren and another one on the way. So when you think “Brady” – the Bedfords could come in a pretty close second. “Before we started the build three years ago, we’d all be staying on the section in the shed with some in tents,” laughs Mark. “It was very much glamping styles. We had the gas califont for heating, an outdoor shower, as well as a very large freezer and a microwave, so really, we had everything we needed.” When it came to the actual construction of the house, one of the prerequisites was providing a variety of spaces for family to fill. And since completion, Mark and Diane have held one of their children’s weddings there (with 80 guests, and a pre-wedding party for 100 guests), as well as hosting friends and family for holidays and weekends. “This is a place for all of us,” explains Diane. “It’s for romantic getaways for the couples, girls and boys weekends away, family school holidays and this year it will be the first Christmas we’ll spend here all together. It might not actually be the Christmas Day because we’re at the stage where there’s a whole other branch of in-laws and family obligations – but we will all get together and I’m really looking forward to the occasion.” The footprint of the property allows for larger groups of guests to stay. There are two bedrooms upstairs and two downstairs, one of which is a bunkroom housing six, large, single beds.

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The interior design has been cleverly pieced together by Diane, to capture a laid-back beach feel while maintaining a modern look. Polished stone floors are accentuated by patterned rugs. There are smart pieces of contemporary art, an eclectic collection of books and magazines to leaf through while lounging on one of the comfortable sofas, chairs or window seats. “We wanted a home that would flow, so we could have spaces and places to sit and just chill,” says Diane. That flow traverses between indoors to outdoors, with large bi-fold doors opening up to decks, one side is a covered section with the centrepiece being a huge outdoor fireplace that doubles as a pizza oven and has been used for the odd roast as well. “One of our sons-in-law is from Argentina, and he has roasted some wonderful meats using that fireplace,” says Mark. “Meanwhile the kitchen is large enough for everyone to get stuck in when it comes to meal times over the holidays. It’s always a combined family effort.” The gardens are also a shared passion for Mark and Diane, who have worked together, converting the back part of the section from what was mostly grass, to a haven of tropical and succulent plants leading through to a secluded outdoor bath area, ensconced behind a brush wall. The bath takes pride of place, resplendent with fittings cleverly crafted by the local plumber. Another touch is the large, extremely heavy stone hand basin, a present from Diane’s son, toted home as luggage on a trip from Bali. Mark and Diane are now finding they are frequenting their second home more often, particularly over the winter months. “It’s actually a beautiful time of year,” says Diane. “Over winter it’s tranquil, it’s peaceful but there’s

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still so much going on. You wouldn’t feel lonely as there’s still such a vibrant community going on here, from the local wine club to golfing and a group of road cyclists – still close to Whitianga and Coromandel Town for supplies.” Mark is a keen fisherman and cyclist, and Diane keeps up on many jaunts on her electric bike as well and the pair are often the only ones on the beach over the cooler months – apart from the hard-core surfers and fishers – as they walk their golden retriever Peggy. Diane’s affection for Matarangi stems back from years of holidaying here with her children. “Over summer it was sand castle competitions, loads of canvas tents because there weren’t many permanent homes and lots of fishing,” she recalls. “I felt comfortable letting the kids go around the walkways with their friends, there was a sense of freedom, and really there is still that quality about here still now.” It’s these types of experiences they want to share with others, and why they’ve also listed their place with Bachcare. They both agree having Bachcare manage their property as a holiday rental has been beneficial. “We often hear that there’s not enough accommodation over some weekends, so giving other people the opportunity to enjoy the Coromandel as much as we have seems only right,” says Mark. “With Bachcare you have someone coming on-site to welcome visitors, ensure the property is clean and tidy for when they arrive, and leave it in the same condition when they leave,” he says. “Bachcare will do everything from topping up the gas bottles, to providing clean linen if it’s required. They also vet visitors ahead of a stay, so we feel comfortable that people are going to treat our place like they would their own.” l The Bedford’s Matarangi property is available through Bachcare – Property ID 3242

Photographer : Matt Queree w w w.mattqueree.com

Above: Mark and Diane with Peggy the Retriever at their Matarangi property. Right: Diane’s daughters Sian and Ashlee enjoying the outdoor fireplace.

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Sentinel House – Coromandel Town What started as an excuse to enjoy great company and a nice dinner out ended in surprise and jubil ation for Deborah HideBayne and Duncan Bayne when the couple won t wo accol ades in the 2017 New Zeal and Institute of Architects (NZIA) Awards for the Waikato and Bay of Plent y region.

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he Baynes walked away with a Regional Housing Award and a Resene Colour Award for their self-build Coromandel Town home “Sentinel House,” designed by well-known architect, Ken Crosson and constructed by Baynes’ own eco-build business, Coromandel Construction Ltd. “When we started looking for design inspiration for our new family home we looked online, “explains Deb. “We found many great projects but they all seemed to be overseas, mainly in Seattle for some reason,” she laughs. “Then one day we found an image of a place we really liked and were delighted to find it was in Whangapoua on the Coromandel. It was designed by Ken and that’s how we found him,” she says. The NZIA website helped the couple design a brief, but they still weren’t convinced their modest budget and bold ideas would be something Ken would be keen to align with. It turns out Ken was, being impressed with how open and aspirational their brief was. “Ken really liked that we’d thought about the total life of the building and how our needs might change over the years,” says Deb. Building an energy efficient home was also important, with solar gains high up on the priority list, along with a good mix of public and private spaces. “We used clay brick on the outside of our home and painted it Resene Appliance White. We had identical cladding inside so it wraps all around and follows on through the walkways,” she says. Deb also works as a curator, and her husband is a potter in a former life, so they had a strong vision about wanting their home’s interior to have the look and feel of an art gallery. “We have used minimal detailing and deliberate use of art on the inside. We look at the house as being a neutral background in which to display objects and live in,” she says. “Our house is the quieter background in which the objects can do the talking.” In the NZIA Awards, the judges were captivated by many things, but

“OUR HOUSE IS THE QUIETER

BACKGROUND

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Breathtaking views in a comfortable and intimate environment.

space and Ken’s use of it, was a standout feature. One judge commented that the “spaces were a delight to inhabit” and the Baynes felt happy that this detail was so prominently acknowledged by them. “We knew that we wanted to make the most of the space we had, but we had to think about how to do this without just building a huge house,” explains Deb. She likens the 28m x 4.5m home as being designed like a box that opens out into a long line. They made the most efficient use of the space by dividing the areas into three parts. “We split the house into three and made each area two levels. The first section is a garage, combined with laundry and toilet, with bedrooms and bathrooms upstairs. The middle part offers a dining room, kitchen and bedroom and bathroom also. The last area to the right is just used as living space.” Although the house is narrow and the rooms not particularly large, they made clever use of high studs to ensure all the rooms have a spacious feel. When the judges visited themselves, Deb and Duncan still never believed they would win. “The judges seemed to genuinely love our home and could see that it worked and really understood our lifestyle choice,” says Deb. “Privacy away from living spaces was something we requested in our brief and the judges have picked up on that. We have older and younger children as well as a lot of guests, and we wanted them to feel a sense of privacy so the bedrooms are well away from the living area.” “It was gratifying to win and to feel that our risks paid off. Not everyone will be a fan, but to have the design validated by a whole group of architects was amazing,” she says. “We believe that design is something worth spending money on, and for us, getting the design right was crucial to the success of the project.” Coromandel Town was established in the mid-19th century as a colonial service centre for the district’s milling and goldmining operations and many of the pioneering houses still remain. The Baynes wanted their home to fit into the community aesthetically, but not necessarily in the traditional way people might think. “Nowadays if you want to add an extension to a very old property you will be encouraged to make the new part look new rather than blend with the old,” says Deb. “The building we’ve made will one day be considered old, so our rationale was that although we’re building a new house it won’t always be – at some point it will be old from back in 2017. It was more important to us that it was well-designed with sustainable materials and be an enduring piece of architecture for the town.” It’s also the ethos behind Deborah and Duncan’s company Coromandel Construction, which they started in 2005 specialising in projects where

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they can add their knowledge of design and eco – options into the new builds, alterations and extensions projects. And as proud as they are of their award-winning home, Deb firmly believes a building is only as “good as the life it can give you living in it”. So, the fact that their home is fit-for-their purpose, makes her happiest. l Architect:

Ken Crosson w w w.crosson.co.nz

Contractor :

Coromandel Construction Ltd w w w.coromandelconstr uction.co.nz

Photographer : Sam Hartnett w w w.samhartnett.com

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ADVERTO RIAL

Coastwood Homes Lockwood-Coromandel When you think about getting away from it all there is no pl ace more soothing to the soul than the Coromandel Peninsul a.

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ith surroundings that inspire life balance after stressful work weeks, there is nothing that can rival the accessibility, bounty and beauty of this natural showcase. This is why there are so many stunning holiday homes in the region, and another reason there are so many beautiful Lockwood homes to be found there. Weekend getaways and holidays should always be about recharging, filling up the tank and getting those life batteries back up to 5 bars. It stands to reason then that investing in a holiday home that’s number one feature is low maintenance, followed closely by healthy living and strength of structure should be your natural choice. Coastwood Homes have honed their skills doing just that, having refined the art of Lockwood living crafting beautiful solid timber homes for hundreds of happy holiday makers for generations. Relentlessly committed to quality and customer service, they are 14 time recipients of the coveted Lockwood Contractors of the year award. According to Katie McDonald, Sales Manager for the Coastwood team, the best time to visit your Lockwood holiday home is all year round! Here are some of her thoughts on what they consider important things to keep in mind when starting the journey towards building your holiday home; • Careful assessment of the site, making the best use of natural light and passive solar gains. • It is the sunny Coromandel so make the most of the climate with indoor outdoor flow and maximise any views • Get your living and bedroom spaces right. How many will be staying and how often? Holiday homes tend to become busy places with friends and family over long weekends and extended breaks. Having a mini haven in a bustling environment can make all the difference to your precious break time.

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• If you have a big open social kitchen planned, do you need to think about a scullery for stowing all those holiday essentials? • Extra packing space a must? Consider custom made bunks with room for extra linen or clothing storage, something the Coastwood team does particularly well. • Do you need a second living area for media or a rumpus room? Good to consider if there are lots of teenagers who need their own space. • Bespoke vanities in bathrooms allow for larger benchtops and extra storage for toiletries and towels. Coastwood are yet again masters at intelligent use of space in bathrooms and kitchens. • Outdoor showers are good for getting rid of all the sea salt and sand after a good day out fishing, exploring or simply soaking up the sun • Well connected decks that wrap around to make outdoor entertaining and access to the home easy. When combined with great floor plan design the result is a seamless connection to the outdoors. • Type and style of joinery and glass. Extra height joinery looks sensational and always brings that element of volumetric space and light, especially when combined with Lockwood sarked ceilings and structural laminated beams. Speciality glass to keep out damaging UV rays should be considered for the long term too. Lockwood offers a relaxing softer environment with the Scandinavian style Lockwood blonded timber option where the natural wood look doesn’t suit your style. Whether you want to explore your own Design and Build with Coastwood’s Architectural Draftsperson, or would prefer to use one of their customisable plan options, opt for a smarter eco-friendly choice and build your home with Lockwood, New Zealand’s Home. For Good. l


Enjoy your Coromandel Summer in style! Choose a beautiful family home or bach designed and built by Lockwood Coromandel, Coastwood Homes. Invest in a holiday home that’s number one feature is low maintenance followed closely by healthy living and strength of structure, it’s your natural choice.

Talk to the local experts, 14 time Contractor of the Year, Coastwood Homes, Kopu. VISIT THE COASTWOOD HOMES SHOW VILLAGE, MAIN ROAD, KOPU, THAMES PH 07 868 8733 | E coastwood@xtra.co.nz | www.lockwood.co.nz


H O ME S

F E ATURE

A good life with small things New Zeal and Gardener Editor-at-Large and Tairua bach owner Lynda Hallinan tells us why a small bach on a l arge section is her idea of holiday heaven.

Favourite thing about being a bach owner? Having a relaxed home away from home. Plus Tairua’s only a 1.5 hour drive, taking all the back roads, from our small farm in Hunua, so we can pop down for the weekend and arrive in time for a Friday night supper of fish and chips. What do you enjoy about Tairua as a place to holiday?

Gardening writer Lynda Hallinan appreciates the small things in life.

Everything’s there so we can just pack the kids and the dog in the car and go. Tairua has great family-friendly cafes, amazing food, a well-stocked supermarket, a fabulous gift store and art gallery, plus a hardware store that has lots of herb and vege seedlings to satisfy any impromptu gardening needs. At high tide we all go to the surf beach and at low tide the kids go crab-hunting and sprat-chasing at the estuary. What’s your view on the beauty of the original little baches still existing on the Coromandel? When we bought our bach it had been uninhabited for years and most people assumed we’d just pull it down, but I love the retro aesthetic of old fibrolite baches. They speak to us all of a simpler time and it’s a shame to see them pulled down. Tell us about the satisfaction/motivation for having a roadside vege/flower stall. I have a large garden and orchard at home and it always feels a bit naughty to abandon it over summer. I hate to see things go to waste so it’s a delight to pack the boot of the car with buckets of fresh flowers and baskets of produce to share with holidaymakers. Mind you, the kids spend all the profits on ice creams at the dairy! What are the benefits of having a bach that’s small? Our bach is only 42-square-metres but it suits us fine. When you have a small bach there’s less cleaning to do, and if there’s no TV and no mod cons there’s more time for arguing over card games late into the night! And a section that’s probably considered big now compared to modern urban lot sizes?

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Lynda’s home grown produce can be found on a stall outside her Tairua bach over summer (photos left and above).

As a gardening writer, I’ve always thought that the perfect house and garden combination is a very small house and a really huge garden! Our section’s over 800-square-metres, which is enormous by urban standards, but at the beach it’s helpful to have heaps of room to park a boat (or two) and pitch tents when friends come to stay.


Any tips for creating a bach garden that doesn’t take huge amounts of time to maintain? Grow what you want to eat, and don’t plant anything that can’t survive without regular pampering. We have a flower garden of perennial dahlias, alstroemerias, gladioli, rudbeckias and heleniums out the front, which were all chosen because they’re in full bloom over the summer school holidays when we’re basically living at the bach, and a large vege patch. I operate on a once-a-year-dig basis at the bach; we clear the whole patch in early September and plant everything at once, then walk away until summer, when we come back and eat it all. It’s a lucky dip but the soil’s rich and free-draining so it works. If you want a low-maintenance coastal garden, opt for plants with silver or grey foliage, as they are best able to cope with salt-laden winds and dry, sandy soil. How did you come up with the look for your renovated bach? I’m an obsessive op-shopper so the bach doubles as handy storage for all the collectibles I can’t find room for at home! Almost everything in it is second-hand, salvaged or recycled, from my late grandmother’s kitchen table to our $30 dinner set from a carboot sale in Piha, so there’s no stress if anything gets accidentally broken by the kids. The only splurge was the retro Orla Kiely and Lewis & Wood wallpapers, which I bought online from wallpaperdirect.com l *For more summer gardening advice, check out Lynda Hallinan’s public gardening page on Facebook. www.facebook.com/LyndaHallinanGardening Photographer : Sally Tagg

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B U I L D I N G / PLAN N IN G

Navigating the District Plan Building? Subdividing? Planning a development? Use our District Plan Portal to check the rules that apply to your property The District Plan controls the way land is used and subdivided in our district and what natural and cultural features should be protected. If you're thinking about building or subdividing, or if you're planning a development, you'll want to check the District Plan rules that apply to your property. We've made it much easier to do this with our new District Plan Portal, available through our website at www.tcdc.govt.nz/dpd

house, or subdividing a property, or the rules which apply to a zone or an overlay, such as Coastal Living Zone and the Historic Heritage Overlay.

On the portal you'll find our Line of Enquiry tool, which you can use to search the District Plan using a property address or a zone as a starting point.

Line of Enquiry also shows the planning maps for the selected property generated in our SMART Maps system.

The relevant rules are then extracted and provided in a printable document. For example, the rules for building a

SMART Maps is our web-mapping application that allows you to explore a collection of maps focused on property, planning, parks and reserves, cemeteries, hazards and much more. www.tcdc.govt.nz/smart

About the District Plan We are currently operating under two District Plans. The Operative District Plan became fully operative in 2010. Councils must review their District Plans every 10 years and the current review has been underway since 2012. Â We now have a Proposed District Plan, this is the new District Plan but it has some areas that are still subject to appeal (legal challenge). This means that the Operative District Plan rules may still apply in some cases. Check with our Customer Services team on 07 868 0200 if you're not sure which plan's rules apply in your circumstances.

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A digital version of both the Operative and Proposed District Plans is available through the District Plan Portal on our website: www.tcdc.govt.nz/dpd It is searchable and printable.


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Keeping up appearances

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A guide to looking after your Coromandel home

desire for a better lifestyle, low interest rates, and the Auckland ‘halo’ effect mean more people are thinking about the Coromandel as an option to either live permanently or purchase a second property. Since October 2014 there's been a 21.5% boost for property values in our District according to Quotable Value (QV) figures and during 2016-17 the annual increase was 15.5%. For those retiring, semi-retiring, looking for a different lifestyle or investment opportunities, the Coromandel is a cosmopolitan region – with people choosing to own property here ranging from sixth generation pioneer families, to Waikato farmers with the bach and big boat. One of the growth sectors in the Coromandel is the holiday accommodation industry, which has seen a casual ‘let’s rent out the bach to pay the rates,’ transform into a highly professional business to cater to domestic and international visitors. When it comes to maintaining your property, or if you’re building or planning to build,

here are some things to consider to keep your Coromandel property at a premium.

EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS Make sure you're ready for the next big weather event by getting to know your neighbours. Record their contact details so you can all check on each other's properties in the event of flooding or other damage from rain or slips. Our Council often can not inspect individual properties and it's up to the owners to make arrangements to ensure their property is OK. LEAKS AND MOULD Over winter the Coromandel can experience high levels of rain, so make sure stormwater disposal routes are clear and don't cause issues with neighbouring properties. Try to keep your house in a condition that doesn't encourage mould or damp. Keep your place well aired and remove mould as soon as it appears. Dampness is often from external sources – so check that gutters are clear – and downpipes and drainage are working. Vegetation happily growing in spouting

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is a common occurrence on the Coromandel. This can cause blockage and water penetration issues which could easily be avoided. Where the house has a suspended floor, check that the ground is dry and there are no leaks. If you own a property that has issues with weathertightness, it's a good idea to do regular maintenance checks, to help identify any further potential leaks and if needed, get in touch with a weathertightness consultant to assess the area, and follow with repairs as soon as possible. SMOKE ALARMS Working smoke alarms save lives. For those times when you use the bach or rent it out to others, ensure alarms are always in good working order and are installed in line with the legal requirements – the right type in the right places. So where is that? In every sleeping space or within 3

Photo: HBL – Hansen Builders & Landscapers Ltd

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meters of every sleeping space door and located on escape routes. They must have a hush facility with a minimum duration of 60 seconds. Smoke alarms may be battery powered and don’t need to be interconnected. KEEP YOUR HOME SAFE A safe home means peace of mind for yourself when you're not there, as well as for those who may be renting your place. All holiday rental homes need to be reasonably secure. If a security alarm system is installed, it needs to be working, to avoid needless worry if it gets activated when you’re not there. If you rent your property out you might want to consider meth checks. You can install an alarm – a meth minder detector system – and also check your insurance cover. All too often, people think their policy covers meth contamination, only to find it doesn’t. HEATING AND VENTILATION Good ventilation is important for maintaining healthy indoor air and reducing the amount of moisture, which actually makes your home easier to heat. The simplest way to ventilate a home, even in winter, is to open the doors and windows to allow fresh air in. For a rental property, a form of heating in any living room is required. If there’s a useable fireplace, the chimney needs to be safe and regularly cleaned. It’s best to permanently block off unusable fireplaces to prevent tenants using it and to reduce draught. Try to regularly service any ducted heating and ventilation systems as well. You might not realise, but any unflued gas heaters release moisture and pollutants into the indoor air during combustion.

Building work – what can you do? A number of things we do which are considered ‘building work’ are low risk, so don’t require a building consent. Exempted work is generally work that will not impact on the structural integrity or safety components of the building. Before you start a building project, contact our Council to see if a building consent is required, it could save you time and money down the track. EXEMPT BUILDING WORK Things that don't require a building consent include but are not limited to:: • Closing in existing veranda or patio This is with a floor area not exceeding 5 square meters. • Awnings As long as it: – (a) is on or attached to an existing building; and (b) is on the ground or first storey level of the building; and (c) does not exceed 20 square meters in size; and (d) does not overhang any area accessible by the public, including private areas with limited public access, for example, restaurants and bars. • Porches and verandas As long as it: – (a) is on or attached (b) is on the ground or first storey level of the building; and (c) does not exceed 20m2 in floor area; and (d) does not overhang any area accessible by the public, including private areas with limited public access, for example, restaurants and bars.

• Shade sails As long as it: – (a) doesn't exceed 50m2 (b) is no closer than 1m; and (c) is on the ground level, or, if in a building, on the ground or first storey level of the building. • Decks, platforms, bridges, boardwalks, etc. Building consents aren’t needed for work in connection with a deck, platform, bridge, boardwalk, or the like, so it's not possible to fall from 1.5m, even if it collapses. Construction must comply with the Building Code. So it doesn’t matter how minor the project is, all building work, including exempt work, must be carried out in accordance with the Building Act, the Building Code to ensure they are safe for people to use. Any exempt building work not completed in accordance with the New Zealand Building Code or the Resource Management Act may be subject to the enforcement provisions of either Act. Building work must also comply with any other relevant legislation, including: • Plumbers, Gasfitters, and Drainlayers Act 2006 • Gas (Safety and Measurement) Regulations 2010 • Electricity Act 1992 • Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010 • Resource Management Act 1991 • Fire and Emergency NZ Act 2017 • Health and Safety at Work Act 2015. ILLEGAL WORK – BUILDING WITHOUT BUILDING CONSENT You can’t get a retrospective building consent for work done without consent. If building work has

Photo: HBL – Hansen Builders & Landscapers Ltd

INSULATION From 1 July 2019 insulation is compulsory in all rental homes. Any new, replacement or top-up insulation installed in a rental home after 1 July 2016 must meet requirements that will apply from 1 July 2019. Ceiling and underfloor insulation must be installed, where it is reasonably practicable to install. Wall insulation isn’t compulsory.

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Some questions we get asked a lot Can I put a container on my section for storage? Very likely resource consent is needed. A building consent is not required if temporary and used for storage and meets spread-of-fire regulations. If the container was to change its use from temporary storage to another use e.g. workshop, retail store or habitable situation a building consent is required. Do I need a consent for demolition? Demolition of detached building of 3 storeys or less is exempt from requiring building consent. All related services must be capped, sealed or disconnected by qualified service providers. The site must be fully cleared, and our Council records and rating assessments need to be updated to correctly reflect the changes. If you suspect hazardous material is part of the project, you should contact Health and Safety at Work (to find out more about safe removal of the material). What if I want to do some work myself? It must be to appropriate standards set by the Building Code. Some work, notably gas, plumbing and electrical work, must be done by a registered professional. You need to check whether or not the work you propose to do requires a building consent and/or a Resource Consent before you start the building project. What are the rules about building fences? You can build a fence up to 2.5m in height from the supporting ground level without a building consent. If the fence is for a swimming pool or spa pool or over 2.5m you will need building consent. Over 2m high needs resource consent. Is it different for retaining walls? You can build a retaining wall without a building consent so long as it is no higher than 1.5m (and does not support any surcharge or any load additional to the load of the ground). But it must still comply with the Building Code. Always ensure there are soakage drains behind any proposed retaining wall. If you add a fence on top of the retaining wall, check whether or not a building consent is needed for the overall height of the retaining wall plus fence. What about making changes to garages, sleep-outs and sheds? Some of these do need a building consent and others are exempt. However, all must meet the Building Code and the requirements of our District Plan (e.g. site coverage, height to boundary, distance to boundary)

been done without a building consent, you may: • Receive an Infringement Notice and be fined; or • Receive a Notice to Fix to make the work compliant with the Building Code; or • Have to remove all illegal work; or • Have trouble selling the property or getting insurance payouts. However, the Building Act 2004 does allow you to apply for a Certificate of Acceptance (COA). A COA can only cover work that is visible – where the work can be inspected and can be seen to be compliant with the Building Code. URGENT WORK Urgent work is work that is required to be carried out immediately to prevent health issues or to prevent serious damage to a property e.g. waste water drains. The property owner must apply for a Certificate of Acceptance as soon as practicable after completion of the building work.

Garages (Car Sheds) and Carports. A building consent is required for a garage (car shed). But a carport that is no more than 20m2 in floor area, does not need a building consent so long as it is on the ground level. Floor area is the area within the structure supporting the roof. A carport is defined as a roofed structure for storing a vehicle that is permanently open on at least one side. Garden Sheds. You can erect a shed up to 10m2 in floor area with maximum height of 3.5m. The shed must also be its own height away from any residential accommodation or any legal boundary. All roof water must be disposed of on-site and in a manner that it does not have any effects on neighbouring properties. Photo: HBL – Hansen Builders & Landscapers Ltd Sleep-outs. All sleep-outs must be in conjunction with an existing dwelling and sited no closer than its own height to a dwelling or legal boundary. The sleep-out cannot be another dwelling. Building consent is not required if it meets certain conditions including it is less than 10m2 and has no sanitary facilities. Conversion of a detached garage to a habitable space such as a sleep-out is not a change of use as they are both SH (Sleeping Single Home). However it’s a good idea to meet the Building Code requirements for a habitable space, especially in the following areas: • A damp proof membrane under the slab or a suitable waterproof topping on the slab. • Finished floor level in relation to ground (requires 225mm to natural ground or 150mm to a paved surface), or adequate waterproofing membrane to walls. • Insulation of walls (including joinery) and roof space to meet building code requirements. • Appropriate underlay to both roof and wall cladding. • Structural considerations: • Bracing to walls (calculated as if there is no existing bracing) • Trusses at max 1200mm centres. • Windows and door openings (air seals/flashings etc.)

www.tcdc.govt.nz/regulatory

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Design for Life For homes with space in the right place

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ifemark is an independent certification system based on the design standards of accessibility, adaptability, usability, safety and lifetime value. Design features such as level entry onto decks and wide hallways mean homes with Lifemark approval are comfortable spaces to live in. Other simple design features include electric sockets and light switches that are in easy reach. Door, cupboard and tap handles that can be simply manoeuvered. Lifemark promotes universal design, meaning a home can be easily used by people of all ages and stages. This user-friendliness is one of the reasons our Council supports the Lifemark model for home design in our new District Plan. It’s all about future proofing our district’s housing stock, meaning there is a variety of good quality homes for our aging population in years to come. Our District Plan Manager Leigh Robcke says the Council heard feedback saying there wasn’t much choice for older people who want to live independently. Our population’s average age is one of the country’s highest, so it’s important there’s flexibility and quality. That’s why there have been amendments to the rules over minor units, or self-contained dwellings up to 50m2. Think granny flats and small houses. These used to require resource consent but through our District Plan review this requirement was removed; resource consent for a minor unit up to 50m2 is no longer required (in most situations). Here’s the big carrot for property owners; if their design is approved by Lifemark, they get to put up a bigger building – 60m2 – and this can be done without resource consent from our Council. So far the public have been enthusiastic about the changes. With the Lifemark approval, they’re getting more space, and it’s also giving them more food for thought about how to design their property so it suits them for many, many years into the future. It means that when it’s time for people with less mobility, say, to live there, their needs have already been taken into consideration. www.lifemark.co.nz l Lifemark design principles support things like wider hallways, improved lighting and intelligent design features to prevent slips, trips and falls, which allows ease of access for the elderly or people with disabilities so they can continue to live in their own homes.

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Relax & Recalibrate We know being on the Coromandel is good for your soul, but for an added boost of goodness there's an extensive range of retreats giving you the opportunity to slow down, relax and recalibrate.

OHUI RETREAT Ashram Yoga’s Ohui Retreat  is located on a beautiful 20-acre beachfront property at the northern end of Opoutere Beach. They run regular yoga and meditation courses, plus many other workshops and retreats throughout the year. They host a constant stream of travelers, yogis, students and wwoofers (Willing Workers on Organic Farms) who stay from one day to several months. “We welcome all, whether you are new to yoga or have been practising for many years or if you just want to spend some time at the beach,” says director of Ashram Yoga, Atma Okan.

Ashram Yoga.

Some of their regular events include: • Intensive yoga teacher training • Silent meditation retreats (3-day and 5-day) • Yoga revival weekends • Guest workshops • Personal/casual retreats • Group stays www.ashramyoga.com

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Heal th Retreats

SURF N STAY Katrina Millar from NZ Surf N Stay in Whangamata runs various beach side retreats throughout the year. Surf N Stay also organise unique retreats for groups and companies. These special days are filled with fun activities including surfing lessons, guided SUP, kayaking tours and yoga classes. Each retreat has a different theme, with a focus on food to create positivity. Their first retreat in October 2016 was YOGA-SURF-EAT, which was a huge success. "Everyone had a great time so we decided to continue," says Katrina.

wellness advocate. She says yoga is the core platform that underlies not just her physical body but her personal outlook on life. Christina also offers 8am morning yoga in Whangamata at the estuary access 23 from mid-December to March, and massage at Nourish. nourishmassage.co.nz Rose Kavanagh from Revegolution provides the food for the retreats with a focus on revolutionising vegetarian food. Rosie also offers on-site catering for private events or can provide dishes to complement an event.

The second retreat offered was held in November 2016 with a 'summer beach and salad' theme, and another in February 2017; ‘Sunset Evening Retreat SUP – YOGA – BBQ’. All the retreats are inspiring, beachside fun, and can incorporate yoga sessions, stand up paddle boarding (SUP) sessions, catered with vegetarian foods. The yoga is taken by Christina McGrath from Swell Fit Living. swellfitliving.com Christina is best described as a yogi-athlete-

From left: Katrina Millar, Christina McGrath and Rose Kavanagh.

“I develop menus and prepare healthy, nourishing and ultimately tasty cuisine. Everything is purely vegetarian, and can cater to gluten-free and vegan diets also,” says Rosie. www.facebook.com/revegolution Surf N Stay have upcoming retreats planned and provide accommodation as well as being a surf and SUP school for all year round lessons. They also provide Donut Island kayak tours. For more information check them out on Facebook, @NZsurfnstay or visit surfnstaynewzealand.com

MAHAMUDRA CENTRE Mahamudra Centre is an FPMT (Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition) Tibetan Buddhist retreat centre set in the stunning Colville Valley. The Mahamudra Centre offers various retreats, courses and events which are open to the general public. "You do not need to be Buddhist to attend however we do also provide more in-depth retreats and teachings for practicing Buddhists," says Sarah Brooks, Spiritual Programme Coordinator.

Photo: Sarah Brooks

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Their peaceful atmosphere and lovely gardens provide a tranquil, relaxing environment for individual or group retreats. Drop-in visitors are also welcome with accommodation and meals available. The facilities can also be rented by other groups looking for a place to explore spirituality and develop peace of mind. For further details see mahamudra.org.nz and follow them on Facebook www.facebook.com/MahamudraCentre

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Heal th Retreats INSPIRE WELLNESS Inspire Wellness is a beautiful new yoga studio next door to their Organic Shop and Café in Whangamata. "We hope you can join us for one of our yoga and nutrition retreats, some inspiring yoga classes and workshops, delicious food in our organic eatery, or to shop for some nutritious groceries and fresh produce in our organic shop," say Inspire owners Carrie and Jay. For more about their upcoming events see www.inspirewellness.co.nz or visit them at 606 Port Road, Whangamata.

SOME OTHER RETREATS MANA RETREAT CENTRE is a sanctuary nestled in the bush-covered hills of the Coromandel Ranges. They hold group retreats, workshops and professional development trainings for people to experience body-mind education, creative expression, spiritual exploration and renewal. The Mana Retreat Centre is a supportive space of beauty, inspiration and simplicity. manaretreat.com TE MOATA RETREAT CENTRE is situated within the Coromandel wilderness and lit by solar power, offering special meditation and sacred sites. The purpose built-meditation O U R

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hall offers an unparalleled experience of silence and simplicity, and is ideal for long silent meditation retreats. They offer a yearround programme of retreats and gatherings and is also available to hire for your own retreat. temoata.org EREMIA CHRISTIAN RETREAT is a sanctuary, a place of rest and healing. It occupies 3 acres of headland at Wyuna Bay with stunning views of the ever changing Coromandel Harbour. Eremia means "come aside”. Eremia invite you to take a break from your busy life to pause and reflect and enjoy life. www.eremiaretreat.nz

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TIKAPA MOANA ECO SPA RETREAT is set in the subtropical organic orchard on the tranquil Seabird Coast, between the majestic Coromandel and Hunua Ranges, on the sparsely populated western shore of Tikapa Moana (Firth of Thames). They offer a unique wellness experience that seamlessly blends together personalised private treatments, a relaxing pastoral healing environment, organic foods they lovingly grow in their garden and orchard, all of which add up to a truly affordable, eco-friendly experience. ecospa.nz

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Trust on Board for proposed new

Medical Facility

A Trust Board has now been established that will guide the next steps towards the development of a Mercury Bay medical facilit y in Whitianga.

The Mercury Bay Medical Facility Trust Board The Board members are:

Murray McLean –

Mercury Bay councillor for the Thames-Coromandel District Council. Murray moved to Whitianga permanently 15 years ago, but proudly has history dating back to 1865 when his forebears arrived here as settlers. Murray has been self-employed in the building industry, got his Masters of Business L to R – Kevin Pringle, Jim Scott, Administration (MBA) Murray McLean. Front Alison Henry, Merv George. when he was 40 and is also involved in the Masonic Trust, whose Board is responsible for managing $20M in assets. Murray is also a former MP.

James (Jim) Scott MDS [Otago}, F.R.A.C.D – After

graduating in dentistry in 1960, he served in the Royal New Zealand Navy and Royal New Zealand Dental Corps for 17 years before entering into private practice in Auckland as a Specialist in Restorative Dentistry. After 40 years’ dentistry, he retired to Matarangi, where he has been secretary of the Matarangi Ratepayers Association since then.

Kevin Pringle ONZM, M.B., Ch.B., F.R.A.C.S – After Draft only.

R

epresentatives are all from the Mercury Bay Area, with strong professional backgrounds in either health, business or community support sectors. “While these Trustees have been appointed, we still want to hear from people throughout the community who want to be involved,” says Murray McLean, who has been elected as Chair of the newly formed Trust Board. “Our next step will be establishing a business case for the development of the project, which will involve a series of public meetings, and will also help the Trust with stop/go points along the way.” In Council’s 2016-17 Annual Plan, $250,000 seed funding was approved from the Mercury Bay local rate to go towards the setting up the Trust, which, with these funds, will now be responsible for the delivery of a business case for the development of the facility. The business case will include a detailed implementation plan, detailed design plans, cost estimates, resource consenting requirements, strategies for securing funding, working with the medical practitioners and health authorities, determining on-going operation and management structures along with communications. “We are in discussions with an organisation, that has a proven track record in the development of medical facilities, which will be coming back to the Trust Board with a Business Case proposal which we then plan to share with the public,” says Mr McLean. To find out more about the project and the proposed site for the facility go to www.tcdc.govt.nz/mbhealthfacility l

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completing his degree at Otago School of Medicine, Kevin went on to practice paediatric surgery at Melbourne, Chicago and Iowa, where he became Associate Professor of Pediatric Surgery, before returning back to NZ. Kevin currently has a 0.2FTE academic appointment – Professor of Paediatric Surgery with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, UOW (University of Otago, Wellington). He has on-going research collaboration with Professor Hiro Kitagawa, Head of the Department of Pediatric Surgery at St Marianna University School of Medicine. Kevin is a Whitianga resident.

Alison Henry – A Cooks Beach resident for the past 15

years and a former Chair of the Mercury Bay Community Board. As well as having a background in community social work, Alison worked for the Department of Conservation in Auckland in the 1990s. She has completed Resource Management Commissioner Training, and was a member of the TCDC District Plan Review Committee. She continues to be involved with Kauri 2000 as well as the local Mercury Bay arts community.

Merv George – Born and bred in Whitianga, Merv has

owned a plumbing and drainlaying business in the town since the 1970s. He has been the fire chief of the Whitianga Volunteer Fire Brigade since 1984 and past president of the United Fire Brigades Association of New Zealand. (UFBA). Merv was also awarded a Queen’s Service Order (QSO) honour in 2010 for his contribution to the fire service.


Hauraki/Coromandel needs more St John ambulance volunteers Join us, it could change your life. Being a St John ambulance volunteer could be just what you’re looking for. Working with a dedicated team, learning new skills and giving something valuable back to your community, can be incredibly rewarding. Call us today to find out how you can train to become a St John ambulance volunteer. You’ll never look back!

For more information call Julia Te Huia on 027 458 0443 or visit stjohn.org.nz/volunteer


DOING BUSINESS ON THE COROMANDEL

Sea Change

Thanks to leaps in technology and lifest yle choices, we’re seeing more people move away from the Big Smoke to live and work in pl aces a little more remote. Here are some stories of people who have opted out from cit y life - to get in on the Coromandel buzz.

Tim and Li z z i Hayd e

H

aving their own slice of “paradise” turned from dream to a reality when Lizzi and Tim Hayde moved permanently from their beach front home in Auckland to beach front Kuaotunu, Coromandel in early 2016. Lizzi, a qualified Yin Yoga Instructor and Tim, an investor, were living in a beach-front home in Devonport, on Auckland’s North Shore, but the lifestyle they were leading was increasingly at odds with their desire for a more stress-free life. After looking for several years at homes to buy from as far North as Matakana to Mt Maunganui in the Bay of Plenty, it was a family connection and the pull of what Kuaotunu had to offer that eventually won the happy newlyweds over. Their Coromandel property has two small cottages on site – and with downsizing – they’ve started their new life by the beach. “The footprint is a quarter of the size of our old place, but we actually get on even better

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now, than we did before in the smaller space,” laughs Lizzi. “We’ve also fallen in love with the familiarity and the presence here. Tim’s a great handyman and there are plenty of projects to keep him busy.” “The lack of traffic and stress, the gorgeous scenery is just paradise. People talk about having to drive somewhere like Whitianga (15 mins away) but that travel is nothing to me,” says Lizzi. More often than not, Lizzi spent more time in her car travelling to and from different classes in Auckland than she did actually teaching. “I’d often be on the road by 6am and not finish until 7pm the same day and the long hours just left me feeling exhausted,” she explains. Those days are long gone. Having Tim’s sister living in this former gold mining town was also a drawcard. “We liked this area, being close to family and the idea of being a part of a welcoming community that we were familiar with,” says Lizzi. “And there’s so much beauty, you’re surrounded by it – great beaches to swim, places to walk the dog and a great community of people to do this with,” shares Tim.

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Kick-starting her yoga business again in a smaller place was a challenge Lizzi embraced. Her regular sessions in the local Hall have been a great introduction to the community. “My practice is going well – it’s very strong. I’ve got a regular group of Yogis attending and I can offer something that wasn’t previously available on such a regular basis in the area before in an amazing setting.” Tim, who admits he’d never consider himself retired, was only too happy to swap his office view of a carpark for the beach. “Great broadband here has enabled me to do things just as fast as I did in Auckland, but now I have an abundance of wildlife and birdlife around me as I look out my window,” he grins. “I enjoy working from home and there are other aspects to what I do – with the flexibility to provide feedback and discussion to people around investment” he says. Lizzi admits she had some fears around the move and wondered if they would be able to keep entertained and busy. But after nearly 18 months in their new home those fears have been allayed.

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DOING BUSINESS ON THE COROMANDEL

“I AM AMAZED AND INSPIRED

by the amount and assortment of talent down here …”

“Some weeks it’s just ourselves we see for a few days in a row which is fine,” says Lizzi. “The downsizing has meant we can travel more – we plan to visit Aitutaki and India soon and chase the sun.” There are also unexpected benefits with moving – decreased petrol costs, and exposure to many affordable local treats. “People here show a real love for the environment and take the time to get out there and meet and get to know others,” says Tim. “There are reduced costs of transportation which surprised me. Although you travel further distances geographically, the lack of stopping and starting, waiting in traffic means travel costs have halved.” “We also collect our own rainwater,” he adds. “It’s just pure water, great with our own bore and zero cost.” Tim also believes property rates are reasonable and you still get all the normal services you would expect. “There are a multitude of semiretired tradies – it is so easy to get great quality workmanship with comparable rates,” he says. “I am amazed and inspired by the amount and assortment of talent down here from musicians, and artists, to people with special talent and tradespersons with top expertise,” says Tim. “This is a wonderful little enclave we live in and we are noticing that more people are seeing what we see and development and housing is on the increase. There are four new houses being built next to us after years of nothing, so it is a sign of the times – Aucklanders and out of towners are starting to build with a plan to have a home to come to when they retire.” Tim and Lizzi have no regrets. “If you can accept the shift and change and you are ready and at that stage in life, it’s a wonderful place to enjoy – to work or to totally relax,” says Tim. You can find more out about Lizzi’s yoga studio www.facebook.com/YINspirationNZ

Gerard and Janie Mur ray

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erard and Janie Murray sold up in Auckland 18 months ago and bought in Whangamata where Gerard now operates his NZ InXpress franchise – a freight brokering business. Gerard and Janie are empty nesters and with their Auckland home steadily adding the dollars in the last ten years, it’s been a smart move for them – not just for their decreased stress levels – but also financially. Having enough equity in their old family home meant they could buy on the Coromandel, renovate and still have money left in the bank. Gerard’s franchise with InXpress allows him to continue being involved with a global company that has the systems and communication resources to help small business every step of the way with their imports and exports. The down side is there aren’t too many new clients on the Coromandel and Gerard still looks for new business in Auckland, Tauranga, Hamilton and all the places in-between. “I spend two nights, three days most weeks up in Auckland in long pants, shaking hands,” says Gerard. “But come Thursday afternoon I can’t wait to get back home to Whanga”. Janie has taken a role in one of the town’s premier womens’ clothing boutiques and works most weekends. With the both of them used to spending hours getting somewhere thanks to Auckland traffic, it’s taken a little while to get accustomed to three-minute travel times to get a car park right outside their favourite coffee shop or down to the beach for an energetic morning walk. “Truth is, we both love it,” grins Gerard “but it’s not all beer and skittles.”

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Gerard has some advice for anyone considering the big move: 1. Check internet connections. Many homes you want to live in permanently could currently be existing old baches – email was science fiction when they were first built – so just check with your service provider about cable, UFB and future plans around broadband for the area you’re moving to. 2. Setting up or introducing a new business? Think outside of the square on how to be sustainable or to grow. 3. Factor in transport. Auckland International Airport is 2 hours away from the Coromandel – so if you forget something – you need to have a plan. 4. Keep an eye on the time. Most coffee shops close early in the afternoon over the low season.

But there’s a lot of upsides too. “My resting heart rate has fallen from around 70 to 59,” says Gerard. “I’m still working as hard as I was but there’s less pressure – more space in my day, and the fishing isn’t too bad either.” And it’s those sort of things you can’t put a price on either.

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DOING BUSINESS ON THE COROMANDEL

Nigel and K ir i B oot

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core an eagle on the 7th hole at the Whangamata Golf Course and Nigel Boot will give you a free tablet. It’s all part of Nigel’s talent to be able to use his background in the international IT market to connect up and support local. Aussie born and bred, Nigel married Kiri, a kiwi from Auckland, 10 years ago. He’d been an IT manager in multinationals for over 20 years and while Sydney’s a great city to live, the pair decided they wanted to leave the rat race. They settled on Whangamata six years ago, after the same company they worked for agreed to let them work remotely. Kiri has since left that role so they could start a family, daughter Maia has just turned 2, and with improving technology, Nigel has been able to service his international clients very easily since they first made the move to the Coromandel. “With I.T, I’m lucky to be able to provide service from any location” says Nigel. “I could just about be living on the moon”. However, when his Sydney company was gobbled up by a large US telco and travel began to take up half of his time, Nigel changed focus. “We live in the middle of NZ’s Golden Triangle – Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga – and there are so many businesses locally and

surrounding us that need I.T support,” he says. So, with a small team of three, and an increasing focus on that Golden Triangle, Nigel is on the road a couple of days a week. “The travel is all just part of growing the business – and the fact is my Sydney travel times were about the same and often a lot worse,” he says. A keen tennis player, Nigel tries to get down to the local courts as often as he can. “I play a mate every Thursday at 7.30 in the morning. We’ll knock it around for an hour or so then grab a shower and start work. There’s no way I could ever do that in Sydney.” Most of Nigel’s current work revolves around disaster recovery, security and improving business efficiencies. So what about the future? Nigel believes there’s an explosion about to happen – an explosion of people working where they want, how they want. Already HR experts all over the world are lauding it. “With ultra-fast mobile internet spreading rapidly we will soon be able to do anything from here – who knows how the world of business will look in 10 years but we’ll be ready for it,” he says. nigel@bootITconsulting.com

“Nigel believes there’s an explosion about to happen

– AN EXPLOSION OF PEOPLE WORKING WHERE THEY WANT, HOW THEY WANT.”

THE COROMANDEL good for your business

Base your business in the Coromandel. Thames-Coromandel District Council is ready to help.

AUCKLAND

COROMANDEL TOWN

THAMES

WHITIANGA

WHANGAMATA

90 min from half of NZ’s population, international AKL airport and 2 major ports. An enabling business environment. A truly special place to live, work and play.

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HAMILTON

TAURANGA


The Thames-Coromandel economy 2.2% growth in 2016

28,400

June 2017 compared to previous year as per latest Infometrics report Median residential property price

GDP Economy

1.6 growth in 2016

986m

$

Tourism Contribution to GDP

$

98.9m

10% of Total 2016 GDP

$

$

669,449

Commercial visitor nights

Total Visitor spend for 2016

752,412

$ $

$

2.2% growth from 2015

43,030

up by 8.7% - June 2017

355m

up by 5.9% - June 2017

Retail Spending

102.3m

$

GDP

1,030m

increase of 3.6% - June 2017

Source: Infometrics 2017

Top 7 industries proportion of GDP % - 2016

3 Tourism .......................................................... 10% 4 Manufacturing .................................................. 9% 5 Construction ..................................................... 9% 6 Health Care and Social Assistance .................. 8% 7 Retail Trade ...................................................... 8%

Business Units 2016 - 4,221 increase of 0.3% from March 16

$

Accommodation and Food Services

276

3

Administrative and Support Services

185

4

Construction

168

5

Arts and Recreation Services

17

86

Construction

$

$

26

Accommodation $ and Food Services

8

10

Agriculture, $ Forestry and Fishing

11.9%

6

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

11%

Other Industries

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services

8.9%

Manufacturing

Owner-Occupied Property Operation

7.5

%

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2

Retail Trade

Accomodation and Food Services

7.4%

431

Health Care and Social Assistance

2 Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services ........ 12%

3.8%

Health Care and Social Assistance

Biggest contributors to economic growth $ 2006-2016

1 Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing.................... 12%

24.9%

1

increase of 18% - June 2017

up 5.9% - June 2017

Total Median Earnings Year end 2016

$

Top 5 industries since 2006 that have created the most jobs:

Highlights:

Resident Population

8.5%

Construction

Unallocated

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8.1%

Health Care and Social Assistance

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DOING BUSINESS ON THE COROMANDEL

Enviropreneurship Supporting a green economy A s our Council’s Chief Executive Rob Williams gets to meet and speak with other CEs and Mayor s on issues of mutual interest, benefit and coll aboration. Here are his thoughts on discussions around the development of green businesses.

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conomic development and how an area like ours can make inroads when it comes to changing or assisting inward investment, new jobs and new businesses, is a core focus for me as Chief Executive of our District. On that subject I’ve had a number of very interesting conversations recently regarding the potential for a green economy and as a consequence I’m particularly interested in finding out how to motivate people in the area of enviroprenuership. You may not have heard the term enviropreneur before, and I must admit that until I started doing a little research on the development of a green economy, I hadn’t either. I first came across the word’s use in an article about a Banks Peninsula farmer called Roger Beattie www. rnbeattie.co.nz who is a chap with a very varied and arguably, quite remarkable background. He ultimately hit the headlines back in 2008 when he first mooted the idea of farming weka as a way of protecting the species from potential extinction. Discussions I’ve had in recent times were in far less controversial areas, but were nevertheless still open to the threat of dividing communities. There are a remarkable number of people that wish to promote dialogue regarding the sustainable growing and harvesting of native timber, the removal of 1080 aerial dropping and replacement

The idea of commercialising weka to protect endangered weka has been mooted for several decades.

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Alternative natural remedies with products from kanuka leaf material is harvested and collected by hand on Great Barrier Island. www.barriergold.co.nz

with alternative pest eradication industries, and even the growing of native flora that can be used for medicinal purposes or in the food industry. Every one of the above by way of example has the potential to work from a financial perspective. However all of these types of discussions come with risks, and at one end of the spectrum there is a view that there is a reason (or many reasons), why not one of these ideas will ever get off the ground. I personally still struggle with that end of the spectrum, as the deciding factor when entrepreneurs of the past have tried and failed to move things forward seems to have been a bureaucratic or political issue, rather than a viewpoint from a scientific standpoint. Creating industries in our District with a clean/green, low carbon environmental footprint would on the surface appear to be entirely consistent with our vision and desire. How is it that we are not at the centre of these types of discussion from an economic development perspective? A case in point is the story of Greg Howard. Greg is looking to farm linseed flax on the Coromandel, which can be used to manufacture a whole range of products and by-products. The flax oil is used in the

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Greg Howard with the raw products for his business - flax seeds, husks and stalks. The stalks, when processed with possum fur can be turned into a high-end fabric for the fashion indutry.

Greg has a business case, the field test trials for growing the flax have been conducted and are successful, and he’s been provided land at Cooks Beach where he can grow the flax seed, which needs to be in the ground by the end of October (that’s the latest date if he wants to start production within the next 12 months). What he needs now are investors to back the planting and manufacturing processes. We’ve been working in a support and facilitating role, providing networking opportunities for Greg, (as we do for all approaches by businesses), but he still needs that investment prospective to get his fledgling business across the line. If you want to find out more about Greg’s business email him at truegripleather@gmail.com In the wider scheme of things, Greg’s enviropreneurial idea, which is using our flora and fauna to our commercial advantage, could not only provide a way to lift our District’s economic performance per hectare – but possibly serve to boost the product that we have to offer our visitors when they arrive on our shores, both locally and nationally. I’m really interested to hear about ways we can focus and support unique New Zealand businesses, because they are a real point of difference and something that no one else can lay claim to as a piece of “god-zone”. So if you have an enviropreneurial business idea (or any business ideas) for the Coromandel, do get in touch. l

health/beauty industry, from the flax husks a high-end feed for the equine market is made, while blending the flax stalks with possum fur produces a material ideal for the textile industry. Now Greg is a bright ideas kind of guy – he’s already developed a possum fur golf glove – and says part of his latest venture, (the blending of flax with possum fur), produces a high-end material that he says he already has businesses interested in buying – once he can deliver the final product.

Rob Williams is the Chief Executive of the ThamesCoromandel District Council. Have you got some ideas on enviropreneurship for the Coromandel? Email rob.williams@tcdc.govt.nz

WHAT’S THE

FUTURE FOR THE

COROMANDEL Have your say in our next Long Term Plan 2018 - 2028. Public consultation in March 2018. O U R

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www.tcdc.govt.nz/ltp

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DOING BUSINESS ON THE COROMANDEL

Putting fibre in our

digital diet

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It was back in July 2015 when we lodged our bid for better broadband in the Coromandel with the Government and we’re now starting to see the results.

ecause of the strong arguments we made in that 213-page bid document, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment has selected 14 of our communities to have ultra-fast broadband fibre (UFB) installed, and in July 2017 the rollout began in Thames. The work there is expected to be completed in the first half of 2018. Te Puru, Waiomu, Tapu, Coromandel Town, Whangapoua, Matarangi, Kuaotunu, Whitianga, Ferry Landing/Cooks Beach, Hahei, Tairua/Pauanui, Whangamata and Matatoki will follow until the full build is complete in 2022. Fibre will be installed down all the streets in each of these areas, allowing residents and businesses to connect to ultra-fast broadband if they choose. In this part of the country Chorus has the Government contract to install the fibre, so over the next five years you can expect to see signs on the streets in your neighbourhood as the work begins saying “Fibre is coming”. WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL ABOUT FIBRE? Local governments like our Council provide a lot

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of infrastructure that makes life better, like water systems, local roads, community facilities and much more – but we don’t provide telecommunications services. However – central Government is giving the private sector a push by investing $2B into improving internet connectivity across the country and the UFB build in the Coromandel is part of that. Homes and businesses connected to fibre will typically have download speeds of up to 100 Mbps (megabits per second). That’ll be a lot faster than the broadband you can get over your copper telephone wire. (Check your internet speed at www.speedtest.net) Being online now is part of daily life for more and more people. We can now watch movies and TV from on-demand services, we can make video calls to friends and family on the other side of the world, and we expect information on tap – whether it’s the latest news from the Beehive or if the Coast Road is closed. Also – and here’s where our Economic Development Manager gets excited – there is a link between broadband connectivity and economic growth. It has

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gotten much easier to live and work in remote areas and still be connected to suppliers and consumers in the big markets. BUT I DON’T LIVE IN A TOWN BEING CONNECTED TO FIBRE Don’t worry, we’ve thought about you too and have been working with Chorus, Vodafone and other network providers on better coverage for your area. While the Government’s UFB programme is installing fibre in the cities and towns, there is also a Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) to connect people in smaller communities to faster internet. Some of our rural areas have already benefitted from the first phase of the RBI and as this magazine went to press the Government had announced funding for the second phase but had not yet released coverage areas. A section of the Kopu-Hikuai Road (SH25A), the Coromandel Coastal Walkway and Port Charles will receive improved mobile phone coverage under the Mobile Black Spots Fund. This fund is aimed at improving network coverage on sections of state highway and in more remote tourist areas. And, where it’s been possible, we’ve been working with the likes of Chorus, Vodafone and Lightwire to push forward investments in cell-phone towers and roadside fibre cabinets that serve our rural areas. For more information on broadband in the Coromandel, see www.tcdc.govt.nz/rbi l

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BUILDING OUR COMMUNITY... COROMANDEL’S LOCAL AWARD WINNING BUILDER.

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WHITIANGA NEW AGE GOLD RUSH By Leigh Hopper

When the invitation to write a feature article in The Summer magazine arose, I thought it a timely opportunity to briefly retrace some of the history regarding our developments on the Coromandel over my lifetime, and to reflect on the outlook. When my father Ian and his brothers ventured into the

that usually boiled huffing and puffing over the hill, and returning

Coromandel with the acquisition of land at Pauanui they had a

to Pauanui at sunset in the winter months. The weekends however,

vision to roll-out a modern, fully serviced beach resort. The Kopu

were fantastic, and many hours were spent surfing the Pauanui

– Hikuai State Highway was about to be opened, enabling ready

bar without another soul in sight, that is, until the holidays, then

access to the delights of the Coromandel east coast. The late 60’s

you had to hustle for a wave. Pauanui primarily remains a popular

and early 70’s was a prosperous period and there was a market

holiday destination.

for those seeking a Bach by the sea within a weekend commute. This was the kiwi dream at the time. The regulatory process to kick

Circa 1990 the family business had been largely divided between

Pauanui off was a relative handshake compared to today, and the

the two principal families of Ian and Tony Hopper. A 40 ha parcel

then Thames County Council obliged quick haste and works were

of land adjoining the Pauanui development came up for sale. My

underway within a few months of the possession of land. From

Father and I had a particular interest in pursuing a waterways-style

there Pauanui Ocean Beach Resort was moulded stage by stage

development over this site, similar to the extensive Gold Coast

over ensuing years, consistent with a master plan that eventually

projects in Queensland. The land had the prerequisites, flat and

included additional adjoining parcels of land. Pauanui has proved

just above high water level, sandy soils, affordable access to a

to be a very successful development, internationally acclaimed for

navigable waterway in the Pauanui-Tairua Harbour, and available

its urban design elements.

infrastructure such as sewerage, water and roading. Immediately the land was secured, we applied our minds to how to engineer

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I treasure many memories of those early days. The old man (Ian)

and construct a waterways development, much of it below sea

moved from Whangaparaoa at the beginning of 1967, with my

level. Planning involved assessing the environmental impacts

Mother (Kath), me and my three younger sisters (Gay and Annette

and a raft of regulatory process ensued as required by the then

still residing in Pauanui, and Penny at Whitianga). For us kids, life

impending Resource Management Act (October 1991). Pauanui

in Pauanui largely consisted of days getting to and from Thames

Waterways was the first comprehensive coastal project application

High School. They were long days, starting with crossing the Tairua

under this Act. There was a steep learning curve, anguish over

Harbour in the early hours, to catch an old Comma Bus in Tairua

funding, sales, and consequently a few sleepless nights. Appeals


A DV ERTO RIA L

were avoided and construction commenced 1992 with the first

The Ultimate Lifestyle Property

release of sites in 1993. The product again proved popular and our faith in discerning buyers seeking high amenity waterfront property was borne through. With business interests in Auckland, and Pauanui Waterways in progression I would regularly fly between the office in Orewa and Pauanui, sighting Whitianga below as I went along my route. The opportunity of replicating a waterways-style development at Whitianga was clearly evident from aloft. And in 1997 we purchased a strategic 73ha landholding in the flat lands of Whitianga and put a joint venture proposition to four adjoining land owners (Abrahamson, Maclardy, Humphries). Deal done, a new company ‘Whitianga Waterways Ltd’ was formed.

Peter Abrahamson (Project Manager) and Leigh Hopper at Whitianga Waterways

Again we set to the task of establishing a Structure Plan for the combined area (220+ ha) and pursued an assessment of environmental effects. Whitianga Waterways was however, a little more complicated, with a need to redirect the state highway to enable a canal network to be forged into the land while retaining a strategic route into the town centre. Other additions were planned; the airfield needed to be extended to address future air services, major sewer and potable water mains to service the 1500 lot project, plans for national retailers, comprehensive

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retirement developments with aged care facilities, waterfront retail, medical facilities and marine servicing, were all integrated into a Comprehensive Development Plan. In support of the plan followed a Plan Change, Subdivision Application for the initial stage, 24 Resource Consents for physical works, Iwi protocols and again a suite of Restricted Coastal Permits. Consent time lines extended to 2 years including an appeal which was referred to the Environment Court with a favourable determination only to be vetoed by the Minister of Environment but reversed two weeks later by an amendment to the Hauraki Gulf Maritime Park Act… What a time! …This was the period I lost my hair. Only with the support of the community, lead by the matriarch of Whitianga, Joan Gaskell (Community Board Chair) urgency was achieved to address the veto. At one stage I recall attending a meeting in the packed Whitianga Community Hall. Joan called for a show of hands for those prepared to hop on a bus and head to Wellington to camp on the front door of Parliament to protest the injustice of a Minister overturning a Court decision. We could have filled a few buses. Jim Anderton was acting PM at the time, both Joan and I had some interesting discussions with him directly. To his credit, he expedited the amendment and it stands as one of the fastest, if not the fastest piece of legislation to have ever been put through. Auckland. The city exodus now has momentum, 90% of our sales Construction of the initial stages spawned a surge in development

are to permanent residents. As internet services, professional

across the township. In short time Whitianga now has a range of

services, air transport and ferry services increase, so will the

residential options, two supermarkets, additional building supply

attractiveness of the Coromandel as a place to live, work and play.

“I BELIEVE WHITIANGA WILL BE THE CENTRE OF OPPORTUNITY FOR INVESTMENT, EMPLOYMENT AND SERVICES.”

The stage is set for an encouraging future on the Coromandel. I believe Whitianga will be the centre of opportunity for investment, employment and services. Growth will continue in Whitianga driven by demand in the two principal sectors of retirement and tourism. There will be pressures on resources, these are not insurmountable. The world is changing at an ever increasing rate. We have something special on the Coromandel the rest of the world will want to experience regardless of change, possibly expressly as a result of change. If communities on the Coromandel identify with a common vision for a future of excellence across all endeavours, there is an ability to generate prosperity while enhancing this special place we live in.

merchants, expanded retail services, a major sports complex, new tourist accommodation options and several tourism activity

At Whitianga Waterways we have a large works program ahead.

operators – such as world famous The Lost Spring. Council has

This year will see the addition of a major new extension to

addressed infrastructure with investment in modern sewerage

the canal network, releasing many of the prized sites in the

treatment and water supply systems. Whitianga is in good shape

development and realising water access to Marlin Waters, a 2ha

to accommodate growth and is emerging as the major centre on

waterfront hotel site, and the first stage of a waterfront retail area

the Coromandel. New housing is notable for the recent change

where residents and the public will be able to pull alongside in

in buyers to accommodate a high percentage of new permanent

their watercraft. The canal system also reveals Endeavour Island, a

residents.

new island address on New Zealand’s coastline. Watercraft will also be able to pass under Joan Gaskell Bridge for the first time since

Recent strong immigration, overloaded infrastructure and

its construction. Future components of the Master Plan include a

expensive housing in our major cities has driven many to seek

marine services facility and a major waterfront retirement village.

better lifestyles beyond city limits. The Coromandel is very alluring

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with its magnificent topography, community scale coastal villages,

Living on a Waterways is exceptional, particularly if one is into

expanding infrastructure and more affordable housing yet still

boating as am I. Regardless, it’s still extraordinary with an open

relatively close to friends, family and business connections in

outlook across the water and no need for a swimming pool.


A DV ERTO RIA L

Marlin Waters Waterfront Villas

Waterfront buyers often convey their pleasure to our sales

W H I T I A N G AWAT E R WAY S . C O . N Z

team just a few weeks after moving into their new homes as to

HOPPERS.CO.NZ

how unique it is, how the wider family enjoys the amenity and how friendly their neighbours are. This is not surprising to our

(07) 866 0164

team of course, as our company focuses is on lifestyle property supported with events and activities. Whitianga Waterways is located centrally on the Coromandel east coast and is a gateway to some of New Zealand’s most attractive coastal cruising, diving and fishing grounds. It offers a lifestyle hard to beat. And in that regard I, myself plan to move to Whitianga for retirement. I am currently putting the final adjustments to a new house design and plan to commence construction next year. It’s time for a better work/life balance, and Whitianga is my destination of choice. I have cruised the north east coastline

1

of the North Island extensively over the years and keep being

7

2

drawn to the magic of the Mercury Islands. Where better than

4

Whitianga Waterways to be based.

6

3

8

5

9

10

We are so lucky to live in this wonderful country with its diversity of scenery, temperate climate, active outdoor pursuits and clean environment. The Coromandel epitomises these elements, Whitianga Waterways provides the launch pad

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(excuse the pun). I am looking forward to many more enjoyable days indulging the delights.

W H I T I A N G A W AT E R W A Y S M A S T E R P L A N

Waterfront Living on the Canals

1

COMMERCIAL AREA

7

RETIREMENT VILLAGE

2

RESERVE

8

MEDICAL CENTER

3

WATERFRONT RETAIL

9

COMMERCIAL AREA 2

4

TOURIST ACCOMMODATION

10

MULTI SPORTS PARK

Ph: (07) 866 0164

5

SALES OFFICE

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MARINE SERVICING

W H I T I A N G A W AT E R W AY S . C O . N Z

6

MARLIN WATERS

Whitianga Waterways Office 20 Vanita Drive, Whitianga

PRECINCT

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The Aquaculture

M

economy

any of us love our seafood and aquaculture contributes hugely to that love affair and our food-basket in the sea. Aquaculture also enhances the recreational catch for fishing folk who hang out on the water by the mussel farms, in boats or kayaks, with a line or two over the side. Tourism, employment and recreational pursuits are all boosted by our aquaculture industry. Service industries within our local communities thrive on the additional spin-off from the provision of engineering and other necessities, such as ropes and buoys, for the industry. In February 2017 the NZ Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) released a report on the economic contribution of aquaculture (marine farming and processing) to the District. “Aquaculture is a key part of the social and economic fabric in the communities of Coromandel Township, Manaia and Whitianga where the majority of sector employees live and work. Iwi-owned aquaculture assists community wellbeing with contributions from marine farming co-funding education and health services,” the report says. As well as creating jobs and contributing to local and national GDP there are also a number of qualitative social benefits that come from mussel farming and aquaculture. You can read the full NZIER report at www.tcdc.govt.nz/aquaculture. Here’s some of the highlights: JOB CREATION In the Thames-Coromandel and in neighbouring districts, aquaculture contributes over 800 direct full time (FTE) jobs. • About half or 350 of the roles are directly attributable to aquaculture within the District and are specifically in aquaculture farming and processing. The industry provides wages ($13.4M) and employment

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(350 FTE and 387 as full or part-time direct jobs) forming almost 4% of the District’s total employment. Of this 4%, approximately 1.5% (117 mussel and 26 oyster) are in marine farming and a further 2.5% (201 mussel and 43 oyster) in processing of aquaculture product. These jobs are available year-round rather than seasonally and the farming jobs in particular are significantly better paid than other more scarce year-round local employment opportunities. • The remaining 450 of the total 800 jobs are made up of aquaculture roles in other regions, notably in Auckland and Bay of Plenty and Waikato. These roles range from producing equipment to local market sales plus processing and exporting. ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION • Aquaculture contributes 7.2% ($69.6M) of the GDP of ThamesCoromandel District. • Of the $69.6M of GDP $43M (4.5%) is from marine farming and $26.6M (2.7%) is from aquaculture processing. • Coromandel aquaculture also created export revenue of $73M in 2015. • Coromandel aquaculture creates local market sales of $30M+ annually. • Further direct and indirect economic activity is related to industries that support aquaculture and benefits the households that receive income, within Thames-Coromandel and in other districts, from it. Aquaculture stimulates growth in other industries such as construction, transport, retailing, education and hospitality. • Thames-Coromandel aquaculture delivers around 1/3 (30,000Tonne) of New Zealand’s GreenshellTM mussel production and 1/4 (700Tonne) of New Zealand’s Pacific oyster production by weight.

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SOCIAL CONTRIBUTION • The District’s current marine farming is equivalent to an economy the size of Coromandel Town (2,817 as per the 2013 census). • Parallel industries have flourished on the existence of aquaculture in the region, notably including the $2M+/year Coromandel recreational charter fishing business creating some 15+ FTE jobs. • Culinary tourism is another spin-off from the high quality mussel and oyster products produced in the region. • Most of the products and people that support the sector e.g. ropes, floats, seed-stocking, transport, vessels, are produced locally and New Zealand owned and operated. OUTLOOK AND NEXT STEPS • Current proposals for new consented areas could take shellfish production past 50,000Tonne in the following decade. Increased tonnage from existing areas could increase mussel and oyster production by 50% by 2025. • The NZIER report conservatively models the potential growth from an expansion of both mussel and oyster production by 50% including the proposed introduction of fed-fish farming with potential to produce 8,000 tonnes per year locally. The report finds that could add a further 5.0% ($48.1M) to the GDP of the District. • The report notes the growing international demand for high quality seafood protein and the growth trend in high value nutraceuticals derived from mussels and other aquaculture products. Additionally, selective breeding and commercial production programmes are underway for both mussels and oysters. • Waikato Regional Council are seeking interested investors to establish finfish farming within a 300 ha zone west of Coromandel.

COROMANDEL AQUACULTURE FACTS AND FIGURES Mussels

Oysters

Combined total

Number of marine farms

100

15

115

Number of farmers/entities

35

3

38

Consented hectares

1,480

70

1,550

Tonnages produced by Thames-Coromandel 2015-16 financial year

24,832

466

25,298

Tonnages produced in other regions but transported to district for processing 2016 FY

4874

250

5,124

Estimated employees on farms

117

26

143

Estimated wages ($M)

5.2

1.3

6.5

Estimated employees working in processing

201

43

244

Estimated processing wages ($M)

5.4

1.5

6.9

Exports sales revenue, FOB ($M)

68.3

4.7

73.0

Gross output marine farming ($M)

55.1

2.5

57.6

Estimated GST, excise and levies ($M)

1.14

0.04

1.18

Marine farm contribution to Thames-Coromandel GDP ($M)

41.0

2.0

43.0

Marine farm contribution to Thames-Coromandel GDP (%)

4.3

0.2

4.5

Aquaculture processing contribution to Thames-Coromandel GDP ($M)

24.5

2.1

26.6

Aquaculture processing contribution to Thames-Coromandel GDP (%)

2.5

0.2

2.7

All aquaculture contribution to ThamesCoromandel GDP ($M)

65.5

4.1

69.6

All aquaculture contribution to ThamesCoromandel GDP (%)

6.8

0.4

7.2

Measurement

GREENSHELLTM MUSSEL FARMING IN THE COROMANDEL Nearly 40 years ago, in 1978, a small trial mussel surface long-line was anchored in Coromandel Harbour and with it, the Coromandel mussel farming industry was born. In the decades since, the industry has evolved from a group of innovative pioneers, into specialised producers of premium seafood, all while upholding environmentally sustainable methods. Greenshell mussels are farmed sub-tidally, suspended from a surface long-line rope and buoy system. Growing ropes are seeded with very small (1mm) mussels called ‘spat’ which are mostly harvested attached to beach-cast seaweed, along Northland’s Ninety Mile Beach. Some spat, is at times, caught either locally, or increasingly, it is bred in a commercial hatchery. Once the baby mussels have attached themselves onto the growing

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Source: NZIER and Aquaculture New Zealand

rope, they remain until they become a seed size of around 40-50mm when they are then stripped off and resettled at optimum density onto the final grow-out rope. Harvest size is generally 90-100mm shell length, with total growth taking some 18 months. Harvest is timed for when the mussels are in optimum condition and also by an Industry programme of water and shellfish quality monitoring to ensure absolutely safe food. For both mussel and oyster farming, large amounts of work are done at a shore base. Work includes reconditioning used farm gear, and preparing and assembling new equipment for onfarm deployment. The majority of mussel rope and stocking is made and supplied locally from Thames. Additionally there is work in light engineering for farm and vessel equipment and maintenance, which is also provided locally. The Coromandel Marine Farmers’ Association Incorporated (CoroMFA) has membership from every mussel farm, and many of the oyster farms, within the Hauraki Gulf/Tikapa Moana. There is also mussel farming at Great Barrier Island and oyster farming in Mahurangi Harbour that constitutes the rest of the aquaculture industry within the Hauraki Gulf/Tikapa Moana. The significant new areas of water now under development e.g. at Wilson Bay, off the Thames Coast, will allow increased mussel production of up to 50%, to 40,000Tonne annual production of Greenshell mussels, from 26,000Tonne already produced now from around Coromandel. Iwi businesses now own a significant proportion of the marine farms in Waikato and the Coromandel. The Coromandel aquaculture industry invests $350,000 + annually to ensure shellfish harvests from growing waters are always clean to meet stringent Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) Shellfish Standards, to

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LOCATIONS OF MUSSEL AND OYSTER FARMS

prevent microbiological and biotoxin contamination. This data is also important to the Ministry of Health for protecting the public interest in the harvesting and consuming of safe shellfish. OYSTER FARMING HISTORY IN THE COROMANDEL Coromandel oyster farms were some of the first in NZ to move from seabed cultivation on rocks and similar environments. In the early 1960s techniques were developed for farming the Native NZ Rock Oyster inter-tidally on sticks and trays and baskets. In the 1970s, production shifted to NZ Pacific Oysters which have high growth rates, good taste and appearance and reach larger sizes. By the 1970s Pacific Oysters had built up to high numbers after being introduced into New Zealand in the 1960s, perhaps on a barge from Japan, with materials for building the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Coromandel farmed oysters are washed over by two tides a day and spend 1/3 of the time suspended out of the water. This gives the oysters time to rest and ensure shells are clean, as most are sold fresh or snapfrozen in their shells. They are harvested at 15-20 months. Hauraki production of this briny aphrodisiac delicacy is around the Coromandel Harbour and surrounds, Waiheke/Clevedon and in Mahurangi Harbour at Warkworth, north of Auckland.

PART TWO: REPLENISHING THE FOOD BASKET | WĀHANGA TUARUA: MAHINGA KAI – HE KOHINGA KI TE KETE KAI

Source: Waikato Regional Council

GROWTH EXPANSION OPTIONS FROM THE HAURAKI GULF/TIKAPA MOANA SPATIAL PLAN

PROCESSING COROMANDEL’S SEAFOOD There are a number of companies involved in value-added processing of the products harvested from aquaculture in the region, they include: Moana New Zealand The largest maori-owned seafood and fisheries company in New Zealand that is heavily invested in NZ Oyster farming, particularly in the Coromandel. As shown on its website, Moana NZ commits to a deep sense of responsibility and respect for kai moana, honouring the taonga they have been entrusted with. The company employs 43 people in processing oysters in Coromandel Town, as well as additional people for farming. www.moana.co.nz 92

O P Columbia Based out of Whitianga, specialising in Greenshell™ Mussels. OPC processes and exports mussels world-wide and employs approximately 11 people full-time and has another 150 jobs for 42 to 45 weeks per year, depending on the mussel harvest season. www.opcolumbia.co.nz

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Source: Waikato Regional Council

Coromandel Mussel Kitchen

Map 5.1 Existing aquaculture sites, indicative areas preferred for future aquaculture development, and areas unsuitable for aquaculture. Is unique in that it collects, cultivates, See Appendix 2 for detailed locations andharvests, explanations cooks of the numbered sites.very and aquaculture serves it’s

own green-lipped mussels. They grow most of their herbs and fresh salad items onsite, and now brew their own craft beer under the MK Brewing Co brand. Coromandel Mussel Kitchen has employed people in mussel processing but is now focused on producing and selling through its restaurant a wide range of mussel and other foods. www.musselkitchen.co.nz

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• selling 3Tonne mussel berley per RECREATIONAL CHARTER BOAT BUSINESSES week, which also comes from rejected, These generate over $1M of annual income for Coromandel (Town), broken and discarded product, as well from taking out some 20,000 fishers annually. The customers experience as selling large volumes of edible fresh high customer satisfaction with fish being caught (~90%) inside mussels daily Coromandel mussel farms for snapper and other fish species feeding • employing 3 staff (likely more as FTE), with opening hours typically within the vicinity. At May 2017 the District had seven companies from 6am to 9pm every day. and 12 vessels (15+ FTE) all Salty Towers Limited is rightly with skippers and some with deck proud of the service it provides hands, making many valuable jobs using local people and products for the District. “Recreational fishing contributes to the to successfully support the Some of the best places to go community. fishing on the Coromandel are around mussel farms, which is why there is a thriving charter RECREATIONAL FISHING boat industry. One of the charter Aquaculture helps to enhance the operators provides their service all recreational fishing attraction in year round (weather permitting). the Coromandel. There’s also charter businesses like Recreational fishing contributes Tom and Lorraine Meyers’ who have 2 vessels to the social, economic and cultural well-being of all Kiwis, whether with 2 skippers and 2 deckhands, plus partthey actually go fishing or benefit from the significant economic time staff for servicing and supplies. Tom says activity it generates. that 90% of the charter fishing is done in and Recreational fishing is a billion dollar industry for New Zealand around the mussel farms, as that is where the according to a 2016 NZ Marine Research Foundation report. Saltwater good fishing is. fishing is the fifth most popular leisure activity for hundreds of thousands “We regularly get people on our charters of New Zealanders. To add to this, NZ is the third largest trailer-boatcatching snapper from 10 to 15lb, well up owning nation per capita and the trend is moving from moored vessels to 20lbers,” Tom says. Locally, Tom spends to larger trailer boats. about $6,000 a month on fuel, as well as about Demand for adequate recreational facilities to cater for $450 per week on bait, not to mention the recreational fishing demand and growth is increasing. Nationally, costs of gear and maintenance. recreational fishing supports 8100 jobs stimulating $1.7B in total www.coromandelfishingcharter.co.nz economic activity. Salty Towers Limited is another $1M fishing business and much of its The Thames coast and Coromandel area are extremely popular success is attributable to the presence of mussel farming in Coromandel. destinations for recreational fishing and this is in part due to the A family business run by owners Jeremy and Hank Codlin, it has an presence of the mussel farms and the habitat they provide for many fish annual turnover of $1M from: species including snapper and kingfish. Many recreational fishers also • supplying the bait for much of the local recreational charter fleet and visit the Coromandel independently for the good fishing that is in and for fishers beyond around the mussel farms. These people also buy fuel, bait, food, tackle • selling ice, bait and berley to recreational fishers and accommodation locally for their adventures. • smoking and filleting fish for customers (500 good size fish done after Research also shows that fishing and outdoor activities are major 3 days over Anzac weekend 2017) drawcards for tourists and New Zealanders returning home to settle down and raise a family. l

SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL WELL-BEING OF ALL KIWIS …”

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THE CHARITY SAVING LIVES AT SEA


King of the

Hop

T

A sk Noddy (Graeme) Watts to name the make of a modern car as it passes and you’re likely to get a bl ank look . “Designed by Microsoft Car Designer 3.2 0,” he’ll remark .

Photo: NZV8 Magazine

he inspirational leader of the Beach Hop in Whangamata is a car guy, it’s in his blood. But he’ll need to be driving a certain type of vehicle to transport him somewhere more than just down the road. Noddy lives in a garage and has three classic cars, all of which are off the road. When it comes to classic car ownership in Whangamata, he’s one of many you will find every morning at Vibes Cafe where they can catch up about what spins their crank. “It’s the mechanical fountain of youth, you get behind the wheel and it’s just cool.” Go back 17 years to an evening dance event held by the Rock and Roll Club, “The Coastal Rockers.” The town’s business people had come together wanting to add to the event. With this, they approached Noddy and asked him to get involved. The foundations of New Zealand’s biggest celebration of the 50s & 60s were born. The First Hop in 2001 – the

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Whangamata Rock and Roll Festival – drew 4000 people, 100 cars and 100 bikes. But it had a really boring name. It was Noddy who came up with the name and logo The Beach Hop; five days of Rock’n’Roll, cars, bikes and fun. It’s certainly changed the town. People who have been to the Hop buy here and end up moving here. These vehicles are investments for people because the classics hold their value. Investors aren’t just the so-called westies, these are serious businesspeople. It’s a really good demographic to have in town,” he says. “I’ve been here 25 years and it will always be a surfie town but you go back to the Beach Boys, and surfing and cars go together. I’ve got a list now of 300 people that have cars in this town. Any day of the week you will see a classic car. ” Noddy leads a small crew who manage things like merchandise and marshalling, a tight-knit bunch of volunteers who build a car each year to give away.” They also let their hair down with a Scoot 4 Loot charity fundraiser for prostate

cancer, riding around the Coromandel in fancy dress on 50cc scooters with a strict rule: they must only spend $500 to buy their machine. “We raised $5500 in December 2016 and had so much fun. It was the most perfect Coromandel day.” The Beach Hop crews are extremely capable but their meetings are informal. “We just have a lot of fun. It’s a responsible job, so you have to have people you really rely on and it’s tricky managing volunteers. We downsized the crew because people had good intentions but it was hard to manage, so it made it easier not to have too many chiefs.” Fun is a word that came up often in a conversation with Noddy about life. For six months of the year you’re likely to find him in a Mustang convertible on Route 66, guiding Kiwi travellers on the time of their lives in groups of 30 or 40. Noddy was a regular visitor to America through Beach Hop and in 2010 was approached by a travel company to lead a bus tour, to which he responded: Forget that – we’re car guys. We want to earn our stripes and drive. He has led 16 tours since then, driving the Mother Road across 6000 miles to show ‘the real America’. “The Mother Road creates brothers and sisters because by the end of the tour, our people are like family,” he says. “The Beach Hop becomes a reunion time for a lot of them, and after 16 tours, that’s a lot of barbecues for me to get around during Beach Hop.” People tell him it’s a dream job. But when steering wheels are on the “wrong side of the car”, and every problem is Noddy’s to solve: “It can be challenging.” Fortunately, Noddy is a born problem-solver. Maybe it comes with the territory of classic car enthusiasts: those who source parts and rebuild old cars or build them from scratch. Educated in Thames (a former Thames High student) he built a T-bucket hot rod when he was 18 that took him seven years to complete and was a national show winner back in the


Photo: NZV8 Magazine

90s. “I saved up and bought something every pay day.” He moved to Auckland and then returned to the Coromandel, settling in Whangamata for two years where he managed the Coromandel region for NZ Post, using his training as an industrial engineer to swiftly rise through the management ranks to a national level. Noddy developed and implemented a new system at a time when New Zealand Post was a global leader in the industry, and he got to travel the world to such places as Kenya, Uganda and East Timor where he helped get the first postal operation up in the 2000s. “With industrial engineering you are looking at processes, how it all works, and I felt I was making a difference. It wasn’t always about technology; it was working with the people to help them work better. Our job was to communicate between the shop floor and the managers or Ministers to give them a better outcome.” Noddy brings this experience and skill to his Beach Hop event planning. After 17 years of the Beach Hop, he knows event management is all about a good foundation, planning and expecting the unexpected. “With event management anything can go wrong and you have to be prepared. You have to be able to change the plan and be quick to deal

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with the problems. You have to be assertive but not be a hot head and you have to build a really strong relationship with your council. We have a great relationship with TCDC and I really mean that, they’re very proactive. It used to be putting road blocks in front of you but today the council is absolutely brilliant. “We need people on our teams who can make a call, and think about the bigger picture and how it might affect someone down the line. People who can step in and fix things.” Noddy is regularly asked by event organisers around the country to start something new in their area but declines gracefully. “I always said when we run the perfect event, I’ll step down.” He has given presentations on event management at AUT University and is contacted by students from all over the country during their curriculum module on event management in year 13. He tries to oblige, but it’s the local kids of Whangamata Area School that get the

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best insights into Beach Hop’s formula. For five years the Beach Hop crew worked with the school’s automotive technology class and a Beach Hop Cup and scholarship is awarded to a technology student each year using proceeds of the quiz night during the event. “That’s pretty cool,” he says. “We have a template here with the Beach Hop event, and you could take out the cars and the music and dancing and replace it with something else. Beach Hop isn’t just a car show but music and dancing is a huge part of what we’re celebrating. It’s a really important part of the 50s and 60s New Zealand history. After the war the 50s really took off – music, fashion and the cars all changed. That’s what we celebrate at the hop. “It makes me sad today when I look at what’s happening in our culture, what are we going to celebrate? Nothing has changed that dramatically. In the 50s, TVs came in, people became more mobile because of cars and it was big on family.” Last year was the first time you saw Noddy’s name on the programme because, he says, “It’s not about me”. “The Beach Hop is not my event, I’m the spokesperson, and it belongs to the people who come; the dancers, the musicians, the people of Whangamata. I know it doesn’t please everyone, it never will, but this town owns the event.” l

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A ‘team effort’ keeps us at the top of our game!

You can’t beat top performers, experience, proven results and longevity

07 865 8499 411 Ocean Road | 607 Port Road 101 Bambury Place, Onemana

www.whangamatarealestate.co.nz


Hayden Paddon is the first New Zealander to lead a World Rally Championship event since Possum Bourne back in 1999. Hayden was World Rally Champ in 2011 as well as NZ Rally Champ in 2008,2009 and 2013. In August 2017 he took part in the Goldrush Rally of Coromandel in a Hyundai i20 AP4 car run by his Paddon Rallysport team. And while he didn’t take the chequered flag at this event, he certainly enjoyed his time on our roads.

Photo: Geoff Ridder

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This was the first time racing the Coromandel – what was your expectation of the race? This Rally is over 7 stages and is 180km long, so the distance is a lot shorter than a traditional World Rally Champ route, which is usually around 350km in distance. The Coromandel Rally is really tight and twisty, there’s lots of bends and corners, whereas overseas it often tends to be a lot smoother, longer, flatter runs – and this one has way more gravel! There’s some stunning scenery here, but when you’re racing you don’t get much of a chance to take it all in. So have you had a chance to visit the Coromandel just for a holiday? I had weekend break back in 2016, where I stayed in Whitianga and visited Cathedral Cove, Hot Water Beach – the traditional tourist hot spots that most people do. It’s a beautiful part of the world. I grew up in Geraldine in the South Island so I enjoy spending time in smaller towns – and I also just enjoy visiting different parts of New Zealand generally. A lot of the time now I’m overseas so any chance to come back home I seize the opportunity.

Hayden Padden enjoying time in Whitianga, when he’s not behind the steering wheel of a car.

The Coromandel is also home to the Leadfoot Festival, which is held over Waitangi Weekend at motorsport legend Rod Millen’s ranch in Hahei. A public ticketed event it brings together a mix of classic cars, vintage motorcycles, while Rob personally hand selects championship racers from around the world to participate in the Leadfoot Festival. Have you ever been shoulder tapped to participate? Yes but it’s never fitted into my calendar – it’s definitely on my

“It’s built for comfort and we can also go racing with the car on the racetrack, that’s what driving is all about.”

Your favourite hatch. Redesigned.

Hayden Paddon

100% PERFORMANCE

www.facebook.com/wingerpukekohe @wingerpukekohe

www.winger.co.nz

69-77 Manukau Road, Pukekohe

(09) 239 2389


to-do list, along with the Goodwood Festival of Speed in England. I’ve been up to Rob’s place and driven his track for fun. Rob’s an absolute legend and growing up in the late 1980s I remember watching him driving his Mazda RX7 leading the pack in the 1988 Ashley Forest Rally Sprint in North Canterbury – where he was the only driver to record under 60 seconds a lap. Racing has certainly changed since those days. What would you say are the biggest changes in racing? The professionalism, the money and the technology. When I compete overseas there’s a support team of 220 and we have three cars – which cost upward of $1M each. (Compare that to a NZ Rally Championship where there’s a team of 8 and the one NZ based car). The cars are modified with more precision, so they go faster and the technology is more advanced. We even get to read pace notes ahead of a race - including other driver’s pace notes, which means where we used to win by 10 seconds, we’re now fighting for 1/10th of a second to win. Rallying is a sport for adrenaline junkies – so what do you do in your spare time to relax when you’re not racing? Snowboarding, mountain biking .. and ok at a little slower pace I enjoy golf. I’m the type of person that’s always looking at my watch, wanting to keep moving and getting on with things. I actually find the Rally NZ legs I complete more relaxing – there’s a more laidback atmosphere. The people behind these events are all volunteers, they do an amazing job, and a huge thanks to the locals from all the cities and towns who host us around the county for each leg, and everyone is really welcoming. That’s why I try

to do at least two NZ Rally events every year because I’m a huge supporter of NZ Rally and have immense gratitude to everyone who’s a supporter. So will you be back for another Coromandel Goldrush Rally – or even just a holiday visit? Yes if the chance comes up again I wouldn’t say no. For Coromandel Gold Rush information www.nzrallychamps.co.nz and to keep up with Hayden check out his site www.haydenpaddon.com l


2017/18

EVENTS GUIDE

Events add diversity, vibrancy and overall well-being to our communities. Here’s a snapshot of what’s going on around the Coromandel over the next 12 months for you to come along and enjoy. For a full list of events go to www.thecoromandel.com or www.tcdc.govt.nz/Your-Council/Events-Meeting-Calendar 6-8

Oct 2017

16-18

Feb 2018

HAURAKI HOUSE ART GALLERY

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A celebration of all things British, held in Whangamata. Includes a car and bike show, whiskey dinner, village fete, live concerts, organized drives and more.

Oct 2017 Feb 2018

7 - 15 Oct 2017 Coromandel Arts Tour

17 Dec 2017 - 13 Jan 2018 Xmas Exhibition

20 - 24 Oct 2017 Pastel Artists Coromandel

9 Jan - 4 Feb 2018 Coromandel Art Group

31 Oct - 11 Nov 2017 Coromandel Embroiderers Guild

9 - 19 Feb 2018 Erica Lyans

www.britsatthebeach.co.nz 76

Easter Exhibition: to be confirmed

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The Whangamata Lions Craft and Farmers Market hosts nearly 100 stalls offering a huge variety of craft, food and produce. Stalls are located inside the Memorial Hall Complex, and outside in more of an open air market. The Lions Book Sale, always the biggest and most popular stall at the market, is located in the main hall with books galore.

Coromandel Recreational Fishing Club One day events for Members and Non Members Labour Weekend (October) Prizes for Heaviest Snapper 1st, 2nd and 3rd and 1st for different species

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Oct 2017 April 2018

Anniversary Weekend: (End of January) Prizes for Heaviest Snapper 1st, 2nd, 3rd, Average Weight and Mystery Weight and 1st for different species, Juniors 1st for different species.

Classy Chicks Ladies Competition (Beginning of February) Major prize is a Travel Voucher: Mystery Weight, Snapper 1st, 2nd and 3rd and 1st Different species, Spot prizes, Skippers Draw and Starter Packs for each boat

Sat 21 Oct 2017, 8:00am–3:00pm Sat 27 Jan 2018, 8:00am–3:00pm Sat 31 Mar 2018, 8:00am–3:00pm Sat 20 Oct 2018, 8:00am–3:00pm

Books... paper, words and work. An Exhibition. Philip Fickling, Paper Engineer. Saturday and Sunday October 27 and 28 10am-4.30pm. Meet Our Writers. An evening invitation to meet our local writers, see their books, hear about their work share our hopes for a new village library and to join us, as FOLK, Friends of the Library Kuaotunu. October 28, 2017, 7:00pm Refreshments and tempting snacks available. Kuaotunu Village Hall, Black Jack Road Kuaotunu

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Oct 2017

Take a Kid Fishing: (April School Holidays) Junior: Prizes Heaviest Snapper 1st, 2nd, 3rd, Kahawai 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and Heaviest Different species. Adults: Heaviest Snapper 1st, 2nd, 3rd Entries forms from: Coromandel Fish and Dive 07 8668779 Wyuna Studio 07 8668069 Email: coromandelfishingclub@gmail.com Contact: Christine 0211008653

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The Flight Centre K2 Road Cycle

Oct 2017

One of the toughest most scenic and varied rides, the route travels through sub tropical forest, pacific coastlines, rural farmland and the Pohutukawa coastline of the Hauraki Gulf. 2017 will be the 16th anniversary of the event starting from Coromandel town on the 28th October.

Visit www.arcevents.co.nz for more information

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Nov 2017

25 Trees

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Dec 2017

Image:: Flea Photos

Nov 2017 Manos Del Chango with Delaney Davidson, and Nicole Izobel Garcia. Together these three present their World Debut Show combining live music with projected images. Davidson using his unmistakable dark take on guitar-driven Blues, Country and Rockabilly, joins with Nicole, who brings her timeless voice, dusty keyboard and classic drum machine. Creative Mercury Bay in association with Arts on Tour bring this event to Whitianga. Whitianga Town Hall at 7.00pm For further information: www.creativemercurybay.co.nz

Flea Photos

An annual curated exhibition showing 25 local creatives imaginative and original Christmas Tree’s in conjunction with Boxing Day an exhibition of peep show dioramas around the theme of Christmas. Exhibition arranged by Kuaotunu Rudolf Steiner Trust Board to promote the communities artistic character and as a goodwill gesture . 10.30am-5pm, Kuaotunu Village Hall, Black Jack Road Kuaotunu

Christmas arades P~

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THE 29TH

Coromandel Town Christmas Exhibition The Coromandel Christmas Exhibition continue to show the best of Coromandel art and helps encourage new and up-coming artists. There will be an opening on Sunday, 17 December. Mix and Mingle from 5pm with an opening at 6PM. Hauraki House Art Gallery, Coromandel Town ARTISTS EXHIBITING: Ian Webster, Michael Smither, Gia McGregor, Cindy Alger, Fatu Feu’u, Wailin Elliott, Christy Benton, Rex Brett, Allan Beaver, Lindsay Garmson, Bronwynne Cornish, Bev Thatcher, Barbara Von Seida, Rod McCleod, Diane Cade, Tracy Johnson, Stuart Fyfe, Mike Cogswell, Fiona Tunnicliffe, Jenny Shearer, Deborah Hyde-Bayne, Ian Crighton, Jan Linklatter, Kay Ogilvie, Mike Barton, Eric Lyons, Mike O’Donnell, Ray Morley, Petra Meyboden, Jan Koshian, Ian Dalzell, Sue Pidgeon, Peter Sephton, Caitlin Moloney, Evelyn Siegrist, Paul Armstrong, Michelle Blake, Kevin and Kim Brett, Mary Lee, Casey Marshall.

Coromandel Town

Christmas with a 70’s flavour Saturday 9th December, 2.00pm

Thames

Saturday 9th December 11.00am

Whangamata

www.coromandeltown.co.nz/january-2018.html

Saturday 9th December, 3.00pm

Whitianga

To be confirmed

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17 Dec 2017 13 Jan 2018

Everyone is welcome - bring a friend!

Matarangi

To be confirmed O U R

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Events in Onemana "Carols by Candlelight"

Market Day on the Reserve

The family event where the whole community get together to sing well loved Christmas Carols. Traditional gingerbread men and ginger beer will be served and special surprises for the little ones all happening in Onemana on the 23 December from 8:00pm - 10:00pm.

A variety of stalls, selling food, plants, clothing, books and many interesting games - fun day for the whole family. A talent competition and the big sand dig, all taking place during the market day. Family fun in Onemana from 10am to 5pm on 29 December.

Whitianga Art Craft and Farmers Market

from The Whangamata Summer 24 Dec 2017 Festival is run by a not 2 Jan 2018 for profit community group who fundraise all year round, in order to provide a focus for youth, young families, locals, holiday makers and the elderly by staging community events. such as concerts, volleyball, sandcastle and ice cream eating competitions, a beach dig, a FREE kids holiday programme, Opera in the Park, a night market and a huge craft market day.

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23 Dec 2017 31 Mar 2018

Unique locally made handcrafts which includes soaps, wooden toys, bird feeders, woollen goods, clothing, sewing, garden ornaments and furniture plus photography and paintings, produce, jams, pickles, baking and plants.

Our Principal Sponsor is the TCDC who grant us a fifth of our budget. The rest is up to us! So to support us in our work for the community please bring along a donation to concerts and buy our glowstix and raffle tickets!

Soldiers Memorial Park, Albert St Whitianga Saturdays 8:30am - 1pm. from

27 Dec 2017 Whanga WeekŽ is a 2 Jan 2018 7 day event run by the Trust Waikato Whangamata Surf Life Saving Club Aimed at both competitive athletes and those that want to have some family fun in and around beautiful Whangamata. The week long programme helps raise much needed funds to enable the surf club to purchase the equipment they need to keep the men, women and children who use the aquatic environments at Whangamata safe. 27 December GJ Gardner 10km run/5 km fun run 28 December Zenith Distributors Classic Harbour Swim 29 December Whangamata Pharmacy Miss Whangamata 30 December Whangamata Real Estate Pub to Club run 31 December Z Energy Fun Walk 1 January 2018 Stirling Sports Miracle Mile beach run 2 January Unichem Pharmacy Surf Boat Spectacular Check out whangamatasurf.co.nz for further detail including registration details, start times and entry costs. This programme would not be possible without help and the club would like to thank it’s major sponsor, Whangamata Real Estate Limited, as well as GJ Gardner, Zenith Distributors, Whangamata Pharmacy, Z Energy, Stirling Sports and Unichem Whangamata Pharmacy

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All activities on this programme are to be held in Williamson Park unless stated otherwise.

Look out for Coca-Cola who will be popping up during the Festival to give away product and prizes! All events will be confirmed on our official programme out the week before Christmas. Or follow us on facebook Whangamata Summer Fest.

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29 Dec 2017 7 Jan 2018

Come and explore our 18th Annual summer market. Lots of great stalls, free daily talks programme, on-site health practitioners, massage therapies eco-friendly products, organics, crystal jewelery, natural remedies, herbs, recycled furniture and much more. www.wellbeingmarkets.co.nz info@wellbeingmarkets.co.nz contact Peace: 0272929699 Whitianga Town Hall, 24 Monk Street, Whitianga. 10am-5pm, free entry. 79


January 2018

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Dec 2017

An opportunity to meet our emergency services to find out what they do. The festival is well supported by a wide range of exciting stalls throughout the day. And they donate their site fee to selected emergency services. Join us for an unforgettable encounter with nature these holidays. The Moehau Environment Group Summer Programme runs all January and includes guided walks, starlight cinema, kiwi encounters, nocturnal walks, Junior Rangers at popular campgrounds, kiwi avoidance training for dogs and a family fun run. All funds raised help kiwi on the Coromandel. Download our Programme booklet from www.meg.org.nz/summer-programme or pick one up from the Coromandel Information Centre. To book phone (07) 866 6903.

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January 2018

Moehau Environment Group Summer Programme Northern Coromandel

Events run throughout January, go to: www.meg.org.nz/projects/summer-programme/

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January

A full day of entertainment, kids rides, yummy food and a world of arts. We are scheduling live entertainment throughout the day and we hope you enjoy the offering and have a real blast at the Keltic Fair info@kelticfair.co.nz www.kelticfair.co.nz

2018

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January 2018

Hahei

Market Day a

Highly popular Summer Market held at a relaxing venue with room to chill.

WWW.COOKSBEACHSUMMERGALA.CO.NZ

Be warned with 150 stalls offering a great selection of local and imported items shopping will be compulsory. Amusement rides for young and old and of course relaxing music. The Hahei Market day is run by the Hahei library Volunteers group to raise funds for the library and community projects. Kotare Reserve , Pa Road, Hahei commencing 9am - 2pm

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January

6

January

Enjoy a family friendly day out at this iconic event.

2018

BARRYDOO DAY 10AM UNTIL 3PM COROMANDEL TOWN,HAURAKI AT HOUSE RESERVE, KAPANGA RD.

Remembering iconic artist Barry Brickell’s contribution to Coromandel Town will be held at Hauraki House Reserve on the 6th January, 2018. The event is born from an idea by Coromandel clay artist and close friend of Barry’s, Wailin Elliott. Everyone is welcome to join with artists and friends of Barry Brickell’s to have fun with clay – make it and break it. This event is in the early stages of being organized with other events being planned to ensure a fun day to remember. See you there.....

2018

Located at Tairua School with a view out to sea you won’ t be disappointed. Featuring a fabulous music line up throughout the day. Delicious food stalls and great beer, wine and cider outlets. A craft fair and a kids zone - there really is something for the whole family. 9am - 4pm, www.tairuawineandfood.co.nz

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January 2018

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January 2018

The Extravaganza Fair Whangamata Area School Port Road

Roll up. Roll up. Roll up! Welcome to Season 3 of New Zealand's largest and newest travelling event! The Extravaganza Fair! We're bringing to NZ a unique style of market stalls, arts and craft, food, musical entertainment, circus shows, performers, unique to NZ tiny homes, including open home and kids shows and games. We're bringing back the 'old school', join in our sack races, tug of wars and musical bean bags and be in to win prizes! Starts at 9am.

Join us for a great day at the Mercury Bay Seaside Carnival with live music, street entertainers, fantastic food, 150 stalls, rides and games. This community event is a fundraiser for the Mercury Bay Area School. Funds raised will go towards a new van for school and community use. Please help MBAS by donating a gold coin on entry.

Gates open at 9:00am and close at 3pm

C or o S u m m e r F e st

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January 2018

A celebration of summer goodness. A small boutique festival with amazing live music, put together with love and passion. Set amongst lush native bush on private land in Coromandel Town. With a range of eclectic, interesting and beautiful music styles. BYO picnic, games, epic night-time badminton battles, and delicious food. Enjoy an afternoon of good tunes, play some games, sit back with a picnic and then dance into the night.

23 Colville Road Coromandel, 1:30pm - 12:30am, www.corosummerfest.co.nz O U R

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CALENDAR OF MAIN EVENTS @ COROMANDEL MUSSEL KITCHEN THIS SEASON

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Jan - Mar 2018

Saturday 20 January: Coromandel Music Society Concert from 5pm Saturday 10 February: Coro Oyster Feast from 2pm Saturday 31 March: Mussel Festival from 2pm (Easter Weekend) For further information see www.musselkitchen.co.nz

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January 2018

PAUANUI BEACH, BY THE SURF LIFESAVING CLUB

City Surf is a weekly SUP/Ski Paddle event held in Auckland, but hosts two destination races including one in Pauanui this summer. There is something for everyone in the family with a range of categories available to enter whether you are a novice, teen, enthusiast or a more competitive athlete. 9am start tbc

www.citysurfseries.com

presents

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January 2018

YOU OUGHTA KNOW IRONIC THANK U

BAD TO THE BONE ONE BOURBON, ONE SCOTCH, ONE BEER GET A HAIRCUT

WHO CAN IT BE NOW DOWN UNDER BE GOOD JOHNNY

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STRICTLY LIMITED LOCAL TICKETS • AVAILABLE AT I-SITE WHITIANGA, INFO PLUS WHANGAMATA, PAUANUI INFORMATION CENTRE

ONLY $89*

OR $99* FROM WWW.GREENSTONEENTERTAINMENT.CO.NZ OR WWW.TICKETEK.CO.NZ *plus booking fee

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February 2018

NAUTI GIRLS Fishing Competition New Zealand’s largest Ladies ONLY fishing tournament. Over $30,000 in prizes up for grabs. Party all night in our custom marquee, with live music, bar and kitchen. An awesome weekend on the water and even more fun off. Whangamata Ocean Sports Club www.oceansports.co.nz

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February 2018

A unique weekend bringing together a mix of classic cars and motorcycles featuring famed motorsport legends. In action will be everything from classic formula and road race cars to off road machines and vintage motorcycles. The Leadfoot Festival attracts drivers and race cars reminiscent of many era’s in an enthusiastic display of speed, style, sound, smell and color providing a high-profile, competitive environment for the world’s great manufacturers and racing stars. Guests will be given one of a kind experiences featuring unparalleled access to the drivers, pits and race cars. from

Feb - Apr 2018

280 Link Road, Hahei Gates open at 7:00am Racing starts at 8:00am www.leadfootfestival.com 3-4, 10-11

EVENTS FOR

March 2018

ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO WEEKENDS

ILLE IN 2018 OLVCommunity CColville Festival Easter weekend March 30, 31 and April 1

Children's day celebration first Sunday of March 4th

Waitangi Day event celebrated the weekend of the 6th For more information contact Colville social service collective closer to 2018 for updates www.cssc.net.nz cssc@colville.org.nz, 078666920

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Discover the array of artists and learn about their individual creative processes. It is an opportunity to meet local artists in their studio setting. Mercury Bay on the Eastern Coromandel Peninsula, encompassing the areas of Pauanui, Tairua, Hahei, Hot Water Beach, Cooks Beach, Whenuakite, Whitianga, Kuaotunu, Matarangi and Whangapoua. 10am to 4pm www.mercurybay-artescape.com

2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8

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9-10

THE HARLEY'S ARE COMING TO TOWN

March 2018

Sat 9.30am Bike show. 11am over 600 bikes leave on a group ride. Fundraising for the Whitianga Sea Scouts - Den Building fund. Craft Stalls - Food Stalls Bike Wash - Sausage Sizzle Quick Fire Raffles - Live Music - Busker Entertainment Taylors Mistake Reserve, Albert St, Whitianga. From 2pm to 6pm on 9 March and 9am to 6pm on 10 March Harley Only Gathering

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March 2018

13-15 April 2018

A 5 day festival celebrating the music, culture, fashion, hot rods, motorbikes, dancing, dragsters and scooters of this golden era. www.beachhop.co.nz

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April 2018

Join us to celebrate our sixth festival. A fabulous day of food, wine and music by the beach. www.atasteofmatarangi.co.nz

Get your teams organised for Scuba Olympics and plan your weekend of diving away in Whitianga. With over $20,000 in prizes to be given away and scuba divers and their families attending from right around the country - this is the one dive event you don't want to miss. Enter in as few or as many activities as you like but if you enter them all then you will go in the prize draw for a trip for two to come diving somewhere tropical with us. See www.divefestival.co.nz for programme details or email Linda at Dive Zone Whitianga for an entry form linda@divethecoromandel.co.nz Dive Zone Whitianga - Scuba Diving in the Coromandel, NZ

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Coromandel Town Seafood Festival

May 2018

Seafood in all its glory.

Cooking demonstrations, stalls selling food and crafts, art displays, live music, activities for the children and more. This is a fun-filled, family friendly day showcasing the local aquaculture industry.

This is the first annual half marathon to be held on 26th May 2018 in the beautiful Mercury Bay. There is a 21km course, a 10km course, a 5km course and a 2km kids beach dash.

Coromandel Area School from 9am – 4pm www.coromandelseafoodfest.com

Each course can be either run or walked.

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www.whitiangahalfmarathon.co.nz

May 2018

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Gold Rush Rally of Coromandel

August 2018

www.nzrallychamps.co.nz June 2018

CONTACT COROMANDEL

Information Centre

Samuel James Reserve, Coromandel Phone: +64 7 866 8598

PAUANUI

Information Centre

Shepphard Avenue, Pauanui Phone: +64 7 864 7101 Returning in June 2018 Coromandel Illume Festival - Light Stories - Wonder For two nights we are lighting up the main street of Coromandel Town. A free family festival, with live music, projections, street performers, lights, great food, fun and laughter.

THAMES

www.illumefest.co.nz

WHANGAMATA

I-SITE Visitor Centre

Thames Civic Centre, Mary St Phone: +64 7 868 7284

Info Plus

616 Port Road, Whangamata Phone: +64 7 865 8340

WHITIANGA

I-SITE Visitor Centre

Sept

66 Albert Street, Whitianga Phone: +64 7 866 5555

FESTIVAL

2018

TAIRUA

Information Centre

With over 50 food and wine stallholders in a purpose built marquee village, the scallop festivals promises something tasty for all. Wash that down with great celebrity cooking demonstrations, roving entertainment and 3 stages of live music all day. Whitianga Marina, Esplanade. September 2018 (date tbc) 10am-5.00pm Scallop fever is alive. Find out more at www.scallopfestival.co.nz

223 Main Street, Tairua Phone: +64 7 864 7575

KAUAERANGA

Visitor Centre Department of Conservation Kauaeranga Valley, Thames Phone: +64 7 867 9080

Sept 2018

With the half marathon (21km), the 10km and 5km events, the Whangamata Run Walk Festival offers something for participants of all ages and abilities. All three courses take in spectacular views of ocean beach and pristine bush-clad hills along the way. Enter individually, with friends and family, or gather a team together. Held annually in September, for further information see www.whangamatarunwalk.co.nz All details have been provided to us by event organisers, who take responsibility for accuracy of times and dates and information. Please do check websites to see if dates or changes have been made.

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Waiotahi Gold Mine, Thames part of Waiotahi Gold Mine, Thames. Price, William Archer, 1866-1948. Collection

of post card negatives. Ref: 1/2-001555-G. Alexander Turnbull Library

Our heritage is gold

F

From August 2017 - August 2018 Thames marks the 150th anniver sary since its goldfields opened.

rom the construction of giant lighthouses to the 100ft kauri beams that hung in the buildings where these beacons of light were built – Thames of 150 years ago was centre stage of an era that changed our world. The town’s 150 years of Gold Fever celebrations began on 1 August 2017 with a street parade and afternoon of performances at the Thames War Memorial Civic Centre by local schools, storytellers and musicians. People of all ages joined the procession – many dressed in miner’s regalia and 1860s period costume – led by the sound of Scottish drums and bagpipes as they celebrated the momentous occasion in their local history. Thames was once the biggest town in New Zealand with a resident population of 18,000 and 100 hotels. The industrial and commercial enterprise of Thames’ forefathers was made possible with the co-operation of Maori rangitira, who negotiated in the knowledge that life was about to change irrevocably. "Maori saw a great trading opportunity and they were very capable negotiators who earned respect for being so astute in business," says local historian Russell Skeet. Negotiations took place with Hauauru Taipari (1800-1880), his son Hauauru Tikapa Taipari and Rapana Maunganoa. Hauauru later came to be known as Hoterene Taipari after he signed the Tiriti O Waitangi in 1840, brought by Willoughby Shortland. The younger Hauauru Tikapa Taipari (1833-1897) was later named Wirope Hoterene Taipari and was instrumental in opening the goldfields and laying out the Thames township. Opening the 150th commemorative event at the Thames Civic Hall was Ngati Maru kaumatua Waati Ngamane, who spoke a karakia before the young people of Thames – students from Thames South School – sang a waiata followed by a kapahaka by Thames High School. The afternoon was hosted by a descendant of one of Thames’ founding industrial families, Allan Charles Judd, who is the great, great grandson of Charles Judd. Charles was a skilled iron moulder who bought several small sections of land bordering the Karaka Creek in Grahamstown. He set up business 150 years ago on what is better known now as the old Placemakers site, and the first iron was melted for the newly proclaimed Thames Goldfield. Like many others with an appreciation of their heritage, the Thames

150th Gold Fever celebrations has lured Allan back to the town that he and his ancestors loved. As a fifth generation Thames person, Allan is among the volunteers of The Treasury in Thames, which is an archive and family research centre. It showcases the rich and diverse social and cultural history of the Hauraki region by collecting the records of our places and our people. “Men came to Thames chasing gold, so the ancestry of [pakeha] people coming to New Zealand often starts with Thames. The 150th anniversary of the Thames Goldfields is a great opportunity for people to research their ancestry," explains Allan, a natural storyteller and scriptwriter. Like all the volunteers at the Treasury, Allan gets great satisfaction in knowing the stories of his own family. “I ask people if they need me to help them find out about their ancestry because it’s knowledge and history that is important for New Zealand. It’s a privilege for me to tell these stories of my family. We are a young country but this is how history is made.” Charles Judd started Thames Ironworks in September 1869 and manufactured sawmilling and mining equipment including batteries for the Waihi Gold Mining Company. Thames was also a centre in which giant cast iron lighthouses were made – built in pieces at the Charles Judd Foundry and assembled before being disassembled and dispatched to the treacherous waters off Cape Campbell, Cape Brett, Kahurangi Point and East Cape. The formidable task of assembling them at these locations is rarely thought about today. Like the men who dug gold in the hills behind Thames, making a living was dangerous and difficult. But it laid foundations for modern New Zealand. “Only one or two generations ago, people turned a blind eye to the hardships and the risks,” reflects Allan. “It’s only now with the passage of time that we can appreciate what these people endured,” he says. In 1908 Charles Judd changed the company name to Charles Judd Limited and took on his five sons – all skilled tradesmen – as partners. The Judd family name operated in Thames up until 1992, when Allan’s father Bruce closed a small engineering business down the road from the original foundry. Today Thames has a population of 7000, some of those with ancestry harking back to the Thames goldfield days, while others are more recent residents, however all have chosen to live in Thames, a place that's history is steeped in gold. l

Information provided in this feature on the anniversary of the Thames Goldfield does not include history from the perspective of Maori. Readers may wish to read more on this in The Hauraki Report, available on the website https://justice.govt.nz

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Catch Gold Fever 1 Thames Goldmine Experience

Marvel at the work of the Hauraki Prospectors Association volunteers on a tour of original mining tunnels and machinery. View demonstrations and stories of the 19th Century gold processing machinery at this priceless collection of industrial artefacts at cnr Moanataiari and SH25 at the northern end of Thames. Ph 07 868 8514. Visit www.goldmine-experience.co.nz for year-round opening hours.

2 Growing with Gold For a gold coin, visit a photographic display of Thames from the earliest gold mining days at The Treasury in Thames. Open Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday 11am until 3pm, from 1 August 2017 through the summer at The Meeting Room, The Treasury, Queen Street, Thames. Ph 07 868 8827. www.thetreasury.org.nz

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Thames Heritage Walks Take one of the five historical walks, colour coded orange, red, blue, green and purple*, with options to see old mining cottages and mine sites, disused cemeteries and pa sites, along with a wander through the oldest arboretum in the country. www.thecoromandel.com/explore/listing/historic-walks-of-thames *Walking tracks representations only

3 Thames School

of Mines and Mineralogical Museum The technical skills and inventions from goldmines in Thames provided New Zealand with a reputation worldwide for innovation and achievement. At the Thames School of Mines and Mineralogical Museum you can step back into this world at the most intact school of mines in the southern hemisphere. Open daily January – March 11am to 3pm and rest of year Weds to Sun 11am to 3pm. Cochrane St, Thames. Ph 07 868 6227.

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4 Thames Museum This museum in Cochrane Street Thames traces the town’s early history with recreations of Victorian rooms, a miner’s hut and treasures used in the creation of the town. There’s a shop selling local art works and merchandise and it’s open daily 10am – 4pm. Ph 07 868 8506. For these and other Thames 150 celebratory events, visit www.thamesinfo.co.nz

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Praying for gold Numerous public hotels sprang up in the Thames goldfields 150 year s ago, and the churches quickly followed.

Horsedrawn carriage on Main St Karangahake 1898.

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rior to the opening of the Thames goldfield, missionaries would do whatever it took to get the word to the populace. Standing on wooden barrels outside public hotels to give a sermon, they would also travel to saw mills, the banks of creeks and inside the homes of the few settlers that dwelled here. Once gold was struck it became clear this was no longer going to satisfy the needs of the exploding Thames population. Churches and schools were seen as a priority in the laying out of the new township. Land for the first Presbytarian Church was gifted by Wirope Hoterene Taipari and the first services were conducted in the church built on this gifted land on 25 May 1868. Historian Russell Skeet elaborates on the role that Maori played in helping establish Christian order in the booming Thames township. “It is as well that we understand the part that Maori played in the opening of the goldfield for their story is one that we have yet to fully

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comprehend and acknowledge. For today however the significance of Maori in our story is their acceptance of a Christian God under the guidance of the Church Missionary Society, and their absolute willingness to subordinate the way of their culture to another faith system, and their generous giving of land for the building of churches, schools, and hospitals.” While the Christian faith was new to Maori, it was a long-established and integral part of Victorian culture. By the time the 1870 Thames Directory was printed, there was a Church of England at Rolleston St and Mackay St, a Roman Catholic Church at Willoughby St, a Presbytarian Church at Richmond St, a Weslyan Chapel at Willoughby St, a Baptist Chapel also on Willoughby St, a Primitive Methodist Chapel in Mackay St that eventually joined with the Methodist Church, and a Maori Church in Parawai. There was also Sunday School and services at Tararu (also known as Shellback at the time).

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Denominations represented included Anglicans, Presbyterians, Roman Catholics Weslyans, Primitive Methodists, Baptists and Congregationalists; and several of these denominations have more than one church. The churches themselves ran from the beach services conducted at Tararu by the Anglicans to the magnificent 1871 St Georges Anglican Church on Mackay St. A notable preacher at these early services was the first Bishop of New Zealand, Bishop George Augustus Selwyn, and Archdeacon Vicesimus Lush who was appointed the first vicar of Thames in 1868. They and others like Rev. James Buller of the Methodist Church were all remarkable men who rose to the challenges of the time. The Weslyan Historical Society journal recounts: “As early as 1870 services were held at Coromandel, where mining was also being carried on, at first led by local preachers sent from Thames. Often these men travelled through the night to keep their appointments,

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View of HMS church, c.1868, looking from hill to the south east; Shortland area and Thames Wharf in background.

(G-96131-1/2, D M Beere Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library

scrambling among boulders along the beach, dodging the tides and forcing their way through the tangle of bush that grew down to the water’s edge.” The Wesleyan Methodist Church on the Thames goldfields flourished soon after the opening in August 1867 and since many of the Thames miners were from Cornwall, there were numerous followers of the Wesleyan Church beliefs. Churches 150 years ago provided support for hard times, such as their involvement with benefit concerts when a miner was killed or injured. But they also played a significant role not just for the fellowship and faith but in the founding of educational institutions. “Today it is hard to realise that once upon a time education was neither free nor compulsory and the churches played a huge role in educating the young,” says John Isdale from the Thames School of Mines and Museum. “During the Waikato Wars where the Maori participants were around 80% literate, the Imperial British forces were 50% literate – so the effect of the mission station education is obvious. “In Thames, the scale of Sunday School education is almost unbelievable. The little Wesleyan Sunday School, which was taken over as the Thames School of Mines in 1886, had at one time no fewer than 18 teachers and the Anglicans had more than a dozen separate classrooms.” John recounts the observations of a Catholic Sister, over a visit made by Auckland authorities to the newly opened goldfield. It revealed barefoot Catholic boys running around while apparently the boys of other denominations were in school. “Action was prompt. Funding from the church was quickly organised and not only were the boys in school but a separate school was also set up for the girls.” To a historian, churches and the Reverend Lush and later Father Lyons contributed to the historic record of Thames. Thames history blogger Althea Barker posted this exciting find of her own heritage

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on her blog when she uncovered a Golden Wedding newspaper notice in the Thames Star of 7 June 1921. “Researchers/genealogists – keep looking for new information. I spend hours looking at old papers and once in a while something happens that makes it worthwhile. Today I found a new family notice for my Great-Grandparents. They married in 1871, in the St George’s Church in Rolleston Street.” Althea’s blog is full of fascinating photos of church life for both pakeha settlers and Maori, and records the origins of some of the many faiths that found a strong following in the newly established Thames township. The ceremonies that were more typical of life in countries of origin for settlers were often celebrated in Thames – more so than today. “On 31 October 1888, at the St George’s Church Hall, 350 people gathered to celebrate the old Scottish tradition of Halloween,” writes Althea. “This was traditionally the name given to the evening before the festival of All Hallows or All Saints which was on 1 November each year. In England and Scotland the traditions varied and the superstitious elements were more aligned to the Scottish Halloween. “In subsequent years, the Thames Burns’ Club continued to celebrate Hallowe’en. Some years it was a Social and others a full Halloween Ball.” l In 2018 the combined churches of Thames also plan to hold an outdoor church service – “Picnic & Praise in the Park” with a modern band and free sausage sizzle. Bring your own picnic and

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seating to enjoy the balmy summer weather under the mature trees at Victoria Park, Brown Street, Thames. 5 – 7pm 25 February 2018. Contact: Alison McIntosh mcgaval@slingshot.co.nz Althea Barker’s blog can be found at: http://thamesnz-genealogy.blogspot.co.nz/ search/label/Thames%20Churches

Earliest beginnings The Church Missionary Society established the original Hauraki Mission Station on the swampy banks of Puriri Stream in 1833 after a fact-finding visit by Rev Henry Williams and catechist William Fairburn. Williams and Fairburn had been particularly impressed that Maori they visited along the Waihou river already knew hymns and prayers in Maori. The site was moved to Thames (Parawai) in 1837, on higher ground above the Kauaeranga River at the north side of the Herewaka Stream. Though this station (and a church built here) are long gone, Holy Trinity was built further south along Parawai Rd in 1886 and this stands today.

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My Heritage A s the town marks 150 year s since the Thames Goldfields were procl aimed open, descendants of gold miner s – and other s - have been inspired to write tales of yesteryear . Tales that are so extraordinary that they can only be based on the truth.

Allan Berry Thames, An Early History 1838-1920 Allan Berry is a born storyteller, and in his 90th year he has released a book of some of the best stories on Thames’ early settler history. Allan retired from school teaching 30 years ago, although the word retirement doesn’t really fit this man. He and partner Elizabeth moved to the Kauaeranga Valley and planted 1200 mandarin trees in one day – what is more they’ve only recently employed help to manage them – and Allan began writing books on local history. The first two were about the Kauaeranga School and the valley which was socially and industrially an integral part of Thames (and once the name of the area we know as Thames). His latest book Thames, An Early History 1838-1920 was launched in August and follows 10 years of fastidious research from primary sources, beginning with the merger of two towns – Shortland (for Willoughby Shortland) in the south and Grahamstown (for Robert Graham) in the north. The first few pages lure the reader in with the summary of Robert Graham’s story – the son of a well-to-to-do miner and farmer near Glasgow. It details uprisings and ancient Maori customs, shipwrecks, findings of gold treasure, and the laying out and naming of streets and parks like the present Dickson Park “where strawberries and cream were sold for sixpence”. Throughout, Allan brings to life the personalities and enigmatic achievers who are at risk of being forgotten. “I got most surprise and joy out of a chapter I called ‘distinguished people’,” he says. “Boy we did have some distinguished people in a multitude of disciplines and a lot of them have never been heard about.”

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The lives of people in their home town of Thames connects all the stories. Among those mentioned are tunnellers and nurses from Thames involved in the Great War 1914-18, tunnellers who were often civilian miners from the goldfields. Thames miner Daniel Perry is among those mentioned; given 21 days field punishment

Kae Lewis Goldrush to the Thames New Zealand 1867-1869 Kae Lewis became so engrossed in researching the tale of her great, great grandfather’s arrival to the Thames Goldfields 150 years ago, that she set up a website and wrote a book about the times. A Thames holiday home owner, Kae has volunteered for The Treasury in Thames for many years. But it was the sense of joy and connection from discovering more of her own

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(handcuffed and fetters on feet to a wall or post in view of comrades for up to 2hrs a day) for being 15 minutes late for fatigue party. This excerpt from Allan’s book: “They dug tunnels under the German Trenches, dug a cave and packed it with up to 3,000 1bs of explosives, retired to their own lines and set off the charge. Those not killed in the German trenches died of carbon monoxide poisoning in a large surrounding area. Even when returning to their own lines the tunnellers were subject to the same danger as the infantry men as is evidenced by the number wounded by shellfire…” The Tunnelling Company was the first of the NZEF to serve on the Western Front in 1915 and the last unit to arrive home on 23 April 1919. For these and other stories of people who may be your ancestors – a copy of Allan’s book can be purchased from the Thames Museum, Carsons Bookstore and mining heritage attractions in Thames. l family history that led her to create www.kaelewis.com to help others with searches on goldminers. Launched 15 years ago, Kae’s website holds the names of thousands of goldminers from all the goldrushes of New Zealand spanning the years 1861 – 1872, drawn from her voluntary work transcribing goldminers records from Archives New Zealand. “My ancestors went to Tapu which opened in the second year and there was a mini rush. In those days they called it Hastings, and my great, great grandfather was born there,” says Kae of her own history.

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Angela Curtis The Shotover, 150 Year Souvenir (available at Carson’s Bookstore Thames) Behind the veil of a waterfall in dense undergrowth around the Kuranui Creek in Thames, a sparkle of gold alerted gold diggers to the first major find on the Thames Goldfield. George Clarkson, William A. Hunt, William Cobley and John Ebenezer White went down in history as the first men to make this discovery, registering their claim at what would be named the ‘Shotover’ on 10 August 1867. Angela Curtis – the great, great grand-daughter of William Cobley – wrote and released "The Shotover, 150 Year Souvenir", in honour of this story. Angela held a book launch at Carson’s Bookshop in Thames on 14 August 2017 – exactly 150 years to the day since the first payable gold was found on the Thames Goldfield. The claim was so rich it yielded quartz half its weight in gold until eventually, they weighed it in tons. The repercussions of the first payable bonanza echoed throughout the world. Thousands of optimists rushed to the goldfield which stimulated the failing economy of the new colony. Prospectors scoured its treacherous pinnacles in hopes of finding riches of their own. Others grew rich on the goods they sold and the services they offered to the mining population. “The four men started mining the waterfall using a battering ram they built from the trees around their claim,” Angela says. “Later, William took his gold and bought 40-acres of farm land now known as Devonport. Researching how Thames and Devonport

were formed and the part my ancestors played in their history, has been life changing,” she adds. When asked how much the ‘Shotover Four’ earned, Angela estimates it was roughly between $19 to $20 million in today’s value. “That’s not including what they sold the mine for and what the shareholders received from the clean up at the end of each month.” Angela’s great, great grandfather returned to England and took kauri from Thames, building his parents a huge kauri homestead. He met his wife there, Louisa Penman, and brought her to New Zealand where he built her a kauri house on the farm in Devonport known by the locals as “The Mansions.” “He was instrumental in the development of the area and renamed what the locals called ‘Cobley Beach’ as ‘Cheltenham Beach’.” The author says her visits to Thames not only inspired her book but taught her the value of knowing her ancestor’s history. “I didn’t know my ancestors were that famous until I went to the Thames School of Mines Museum and saw their photos hanging on the wall. “The next day I went to the Devonport Museum and the curators pulled out boxes of William and Louisa’s belongings, all donated by my family. I tried on his spectacles, it was surreal. “At William’s granddaughter’s house, my daughter Tessa tried on the black silk dress William bought Louisa in Paris. It can now be viewed at the Thames Historical Museum.” Angela says learning about her ancestors has taught her more about her true self. “Everything we do in this life is left behind to become our legacy for our descendants and I want this book to be part of my legacy.” l

Kae has now written a book as a companion to the website. Goldrush to the Thames New Zealand documents the years of 1867 – 1869 when the first flush of gold miners arrived to look for gold. “I don’t think many people appreciate how many of these men there were in Thames. My book gives the story of them and the ones that went to Tapu. They took a shovel and a pick and they dug a hole. They didn’t work for a mine or a company, they had to take out a miner’s right and they could go and dig. And they did.” The book describes all the claims and mining companies of Thames, Tararu, Puriri and Tapu

between 1867 and 1869 and the miners who operated them. “It provides another source of information for historians and genealogists alike and is a very fitting memorial to those early mining families in Thames,” says Geraldine Dunwoodie QSM, of the Coromandel Heritage Trust Committee. Much of Kae’s research is based on the work by reporters for a workingman’s newspaper of the time, the Daily Southern Cross. “The New Zealand Herald was really just the voice of the Government and the wealthy people and there was a real distinction between the two," says Kae.

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More reading from the Thames 150 year Weekly blog – life as it happened on the Thames goldfield from 1867 to 1868. www.firstyearthamesgoldfield.co.nz The Comer Family, A Family with a Heart of Gold The story of two Devon brothers, born almost 25 years apart, who came to the Thames Goldfields. Robert, known as ‘Uncle’ Comer, arrived in January 1867 and George in January1880 and both were successful mine managers. This book covers many family trials, tragedies and successes. For sales contact Sharleen Campbell and Jennifer Comer on e-mail: 4sharleen@gmail.com True Tales of Thames (available through The Treasury, Thames) The book, with 100 stories and poems, is published by The Coromandel Heritage Trust. The true stories were collected from people with links to Thames, both early and recent. For information contact the Treasury at www.thetreasury.org.nz or email info.thetreasury@gmail.com. Interested in ancestry? Might you have a goldmining ancestor? Visit the Treasury in Thames.

“There were these magnificent correspondents for the workingman’s newspapers who went up into the ranges on a daily basis and interviewed them all, and I’ve tried to acknowledge them in that book,” she says. “It acknowledges the miners themselves and the correspondents of this newspaper.” l

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Steampunk the Thames is a modern-day celebration of Victorian industrial era innovation and creativity and the festival in 2017 and 2018 is growing bigger than ever. The frontier hotels and unique heritage sites of Thames all add to the Steampunk fantasy theme, as do the numerous craftspeople who have adopted the event with their own creative stamp. Thames offers great opportunities to shop for retro, craft and second-hand goods at places such as the Seagull Centre, allowing Steampunk-inspired creativity to flourish. But what exactly is Steampunk? "It is a fantastical retro-futuristic world powered by steam – Victoriana and the industrial revolution fused with science fantasy," explains Deborah MacDonald Brown one of the Steampunk organisers.

“The discovery of the goldfields in 1867 set the foundations for Thames to become a Steampunk town in the 21st century and who would have suspected it? After gold was discovered, people flocked to Thames from Victorian England and the far reaches of the empire to seek their fame and fortune," says Deborah. For those that appreciate how much fancy dress can break the ice and contribute to even more fun, there are plenty of opportunities to get creative and build your Steampunk-inspired outfit before showing it off at the festival in November. For a full list of Steampunk events see www.steampunkthethames.org l

Steampunk it up November 9 to 12 – Steampunk it up with the fantastical fusion of Victoriana and science fiction that is Steampunk the Thames. After gold was discovered, people flocked to Thames from Victorian England and the far reaches of the empire to seek their fame and fortune . Now, 150 years on, join the artistic dress-up drama at the Steampunk Ball, a Night of Burlesque, the Steampunk Banquet, and more.

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THANKS TO THE STEAMPUNK ORGANISERS FOR THE USE OF PHOTOS.


Where the Maori found gold A contest seeking original songs about the Thames goldfields is among numerous events being held until August 2018, and because of it, the considerable talents of locals Sean Kelly, Estelle Cashmore and Andy Mccaskill are bringing history to life. Sean Kelly is a full-time musician living a dreamy life in the Waiotahi Valley of Thames, where he writes his own music in peaceful surroundings that once boomed with the battery stampers that crushed gold. “I came to New Zealand from Ireland in 1990 and three years ago moved to the valley. It is perfect. It’s a beautiful part of the world. I couldn’t imagine anywhere better actually.” Sean’s move away from Auckland allowed him to pursue song writing and music full time and led him to the material for his song I’m a long way from home. He entered this into the Thames 150 Song Contest after a call from organiser David Greenslade.

The song is in the voice of an Irish miner and speaks of the ceili or ceilidh (pronounced Kay-Lee) at the Brian Boru hotel and names some of the places from the map he found. I’m a long way from home but the names of the plots Would have you believe that somehow you’re not Shannon side and Kerry and Star of Fermanagh The Rose and Shamrock and Faugh a Ballagh

“There is a sign behind the Thames Hospital noting the first prospectors and naming them,” Sean says. “And that’s where my line is from, about the Maori finding gold in a crystal clear stream.” For more on the subject, Allan Berry’s book Thames An Early History, records: “George Clarkson heard of a Maori report of gold found in a kumara patch at the mouth of the Kuranui Stream…and an unpublished typescript by Alistair Isdale states: ‘Mackay and his friend Te Hoterini Taipari succeeded in having a small area opened for gold prospecting…Mackay found nothing. In the middle of 1867 two Maori, Hamiora te Nana and Paratene Whakutu, found gold. Taipari and Mackay brought 10 diggers in the Cornstalk and the field was opened...’ For the song by Estelle Cashmore, inspiration came from the life of an ancestor who arrived aged just 16 from Ireland. “In common with a lot of people in Thames I have Irish ancestry, and my ancestors came here in 1864 when things were very poor in Ireland at the time. The song is about these people having to leave their place of birth and start a better life in a new country.”

The farmers were evicted and their families all went too. A few brave souls had had enough, the landlords were too tough They sought to find another land to bring their children up. To bring their children up Andy Mccaskill has lived in Thames all his life and produced four albums. A painter and musician with his own studio, he has recorded many albums for local musicians. An Irish Ceilidh will be held at St James Church is on Friday 16 March, 2018 7.30pm – 10 pm. Tickets: $20 Adults, $10 CSC Holders & free for children . Contact: Sean Kelly Phone: 027 252 0806 (txt only) E-mail: kellyboy@orcon.net.nz. These and more events at www.Thames150years nz Enjoy walking? Head to the Karaka Track carpark on Karaka Road, just before Irishtown Road. The track heads alongside and above the Waiothi Stream through regenerating bush and passes the odd mine shaft as a reminder of the district’s past. l Photo: Alison Smith

“When my partner Maree and I moved up the Waiotahi Valley, inside one of the cupboards, the previous owner had left a map that dates back to the 1870s. It’s a map of the Thames Goldfield with all the claims,” he says. “Some of the names I found totally intrigued me.”

shoulder tapped by an audience member who asked about the reference to the first discovery being by Maori.

Estelle and sister Val McCallum wrote about their family, and their book The Celtic Link is housed at The Treasury in Thames. The song lyrics followed her work on this book. In the 1800's their land was very poor The Irish were a problem and had to be outlawed The crops had failed, the people starved, they knew not what to do

The chorus goes; I’m a long way from home, but the craics still good In a big town called Thames in New Zealand The Maori found gold in a crystal clear stream Since then we have come from all over the world Whilst there is some controversy over which man discovered the first payable gold, Maori were most surely the first. When Sean played his song publicly he was immediately Compiled by Alison Smith with input from and thanks to Althea Baker, Russell Skeet, John Isdale and with excerpts from A Century of Light by H. Harris, Wesley Historical Society (NZ) Publication #24(1&2), and David Wilton, The Treasury, Thames.

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how far we've come To contempl ate how far modern practices have come in the l ast 150 year s – yet how essentially our needs as a communit y have remained unchanged – look no further than Twent ymans Funeral Services in Grahamstown, Thames.

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wentymans is the oldest surviving funeral home in New Zealand, of which owner and Managing Director Adrian Catran is extremely proud. A descendant of tin miners from Cornwall, Adrian has his own long association with Grahamstown. It follows the arrival of the six Catran brothers from the small town of Ludvgan in Cornwall, England, to seek gold in the newly established township on ‘the Thames’. Living a few streets from where Adrian now lives and runs his funeral directing business, the brothers feature in the occasional newspaper report of the time for their noisy shenanigans after evenings in the town’s busy hotels. Men had arrived in their thousands in the months following the Thames goldfield proclamation on 1 August 1867. It was a life where hardship and opportunity were encountered in equal measure and miners were no pushovers. They suffered miserable conditions in the cold, muddy hills that had been stripped of their magnificent cloak of kauri forest and they endured it with patronage at one of the numerous hotels that sprang up. The realisation of riches in the Coromandel had a huge impact not only on the landscape and Maori population, but on Auckland, which was in the throes of a depression at the time. This was one of the richest goldfields ever discovered. But in the hillsides rising as a backdrop to the Firth, it was hard quartz rock that held the precious metal in its embrace and

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it required heavy machinery rather than pick and shovel to release it. Within a few short years the haphazard miner’s shacks were replaced with Victorian houses built of kauri, and companies had overtaken the small mining claims. Mills were constructed with giant metal ‘stampers’ to crush the ore, working day and night with no respect for the sabbath. Laws were swiftly enacted to try to safeguard the

population from the most dangerous of the practices, such as the risk of being crushed to death by a stray giant boulder that had been blasted from the hills above the town. This was clearly a land of opportunity for an established undertaker. By 1868, William Twentyman had set up his building contracting and undertaking business in Owen St, Grahamstown. He hired horse and carriage from Mr White on Pollen St -

Adrian Catran (pictured). The Twentymans’ fleet includes a one-of-a-kind Presidential Hearse, along with a 1939 Chevrolet Hearse among other vehicles.

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whose stables were situated on the corner of Kirkwood and Cochrane Streets - for deliveries to the cemetery. Shortland Cemetery is where William and his wife Mary Jane Twentyman were buried; Mary having died on 1 May 1888 aged 42, followed by her husband William less than five months later, aged 47. The business carried on under the management of their sons Robert and William and the sawmilling and building department of Twentymans closed down only in 1976. Twentymans stayed in the Twentyman family until the early 1990s, and Adrian kept the Twentymans’ name when he bought it in 1993. Adrian renovated the old house on Pollen St that serves as family meeting room and casket room for Twentymans, so that families have somewhere homely and comfortable to meet and discuss their needs for funerals. The tastefully decorated historic Thames house is the shopfront of the business, while the rear of the building houses a mortuary where the dead are cared for; housed, embalmed, dressed and made up prior to their funeral and burial or cremation. And this is where the historical merges with the 21st Century, for Twentymans is not only the oldest surviving funeral home in New Zealand, but among its most innovative. The business has chapels in Whitianga, Paeroa and a building in Whangamata and many are surprised to realise what other facilities lie behind the seemingly unchanged cottage on Pollen St Thames. At the rear of the building is an office for staff, a roomy secure garage for the numerous Twentymans vehicles, an award-winning eco-chapel, with seating for 200 and provision for another 60-80 outside. From its audio and video booth, friends and family worldwide can view the funeral service taking place by accessing a passwordcontrolled live stream on the Twentymans’ website www.twentymans.co.nz. Across the road from the chapel on the service lane off Queen St, the former Judd’s Foundry – where huge lighthouses and other Industrial machinery were built - has been restored by Adrian with the aim of housing a small cremator to serve the Coromandel Peninsula community. Currently families must drive to Hamilton or Auckland to see their loved ones cremated,

www.twentymans.co.nz

FREE PHONE 0800 500 003

which means that funerals held on the east coast of the Coromandel must be conducted earlier in the day and the families face a lengthy journey on one of the most emotional days of their lives. Twentymans’ chose to apply for a Certificate of Compliance to establish a cremator that would sit inside this restored warehouse building on its large commercial site. Unfortunately, a Certificate of Compliance application was not issued and this decision is now under appeal.* Adrian wants the crematorium to operate a separate pet cremator, and anticipates just 170 cremations per year would be performed, amounting to 21 working days of operation. “There is a need for a cremator here. This is not about a big money spinner – I won’t see any return on the costs of this in my lifetime – but for families that wish to have their loved ones cremated close to home, it’s a loss,” he says. In New Zealand, more than 60 per cent of families now choose cremation after someone has died. “For us, that figure is 70 per cent,” says Adrian. This is still well below Japan, where cremation occurs after 99 per cent of deaths. He is buoyed by comments on the Twentymans facebook page following his decision to appeal, such as: “I hope that you succeed in providing that extra level of care for the Thames community!”, “I certainly hope people will watch it and trust that Twentymans have the town’s best interests at heart - Go Adrian!” and “There would be less smoke and pollution from the crematorium than Judds Foundry on the original site of the proposed crematorium in the era!”. Preparing the deceased for burial is always going to be a community need. There are numerous options being trialled worldwide, though each has its critics. Resomation in which a deceased is treated with heat, chemicals and water before being cremulated into ashes; composting - in a ‘pod’ with compost material added until compost is formed months later; and freezing the body before reducing to ashes. Modern cremation techniques ensure there is no residue or odours, and the cremator is a unit about the size of the modern residential laundry. “We will stand by our customers and our commitment to keeping local businesses

Twentymans’ award winning chapel, located behind the historic Pollen St funeral home, has been designed to provide world class acoustics and leading edge technology that enables friends and family from around the world to join funerals on the day.

employed with our service,” says Adrian. “Many people don’t want to discuss the disposal of their body when they die, hence cremation or burial are the principle options and have been for decades. There is a need for a cremator here. This is not about a big money spinner – I won’t see any return on the costs of this in my lifetime – but we are doing this for families that wish to have their loved ones cremated close to home.” * The decision was not out by the time this magazine went to press. ARTICLE BY HOOK & ARROW www.hookandarrow.co.nz FOR TWENTYMANS.

Since 1867

THAMES – Main Office 709 Pollen St, Open 8-5 Mon-Fri, 07 868 6003

WHANGAMATA – 303A Port Road, by appointment, 07 865 6884

WHITIANGA – 48 Moewai Park Rd, by appointment, 07 868 6003

PAEROA – Cnr Arney & Willoughby St, by appointment, 07 862 6889 Since 1867

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Come Celebrate 150 years H orse racing and gold may well be the most obvious pairing of them all in the 150-year tale of Thames. In 1867, people were either making their fortune or enduring a bitterly arduous life unsuccessfully trying, and the Thames Jockey Club - one of the oldest in the country – was born from their need to take a welldeserved break. The first race meet is a story of Maori, settlers and miners of all nationalities coming together in celebration and good spirits, on 2 January 1868. Within three months of the opening of the goldfield, 5000 diggers had arrived, and horses were arriving in numbers keenly cared for by their rivalrous owners. The horse had arrived in consignment to New Zealand only some 28 years before. Army officers with their prized mounts are credited with having arranged the first race meeting, in Auckland, which was at the time, a financially struggling town just a boat ride away from the Thames goldfield. Auckland was to enjoy its first injection of real money for some time at Christmas 1867, when thousands of miners boarded the steamers at Thames to travel up the Firth to Auckland,” writes Johnny Williams in his Racing for Gold book. “Meanwhile those who had remained in

Thames looked forward to New Year’s Eve and the free liquor the 10 hoteliers in Shortland had promised to dispense.” The town’s first horse racing meet was part of a four-day sports event that began on New Year’s Day, and included canoe racing, quoit matches, putting the shot, “hop, step and jump” contests, high jump, pole vaulting and running races. Held on the northern side of the Hape Stream, refreshment booths were made ready. The 500 men who had enjoyed the free hospitality of the town’s hotels had not carried on in the usual brawling that was a feature of these early years, and showed only friendly anticipation of what lay ahead this day. Two handsome young men made their names at the games with their athleticism. Nikorima Poutotara of Parawai in the running races on New Year’s Day and Edward (Ted) Jamieson from Kereta north of Tapu, who rode with “skills far beyond his years” as he took out all the flat races at the meeting. On Day three: “Chief Wiropi Taipari wound up a most successful day by leading his warriors in a war dance and songs to the sustained cheers of the crowds,” captures Williams in his book. “Mr Mulligan provided buckets of Whitsun’s beer to be handed around and pannkins were given to the entertainers. When leaving the course for town, the Maori carried Mr Mulligan on their shoulders back to his hotel, the Governor Bowen.” Parawai’s facilities included a saddling paddock, weighing room, a liquor booth and a grandstand capable of holding

Settlers and miners of all nationalities came together in celebration and good spirits for the first Thames Races on 2 January 1868.

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400 people, who arrived dressed in suits and hats; the women in white gowns with bonnets to keep off the sun. The local paper described the grandstand as “a really commodious edifice”. By the mid-1870s racing was wellestablished, with meetings held in Parawai and Tararu. There was disagreement over which of the two locations was the best, and a coin toss determined that Tararu became the venue of the 1875 Boxing Day meeting. In 1901 Thames Jockey Club purchased 50 acres of land from Robert Comer and 43 acres of “native land”, and the Parawai course was developed. The track was originally lefthanded and six furlongs, altered to a righthanded and seven-furlong track in 1926. l

Excerpts from author Johnny Williams’ excellent read, Racing for Gold, Thames and the Goldfields with the History of the Thames Jockey Club provided information for this short tale on founding one of New Zealand’s oldest horse racing clubs.

COME CELEBRATE 150 AT THAMES RACES Thursday 4 January 2018 Parawai Racecourse, Thames

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Living the lifestyle, loving the choice… A unique and welcoming lifestyle village. Our beautiful gardens in a picturesque location provides a natural relaxed lifestyle. Adjacent to cafés, shops, amenities and healthcare facilities – we focus on active residents having fun.

A HIDDEN TREASURE TO BE DISCOVERED AFTER 150 YEARS! Wednesdays

OPEN DAY! Come and experience th e difference!

NEW APARTMENT BLOCK DEVELOPMENT COMMENCING SOON! 1 and 2 bedroom floor plans to choose from consisting of 3 levels – ground, second and top floor all with balconies overlooking the firth of Thames and surrounding hills. This will join the village as a natural extended lifestyle option. Beautifully designed open plan living that provides you with the luxury of living in an apartment with elegant features.

82 Richmond St, Thames

Ph: 0800 868 5484

richmondvillas.co.nz


Photo: Alison Smith

Te Whanganui A Hei (The Great Bay of Hei)

MERCURY BAY Guided by the stars,

Our Story

Great navigators have found

November 2019 is the 250th anniversary of Captain James Cook’s visit to Te Whanganui a Hei on his first Great Voyage (1768–1771) aboard Endeavour. Cook’s landing at Te Whanganui A Hei was the first amicable contact between Europeans and the Maori. Cook spent 12 days here with Ngāti Hei and named the area Mercury Bay.

Mercury Bay on The Coromandel Stayed to explore To form relationships with the land and people.

The 250th anniversary is your chance to discover – and participate in – our story.

250 years on,

Beginnings

We celebrate The navigators and explorers, And the spirit with which they were received.

Long before Cook’s arrival, Te Whanganui a Hei attracted another legendary navigator, Kupe. Kupe sailed here around 950AD from the mythical Polynesian Islands called Hawaiiki. His journey was followed by the Te Arawa canoe under its tauira or sailing master Hei – ancestor of the Ngāti Hei people who still reside in Whitianga today. Although the Treaty of Waitangi was symbolically conceived at Waitangi, the actual birthplace of New Zealand took place at Ngāti Hei’s turangawaewae – Wharekaho, in the Mercury Bay.

The Mercury Bay 250 Trust The Mercury 250 Anniversary Trust was established to help our community develop events and lasting legacies that commemorate the significance of Mercury Bay in our dual heritage. This is an opportunity to share our stories, embrace our dual heritage and enhance the indigenous marine and land habitats that were impacted following these first connections between two cultures.

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First Encounters It was at Wharekaho just north of Whitianga that the first sanctioned powhiri (welcome ceremony) occurred between European and Maori. There was the first recorded wero (challenge ritual) and a demonstration of Ngāti Hei’s traditional weapons. Mercury Bay was where the first meaningful, friendly, inter-civilisation and cultural exchange took place.

Share Cook and Coromandel Peninsula tribes made the first official exchanges of gifts which included the introduction of the potato, hence the name of Ngāti Hei’s sacred Pa and urupa Wharetaewa or “house of the potato”. Through the 250th anniversary we celebrate brave relationships forged: the opening of one’s heart to engage with a culture different from one’s own.

Navigate Mercury Bay has a long association with great navigators including Tupaia who joined with Cook on Endeavour in Tahiti. At Cook’s Beach, Cook recorded the Transit of Mercury – an astrological event that established the geographic co-ordinates of New Zealand. This placed New Zealand on the world map and gave Mercury Bay its name.

Explore Many scientific discoveries were made with these first encounters. We continue to draw visitors in the act of searching; for knowledge, peace and peaceful time in nature on The Coromandel where they can explore the region and the fulfilment of their own personal journeys.

Join us and contribute to the 250th anniversary of Captain James Cook’s visit to Te Whanganui a Hei-Mercury Bay. l

Contacts: Paul Kelly Joe Davis Email mercury250@tcdc.govt.nz www.thecoromandel.com/cooksjourney O U R

Photo: Jack Burden

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Honouring the fallen with the WWI Memorial Forest

When the New Zeal ander s’ attack at Passchendaele was called off at 3pm on the afternoon of 12 October 1917, 842 Kiwis had been killed and several thousand more wounded.

The Blackest Day 12 October 1917

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t is the most lives lost in a single day in New Zealand’s military history. The World War I Memorial Forest site at the new Kaimarama Cemetery on SH25 just south of Whitianga pays tribute to the New Zealand men killed on that blackest of days, as well as the hundreds of others who fell in the ultimately unsuccessful months-long campaign to break the German lines on the Western Front in 1917. Other Memorial Forest sites pay tribute to those who were killed in other battles and campaigns: Gallipoli, the Somme, Sinai-Palestine and Le Quesnoy. Some sites honour the men from specific Coromandel townships who went off to war and never returned. One tree has been planted for each soldier. When the New Zealand government asked for projects to commemorate the 100th anniversary of WWI, our Council and our Community Boards proposed to establish a series of Memorial Forests across the Coromandel where native trees could be planted to represent some of the 18,166 New Zealanders who were killed in the war. We worked with partners including DOC, the Waikato Regional Council (WRC), iwi, RSAs, schools and community groups in the planting and care of the Memorial Forest sites. We have received contributions from DOC, WRC, Perpetual Guardian (administrators of Stella Evered Memorial Park), Barkers and NZ Lotteries. We have also received many contributions from people wishing to commemorate a tree to a relative who fell in the Great War. As the trees planted in the Memorial Forest sites grow, they will mature into places of quiet contemplation where people can walk and think about history and the sacrifice of those who served and were killed in WWI. l

The Memorial Forest sites Thames – Rhodes Park. Thames war dead. Coromandel Town – Hauraki Road. Represents Coromandel war dead and the “supreme sacrifice” paid by all those who were killed in the war.

Cathedral Stella Cove Evered Reserve

local war dead and the Battle of Passchendaele.

Stella Evered Memorial Park – Lees Rd, Hahei. Commemorates the Somme.

Cathedral Cove – Gallipoli. Tairua – Tairua RSA cemetery. The fallen from Tairua-Hikuai. Pauanui – Tangitarori Lane. The Sinai-Palestine campaign. Whangamata – The north entrance to town on SH25.

Tairua Pauanui

Commemorate a tree to the fallen soldier of your choice with a $25 donation. Your donation will pay for the planting and care of a tree in one of our Memorial Forest sites.

Or, you can gift a tree on behalf of your family to an unnamed fallen soldier. You will receive a memorial certificate without a GPS location. If you wish to donate to the Le Quesnoy Memorial Forest in Whangamata, for a $35 donation you will also receive a commemorative poppy. To donate, go to

www.tcdc.govt.nz/ww1memorialforest

Thames

or call TCDC Customer Services on

07 868 0200.

The Battle of Le Quesnoy. Whangamata

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How you can contribute

You’ll receive a memorial certificate with the soldier’s name and the GPS co-ordinates of the tree.

Coromandel Town Whitianga

Whitianga – Kaimarama Cemetery. Honours the

In February 2017 a delegation from the French town of Le Quesnoy came to visit the WWI Memorial Forest site in Whangamata that pays tribute to the 122 Kiwi troops killed in the 4 November 1918 battle to liberate the town.


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Butterfly

According to traditional stories of voyaging canoes, insects had the task of avenging those who desecrated the sacredness of forests.

e Taiao Maori and the Natural World records that birds and insects including butterflies played a role in emphasising the importance of respecting your kinsfolk and the forest trees, and placating the spirit world before taking something from nature. On remote hills of the Coromandel behind Waiomu on the Thames Coast, a butterfly opens and shuts its wings of black and white stripe to reveal a flash of burnt orange and black on the inside. This is the Forest Ringlet (Dodonidia helmsii) and is arguably New Zealand’s most enchantingly beautiful butterfly. It once flew over treetops from Northland to the Lewis Pass in the South Island, but is now rarely sighted. Wellington entomologist, Dr George Gibbs, and former Forest and Bird national President Peter Maddison of Katikati have both been fascinated by the Forest Ringlet their whole lives. For many years it was the Forest Ringlet whose image appeared on the $1 postage stamp in New Zealand, but while Peter has always kept his eyes open for sightings in nature, he has seen this butterfly on just four occasions in his lifetime. However, if you are in the Coromandel’s forest

Photo: Michael Reid

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Photo: Norme Twigge

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n c h a nt i n g l y b e aut i f u l e n

and signs of caterpillar feeding during January and February, damage. Feeding at night, it takes you may just be lucky enough to notches out of the sides of the see one for yourself. And if you Gahnia, a type of sedge plant that do – the Forest Ringlet Project looks like cutty grass. volunteers will be extremely “I tramped into the Coromandel pleased to hear from you. hills via Waiomu and tramped This summer look out for the out the next day – exhausted, butterfly’s characteristic fast, jerky muddy and wet,” he reported flight high up in the forest canopy Forest-Ringlet stamp – during one of his trips. “Maps of flowering trees like manuka, Issued in New Zealand showed that the food plant they hīnau, marble leaf and whitey Nov 1991 feed on (various species of sedge) wood. It has a distinctive, strong is certainly there and my two-day white stripe on the underside, tramp confirmed the food plant in abundance, which helps to identify it. and the structure of the habitat in some areas “Amongst our butterflies it’s the rarest but looked just right. I’m satisfied the butterfly they haven’t always been rare,” explains Peter could be there...but not flying in the weather Maddison. “There’s one species that lives only conditions I experienced. I did also find what in the Catlins in the South Island. These are strongly looks like evidence of caterpillar hard butterflies to see, because it seems to feeding damage.” fly more in the treetops and when you are in This is the reality of conservation work, the bush, you are tending to look down at the as many volunteers on the Coromandel will ground. There are probably not more than 100 know. Often physically demanding, sometimes people alive that have ever seen this butterfly.” muddy, wet, and also with the primary task of It’s thought that the arrival of invasive pests killing unwanted predators rather than the such as wasps have played a major role in opportunity to admire the species requiring the Forest Ringlet’s demise, and the everprotection, there is huge satisfaction however destructive rat may also have something to do when the species are actually seen in the wild. with it. “The butterfly was found flying in sunshine Finding answers is a goal of the Forest Ringlet on Tuesday, 16km north,” wrote Steve during Project, which Peter kick-started following one of his trips. “I think the Coromandel observations that the butterfly was in serious Peninsula could be a remaining stronghold for decline. It’s hoped enough will be learned to the butterfly. More searches and research over be able to establish a protected colony that will the coming years will confirm this.” safeguard their population. Steve says local Coromandel naturalists had As part of the project, the group invited recently spotted this beautiful butterfly flying Steve Wheatley, who works for the UK charity high up in the canopy at several forest locations Butterfly Conservation, to come across and and the group are heartened by these sightings. find out as much as he can. Steve’s made “We need to get more information about several trips to the Coromandel Ranges in 2017 where the butterfly is and where it is doing to search for the elusive beauty, which had been well. Only then can local scientists formulate historically recorded in the area, and had been a plan to ensure its long-term conservation. sighted by various Coromandel naturalists. Any suspected sightings should be sent to the Steve says his visit to the Coromandel Moths and Butterflies of NZ Trust.” confirmed an abundance of suitable habitat

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The iconic species for New Zealand butterflies is the monarch, although scientists see the irony in this given that it is originally from North America. “The monarch is like our ambassador,” explains Jacqui Knight of the Moths and Butterflies of NZ Trust (formerly Monarch Butterfly New Zealand Trust). The Monarch arrived here of its own accord – thought to have been around 1840 – and is much more visible than our other small number of native butterflies – dwelling, as it does, in suburban gardens and feeding on milkweed (swan plants) in their larval stage.

Butterflies are sensitive to air temperature and therefore appear on stage when the air is warm. You would think everyone would love these harmless and beautiful creatures whose arrival means warm summery days, but Jacqui has been surprised at the number of youngsters who seem to know very little about them and have no experience of joy in nature. “We’ve got so much work to do because some of the children I meet have never been involved with nature at all. I had one boy the other day who was terrified of butterflies and it made me wonder how many people are getting out and appreciating our wilderness areas with their children. We use the monarch butterfly as a tool to get people interested because once you get involved with monarch butterflies you learn about aphids, what sort of plants they need to feed on, how to manage their food supply…you start to learn about biodiversity generally.” l

A kindergarten visit to the Butterfly and Orchid Garden in Thames delights visitors. Photo: Alison Smith

How you can help Any suspected sightings should be sent to the Moths and Butterflies of NZ Trust: nzbutterflies.org.nz

Local volunteer looking for Forest Ringlet in the Canopy. Photo: Steve Wheatley

Why not become a member of the MBNZT? Your $25 subscription goes towards their many projects, and you will receive information-packed newsletters throughout the year so you can learn more about how butterflies and moths behave, upcoming Trust activities and events, along with tips and hints on making your garden more butterfly-friendly. www.nzbutterflies.org.nz

Did you know?

Attempts to control the Cabbage White have had a detrimental effect on our native butterflies. The Butterfly and Orchid Garden in Thames is New Zealand’s first tropical butterfly and orchid house and is a very affordable and easy way to introduce children to these insects, which include butterflies from all over the world. The Butterfly and Orchid Garden is situated within the Dickson Holiday Park, 115, Victoria Street, Tararu, Thames (Just 3km north of Thames in the direction of Coromandel, follow the signs). www.butterfly.co.nz

Photo: Michael Reid

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Our Coast Did you know we have more than 400km of coastline across the Coromandel? It stretches from our white sandy beaches on the east coast, through to the rugged rocky contrast on the west coast heading up the Thames Coast and on to Coromandel Town. But when it comes to how we manage and protect our coast there’s historically been an “ad hoc” approach in different areas, and not an overarching strategy for the entire district. And while we have the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement (NZCPS) and the Waikato Regional Policy Statement (RPS) which feeds into our District Plan, these are more narrowly focused on planning and consenting processes. That’s why we’ve developed a Draft Coastal Management Strategy, which will also help our Council advocate on your behalf when we’re dealing with other agencies (including regional council and central government) on policy and funding of coastal management practices into the future. The Draft Coastal Management Strategy covers: 1. Natural, environmental and amenity values. So looking at how we maintain our estuaries, rivers and the health of our aquifers (groundwater). We also want to focus on healthy rivers and streams. 2. Coastal hazards, physical processes and community resilience. This is about making informed choices around how we respond to changes to our natural coastal systems including erosion, accretion, inundation and tsunami. It’s also about looking at our preparedness for natural disasters. We need to work closely with Civil Defence, DOC, NZTA, Regional Council, iwi and other stakeholders. 3. Maori values. This is about recognising tangata whenua’s special relationship with the coast. 4. Recreation, open space and access. Ensuring public access to our coastline and rivers is well-maintained, while balancing the impact on the natural environment. This also takes into account events and commercial activities in coastal open spaces. 5. Community assets and infrastructure. Ensuring we have high quality, fit-forpurpose infrastructure that is in keeping with the coastal environment and takes into account climate change and coastal hazards. It’s also about having a sound understanding of our existing infrastructure assets around the coast. We welcome your thoughts on what should be included in our new Coastal Management Strategy from 2 October through to 18 November, which will then help formulate the final document which will link into our 2018-2028 Long Term Plan. To find out all the details and for more regular updates go to www.tcdc.govt.nz/cms l

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Throwing shade at

TREE

VANDALS

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he signs are out and the message is clear: we won’t tolerate the destruction or vandalism of trees on our parks and reserves. In the past 12 months our Council has dealt with a large number of cases of tree vandalism including a 70-year-old Norfolk pine on Buffalo Beach Whitianga being poisoned, while less than 1km down the road another tree was intentionally chopped down. Meanwhile four young pohutukawa trees on the beach reserve at the end of Tuck Road Whangamata were drilled into and poisoned. In Mercury Bay, the Community Board have put on a united front erecting signs at some of the sites where trees have been destroyed. “We decided putting up these signs, along with the planting of another tree where one was destroyed, is letting those who commit these

Mercury Bay Community Board members with the new ‘Help us to protect our trees’ signage. Left to right: Paul Kelly, Deli Connell, Tony Fox, Murray McLean, Rekha Giri-Percival and Bill McLean.

acts know that we won’t tolerate it, the wider community won’t tolerate it and what they are doing won’t work – the tree will be replaced,” says Paul Kelly, Mercury Bay Community Board Chair. The signs, point out the history behind the tree planting, and also ask the public for help if they see acts of vandalism by reporting it to our customer services team by email customer.services@tcdc.govt.nz or phone on 07 868 0200. The signs will also be going up around the District when necessary, as cases of tree vandalism or destruction are reported. l

What are the options for trees on Council land? Depending on the tree, species, location and age there are a few things that can be done: Deadwooding: Most trees are selfpruning and dead wood will drop from the trees, but this does not happen all at once, so by removing wood that is dead, wE can improve the health of the tree, let in light through the canopy and possibly improve views. Crown thinning: This is like deadwooding, but also includes the removal of live wood as well. This may include the removal of branches that have not formed well, may be rubbing against each other, or may be inherently weak. The benefits or the side effects can be similar to deadwooding. Crown lifting: This is where the canopy is trimmed to lift it higher. This can be done for many reasons, including public safety; for example, if a tree has branches over a footpath at head height there’s a risk of injury. Power lines clearance: This is generally escalated to Powerco’s contractors who need to undertake the work due to the hazardous nature of working near live power cables. If the tree is dead or believed to be threatening life, property or essential services: A council officer will visit the site. The advice of an independent arborist may be sought if the officer believes there is no threat or if there may be objections from other parties to council action about the tree. Contact the TCDC Customer Service team on 07 868 0200, email us at customer.services@tcdc.govt.nz to talk about trees or submit a request for service www.tcdc.govt.nz/rfs

Tree cut down on Buffalo Beach Reserve.

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Going Natural A natural burial area is being established at the Omahu Cemetery in Thames.

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he area is the result of a partnership with the Natural Burial Interest Group in Thames, who approached our Council through submissions to the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan. “Their input has been very valuable to guide the progression of the area, which has also been made to happen through the support of the Thames Community Board and its Chair Diane Connors,” says Paula Carr our District Cemeteries Coordinator.

“The vision is that the area set aside for natural burials becomes a very special environment with the central idea that everything about the area is as “natural” as possible without anything introduced that would interfere with, or pollute, the environment,” adds Ms Carr. All the nutrients from the deceased will be gradually absorbed for the benefit of the surrounding soil and plants. It is intended that the area will be transformed into a permanent

woodland setting and act as a living memorial to those buried there, be a home for flora and fauna, and become a beautiful space for reflection and remembrance of loved ones. The Natural Burial Garden ground plot layout work is yet to be completed, however concept plans allow for an initial stage of approximately 110 plots. We expect the area will be available for interments and plots for purchase from October 2017. l www.tcdc.govt.nz/cemeteries

What is a natural burial? T H E ESS ENTI ALS 1. No embalming: Bodies buried at this area are not to be embalmed. This is to hasten the natural processes of returning the body and its nutrients to the soil, and to reduce the amount of chemicals introduced to the soil. 2. Single depth burials only: Graves are dug within the living topsoil layer to the depth of the casket with an additional coverage of soil and organic material 3. Caskets are to be made from biodegradable untreated materials: Casket linings and fittings are also to be biodegradable. All items or contents in the casket (including clothing) are to be made of biodegradable material. 4. Shrouds are to be made from natural fibres: If the deceased is to be buried in a shroud, rather than a casket, fasten to a solid board wider than the body for lowering purposes. The board is to be made from biodegradable untreated timber. 5. Unembalmed bodies must be: Kept cold and in absorbent materials until burial. A body must be disposed of within a reasonable time as set out in Section 46E of the Burials and Cremation Act 1964. 6. Infectious diseases: If a person dies from an infectious

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disease, the funeral director must notify the Medical Officer of Health (s.85 Health Act 1956) and take advice, cemetery staff must be informed. In the absence of a funeral director family will assume this responsibility. A person who has passed away due to an infectious disease is to be buried in an ecocasket with appropriate protection against leakage.

OMAHU VALLEY NATURAL BURIAL SITE

7. Tributes are limited: Natural cut flowers only (no plastic flowers) and if placed in a vase are to be removed within a week of the burial. 8. Unobtrusive grave markers: Markers up to 200mm x 80mm made from natural stone or untreated wood are acceptable. These will be installed at ground level at the head of the grave. 9. There will be an overall landscape design: Appropriate native trees and shrubs will part of the landscape design. 10. Preparation of the body: If at any time a family is unsure of any procedures to prepare the body for a natural burial, it is advised that family contact a funeral home or other suitably qualified organisation for guidance.

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Other helpful information www.naturalburials.co.nz – website of the New Zealand Natural Burials Organisation www.naturaldeath.org – website for the organisation which started the Natural Burial movement in the UK The Thames Natural Burial Interest Group is willing to assist with inquiries and may be contacted through our Council naturalburials@tcdc.govt.nz


Vision: The Coromandel where talent lives, works and grows Mission: Making work happen

CAN DO is a group of like-minded people in the business community focused on stimulating business growth and employment. In August 2017 it helped get the Thames Civic Centre buzzing with the community, students, businesses and volunteers from across our district attending its CAN DO Business, Careers and Volunteers Expo. With 30 volunteer organisations and 30 local businesses, the expo provided the opportunity for young people, and others looking for work, to meet potential employers, as well as promoting volunteering opportunities. “Our primary focus is youth. What we are trying to do is get our local businesses to showcase what industry they fit into and the career path they can offer in our region,” Sean Hayes, CAN DO Chair. For Thames High School teacher Linnea McDonald having her students involved with CAN DO has been a worthwhile opportunity. “Watching certain students interact with local business owners, I can see a perfect fit for some of the opportunities on offer,” says Ms McDonald. “I don’t think students would come to an expo like this on their own. So rather than us as teachers, or parents giving career advice, I can see by talking to real people who do this work every day it sinks in for our students,” says Ms McDonald.

please contact Sheryll Fitzpatrick to make an appointment by calling in to the Thames Community Centre, 609 Mackay Street, phone: 07 868 9797 or email: tcrc@xtra.co.nz For more information on what CAN DO has to offer including next year’s expo, see candothames.org.nz or www.tcdc.govt.nz/cando “Everyone needs a starting point and work experience to get a job down the track. For our young people things like the CAN DO Expo helps create connections for them in the community, so if they choose to go to university, when they gravitate back to their home town they will have a network from their work experience,” says Marlene Perry, our Council’s Thames Community Development Officer.

“We are also assisting many young people to get their driver’s licence. By getting their licence this opens up opportunities and options for employment,” says Sheryll Fitzpatrick, Manager of the Thames Community Centre. The Thames Community Centre also has go-to people, for anyone with questions or needing support. If you are seeking work experience or think you could offer work experience after school, during the weekends, or over the holiday period,

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Youth in Emergency Services ARE YOU BETWEEN 16 AND 21 YEARS OLD? DO YOU LIVE IN OR PLAN ON VISITING WHANGAMATA, PAUANUI OR TAIRUA OVER SUMMER 2017-18? WOULD YOU LIKE TO GAIN SOME NEW SKILLS? THEN SIGN UP FOR OUR YOUTH IN EMERGENCY SERVICES (YES) PROGRAMME. This is a hands-on introduction to the work of the emergency services in our area. You have the opportunity to contribute within the community as well as gain marketable employment skills and get a real insight into potential career pathways. And you can also become an active voluntary member of an emergency service now, which looks great on CVs. What do you get out of it? The YES programme involves a mix of knowledge, skills training and activitybased sessions, culminating in real-lifebased scenario exercises to practise your new found skills. The YES programme is run collaboratively with the volunteer Fire Services, St John, Land Search and Rescue (LandSAR), Thames Valley Civil Defence, our Council and local community-based volunteer

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emergency service partners, Coastguard NZ and Surf Life Saving NZ, all of whom will be sharing their knowledge and skills with those who take up the challenge. Everyone involved goes away with a better understanding of what it means to work within an emergency service organisation, as well as learning all-important life skills, strengthening community connections, and building the capacity of our local emergency service organisations.

More information For more information, to register your interest or request a nomination form please contact our Whangamata Area Office: 620 Port Road, Whangamata Email: customer.services@tcdc.govt.nz Phone: 07 865 0072 Visit our website: www.tcdc.govt.nz/yes Or message us on Facebook: @ThamesCoromandelDistrictCouncil

To be involved you need to be: • Aged between 16-21 years old • Motivated and committed • Have good self-management skills • In good health and physically able • A vailable to commit to attending a one-week programme at the end of January 2018. Applications close 4.00pm Monday 8 January 2018.

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EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

While there’s plenty to do in the Coromandel to keep yourself physically fit, there are also options to give your brain a work out too. From short courses to help you develop your personal hobby, to longer programmes to upskill your community, Here’s some of what is available.

WINTEC

While Wintec’s headquarters are in Hamilton, its students are all over the region. On our doorstep are campuses in Thames and Waihi, where the Waikato Institute of Technology offers full time and part time courses. In Thames, those include computer skills, food safety, Licence Controller Qualification, which is required for serving alcohol, and horticulture courses for future arborists and landscapers. Kim Linklater, who oversees regional programmes, says Wintec also works with communities to offer bespoke training. For example, they’ve partnered with Ngati Hei Trust to run horticulture courses in Whitianga. Those students have been learning and working at a site on Buffalo Beach Road, which is due to pass into the ownership of Ngati Hei Trust as part of Treaty of Waitangi Treaty settlements. The programme includes daily hands-on skill development, and covers soil science, plant establishment, weed identification and control. Similar courses have also run in Coromandel Town. If there’s no dedicated venue for these regional pop-up courses, Kim says they‘ll partner with local networks to find a suitable space. That might mean using our Council rooms or a local high school, with tutors travelling to the site. The Waikato Trades Academy, which is part of Wintec, also has a base in Kopu. That’s where high school students from all over ThamesCoromandel can roll up their sleeves and get experience in fields such as construction, electrical engineering, plumbing and gas fitting, as they work towards their NCEA. The majority of the courses fit into the NZQA framework, and students may be eligible for allowances and loans. www.wintec.ac.nz

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VETEL

The staff at Vetel are not just there to get students through their coursework. Executive Director Andrea McCartney and her team go the extra mile to support their students at Valley Education and Training Enterprises Ltd in Kopu. If they need a lift to class, there’s free transport from Waihi, Paeroa, Thames, and Ngatea. If they need extra help with writing and reading, that can be arranged. If they need encouragement, the staff are ready to give their students a boost. There’s a wide range of courses to help people kick-start their career paths in many industries. There is training to get you on track to start work on a farm, in an orchard, in a shop. You can learn to weld, handle a chainsaw or make the perfect flat white. Courses vary in length and level; some are foundation courses, some go up to NZQA Level 4. One programme, for example, is for young people who’re getting ready to join the workforce. They’ll learn some valuable skills such as how to work in a team, time management, and budgeting. This course is free for 1619 year olds. Across the year, Vetel’s 6 tutors train about 90 students from around Thames-Coromandel and Hauraki districts. The courses aren’t just for people starting out on their careers. They are for people of all ages. You can go along and upskill to further your own passion or hobby. For employers, Vetel can also tailor courses to suit the needs of a business and its workforce. Workplace communication skills, for example, can be taught on site, and run in-conjunction with other crucial programmes such as Health and Safety. If employers need staff with specific skills, it is worth giving Andrea a call as she’ll likely have someone in mind.

Gearing up in Mercury Bay, where you’ll find some of New Zealand’s best dive locations.

As part of Vetel’s support for students, there are also work experience and industry placements, help to put CVs together, and to practise job interviews. Students are eligible for allowances and student loads. www.valleyeducation.co.nz

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Students can practise their diving skills in the pool, as well as in the warm waters off Whitianga.

DIVE ACADEMY

Armed with their Diplomas in Professional Scuba Instruction, graduates of Dive Zone Whitianga’s Diploma Program are teaching others to dive in Vanuatu, Fiji, Tonga, Auckland, Bay of Islands, and Australia. Some are crewing super yachts around the world. Others have gone on to become marine biologists or commercial divers. 125 people, most of them Kiwis, have earned the qualification since the Academy of Diving programs began in Whitianga in 2004. For owner Darrell Bird, their location is their greatest advantage; the Coromandel water temperature is warmer all year round than in many parts of the country, and the geography means, whatever the conditions, there’s likely to be somewhere they can get in. The course takes 44 weeks. Half the time is in the classroom. The other half is all about getting in the water, diving twice, two days a week. They dive all over Mercury Bay and as far as the Alderman Islands and the Mercury Islands to the north.

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Students also head out camping for a week at the top of the Coromandel peninsula, where they learn mapping and other skills in a different environment at Fletcher’s Bay. Students will complete a minimum of 100 dives to earn their Diploma. Darrell says after 50 to 60, divers are comfortable in the water and are working on instinct, so they can start learning new skills, such as how to train divers, how to manage group dives, how to help others in the water, and first aid. Darrell says Whitianga is a great location for

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his students. It’s a friendly small community, and there’s little need for transport as it’s small enough to walk around. There are also plenty of part-time jobs over the weekends when class is out. The course is NZQA approved, and students are eligible for allowances and loans. Contact: Dive Zone Whitianga 7 Blacksmith Lane Phone 07 867 1580 info@divethecoromandel.com www.divezonewhitianga.co.nz

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Foreign students are a big deal for New Zealand’s economy. A recent study by Infometrics found that international education was the fourth biggest earner of international export revenue in 2015-16. That means foreign students are bringing about $4 billion to New Zealand’s economy. It’s a competitive market and it’s growing, and the report recommends that “attracting students is often not all about having world class education programs, but the entire experience.” That’s something two very different language schools in the Coromandel are well aware of, and their international students are learning far more than just great English.

EVAKONA EDUCATION

Evakona Education has bases in Whitianga and Thames. Most of their students are Japanese. Others come from China, Korea and Saudi Arabia, among others. Around a dozen Japanese teenagers join the High School Preparation course each year, aiming to graduate from New Zealand high school three years later. For the first year, it’s all about preparing for life at a New Zealand high school by studying English language and core high school subjects. Then, it’s onto Year 12 and 13 where they’re fully immersed at a local college. Evakona supports these students with one-to-one private lessons and help with homework

and assignments. Other Japanese students come for their first year of high school to hone their English before returning home. There’s a wide variety of other courses including intensive English in small classes, and family options where adults’ classes fit in around their children’s hours at local schools. Evakona can also prepare

Success! Happy students with Deputy Principal John Saunders.

students for English formal language tests that may be required for visa and residency applications. Azumi Hopping, who’s in charge of student support, says most students live with host families. The school has about 100 host families in Whitianga and 30 in Thames. Azumi says while the students learn about New Zealand life from their local families, there’s also a benefit to the local economy. Host families are paid to look after the students, and the school uses many local facilities for activities. www.evakona.co.nz

Evakona has campuses in Whitianga and Thames, and many of their ESL students go on to study at high schools around the region.

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WAIKATO UNIVERSITY BUS

Waikato University has started running a daily bus service from Thames to its campus in Hamilton.

COROMANDEL OUTDOOR LANGUAGE CENTRE

Learning by doing is the name of the game at the Coromandel Outdoor Language Centre in Whitianga. There, students get outside and involved in activities and their English improves while they discover the Coromandel. Whether they’re at the beach or on a hike, they’re learning as they go. The students have incredible opportunities to get up close and personal with the New Zealand countryside. They can volunteer at the school’s kauri nursery, run a trapline for Project Kiwi, and maintain DOC tracks. School director Kim Lawry enjoys seeing people’s lives enriched as their language skills grow and they experience the beautiful natural environment here. He says the students all enjoy giving something back to New Zealand through their volunteering. Most of Coromandel Outdoor Language Centre’s students are tourists, or on working holiday visas and they’ve decided to make learning English part of their New Zealand experience. They may stay for a few months before travelling around the country or getting a job. Many of them end up working in or near Whitianga.

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School numbers vary between 20 off peak, to 60 in the summer. Class sizes are small, though that varies by the season. New students roll up on Mondays and slot in to which ever class suits their needs best. Students come from all over the world, particularly Europe and East Asia. While most are in their 20s, the minimum age is 16, and there’s no cap; the oldest student was 81. The teachers are all native English speakers. Kim Lawry says a lot of the students maintain their friendships when they return to their home countries. Again, the majority of students stay with host families in Whitianga. The school has a network of about 75 homestays who host students, and they are paid to look after them. www.activity.co.nz/home

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It’s meant students have been able to get to uni and back for just $2 a day, so they can stay living at home, dramatically reducing their costs. Any enrolled University of Waikato student in the region can use the bus. Around 30 students have been travelling on the Thames route in 2017; it goes from Thames, through Ngatea, Paeroa, Te Aroha, Waitoa, and Morrinsville to Hamilton.

That’ll continue in the 2018 academic year if there’s enough interest, though the route may alter depending on demand. www.waikato.ac.nz/student-life/ campuses/buses-to-campus

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Surf Life Saving New Zealand

The beach is New Zeal and’s favourite pl ayground, but it can also be a dangerous pl ace.

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s 5,000 volunteer lifeguards head out on patrol for another summer season, they cannot stress enough, the importance of being prepared and choosing a patrolled beach so that lifeguards can be there for you if you get into trouble. There are seven Surf Life Saving Clubs within the Coromandel area that patrol locations including Hot Water Beach, Hahei, Cathedral Cove, Tairua, Pauanui, Onemana, Whangamata, Whiritoa, Waihi Beach and Bowentown. When you and your family are planning a trip to one of the Coromandel’s beautiful beaches this summer, please choose one of these patrolled locations and swim between the flags.

About Surf Life Saving New Zealand:

Keep surf safe this summer: While swimming between the flags is a well-known message, Surf Life Saving New Zealand also encourages people to adhere to a few simple rules. Be prepared, watch out for yourself and others, be aware of the dangers and know your limits. Learning about the risks and preparing yourself will mean you and your family can enjoy the sun, sea and sand safely this summer.

Surf Life Saving New Zealand is the charity representing 74 Surf Life Saving Clubs in New Zealand. Since 1910, extraordinary New Zealanders have been volunteering their time to patrol New Zealand’s beaches. They rely on public donations to train and equip lifeguards to save lives and help keep their local community safe at the beach. Surf Life Saving Clubs in the Coromandel area will be undertaking fundraising activities as part of the Surf Life Saving Summer Appeal during the Christmas and New Year Period. Keep an eye out for them at local campgrounds and festivals and please show your support to your local lifeguards. If you don’t see a fundraiser, you can still show your support by donating online at www.surflifesaving.org.nz

www.surflifesaving.org.nz


FREE Stuff to do with kids

Many Kiwis have fond childhood memories of sunny family holidays on one of the Coromandel’s fabulous beaches. Endless days spent with a bucket and spade, digging wet

l e d n a m o r o C e on th

sand and collecting shells. While we’re certain we have the best beaches in New Zealand, there’s a lot more to our region than surf and sand. Even when the weather cools, there’s still loads to do on a family holiday.

Getbooyotsur onhi!king

The best bit – loads of it is free. Here’s a few ideas.

T h er e ar e aw es o m e mcyclounintain biking and g opportunities

Whangamata and Whitia nga have bike awesome parks which are suitable for all levels. Whangamata: www.ridenz.co/trails/wh angamata-rid

Whitianga Bike Park: www.whitiangabikeclu

es to going bush in You’re spoilt for choice when it com walks all over the the Coromandel. DOC’s website lists it’ll take and long how district, with information about legs for 15 your ch stret to t how difficult it is. If you wan ething som e’s ther rs, hou 5 for burn minutes or feel the a find ll you’ ths for all abilities, and in the wetter mon walk in the bush is often dry. lkingandtramping Have a look at www.doc.govt.nz/wa re you set off Remember to check the DOC site befo ared, and tell prep Go to make sure the track is open. out. someone before you head

ges-mountain-bike-park

b.co.nz/trails.html Up Moanataiari Creek Roa d in the hills in Thames, there are mountain bike trails wh ich are suitable for all lev els. One of the area’s best kno wn is the Hauraki Rail Tra il. It runs from Thames to Te Aroha, wit h branches from Paeora to Waihi, and from Kopu to Kaiaua

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www.haurakirailtrail.c o.nz

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Get stuck into a good book

Holidays, of course, are the perfect time to get stu ck into a good book! If you’re a NZ resident fro m outside the Thames-C oro mandel, you can still get a local library card. Just bring photo ID, pro of of address and $2. Did you know you don’t even need to leave the house to check someth out? There are lots of ebo ing oks to download from the library website and read on your mobile dev ice. www.tcdc.govt.nz/library

eFe ling Crafty?

ries in district libra g crafty, our in el vities. fe e ac ar holiday ti If the kids d Tairua run an , ga es like an ti em hi th around Thames, W ns are based io ss ey’re se Th g s. on ar The hour-l and Star W go Le a, Se n may nder the unger childre Machines, U 13, though yo – 5 es ag r suitable fo to help. ne with them need someo

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As well as free books, our libraries also rent out DVD s. Some free, some with small charge. a Whangamata, Coromand el Town and Pauanui als o have their own commu libraries. Opening hours nity-run and addresses are on ou r Council’s website: www.tcdc.govt.nz/Our-S ervices/Library

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Photo: Felicity Jean Photography

Festivals and Markets

Hu nt fo r Rock s

Whether you’re int erested in scallop s or steampunk, cra or car-boot sales, fts there are loads of fes tivals and markets throughout the ye ar across the distri ct, with plenty of crafts and culture food, on offer. Destinatio n Coromandel ha extensive list on th s an eir calendar: www.thecoroman del.com/events/ma rkets-fairs-and-ga www.tcdc.govt.n las z/Your-Council/Ev ents-Meeting-Cale ndar

und have panned for gold aro While historically, people ks. roc for t many are on the hun these parts, nowadays, r ove all ks are being hidden Specially decorated roc t a picture is that you find one, pos a communities. The ide n hide it The up. ok rockhunter gro of it on the local Facebo r own, you e hid . Or decorate and for the next person to find k. about where to loo and give people a tip-off

ry rch Thames Rocks, Mercu Go to Facebook and sea al loc ata Rocks for Bay Rocks and Whangam . information

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s e t s a T g n i h t y r Eve Better

outside! hen you eat stes better w ta ng hi parks all over yt ic er bl Ev BQs in pu B ic tr ec el , ee h a toasty There are fr l District. Wit de an om or -C ocolate, you the Thames mos of hot ch er th m ws ar w marshmallo jacket and a le or toasted zz si e ag us can have a sa d. all year roun

ASkawetesomPe arnek!w

e park. It opened mid Thames has an awesome new skat It’s at Porritt Park on . since 2017 and has been busy ever the mall. There are to next Queen Street in Thames, right facilities there and t toile e also newly upgraded, accessibl drinking water fountains.

Hot Water Beach

Hot Water Beach is always packed over the summe r – with good reason. It’s fun and it’s free. Outside the tou rist season is a great time to go. Chuck on a wetsuit, warm up digging yourself a big hol e in the sand, and enjoy a lovely hot soak. Take spades and check the tide times. You r window is two hours eith er side of low tide. www.metservice.com/ marine-surf/surf/hot-wa ter-beach

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Te Ara O Hei

Te Ara O Hei “The path of Hei” is part of our Coromandel Walks Project. The long term vision is that when fully complete, residents and visitors will be able to walk from Hot Water Beach to Cathedral Cove, on to the Purangi Estuary and through to Whitianga and north. So where are we at with progress? • A 1.1 km loop track, which is part of the planned walk, is already open to the public. The track branches off the existing Cathedral Cove Walk, and is a loop return to a viewing platform , which takes in spectacular views down to the picturesque McHann’s Bay and across the wider Mercury Bay and islands. • The Te Ara O Hei project team planned to take a report to Council lodging resource consent for the project in July 2017. This has been paused while some further details around maintenance and property agreements is worked out, along with follow up with affected landowners and communities to address issues. It’s anticipated a resource consent application may be lodged by the end of the year, which proposes alongside the walking track, a new car park and roading improvements up Lees Road. The car park will provide another parking option for visitors that is outside of Hahei Village, to alleviate pressure during the summer period, generated by visitors to Cathedral Cove. • We’re committed to addressing infrastructure issues around Hahei and the wider Mercury Bay South communities. Our Mercury Bay Area Manager has been meeting with Hahei Residents and Ratepayers who have three groups set up to represent Tourism/ Traffic Management Plans, Environment/Infrastructure and Land Use/District Plan issues and outcomes for the community. The subset groups are helping with feedback on solutions to better manage visitor influx, including parking and signage, along with a draft parking strategy for the Mercury Bay South area www.tcdc.govt.nz/mbsparkingstrategy • Our staff is also working with DOC and local iwi Ngati Hei to progress an arrangement, so we can control and manage the Grange Rd car park, (which is where many people start the walk to Cathedral Cove and is currently under DOC management). This will allow parking bylaws to be put in if necessary. The long-term view is that Grange Rd will become a drop-off site to cater for accessibility vehicles only. • The Hahei Village Entrance car park off Pa Rd, Hahei has capacity for cars and campervans, and is the site for our summer Park and Ride service. We’ve joined up with a commercial shuttle bus operator to provide this service, which saw more than 27,000 people carried up the hill from this car park to the start of the Cathedral Cove walking track. www.tcdc.govt.nz/tearaohei

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Destination Coromandel Your Regional Tourism Organisation

DESTINATION COROMANDEL www.thecoromandel.com

The Coromandel Tourism Industry delivers $430 million to the region. (For Year Ending May 2017. Source: Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment).

There’s never been a better time to engage in tourism in The Coromandel, with successive highs being recorded in visitor arrivals, nights stayed and dollars spent. The performance of the local tourism sector is crucial to our economy. Visitor spend contributed $349 million to Thames Coromandel and $79 million to Hauraki Districts this past year. And the spend is not just on Accommodation, Activities and Transport; these tourism categories are secondary to Food & Beverage and Retail Sales (including fuel), which get the largest share of visitor expenditure in The Coromandel.

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SUMMIT to do

Whangamata local Shaun Fay and a group of mates (50yr s+) tick hiking the Coromandel Pinnacles track off their bucket list.

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f you’ve ever driven on the Coromandel – you’ll know the Kopu-Hikuai Hill which is State Highway 25. With limited passing opportunities, it can be long both sides, especially when there’s a logging truck or campervan sharing the journey. I’ve been up and over hundreds of times in the last 40 years and always feel good when I reach the top and scuttle past the helicopter pads. Hey, I’m OK and I’m half way there. The other thing about the top is the isolation, it’s thick bush and while obviously home to many a possum judging by the road kill, I’ve often wondered what lurks through those valleys and up to the top of the hills. Recently I found out. The Pinnacles Track is in the Kauaeranga

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Left to right: Back Mike, Diana, Rosie, Shaun, Sue. Front Gary and Karen.

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Valley in the Coromandel Forest Park and the only word to describe it is “spectacular.” There are several tracks which all link up – eventually. One arm actually starts close to those helicopter pads I mentioned earlier, which could be handy in emergencies. But that’s something I’m hoping we won’t have to face when my team of old friends, 50 plus, reasonably fit walkers decided to start from the Thames side. It took us a while to get organised, mainly because we’d tried to go three months earlier in August, but there had been quite a lot of rain so we opted to postpone. Eventually nine of us made it to the starting gate after deciding a Friday would be better than Saturday. That’s because the Pinnacles

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An exciting part of the Pinnacles is crossing one of the three swing bridges along the track.

Photo: John Sandoval Photography

Hut is busy. Of the 950 plus huts that the Department of Conservation (DOC) manages around the country, this is the busiest. It sleeps 80 people and most Saturday nights in spring and summer it’s full. Since 2013 over 29,000 people have stayed a night, which means it pays to book online with DOC first. In all, over 66,000 people walk this track every year. And why wouldn’t you walk it? There are stunning views, rock staircases, swing bridges, native birds singing their hearts out as well as incredible pioneering history involving Coromandel’s kauri forests. So would you believe it – when we started out it was raining – so the visuals to start off weren’t great on the way up. Then there was the fact that our group were really working the pace. You need a reasonable level of fitness for The Pinnacles. The steps make it tough and it can be hard on middle-aged knees where you’re carrying a love handle or two. We all went at our own speed and arrived at the Pinnacles Hut within 10 minutes of each other. The Hut is modern, inexpensive, easy to book online, has plenty of room, great facilities and comfy beds. Remember though, it’s a DOC hut – you need to take your own food and bedding. We settled in, made dinner, enjoyed a tipple or three and crashed. Later that evening the midnight walkers arrived with their torch heads – and weren’t exactly quiet – nor was the snorer in the corner, but that’s part of the unique experience of sharing the adventure to the Pinnacles. And very soon after, dawned a beautiful day. The Pinnacles rock is actually another 45 minutes from the DOC hut and most of it is straight up. There are ladders, steel rings hammered into rock and sheer drops. I’m not a big heights guy so I kept it low key and took my time. At the top there’s a small platform where you can see stunning 360 views of the entire Coromandel, from Tairua to the Hauraki Plains, to Mount Moehau and further north. The Pinnacles is a destination where you need a decent level of fitness to make it. I think that’s what makes you appreciate the views even more. There’s a sense of achievement – well, it was for us slightly more senior people anyway. Late Saturday morning our group headed home, passing a surprising

The Pinnacles Hut • • • • •

80 bunks (split into two bunkrooms) 3 chemical long-drops A cold shower (note the word cold) A gas kitchen (and a BBQ) A solar powered lighting system. Press a button and the lights stay on for twenty minutes (then you press the button again of course) Price: adults from $15, kids $7.50 per night (call DOC to book)

“…WHY WOULDN’T YOU WALK IT?

There’s stunning views, rock staircases, swing bridges, native birds singing their hearts out …”

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The Pinnacles, sunrise time. Photo: John Sandoval Photography

Getting there From SH25 at the southern entrance to Thames, turn right into Banks Street beside the service station. Banks Street veers right into Parawai Road, which then becomes Kauaeranga Valley Road. Follow this for 13 km to the Kauaeranga Visitor Centre. The road then continues a further 9 km to the road end. Note that 10 km from Thames the road changes from sealed to gravel.

Pinnacles Walking Route

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Left to right: Karen, Mike, Diana, Rosie, Shaun, Sue, Gary.

number of people on the way up. There were lots of young kids with their families, so we were rather glad we chose the Friday night instead, where we had a more mature set staying at the Pinnacles Hut. This is a popular walk for school kids so make sure you pick your day, especially if you’re staying the night. Year 10’s can be a little loud. The return is a tough walk down and the steps are sometimes quite large. One of our ladies tripped and did a little bit of damage to her shoulder. An unfortunate end to a cracker couple of days – but thankfully that helicopter pad wasn’t put to use. Most of our group live either in Auckland or the Coromandel and we certainly all know the Kopu-Hikuai Hill. It felt good for a change for all of us to stop and smell that fresh clean air – and to discover how spectacular that Coromandel mountain range is. Go to doc.govt.nz then search pinnacles hut. l kauaerangavc@doc.govt.nz

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On the north eastern Coromandel Peninsula, there is a little known gem where indigenous native forests meet the Pacific Ocean in the most stunning and peaceful way. Approximately 1.5 hours drive up the scenic Thames Coast Road, Tuateawa is becoming renowned as it’s own little native sanctuary where the coastal flora and fauna are embraced and protected by it’s handful of residents who are drawn to the ambience within the quiet coastal settlement. Vast populations of native kaka and kereru live side by side with the locals and the dawn chorus in this hidden little bay is second to none. The local group ‘Habitat Tuateawa’ comprising of local volunteers, ensure that pest control is in place to protect the vast and impressive native bird population, providing a safe haven for some of our precious and endangered species. Ocean, forest, coastal seclusion… clearly Boulder Bay calls to those seeking a lifestyle rich in peace and it is easy to see why nature lover’s gravitate to this quiet corner of the northern Coromandel.


A RT S

F E AT U RE

CREATIVITY, A LASTING LEGACY With our rich cultural heritage, the Coromandel is fortunate to have a wealth of culture that both inspires and encourages creativity. From ancient ancestral carving, the old time skill of printmaking, the essential art of weaving and the passionate discovery of nature’s fractals the Coromandel has them all. In this arts feature we will be looking at some Coromandel artists who are using ancient skills to incorporate their personalities and experiences to create beautiful modern pieces. Follow Nici, Lizzie, Sue and Darin as they share their stories of their creative journeys. To see more on the Coromandel Arts and Creative Industries Strategy see www.tcdc.govt.nz/arts-strategy

WeavIng cultures

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With New Zealand’s native forest as a backdrop and native fauna the ambient music which permeates the workshop, it is no wonder German born Nici Greulich works with harakeke (flax), a natural medium for a natural artist.

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FEATU R E

Her style is vibrant, beautiful and steeped in culture, from both her native Germany and adopted New Zealand home. Her love of the ocean and forests which surrounds her Port Charles home shines through in the gorgeous weaving, that is clearly crafted with passion and peace. Her love of weaving started in 1998 and took a serious turn in 2002 when she decided to do a weaving course. “I learned all about traditions, tikanga, behaviour around flax and a whole lot about weaving different styles, patterns, dyes and using different products to give different effects to the finished product,” says Nici. The course took two years and helped shape Nici into the weaver she is today. “The most important tool is a very sharp knife to harvest the harakeke leaves so you don’t injure the plant.” Nici uses a combination of unique tools including old shearing combs for spacing and a dog flea comb for combing the strips into ‘nice fluffy tails’ which can give a unique beginning or finish a piece may need. “I also use little pieces of wood with nails through in even distances, maybe up to five of them for the bigger spacing. I also use a knife to scrape the material to make it soft enough to work with.” The dyes Nici uses to colour her creations are Teri dyes which are specially made in New Zealand for flax weaving. The colours are added early on in the process by placing the fibres in a pot of water, bringing it to the boil and then adding the ready-made dye. The vibrant array of colours can help to grow the idea that forms the final creation. “My favourite pieces are the big pieces like kites, big baskets and wall hangings,” says Nici with a smile, “The most recent is my mermaid, they area challenge and afford all my skills as a weaver.” For the past several years, Nici has been part of the Arts Festival in Colville every Easter. Nici is also part of the annual Coromandel Arts Tour Open Studios. The Spring Exhibition is held over the first two weekend in October. If waiting for Easter and October is too much you, Nici’s wondrous creations can also be found at the The Source in Coromandel Town where she is part of the collective who run the shop. She also has a display during the summer months at Hereford in a Pickle café in Colville. You can also follow her Facebook page ‘Raranga Harakeke by Nici Greulich’. l

H E R S T Y L E I S V I B R A N T, B E A U T I F U L A N D S T E E P E D I N C U LT U R E , F R O M BOTH HER NATIVE GERMANY AND ADOPTED NEW ZEALAND HOME.

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Fortyonehundred reasons to

Love Mandalas

When vivacious and sparkly Lizzie Snow walks into a room sunshine follows. The 21-year-old Fine Arts student is a living embodiment of summer and her calmness and positivity radiates like the gold leaf she uses in some of her work.

The contemporary visual artist already has a portfolio that any artist twice her age would be proud of, including murals, custom designs and collaborations with TEDx and international yoga wear company Lululemon. She founded her company fortyonehundred after fellow students began asking her to design tattoos for them. Her designs inspired by fractals in nature are mesmerizing. Lizzie attributes a lot of the calming influence in her art to Whangamata, “the perfect place to escape from the frantic city to be immersed in nature”.

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Lizzie’s fractal artwork is both abstract, and also structured into mandala designs, which are spiritual symbols representing the universe. Mandala is a term for any circluar diagram or geometric pattern that represents the cosmos metaphysically or symbolically. The symmetrical symbols in Lizzie’s art are hand drawn, and are pulled from her personal experiences. “Whangamata is a pocket of paradise; where you can slow down your pace, absorb the incredible environment and be free to

let your creative vision flow,” says Lizzie. Lizzie and her family, including the gentleman poodle George, frequent their family bach in Whangamata. Although they are mainly summer residents, Lizzie feels connected to Whangamata, “Through living and experiencing places around New Zealand and the world, Whangamata is a place I can’t stop coming back to. The scenery, the culture and the way of life is something that nowhere else can quite compete with”, says Lizzie. “Over the summer, while looking out at Clark Island and listening to the crashing

FEATU R E

waves, I painted a mandala that took over 100 hours to create. The life balance that Whangamata offers enables a calm, balanced and inspired mind set. I create a lot of my artwork in Whangamata, including a wall mural at Blackie’s Café by the Beach down by the surf club! I loved being able to contribute back to this fabulous community and place,” she says. You can see more by joining Lizzie’s 91,000 followers on Instagram @fortyonehundred or by heading to her website www.fortyonehundred.co.nz l

“THROUGH LIVING AND EXPERIENCING PLACES AROUND NEW ZEALAND AND THE WORLD, WHANGAMATA IS A PLACE I CAN’T S T O P C O M I N G B A C K T O .”

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taIrua

Connection

Literacy tutor Sue Preston

Three years ago after joining the Waikato Society of Arts, Sue took an experimental printmaking class, which then led to etching and dry point engraving classes, which she still loves to attend.

has been connected to the Coromandel for over thirty years with holidays in Hahei and a family bach in Tairua.

“Form, light and colour inspire my work, I particularly enjoy natural world subjects and beach themes,” says Sue from her home in Te Aroha where she and her husband run a civil engineering business.

After joining a local arts centre and trialling several types of media including

“I enjoy the challenging process involved with making a print, especially etching on zinc with aquatint which involves many steps before the plate is ready to print.”

watercolours, acrylic, oils and chalk pastels, she is currently hooked on printmaking.

“The chance for a ‘happy accident’ at any stage, meaning what you expect is sometimes different to what actually comes off the press.” Sue was excited with the opportunity to join the Mercury Bay Art Escape, March 2017, spending two weekends in her pop-up studio sharing her art with visitors.

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“FORM, LIGHT AND COLOUR INSPIRE MY WORK, I PA R T I C U L A R LY E N J O Y NATURAL WORLD SUBJECTS AND BEACH T H E M E S …”

If you missed Sue on the tour, you can still find her beautiful work in The Little Gallery in Tairua, you can also follow her on Facebook by searching for Sue Preston – Artist. What is Sue looking forward to in her journey as an artist? “A day where I can devote most of my time to art, without the annoying distraction of that fourletter word WORK!” l

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TIME AND CULTURES MERGE IN THAMES

Gateway Sculpture In a shed in Thames, master carver Darin Jenkins has been busy uniting past, present and future. He’s working on a brief from local iwi Ngati Maru, who received a $50,000 grant from the Thames Community Board to create a landmark sculpture for the southern entrance to Thames as the town marks the 150th anniversary of the goldfields opening.

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As Our Coromandel Magazine went to print, the sculpture was not yet installed in its designated location by Rhodes Park, at the southern end of the Kauaeranga Bridge, next to the Hauraki Rail Trail and Ngati Maru Highway (SH25), but we got a sneak preview as Darin and his helpers crafted the piece. The sculpture is of two stylised wooden figures embracing, standing on a rounded piece of stone that resembles a mussel shell. It is embellished with Maori and Celtic design flourishes and with big cogs and gears made in the A & G Price foundry long ago. The two big chunks of wood that make up the bodies of the embracing figures are cedar and kauri – representing the exotic and native make-up of Thames’s, and New Zealand’s, population. Maori and pakeha, joined through historical circumstance and continually reinventing and refining their relationship. “The past is represented a lot through the steel but also through the stone and the wood as being some of our old resources and assets that we use,” says Darin as his helpers Jackson Jenkins, Jason Taana and Ty Hart shape the wood with an adze and power tools.

to be our biggest assets for the future as well as what’s happening in the present. And it’s incorporating everything from the past, the present, and it will lead us towards the future. That’s my basic concept of the design. And it was good to actually do a collaboration between the stone carver, a steel sculptor and a wood carver – something we’ve wanted to do for a while.” Master carver Darin Jenkins is looking to the future in all his work. He’s passing on his carving skills and knowledge of Maori art to not only his young helpers in the shed, but also to students in art classes in local schools.

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… INCORPORATING EVERYTHING FROM THE P A S T, T H E P R E S E N T, AND IT WILL LEAD US TOWARDS THE FUTURE.

“At the same time the young fellows are all learning a bit about carving and all that as they go,” he says of the three young men helping out when we visited his workshop. “It’ll be something they can look up to every time they go past [the sculpture].” “We do that a lot with a lot of major projects that we do, we’ll bring in young people who want to come in and give a hand and help.” l

“The wood we still use for our forestry. Stone – we’re still using for our roads as well as the stone we’re using is in the shape of a mussel shell, so it gives something to the mussel farms out in the Hauraki Gulf” says Darin. The mussel shell base was carved from Katikati basalt by Tapu stone sculptor Jocelyn Pratt. The metal work was by Thames man John McKeowen. “And my basic understanding of it is that our natural resources and tourism are going

Master carver Darin Jenkins (above) and helpers Jackson Jenkins, Jason Taana and Ty Hart at work on the Thames southern gateway sculpture. O U R

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FOOD Feature

Buzzing about honey, Coromandel’s

new

gold

Beekeeping is woven into the colonial heritage of New Zeal and. Beekeeping was fir st introduced to New Zeal and in Northl and in 1839 as a home craft, but it has developed into a progressive and valuable industry.

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oday, the busy honey bee pollinates roughly one-third of everything we eat, making it essential to agriculture. In addition to pollinating fruit and vegetable crops, the honey bee produces several varieties of New Zealand honey. From the delicate pöhutukawa through to the stronger flavored kämahi and rewarewa, and the robust jellied mänuka honey, these variations are endless and exclusive to New Zealand. The natural antibiotic qualities of some mänuka honeys have also led to an international market for health care products. Last year alone, New Zealand exported nearly NZ $300M worth of local honey. Sadly, honey bees worldwide are under threat as a result of serious pests and diseases, in particular the varroa mite in New Zealand. Passionate apiarists across the Coromandel tend to their bees with care and expertise, selecting the best locations for their workers to produce incomparable liquid gold. Local beekeepers, some with decades of experience, say each year gets harder with out of town apiarists trying to move in on the Coromandel’s lucrative honey market. Relocating bees into the area can inadvertently introduce the spread of diseases and pests. These challenges are only making the local bee keepers determined to continue producing quality products the Coromandel is well known for. Take advantage of being in the Coromandel and make a beeline for a range of products to experiment with your own recipes, using honey that is sought after worldwide for its therapeutic properties and taste. At The 309 Rd you can buy honey, then experience the bush at nearby walks through conservation land. The 309 Honey brand is harvested from bush clad hills with due care and attention to the bees and the environment that produces it. Stop at the Wilderland shop off SH25 20 mins south of Whitianga for honey perfected for over 40 years. Other Coromandel honey producers include Woodland Honey, Wild Honey, Hay Honey and Plan Bee. l

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FOOD Feature Photo: Danika Fanshawe Photography

Stings

Sweet facts about bees, honey and stings There are nearly 20,000 known species of bees, they are found on every continent except Antarctica, and in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants. • A bout one third of our food comes as a direct result of honey bee pollination. • $ 5B of New Zealand’s economy is attributable to pollination by honey bees, domestic honey sales and exports, beeswax and exported honey bees. • T o bring in a kilogramme of nectar, it is necessary for the bee to make 50,000 trips or 50,000 bees to make one trip. • A bee doesn’t have blood vessels like a human; the haemolymph circulates through the whole of its body. Air is taken into the body through spiricles (little holes) along the sides of its abdomen.

• H oney is the only food to include all the substance necessary to sustain life.

Honey Honey is a sweet food made by bees using nectar from flowers. Honey offers antiseptic, antioxidant and cleansing properties for our body and health. Manuka honey is especially known to fight infection and aids tissue healing, it also helps reduce inflammation and scarring. Honey can be beneficial if you have allergies and you eat honey that is local to your area, it may prevent your seasonal allergies. If you have a sore throat honey helps due to its natural anti-inflammatory effects and it will help to heal the wounds more quickly. Honey diluted in water can help with stomach aches and dehydration.

Varroa Mite The varroa mite (Varroa Destructor) is a tiny parasitic mite which enters the hive on adult bees. Once attached they suck the bees haemolymph (bees version of blood) leaving open wounds and introducing various viruses including deformed wing virus. A significant mite infection can lead to the death of the hive. As a consequence the varroa bee mite is reducing the number of bees in managed hives as well as wild native bee colonies.

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What to do if you do get stung: • I f you do get stung, scrape the sting out as quickly as possible (use a fingernail, credit card or other object). • Do not pull or squeeze out the sting as it may release more venom. • Clean with soap and water. • L emon slice and Rubbing Alcohol: gently rub on sting and apply lemon slice. Pain should die down within 10min after applying lemon, deep breathing helps distract you from the sting. To reduce the pain, itch and swelling try the following: • I ce – Ice lessens swelling by constricting vessels and reduces the flow of venom in the blood. The numbing effect soothes pain and itching.

• H oney bees are the only insects that produce food that is eaten by man.

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We all have memories of being stung by an insect and usually think it was a bee and it is not a fond memory. As a result, a lot of people are afraid of being stung again. However most people who think they have been stung by a bee will actually have been stung by a wasp. There are a lot of myths and unfounded fears surrounding bee stings. Only the female worker bees have stingers. Most bees will not attack if left alone so it is best not to swat at the bee. If a bee does sting it will sting only once, whereas a wasp will sting many times.

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• B aking Soda – Make a baking soda paste with water and apply to the sting. The alkaline nature of the baking soda helps neutralize the acidity in the venom. • Vinegar – Vinegar is best for a wasp sting. • T oothpaste – Believe it or not, this a great remedy which works on the same alkaline/ acidity premise as baking soda.

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A taste of Home

A s a visitor or local , there’s no better way to truly taste the Coromandel than a tour of the mussel and oyster farms, or visiting organic grower s and artisan producer s serving home-grown local produce.

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nd over the past three years our Council has been supporting local and home-grown producers by marketing them further afield through a promotional stand at the Auckland Food Show, under the Coromandel Food Collective brand. The Auckland Food Show is held every July at the Auckland Showgrounds and is New Zealand’s premier event for foodies, drawing crowds of up to 32,000 visitors, including media, chefs and investors. Under the eye-catching ‘Coromandel Beach House’ in the Artisan Village of the Food Show, Coromandel producers present tastings and sales of their products with the 2017 Coromandel Collective made up of Thames Valley Bacon, Castle Rock Café, 309 Honey and Chocolates Are Us, providing a selection of manuka honey, chocolates to order, salami and bacon and homemade chutneys. The Food Show is not all about sales, with the Coromandel businesses involved reporting that while definitely worthwhile from a sales point-of-view, a major benefit was working together with others under one umbrella, and getting their product into the hands of chefs and buyers. “We had a chef from a very upmarket resort really interested in one of our vinegars in bulk, he buys in from Italy but loved our product,” says Andy Corles, from Castle Rock Café.

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“Being involved was worthwhile for sales but I got some really positive leads, as well as talking to more people looking for ideas which was cool,” says Leanne Petersen from Chocolates Are Us. “The other aim of being involved in the Food Show is showcasing the Coromandel as a visitor “THE OTHER AIM destination,” says Laurna White our OF BEING INVOLVED Communications, Marketing and Events Manager. “With so many IN THE FOOD SHOW people attending the Food Show, it’s a really good chance for our IS SHOWCASING staff to be up there alongside local THE COROMANDEL food producers, so we can also help promote the Coromandel as a place to AS A VISITOR visit and even think about moving to.” Our Council has also developed DESTINATION…” the Coromandel Food Trail Guide, which local food producers pay to be in, and is just another way that we can entice people to visit, taste and experience what home-grown, local Coromandel has to offer. www.tcdc.govt.nz/foodtrail


FOOD Feature

Shaun Neustroski of Thames Valley Bacon on the Coromandel Food Collective Stand.

The Coromandel Food Collective The four producers showcased at the 2017 Auckland Food Show were:

Thames Valley Bacon

Leanne Petersen (centre) from Chocolates Are Us produces home-made chocolates for all occasions.

Thirty-three judges comprising of leading chefs, food connoisseurs and master butchers selected Thames Valley Bacon’s sustainably produced, mouth-watering bacon as the winner at the 2016 100% New Zealand Pork, Bacon and Ham Awards. The Bushman’s Shoulder Bacon took out top honours in a contest that supports local pig farmers who raise pork solely for New Zealanders and helps consumers identify products where pigs’ needs are at the centre of the farm practice. Thames Valley Bacon specialise in manuka smoked bacons, hams, salamis and their own shop recipe sausages with gluten free options, as well as Christmas hams cured, smoked and cooked to perfection. www.thamesvalleybacon.co.nz

Chocolates are Us

A New Zealand family owned and operated business in Whitianga, using local and New Zealand made products. Their small batch, hand-made chocolates are of the highest quality and its decadent roasted cashew nut brittle and coconut rough is one of its most popular products. www.chocolatesareus.co.nz

309 Honey

Sue Williams with her assistant Ruby explaining why Coromandel manuka honey is a premium grade product.

These honey producers take their name from the road upon which they are situated – an historical and adventurous metalled road that snakes through the Coromandel Peninsula’s forest-clad mountain range between Whitianga and Coromandel Town. Here on the banks of the river that borders their delightful rural property, owners Sue and Andrew Williams have been producing pure, local Coromandel manuka honey since long before it became fashionable to do so. The honey is extracted and packaged under licence at their boutique beekeeping operation and savoured by discerning palates around the world. www.309honey.co.nz

Castle Rock Café

This is a must-stop eatery on the road to the Coromandel’s world-acclaimed New Chum Beach. Their home-made hot, chilli lime chutney, made from New Zealand chillis, is a favourite and like all their products, is packed with flavour and free from preservatives, chemicals and gluten. They gather the finest ingredients locally from their quiet rural community to produce chutneys and relishes, jams and jellies, sauces and vinegars along with an all-day dine-in or take home menu at their relaxed country-style café on the Whangapoua Rd. www.castlerockcafe.co.nz Shelley Corles and mum Margaret help make the Castle Rock Cafe products and business a local success story.

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FOOD Feature

A small selection of places to visit For a fuller list of businesses and products go to www.tcdc.govt.nz/foodtrail

1 THAMES The Depot 713 Pollen St, Grahamstown Thames P: 07 868 3519 Savour & Spice The Depot 715 Pollen St, Thames www.savourandspice.com P: 021 111 0249 Grahamstown Bar and Diner GBD, ‘the GBD’ 700 Pollen St (corner of Pahau St) Thames P: 07 868 6008 www.thejunction.net.nz The Wharf Coffee House and Bar Shortland Wharf thamesfish@xtra.co.nz P: 07 868 6828 The Cheese Barn at Matatoki Wainui Rd Matatoki P: 07 868 1284 www.thecheesebarn.co.nz Omahu Valley Citrus 146 Omahu Valley Road, RD 4 Paeroa P: 07 868 1274  www.omahuvalleycitrus.co.nz Thames Valley Bacon 9224 Paeroa Kopu Rd, RD1 Matatoki, Thames P: 07 868 1042 thamesvalleybacon@gmail.com KORU Café (Located at RAPAURA Watergardens) 586 Tapu-Coroglen Road, RD5 Thames 3575 P: 07 868 4821 info@rapaura.com www.rapaura.com

2 COLVILLE – COROMANDEL TOWN Coromandel Oyster Company 70 Tiki Road, SH25 Coromandel Town P: 07 866 8028

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Pepper Tree Restaurant and Bar 31 Kapanga Rd, Coromandel Town P: 07 866 8211 www.peppertreerestaurant.co.nz Hereford ‘n’ A Pickle 2318 Colville Rd, Colville P: 07 866 6937 www.kairaumatipolledherefords.com  Admirals Arms Hotel 146 Wharf Road Coromandel Town P: 07 866 7069 or Restaurant P: 07 8668272 www.admiralsarms.co.nz

Mercury Bay Estate 761A Purangi Rd, Cooks Beach RD1, Whitianga www.mercurybayestate.co.nz P: 07-866 4066 The Pour House & The Coromandel Brewing Company 7 Grange Road Hahei P: 07 866 3354 www.thepourhouse.nz

PORT CHARLES

Luke’s Kitchen 20 Blackjack Rd Kuaotunu Village P: 07 866 4480 www.lukeskitchen.co.nz

COLVILLE

WHANGAPOUA

3 MERCURY BAY

4 TAIRUA

Castle Rock Café 1242 Whangapoua Rd, Te Rerenga P: 07 866 4542 Mob: 022 391 2070 www.castlerockcafe.co.nz

Flock Kitchen & Bar 227 Main Rd, Tairua P: 07 864 8811 www.flockkitchenandbar.com

The Lost Spring Restaurant & Licenced Café 121A Cook Drive Whitianga P: 07 866 0456 www.thelostspring.co.nz Chocolates Are Us 6A Dakota Drive, Whitianga P: 0800 246 277 leanne@chocolatesareus.co.nz or www.chocolatesareus.co.nz Salt Restaurant & Bar 1 Blacksmith Lane Whitianga P: 07 866 5818 www.salt-whitianga.co.nz Whitianga Hotel 1 Blacksmith Lane, Whitianga P: 07 866 5818 www.whitiangahotel.co.nz 309 Honey www.309honey.co.nz 309 Rd, Whitianga

COROMANDEL TOWN

MATARANGI KUAOTUNU

2

25

WHITIANGA

3

The Old Mill The Esplanade Tairua P: 07 864 9390 www.theoldmillcafetairua.com

HAHEI

5 WHANGAMATA

HOT WATER BEACH

COROGLEN

25

WHENUAKITE 25

TAPU

Smash Pipi 603 Port Rd, Whangamata Facebook @SmashPipiCafe P: 07-865 6562

4

TAIRUA PAUANUI

TE PURU Kauaeranga Valley

HIKUAI

1

6 KARANGAHAKE GORGE

OPOUTERE

THAMES

Bistro at The Falls Retreat 25 Waitawheta Rd Waihi (opp Owharoa Falls) P: 07 863 8770 www.fallsretreat.co.nz

ONEMANA

5

WHANGAMATA 25

PAEROA

KEY Restaurant or café

6

Winery or Brewery Pub or Bar Boutique or Specialty Food

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2

WAIHI

To Hamilton TE AROHA To Rotorua 80kmT o Tauranga 70km

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Markets Tairua Market

Tairua Hall, Main Rd, Tairua

First Saturday morning each month

Kuaotunu Market

Kuaotunu Township

Saturday morning from Labour weekend-Easter

Matarangi Craft Market

Matarangi village shops

Sundays from December to January & holiday weekends

Whitianga Art, Craft & Farmers Market

Soldiers Memorial Park Whitianga

Saturday mornings on holiday weekends and community events

Tairua Fireman’s Market

Tairua Fire Station, Main Rd

Saturday morning of Labour Weekend

Coroglen Farmers Market

Gumtown Hall, Coroglen

Sunday morning Labour Weekend-Easter

Thames Market

Pollen Street Grahamstown Thames

Saturday mornings 8am - 12noon

Coromandel Market

31 Kapanga Rd Coromandel Town

Fridays 8am - 12noon

Whangamata Lions Market

RSA Carpark

Anniversary Weekend, Easter & Labour Wknd

Whangamata Community Market

TCDC Town Green

8am - 1pm Saturdays in summer months


FOOD Feature

SHARING a meal

Among our Council staff we have hunters, vege growers and fruit tree climbers who produce some pretty amazing delights at regular ‘bring a plate’ get-togethers. We coerced, begged and pleaded to have a few of the most guarded recipes to share. Just to be sure there weren’t any last minute saboteurs, all the recipes have been checked to ensure no ingredients are missing.

Wild Pork Sliders wild ll come across some Occasionally you wi , ing ink k in the freezer th pork that you chuc I rk po ld wi recipe for ‘If only I had a great on oking that up…’ Sim co at go a ve would ha found r, ee gin En ms ste t Sy Belworthy, our Asse icament recently. ed pr at th in lf se him ge to a cooking challen Always one to rise ok up a co to y nit rtu po op the Simon jumped at pork ld wi d iently delivere feast. With a conven g recipe kin loo ty tas s given a shoulder, Simon wa NZ an.com with a few from www.dartagn y. wa his on adaptions and sent walk/ to the beach/work/ off ad he Before you e of typ r he ot or t po crock cycle turn on your heat. slow cooker on low

Ingredients

1 Wild Pork Shoulder (to fit in a slow cooker) 4 tablespoons coconut oil (or olive oil) Coarse salt & freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoons paprika 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 medium yellow onion, chopped 2 carrots, peeled and chopped ½ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley 6 cloves garlic, chopped 1 can of diced tomatoes ½ cup packed brown sugar 1 cup of good quality beef stock 2 tablespoons Butter

Method Pat the roast dry with paper towels then cut into two pieces. Rub the wild boar all over with 2 tablespoons of the softened coconut oil. Season with salt and pepper. In a small bowl, mix paprika, garlic powder, and dry mustard. Rub mixture evenly over roast.

In a large pan, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil over high heat. Brown all sides of each piece of pork. Add onion, carrots, parsley, garlic, and tomatoes to your slow-cooker. Place the wild boar pieces on top of the vegetables. Add tomatoes, brown sugar, Armagnac (if using), and demi-glace. Cover and cook on low for 8 hours, turning wild boar once halfway through cooking. Once cooked, remove wild boar to a cutting board and allow to rest tented with foil for at least 10 minutes. Meanwhile, strain the sauce, discarding vegetables. In a small saucepan over mediumhigh heat, reduce the strained sauce until thickened. Remove from heat and stir in the butter. Using 2 forks, break up the pork into large chunks. Add the pork to your favourite buns with a little of the sauce. Eat warm or cool, with or without vegetables… Makes enough for a flat full of boys or a BBQ gettogether with your friends and family.

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Bacon Jam

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Janet Wade, our IT Help Desk Support ing Analyst, is magic when it comes to work and craft ing knitt her and uce, prod fresh with . work also leaves the rest of us in awe e a recipe, When asked if she would like to shar nteered volu Janet smiled mischievously and . her bacon jam deliciousness is Bacon jam is a bacon-based relish, and the ing cook made through a process of slow n brow gar, vine ns, bacon, along with onio food sugar and spices, before mixing in a r. processo n Everyone loves a good relish, and baco two the bine com r... bette g makes everythin ht. delig ’s ivore carn ty hear a have you and art’s This jam adapted from Martha Stew on it ering slath you bacon jam, will have rolling eyes your have and sight everything in course. of way good a in , head your in back

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FOOD Feature

Drunk Rabbit Stew

Ingredients

When one first tries rabbit, one tries not to focus on the sweet Watership Down bunnies, with their darling noses and floppy ears, rather than the tender succulent meat contained within the tiny furry package. Introducing one of our newer staff members to delicacies of fresh rabbit took some convincing, a bribe or two and the promise the recipe contained wine. Only then did Brian Taylor, our Compliance and Licencing Manager, agree to give it a go. Brian and his family came to our Council

with a city approach to food and so we had to send someone out to get him a rabbit and process it so the meat didn’t look like furry wee Hazel and Fiver.

Method Using half the flour (¾ cup) coat the pieces of rabbit, shaking off any excess. Heat the oil and butter in a large heavy-bottomed saucepan, and brown the floured rabbit on all sides. Add the celery, carrots, onions, salt, pepper, bay leaves, 6 cups water and red wine, and stew for about 2 hours. Add the potatoes 45 minutes into the stewing

2 medium rabbits (approx. 500 grams), cut into stew-sized pieces 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour ¼ cup grapeseed oil 3 tablespoons butter 1 cup celery, diced 2 cups diced carrots 2 onions, finely diced Salt Freshly ground black pepper 3 bay leaves 6 cups water 4 cups red wine 4 medium-sized potatoes, diced ½ cup sliced sautéed mushrooms process. Once the rabbit and all the vegetables are cooked, use some water to form a paste with the remaining 3/4 cup flour. Stir the flour mixture into the pot as a thickener. Add the already sautéed mushrooms to the stew and allow to simmer for about 10 minutes. Adjust seasonings, if necessary, and serve. Recipe thanks to Robert Irvine and www.foodnetwork.com

Method Ingredients

750 grams of bacon 2 cups of shallots, finely

chopped 1 cup of any sweet onion, finely chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely cho pped 1 teaspoon chili powder ½ teaspoon smoked pap rika ½ cup bourbon (optional… but better with…) ½ cup maple syrup or gol den syrup ¼ cup balsamic vinegar

½ cup brown sugar

Cook the bacon in two frying pans to allow for room for it to crisp up properly. Cook over medium heat until it browns perfectly. You want the bacon a little crisper with as little visible fat as possible. Transfer to paper towels to drain excess fat off. Pulse your shallots and onions in the food processor or cut them by hand. Leave about 1 to 2 tablespoons of the fat in one of the pan. Add shallot and onion to the pan, cook over medium heat until they start to caramelize. Add the garlic and cook for about one more minute. Add the chili powder and smoked paprika, stir to combine. Increase heat to high and add the bourbon (carefully) and maple syrup. Bring to a boil, stir and scrape the pan so all the little bacon bits comes loose Continue boiling for about 2 to 3 minutes. Add vinegar and brown sugar, continue to boil for about 3 minutes. Using a sharp knife cut the bacon into small pieces. You can also tear it by hand so it looks more rustic, not too perfect. Personal choice. Toss the bacon into the pan, reduce heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes, the mixture will thicken and look jam like in the process.

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Turn off the stove top. Drain any excess fat off the bacon jam by pouring it through a sieve or use cheesecloth to drain it through. Now you have two options, you can pop the mixture into a food processor and pulse until it breaks down more. Or you can leave it chunkier (I like the more rustic, chunkier look) and don’t bother pulsing it. Your choice. Transfer to jars and store in the fridge. You can heat it up in the microwave whenever you want to top something with the jam, or eat it out of the jar with a spoon… again it’s a personal choice.

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Working together to prevent death & serious harm in the Coromandel

go boating Come visit us at the Keltic Fa 2nd Jan 20 ir 18

Listen to More FM for hot tips on how to keep your family safe this summer in the Coromandel Like us on Facebook “Safer Coromandel, our family looking after your family�


Our Girl Ella

Ella Williams is the bubbly, passionate, determined 22-year old “surfer girl” from Whangamata and the Women’s World Junior Surf Champ, 2013. From the age of four Ella’s love affair with surfing began and she was just six years old she declared she was going to be a World Champion surfer, writing this affirmation on her bedroom wall so she would see it every day, determined to make her dream come true. When she isn’t shredding the waves of “Whanga” she’s competing at exotic locations all over the globe on the World Surf League Qualifying Series. The lifestyle hasn’t gone to her head as she’s always ready to share her passion with others. What is your favourite thing to do when you’re not surfing?

What’s your favourite thing to do in the winter in Whangamata?

I love baking. I’m especially loving cupcakes at the moment. I think it is good to do something totally different from surfing that keeps my mind fresh. By going away and doing something different, this helps to keep me hungry to always improve my surfing.

Surfing! But I also love just walking along the beach, breathing in the fresh air with no one around. It’s totally different to summer, which is very busy. There’s something just so special about Whangamata in the winter, it has a really cool vibe. Every time I travel, and come back to Whangamata I realise how lucky I am to live here, in such a beautiful place.

I also enjoy working in my parent’s surf shop – Whangamata Surf Shop, and whatever keeps me outside and active.

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What’s your favourite place to hangout in Whangamata? When I’m surfing, the Whanga bar is my favourite, because of how perfect and world class the wave is. A lot of people come here to surf it. When I’m not surfing and just cruising around I love just sitting on the beach at access 8 because when we first moved here I would come home from school and go straight to beach access 8. This was my go to spot and I would always surf out in front of it. Either side you have the harbour and the estuary and you’re right smack bang in the middle of the beach. Where’s your favourite place to eat in Whangamata? There’s lot of places I go to. I love “Vibes,” they do really yummy hot chocolates and drinks and they’re always happy and friendly – it has a good vibe about it. Sixfortysix is always fun for something different. (Sixfortysix are also in our food trail guide www.tcdc.govt.nz/foodtrail) How do you manage the ‘rock star lifestyle’? I guess it sounds crazy, but being from Whangamata there is something about it that is very grounding. Just by living in Whanga is the best – you’re not in a city, there’s a different vibe about the whole place and it is very special to me. It’s a small town and everyone knows everyone. Growing up here people have known me since I was 7,, before I got into internationally competing, before I won a world title. So, I’ve known a lot of people here before all of that happened and I think that always brings me back down to earth. People always say to me “I remember when you were telling me you wanted to be a world champ and then you went and did it.” Things like that keep me focused and grounded. Also, just being around my family. We are all very family orientated and do a lot of things together; surf, work, hang out – it’s something special we’ve got. Do you have a ‘Plan B’ or future goals? I haven’t been to university and I left school early so at this stage, I’m just seeing where life takes me and enjoying the journey I’m on with my surfing. I mean, I am only 22, I’ll see what happens in the next few years and see what happens with my results. But at this stage, no plan B. My big goal is to get on the world tour and get another world title. This has always been my goal and I keep working towards that. It is hard as there are so many great surfers around and everyone has stepped it up a huge level compared to what it was like 10 years ago. However, it’s exciting and moving in a positive direction. It makes me

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work a lot harder which isn’t a bad thing – a challenge is always good. Who inspired you when you were younger and who inspires you now? I have a different mix of people from when I was younger, but they are still the same people I look up to now. Kelly Slater, obviously, because of how many world titles he has, and that led me in the direction of wanting a lot of world titles as well, I don’t want to have a limit on it. I always looked up to Steph Gilmore because of her surfing, style and personality. She is always so nice to everyone and very open to talk to so I really looked up to her for those reasons. I love Katy Perry – always have and still do today. I love her voice and I think she’s so awesome how she has worked all her life to get where she is today. She had a dream, a vision and a goal and she didn’t let anyone hinder it, or anyone change her views on how she should express herself, so I think that’s inspirational. What gives you your motivation? Living in a small town, I have big dreams and I like showing off. I love the fact that if I win there is a big crowd of people cheering me on. I’ve always loved performing in front of people from a young age. I was always doing something that pushed me and was in front of people, which made me want to win and then that carried across to my surfing, which has motivated me to be on top today. Do you have a motto you live by? Yes – #ImagineDreamBelieve. My journey is founded by these 3 simple words and represents; Passion, Balance, Energy, Respect, Journeys. To find out more and join in the journey see: www.ellawilliams.co.nz/imagine-dream-believe Do you have any advice for your fans? To just keep at it, with anything in life and allow for small improvements. When you start, its going to be hard, but nothing worth having in life comes easy. In regard to surfing, just be in the water. The best training for surfing is surfing. Do you have any advice to local youth in Whangamata? I think it’s easy to get sucked in and to follow everyone else, but you can’t be ‘bored’ here because there are so many things to do. I remember when I was young, I would go down to the beach with friends and just hang out, make sandcastles, and make the most of what we had around us. Get outside and do stuff. The beach is right there and not enough of us are using it. We have so many opportunities to do heaps of exciting fun things here in Whanga.

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What has been your highlight in the past 12 months? So much has happened already! When I won the Bells Beach trials in Australia in early 2017, which gave me a wild card, so I was surfing against the world’s best which was a dream come true. What are your plans for 2018? To just improve my surfing, competitiveness and enjoy each moment. I think it is very easy to look too far ahead and get side tracked. I want to enjoy the moments I have with the people around me, because life is kind of short, so I like to live every day to the fullest. I’m looking forward to competing in the QS (Qualifying Series) with a focus on improving my results. I would love to qualify for the world tour, however at this stage we’ll see what happens. For more about Ella and to follow her journey check out www.facebook.com/ellawilliamssurfer or www.ellawilliams.co.nz.


A DV ERTO RIA L

Whangamata Ocean Sports Club We are an Ocean Sports Club located on the

 Our facilities are modern with a new

beautiful Whangamata Harbour with stunning

restaurant area and kitchen put in about four

views of the ocean. We are primarily focused

years ago. We are fully capable of catering any

on Fishing and preserving our fisheries for the

function. We host weddings during a small

future and fully support the advocacy of Tag

window of the year and space fills up very

& Release & Legasea. We are affiliated with

quickly. We are currently fully booked until

the New Zealand Sport Fishing Council and

November next year! With our stunning view

the International Game Fishing Association.

and new kitchen we can hold up to 90 people

We have over 6300 members, which make us the largest

in our function area and make it a truly amazing evening. With

membership NZSFC Club in the country. During the summer

the Pacific Ocean as the backdrop, newlywed couples truly have

we host some of the largest fishing tournaments in the country.

an amazing venue for their special day!

The all-female Nauti Girls is the largest ladies tournament in NZ and attracts an average of 500 lady anglers competing for over $30,000 worth of prizes. As well we have the A1 Homes Classic tournament in mid-February which is open to members and nonmembers alike and has a huge following, attracting over 600 keen fishermen and women every year. The prize pool is over $60,000.

Membership is currently available so visit our website or email the manager.

Phone: 07 865 8704 manager@oceansports.co.nz www.oceansports.co.nz


Tairua Wet and Wild festival.

Adventure If you want to tick trying a multi-sport event off your bucket list, the Coromandel Cl assic should be at the very top.

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here are two options to try – a duathlon (running and road cycling/mountain biking) or the multi-sport event (running, kayaking, road cycling/mountain biking) – over two days in a weekend in August. The events give you a chance to trail run through iconic Coromandel bush, cycle up and over hills, kayak down some pristine rivers into the Whitianga Harbour and then back into more cycling and running legs, which take you past epic white sand and surf beaches. And the best part is you can do it as an individual, or as a team, and feel satisfied you’ve achieved something pretty special, just by finishing the entire race or just a section of it. “The beauty of the Coromandel Classic is that it draws in such a diverse cross section of people,” says Tom Gethin, Coromandel Classic organiser. “It’s

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Coromandel Classic organiser Tom Gethin.

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now in its 18th year, it’s a well-known and well-timed event on the multisport calendar, it’s somewhat a rite of passage for people training for the Coast to Coast or an ironman, through to first timers just wanting to challenge themselves to something new,” he says. Tom moved to New Zealand from his native Scotland 7 years ago and with a background in rowing, triathlon and half ironman events, his first foray into a New Zealand multisport event was the Coromandel Classic. “One of the things I love about the Coromandel is that the scenery and geography is very similar to parts of Scotland – both places have those craggy hills, huge, ancient trees, sheer cliffs that take you down through rivers to the sea” explains Tom. “And the actual event sees a lot of camaraderie between athletes and teams. So while it’s competitive, there’s

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“… the best part is you can do it as an individual, or as a team, and feel

SATISFIED YOU’VE ACHIEVED SOMETHING PRETTY SPECIAL …”

and

Endurance Competitors grind out the day on the Coromandel Classic (photos here and above) with bush and beach running and a kayak leg. O U R

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Kicking your bucket list The Coromandel Classic.

Here’s a few adventure and endurance events you could try: Otahu SUP festival January www.whangamataevents.co.nz ARC adventure race in February www.arcevents.co.nz/arc-adventure

also room for people to just get out there and have some fun.” When Tom heard the event organisers were looking to sell up the business two years ago, he leapt at the opportunity to take it over. “Moving into event organising was just a natural progression for me,” explains Tom. “I’m an Auckland City Tri Club committee member and triathlon official and the Coromandel Classic is one of races that now come under my business umbrella – Podium Events.” If you’re looking to do both days of the Coromandel Classic weekend event, it does require a dedicated support crew. There’s also the rapport amongst competitors, crew and spectators, which all make for a terrific atmosphere across the Coromandel. A good place for spectators to enjoy the buzz

of the event is during the kayak to bike transition at Cooks Beach on Day One. On Sunday morning at Tairua Wharf, Tom says there’s ‘more of a buzz’ as the combined energy of seasoned racers and newbies set out on their mission to complete Day Two. Coromandel communities are right behind the new ownership of the event, with support received from our Council, DOC and Traffic Management. Major sponsors include Mac’s Beer and Em’s Cookies, so there’s plenty of goodies in the goodie bags that athletes get to take away with them. So if you’ve been competing in trail running events and are looking for a ‘next-level’ challenge, Tom suggests you get involved. Encouraging a friend and joining a team is a great way to begin. There’s also an early “warmup event,” the Karaka Run held in July. This is a 22km trail run, which starts in Thames and goes onto the Karaka track and is a precursor/ familiarisation run ahead of the Coastal Classic. “Come and give one of these events a go,” encourages Tom. “You won’t regret it.” l

Surf to Firth Bush Marathon in March www.surf2firth.co.nz Whangamata Multisport Challenge in March www.whangamataevents.co.nz/multisport Tairua Wet and Wild weekend in March www.facebook.com/tairuawetandwild Cathedral Cove Swim in April www.brentfoster.co.nz Whitianga Half Marathon in May www.whitiangahalfmarathon.co.nz The Great Cranleigh Kauri Run in May www.arcevents.co.nz/kaurirun Karaka run in July www.coromandelclassic.co.nz Coromandel Classic in August www.coromandelclassic.co.nz Whangamata Adventure Challenge in August www.whangamataevents.co.nz Whangamata Run/Walk Festival in September www.whangamatarunwalk.com Flight Centre K2 Road Cycling classic in October www.arcevents.co.nz/k2home

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We’re in this TOGETHER! In the past year Thames-Coromandel

is Coromandel. And along with the

takes pressure off local facilities while

District townships Whitianga and

two NZMCA Parks in the area (an

still bringing Motorhome Tourism

Whangamata have been officially

Association-owned property in

dollars into the area,” says NZMCA CEO

welcomed into the New Zealand Motor

Coromandel township and a leased

Bruce Lochore.

Caravan Association’s nationwide

property in Whitianga) they are a

“In saying that, it’s important to stress

Motorhome Friendly scheme.

positive reflection of the Association’s

that all this is being done at no cost

They are amongst some 47 towns from

drive to share the benefits of

to local ratepayers. The establishment

around New Zealand in the scheme,

Motorhome Tourism, without adding

of the Parks and the promotion of the

which is providing a healthy boost to

extra strain to local facilities or heaping

Motorhome Friendly towns is funded

tourism spending in the regions.

extra costs on local ratepayers.

entirely by the NZMCA. The result is a

The two new locations bring to

“Our members enjoy this very special

win/win for everyone,” he says.

three the number of Motorhome

part of New Zealand and travelling here

Friendly towns in TCDC – the other

in Certified Self-Contained vehicles

New Zealand Motor Caravan Association | P 09 298 5466 www.mhftowns.com | www.nzmca.org.nz


The Coromandel,

motorhome frIendly and proud of It! The Motorhome Friendly scheme is a New Zeal and Motorcaravan A ssociation (NZMCA) initiative bringing motorhome tourism to participating towns – which tend to be mainly rural or provincial centres off the mainstream tourism route – and assures member s in certified self-contained vehicles of a warm welcome.

C

oromandel Town started the ball rolling, joining the scheme in March 2016, with Whitianga and Whangamata signing up in time for the summer period. The three towns join more than 47 other towns from around New Zealand in the scheme. The Motorhome Friendly scheme promotes high standards for freedom camping, which has become a joint campaign between NZMCA and our Council with both organisations signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). “Motorhome tourism is one of the biggest forms of alternative tourism,” says Bruce Lochore, Chief Executive of the NZMCA. “And the Coromandel is one of the most sought after destinations, so it is expected that the demand for motorhome services will grow.” There’s two NZMCA parks in the Coromandel (one NZMCA owned property in Coromandel Town and one NZMCA leased land on Whitianga Waterways land), which is a positive reflection of the Association’s drive to share the benefits of motorhome tourism, without adding extra strain to local facilities or heaping extra costs on local ratepayers.

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“Our members enjoy this very special part of New Zealand and travelling here in certified self-contained vehicles, and staying (when possible) in our own parks will take pressure off local facilities while still bringing motorhome tourism dollars into the area,” says Mr Lochore. “It’s important to stress that all this is being done at no cost to local ratepayers. The establishment of the parks and the promotion of the Motorhome Friendly towns is funded entirely by the NZMCA. “The result is a win/win for everyone,” he says. “Official recognition as a Motorhome Friendly Town will encourage more of our members and international visitors to stop, stay and spend. And for motorhomers, the towns’ status as Motorhome Friendly is a clear indication that they can expect a warm welcome.” Mr Lochore explains that the Motorhome Friendly status offers significant economic benefits to participating communities. “At a time when tourism in this country is enjoying an unprecedented boom, I believe it is vital that the benefits are not confined to the traditional tourist ‘hotspots’ but are shared with councils and communities nationwide,” he says.

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“… the towns’ status as Motorhome Friendly is a clear indication that they can

EXPECT A WARM WELCOME.”

“Our aim in establishing the scheme was to help rural and provincial communities throughout New Zealand get a fair share of tourist spending.” “That’s why the NZMCA has invested more than a million dollars and committed significant resources over the past three years to encourage our members – and other motorhome tourists – to get off the beaten track in their travels.” Our Mayor Sandra Goudie says our Council’s positive relationship with the NZMCA has been paying dividends. “We’re extremely pleased to see our partnership with NZMCA going from strength to strength,” says Mayor Sandra. “We thank NZMCA for investing in our District through initiatives like the Motorhome Friendly Towns scheme, but also the fact that many of their members get involved in our local community projects like dune planting and beach clean-up days while they are visiting,” she says. “The thing is that we all enjoy the Coromandel for the same reasons and so we’re all in it together to make sure we keep the Coromandel beautiful,” says Mayor Sandra. Promotion of Motorhome Friendly Towns goes out to the NZMCA’s 73,000+ individual members and is free advertising for the locations. l

More information www.nzmca.org.nz www.tcdc.govt.nz/freedomcamping

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Whichever section of the Rail Trail you ride, you’ll pass through lush farmland with stunning views of the Coromandel and Kaimai ranges.

Hauraki Rail Trail – from good to great

T

Take a journey along one of New Zeal and’s oldest railway corridor s, dating back to 1898, travelling through beautiful countryside and towns steeped in history.

he Rail Trail’s original section runs from Te Aroha to Thames, passing through Paeroa with a spur through the Karangahake Gorge to Waihi. The newly opened Kaiaua to Thames section opened in September 2017. An extension southwards from Te Aroha to Matamata is planned, that would take cyclists almost to the gates of the Hobbiton Movie Set.

The four existing sections of the Rail Trail make for an enjoyable four-day cruise over largely flat terrain. Or, tackle the different sections of the trail at separate times. As a Grade One cycle trail, the Hauraki Rail Trail is suitable for all fitness levels and cycling skills. From the Shorebird Coast at Kaiaua, through lush green Waikato farm lands, to areas rich in pioneering history, the Hauraki Rail Trail has a ride for you.

Getting there

MEET THE NEW MANAGER The Rail Trail was opened in 2012 and is a continuing partnership between our Council, Hauraki and Matamata-Piako district councils. It is managed by the Hauraki Rail Trail Charitable Trust, which has representation from all three councils and local iwi on the board of directors. Hauraki Rail Trail Charitable Trust General Manager Diane Drummond took over in January 2017 on a mission to take the Rail Trail from good to great in a sustainable way. The logo has been updated, keeping the mountain and rail trail elements of the old logo, but with a heritage feel that reflects the depth of what the Rail Trail has to offer. The website www.haurakirailtrail.co.nz has also been updated to serve as the primary

The Hauraki Rail Trail is less than two hours’ drive from Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga. It is accessible from Kaiaua in the north, Thames, Paeroa, Waihi/Waikino in the Karangahake Gorge, and Te Aroha in the south. The mild Waikato climate provides a great all-year cycling experience. There are a number of companies offering bike hire, luggage transfer, shuttle bus services and accommodation. Plus, there are many great trailside cafes and restaurants to keep you fuelled up on your trip.

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source of information for visitors to the Rail Trail. It now includes events, accommodation, hospitality and services including bike hire and shuttles. A key difference with the new website is that no commissions are payable, visitors can book direct with operators. Ms Drummond is focusing not only on marketing the Rail Trail to visitors, but on leveraging funding from government agencies and partners to pay for maintenance and Below: The Hauraki Rail Trail is good for cyclists of all ages and fitness levels.


SECTION A

Kaiaua to Thames

HAURAKI

Taking in the Kaiaua Shore birds, lush farm lands and Wetlands with views to the Firth of Thames and the Coromandel.

RAIL TRAIL

The Coromandel

Wharekawa Marae

Whakatiwai

Kaiaua

Tikapa Moana / Firth of Thames

Highlights

25

Rd

oas EC

ua Kaia

t Rd Mir

an

da

Rd

Kaiaua to Thames – 55km

Thames

Rays Rest

Kauaeranga River 25a

Bird Hide

Pῡkorokoro Miranda

Piako River

Matai Whetu Marae

Kopu

26

25 t aR nd

d ki R

ira M

Pipiroa

d

55km

Section B to Paeroa

ra Hau

Fro n

Waitakaruru River

Waihou River

Waitakaruru

to Auckland

25

2

2 2

The full Hauraki Rail Trail Kaiaua

Future Trails

B

Marae

Car Park

Start / Finish Point

Springs

Accommodation

Information Centre

Café/Restaurant

Campervans

Heritage Site

Toilets

Camping

C D

Kaiaua to Bird Hide: 10 km Bird Hide to Waitakaruru: 11km Waitakaruru to Pipiroa: 15km Pipiroa to Kopu: 12km Kopu to Thames: 7km

Te Aroha

E

Gun dogs ARE PERMITTED on this section during the duck hunting season only

Kaiaua

Waihi

Paeroa

DISTANCE: 55km

Matamata

Thames 55km

improvements as well as promoting the don’t have to be a fitness fanatic to ride it,” says business opportunities that exist. Ms Drummond. For all enquiries and bookings for Accommodation, THE NEW ZEALAND CYCLE TRAIL PlacesTrail to Dine and to See & Do visit www.haurakirailtrail.co.nz “The is things accessible and convenient for so “It’s the unexpected journeys. Old miners’ O f f i c i a l P a r t n e r many people. The cruise market docks at both tracks, maritime parks, and farm stays. There’s Tauranga and Auckland. The country’s biggest a huge opportunity here to tell so many of airport is within two hours’ drive. It’s hardly our stories and create business opportunities surprising its easy grade and great scenery around them. We also have a fantastic range of has become a hit with families and social artisans, boutique cheese makers, and cafes,” cyclists. I’m a perfect example of how you she says. l 5m

5m

2

1

0m

You will pass through the villages of Waitakaruru, Pipiroa and Kopu, which all offer the chance to refresh over a cuppa and something yummy to eat. Thames is the perfect place for an overnight stop, with plenty of accommodation options and places to eat. Thames to Paeroa – 34km

Thames

A

KEY

An easy ride, mostly along the top the stopbanks beside the Firth of Thames, taking in the Kaiaua shorebirds (the Pūkorokoro/Miranda Shorebird Centre is well worth a visit), lush farmlands and wetlands with magnificent views to the Coromandel Ranges.

0m

This section starts along the Thames Coastal Walkway and is a mostly flat, tranquil, ride through lush farmland along the old railway line between the Coromandel Ranges and the Hauraki Plains. After about 12km you’ll come to the Cheese Barn Café at Matatoki, a perfect place to sample their artisanal cheese and feed the alpacas. Also by the trail are the historic Puriri Hotel and the Convenient Cow Café at Hikutaia. Paeroa, with its giant L&P bottle and many antique shops, is the end of this section. Paeroa to Waihi – 24km Travel the picturesque Karangahake Gorge, riding alongside the Ohinemuri River past historic mining relics and through a one-kilometre railway tunnel (no longer used by trains). Take the Windows Walk loop at Karangahake for more tunnels and mining relics. Put your bike on the vintage train between Waihi and Waikino to rest your legs or cycle all the way. Paeroa to Te Aroha – 23km

The Rail Trail passes historic mining relics on its way through the Karangahake Gorge.

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Carry on down the railway embankment, with views of 952-metre-high Mt Te Aroha and the bush-clad Kaimai Ranges. The historic spa town of Te Aroha signals the current end of the Hauraki Rail Trail but we expect work on an extension to Matamata to begin soon.

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• Minor Dwellings • First Homes • Classrooms and Educational Buildings • Commercial & Office Buildings

Our Thames/Coromandel branch and showroom is located at Cnr State Highway 25 & Kopu Cnr, Thames. Contact us today to arrange your personal consultation! Kevin Smith, (07) 867 9277, kevin.smith@khh.co.nz

0800 534 444

www.keithhayhomes.co.nz


Sea Dogs The Coromandel is a magic place. And to make it a place for everyone to enjoy we have a few simple rules for dogs, handlers, owners, visitors and residents when sharing beaches and reserves. It has been just over a year since our dog rules have changed, so if you are in doubt about when and where you can walk your dog, head to our website and look at the ‘Dog Rules’ page. We have worked hard to make sure we have local rules that are clear and easy to understand for both our residents and visitors. This means having some consistency across the district, such as the

dates and times dogs are allowed on some beaches over summer and public holidays. Signs have gone up through the district, including signs with maps in popular areas. You can also find this information on our website if you are planning a trip with your dog to the Coromandel. www.tcdc.govt.nz/dogrules

HAS YOUR PUPPY PAL GOT THE CORRECT BLING? The Dog Control Act requires all dogs over the age of three months to be registered each year. You should ensure your dog wears its registration tag at all times. It’s also a good idea to have your name and phone number on a dog tag, so you can be easily contacted if your dog gets lost. You can now pay your dog renewal registrations online using credit, debit/credit or account to account. Paying your dog’s registration renewal this way means you will no longer need to bring the form into one of our offices. This isn’t for new registrations, at the moment, but we are working on it.

A RESPONSIBLE DOG OWNER… • Carries a plastic bag at all times and picks up their dog’s poo. • Carries a leash at all times. • Has their dog under control at all times on and off the leash. • Makes sure their dog has access to shade and water and never leaves their do in a hot car. For more information on dogs on the Coromandel head to our website www.tcdc.govt.nz/dogs l

Horsing around on beaches On the Coromandel we are lucky to be able to take our best animal buddies down to the beach. Whether your buddy is a dog or a horse, nothing beats exercise time, enjoying the sand and the surf on our pristine beaches. There are, however, a few rules involved with having a horse on a beach or other public place. The Activities in Public Places Bylaw came into force on 1 September 2017, and has sections aimed at making sure animals like horses and stock don’t disrupt the enjoyment of other beach users.

get to the beach, you will need to obey the rules of the road. This will ensure your and your horse’s safety as well as that of other road users. There are some reserves where horses aren’t allowed, so please be on the look out for the ‘No Horses’ signs. For more information on the Activities in Public Places Bylaw go to www.tcdc.govt.nz/app l

Here are a few things to remember when taking your horse down to the beach for some fun: • You can ride your horse into, on or over a public place (including beaches) if it is safe to do so and you aren’t causing a nuisance to other users. A crowded beach in the height of summer probably isn’t the best time for a canter. • Share the space and remember not everyone loves your horse as much as you do, give other people room and consider using the beach when there are fewer people about. • Make sure that you have control of your horse at all times, it won’t do to have him wander off and start to eat someone’s hat. • Pick up any ‘deposits’ your horse might make, dog owners have to do it, so do you. • Obey the road rules – if you are taking your horse on the road to

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DISTRICT LIBRARY NEWS

Much more than books

‘H

aere mai everyone! Welcome everyone!’ sings an enthusiastic group of toddlers and mums as Toddler Time begins. Over by the public computers, people type up their CVs, email their friends and print important paperwork. A woman sits in a sunny corner, deeply engrossed in a novel. Two strangers are having a lively debate over the day’s newspapers. Welcome to the 21st century library: a space that values citizens over consumers and provides more than just a good book (although we do have plenty of those too!). Far from being places for stony silence and dusty old books, ThamesCoromandel District Libraries are community hubs where people from all walks of life can discover, connect and What’s on at Thames, enjoy. You’ll find our library branches Tairua and Mercury spread across the peninsula, from Bay libraries this Thames at the base of the Coromandel to Tairua and Mercury Bay on the summer? Eastern Seaboard. We’re also on your Visit www.tcdc.govt.nz/library computer and in your pocket: our and sign up for our enewsletter to online resources are available 24/7 through our online catalogue. be the first to find out about all our Our library card allows you to fun activities for kids. borrow books, DVDs, magazines and Or follow us on Facebook more from our three library branches. www.facebook.com/tcdclibraries We can reserve items for you to pick

THAMES LIBRARY 503 MACKAY ST, THAMES 3500 07 868 6616 thameslibrary@tcdc.govt.nz

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up from the library of your choice, and you can also utilise our inter-library loan service to borrow books from other library networks around New Zealand. Your card also lets you to browse thousands of newspaper and journal articles online, borrow e-books, and search databases for community funding and scholarship opportunities; all from the comfort of your couch. Every week offers different community events at each of our libraries, which are free and open to anyone who wants to join in. We host monthly book clubs in Thames and Mercury Bay for those who want to mingle with other readers. Grab a coffee and share whatever you’ve been reading recently with the group, and swap recommendations on what to borrow next. Book Club is a must for anyone who loves meeting new people and discovering new authors. Budding family history researchers can get one-on-one advice from local members of the New Zealand Society of Genealogists, once a month at Mercury Bay Library. Bring in your history mysteries and ancestral dead-ends, and one of our resident genealogists will help you find what you are looking for. It’s free to drop in and chat with one of our experts, or you can phone Mercury Bay Library and book in for a one-on-one session. During the school term, our Toddler Time sessions in Whitianga and Thames are a great opportunity to meet other parents and toddlers for stories, songs and fun activities. Each session is based around a simple theme and runs for about half an hour. Toddler Time takes place every week with our children’s librarians. There’s also plenty to do in the school holidays, with our free school holiday activities taking place twice a week at each of our libraries. Whether we’re building a catapult, constructing the tallest Lego tower or going on a treasure hunt, there’s always plenty to keep the kids entertained. We also regularly host special events such as author visits, Lego Club, book launches, craft workshops, reading challenges and competitions. Keep an eye on our website (tcdc.govt.nz/libraries) and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/tcdclibraries) to stay up to date with the latest local news, new books and special events coming up at your library. l

TAIRUA LIBRARY 2 MANAIA RD, TAIRUA 3508 07 864 7960 tairualibrary@tcdc.govt.nz

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MERCURY BAY LIBRARY 22 VICTORIA ST, WHITIANGA 3510 07 866 4776 mblibrary@tcdc.govt.nz

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A group of beginners during the school holiday block lessons.

SMALL TOWN POOL WITH

Olympic dreams

Thames Centennial Pool staff are making a huge splash with the facility drawing record numbers of bathers and a contingent of swimmers graduating from the team’s Learn-to-Swim and Academy training programmes.

And with alumni like Helena Gasson making waves on the world stage and breaking New Zealand records, it is hardly surprising young swimmers are working hard to swim through the ranks and follow her stellar example. Records show there were close to 55,000 individual swim sessions by users over the extended 2016-17 summer season on top of daily visits by school students, as part of the summer swimming programme over the school terms 1 and 4. Each term there are 300-400 learn to swim students. That’s the biggest number of swimmers ever recorded at the pool and just part of the success story. Some 300 children are enrolled in the Swim Cool Swim School’s Learn to Swim programmes run by pool staff, with more enrolled in private lessons. The 25m council-staffed facility has a growing reputation for producing some of the country’s best competitive juniors, with youngsters who’ve moved through the lessons, now attending squad training with an eye on the NZ Junior Festival. “We’re starting to see kids that have come from our Learn to Swim programme now competing at the New Zealand nationals’ junior level,” says Pool Manager Paul Dufty.

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“To see some of those kids that were taught right from the start now competing at a national level is just so cool.”

“The whole way we have set up our Learn to Swim drill structure bodes well for competitive training down the track. We’re setting these youngsters up so they have the correct body positions and they’re learning the right technique rather than us having to break bad habits.” Paul says people are enrolling their children from around the Coromandel and even outside the District, with the cost of instructors funded out of the lesson price with no subsidy from ratepayers. “We’ve had people coming to Thames and booking into the local holiday parks so they can bring their children or grandchildren to our holiday block lessons over four days,” says Paul. “In New Zealand we have terrible drowning statistics, and as a parent myself, it’s really pleasing to see so many children being enrolled for this essential life skill. It gives parents peace of mind and I know how important it is to have your kids taught how to be safe in the water.” l

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Above top: Thames Centennial pool provides a good ratio of swim coach to students, pictured are from left to right: Tash Cook, Chloe Green, Sarah Bax and Cameron Dufty. Bottom: The block lessons are an intensive block of swim coaching to increase children’s confidence and skills. For more information on the pool including opening times and Learn to Swim session as well as school holiday block lessons see www.tcdc.govt.nz/swim

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‘She’ll be right ’ to

‘We’re ready’ changing our approach to emergency preparedness

In New Zealand emergencies can happen anywhere, any time, and without warning. Civil Defence is made up of people trained to respond to these emergencies. When these emergencies happen, Civil Defence and emergency services will be busy helping the people who need them most. Focusing on impacts caused by hazards will help us to prepare ourselves in the event of an emergency, (Do you lose power during a storm? Is your home/town isolated due to roads becoming blocked?).

Website and social media

In the last 12 months the Coromandel has had some practice on how adverse weather can affect our district, were you prepared? If not what could you have done to make things easier for you and your family?

And for national updates, follow the Ministry of Civil Defence on social media:

Make sure you and the people you care about are ready to get through by knowing the different ways to stay informed.

Radio

In an emergency Civil Defence & Emergency Management and radio and TV broadcasters will work together to tell people what they need to know to get through. If you have a solar or battery powered radio, you can keep up with the latest news and alerts even if the power is out. Listen to these radio stations for information during an emergency: Radio New Zealand (FM/AM), The Hits (FM), NewstalkZB (FM/ AM), MoreFM (FM), Radio Live (FM) Other individual radio stations, check with your local Civil Defence & Emergency Management Group.

For local updates, check your council’s website, as well as your region’s Civil Defence & Emergency Management Group’s website and social media.

www.facebook.com/nzcivildefence www.twitter.com/nzcivildefence

Know your neighbours

In an emergency you can work together to get through. Work out who can help you and who might need your help. Join a Neighbourhood Support Group and create connections to help you get though an emergency. Join today at www.neighbourhoodsupport.co.nz or call 0800 463 444

Emergency Mobile Alerts

There’s a new way of receiving information about emergencies in your area. If your life, health or property is in danger, Emergency Mobile Alerts can be sent to your mobile, without needing to sign up or download an app. Check if you can receive the alerts at emergencymobilealerts.govt.nz

For more tips to help you prepare yourself head to

www.getthru.govt.nz

GET YOUR HOME/BACH READY FOR AN EMERGENCY Emergency supplies

• Toilet paper and large plastic buckets for an emergency toilet

In an emergency you could be stuck at home or if on holiday your bach for three days or more. You probably have most of these things already, and you don’t have to have them all in one place, but you might have to find them in a hurry and/or in the dark. Make a plan to work out what you will need to get your family through.

• Dust masks and work gloves

Basic supplies to have at home

• Hand cleaner

• Water for three days or more – make sure you have nine litres of water for every person. (Save large fizzy and juice bottles, give them a good clean and overfill them with water from the tap, replace every 6 months. • Long lasting food that doesn’t need cooking (unless you have a camping stove or BBQ), and food for babies and pets

Basic supplies to have in a bag in case you have to evacuate • Torches and batteries

• Radio – wind up or with batteries • Cash • Copies of important documents (online or paper) • Walking shoes, warm clothes, raincoat and hat • First aid kit and prescription medicine • Water and snack food (remember babies and pets too)

Talking to kids about emergencies If you have kids, make sure they’re involved in the planning too. Talk to them in an honest, but not scary, way about what might happen in an emergency, what you can do to keep safe, and what your plan is for if you can’t get home. The more involved they are, the less scared they will be if an emergency does happen.

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Community Guide to Emergencies When a natural disaster hits, our community may need to take care of itself for up to seven days before help can arrive.

• H elp you to know what you can do to prepare yourself, and those who depend on you, to survive through an emergency, and

Community Response Plans have been developed to ensure there are measures in place to help the community look after itself.

• E nsure you know the warning signals to evacuate, and where to evacuate.

The plan is designed to:

Plans have been developed in conjunction with the communities for Onemana, Opoutere, Pauanui, Tairua, Whangamata and Whitianga. The full plans can be downloaded from our website

• H elp you to understand the hazards that exist in your community, • L et you know what level of risk these hazards pose to your community,

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www.tcdc.govt.nz/tvcd

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If you are one of the 100’s of thousands of people making the annual pilgrimage to the Coromandel for holidays, it makes sense to think about preparing for unexpected emergencies while you are on holiday. Just like preparing for an emergency at home, work, or school, it’s equally important to prepare for holiday emergencies. Here are a few tips to help you get started:

1. Tell a trusted friend or family member where you

are going, the route you are taking and when you expect to return. It’s ok to change your plans, but make sure you let your trusted friend know that you have.

2. Don’t forget to pack your: a. First Aid Kit – include important medications, water purifier tablets and alcohol wipes. b. Emergency car kit c. Small emergency kit or survival pack to take with you if you go for a bush walk, adventure or day trip. d. Emergency food – these have enough calories to keep you going, just in case. e. Childcare and or pet items – pack for those that can’t pack for themselves.

3. Know what to do if you get sick or hurt: a. Know where to find the local doctor or medical centre. b. Think about becoming a St Johns Ambulance supporter ($50 Individual, $65 Joint or $80 Household).

4. Be aware of your surroundings – learn about the types of emergencies that are common to the area, keep an eye on the weather. Get to know evacuation points for where you are staying. Load the local radio station into your car radio/transistor or Spotify. Find out what other channels you can get emergency management information and updates.

5. Pack smart – Make sure you have

everything you may need to rely on if you need to leave your accommodation quickly.

For more on types of emergencies and helpful resources to help you prepare see the Happens website

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MATARANGI 94.0 OPITO BAY 106.7 COROMANDEL 89.1 WHITIANGA 90.3 HAHEI 90.3 COOKS BEACH 90.3

COROMANDEL PENINSULA

COROGLEN 90.3

PAUANUI 93.9

THAMES 97.2 WHANGAMATA 89.9

HAURAKI PLAINS 97.2 PAEROA 93.2

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WAIHI 90.6 WAIHI BEACH 104.2

TE AROHA 106.7

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A DV ERTOR IAL

Flair and Creativity I n 2016, N e w Z e a l a n d w a s r a n k e d 34 t h i n t h e l i s t o f OECD c o u n t r i e s fo r p e r c a p i ta w a s t e to l a n d f i l l . T h e r e a r e 34 c o u n t r i e s i n t h e g r o u p .

The Seagull Centre in Thames is perfect for a guilt-less purchase once in a while. Here you find treasures with potential and personality. In the process of giving a new life to old things, recycling centres such as the Seagull Centre in Thames and the Goldmine in Coromandel Town are educating, creating employment and saving one more thing from reaching landfill. They also offer extremely affordable goods to those who cannot afford to always buy new. “While we’re dealing in waste, basically our business is people because 80% of our revenue goes into wages,” says Rick Brown, Business Manager of the Seagull Centre in Thames. The centre started with only a $50,000 start-up grant from our Council and a lease of Council land at the entrance to the Thames Refuse Transfer Station, and now employs 12 staff and a team of volunteers, under a charitable trust formed in 2005 and overseen by a dedicated group of trustees.

It contributes goods and available resources free of charge to community members in need. This includes Work and Income clientele, the women’s refuge, Fiji and Tongan communities, schools and community groups and has, when possible, given grants to other organisations. In partnership with the Department of Corrections, community workers are provided with a supportive and productive work environment at the Seagull Centre, to contribute community work labour. “The programme enables a strong sense of personal value and selfesteem in addition to reinforcing a sound work ethic and a responsible attitude to the community at large,” Rick adds. Re-Think is a shop at “the Seagull”, offering an eclectic and ever-expanding range of hand-crafted upcycled items for sale - all made using recycled materials. Buying goods here means you’re extending a product’s life, or it

Come On Coromandel – Let’s do better!

553kg

The amount of waste sent annually to landfill per ratepayer unit in Thames- Coromandel District

398kg

The amount each household (ratepayer unit) recycles annually in ThamesCoromandel District

might inspire you to do some upcycling of your own. So next time you’re in the neighbourhood, check out the Seagull Centre or The Goldmine. Over the next two years, the Seagull Centre is expanding into a Resource Recovery Park. The Seagull centre trades 7 days per week, 10 to 4 pm, 360 days per year.

GOLDMINE

e Goldmine recycle In January 2017, Th sed on the site of an centre – which is hou 0s – cranked into old gold mine in the 180 nsfer Station in Tra e action at the Refus viding a solution to Coromandel Town, pro waste. help in the diversion of finding an old like Despite challenges ere a concrete wh of top mineshaft right on , the Coromandel pad was to be laid st (CILT) set it up Independent Living Tru our Council and h in a joint venture wit (Council’s solid Ltd al Smart Environment ey got funding from waste contractor). Th the Ministry for these organisations and nimisation fund, mi the Environment waste Trust Waikato, cil, un Co Waikato Regional The Seagull Centre local sponsors and Trust in Thames. rkshop for repair With volunteers, a wo ative pursuits is cre and of damaged items If you are interested churning out the gold. e Goldmine you can in volunteering at Th rland, Volunteer contact Carol Suthe 8358. 866 ) (07 Coordinator on Ph

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Re-Think goods for sale at The Seagull, Thames.

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Keeping it

compact Transportable rubbish compactor s for tourism hot spots are being introduced on the Coromandel .

I

n 2016 our Council successfully obtained a $178,000 grant from the Government’s new Regional Mid-sized Tourism Facilities Fund to pay towards building five rubbish compactors that could be placed in visitor hotspots that don’t have refuse transfer stations. These compactors are ideal because they can be moved around the district and placed at points where we have issues with rubbish disposal or high-use rubbish areas and takes pressure off small communities that get overwhelmed by visitors using Council facilities. The compactors are the first of their kind to be built in New Zealand and our Council is getting inquiries from other councils around the country with interest in using them as well. “We know many other councils are facing this same issue, so if we demonstrate the value, there could be more of these units operating around the country in the future,” says Bruce Hinson our Infrastructure Manager. The dimensions (6m l x 1.5m w), means the compactor doesn’t take up a considerable amount of space. The main frame, which contains the motor can stay on site, while the back section, (where the rubbish is stored), can be replaced with an empty unit. “We’ve been meeting with ratepayer and community groups to discuss potential sites to place the compactors,” says Mr Hinson. “And during Pod

Sling Lifting Point

Hooker Frame

Cantry chain Lifting Point Pod to Compactor Coupling Attachment ADAPT Engineering Ltd Mechanical & Structural Designers & Detailing

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ADAPT Enineering Ltd

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these conversations we’ve raised the opportunity for local artists to be involved in painting or designing imagery on the compactors.” The build of the compacting unit has also been a local initiative with Thames firm Watson Engineering winning the tender with its “most cost-effective” bid. The compactors are solar powered and coin operated. Any rubbish approximately the size of a standard blue Council rubbish bag can be disposed of into the hopper. The compactors won’t take any liquid or hazardous waste which must be taken to the nearest waste transfer station. The smell and noise nuisance will Aluminum Flap to cover Pod Loading opening both be minimal. Possible sites being investigated include: 1. Kuaotunu boat ramp. 2. Onemana, next to the fire station. 3. Colville Township, either beside the public toilet or beside the Colville sign. Pod Discharge Door 4. Tairua, beside the Refuse Transfer Station. 5. Purangi Road, near Cooks Beach. Before any compactor is placed on a site we will be Pod Loading Opening discussing it with the local resident and ratepayer groups, as well as informing the local community affected. We also welcome ideas from communities about any other possible Liquid retaining Sill sites where they can be trialled. l

Fig 2 Refuse Pod

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Summer Kerb

Summer Refuse Transfer Station Hours Monday 18 December 2017 – Sunday 25 February 2018 164

WHANGAMATA Monday to Friday 8:30am to 4pm Saturday 10:30am to 5:30pm Sunday 10:30am to 6:30pm Public Holidays 10:30am to 6:30pm PAUANUI Monday to Friday 12:30pm to 5:30pm Saturday 10:30am to 5:30pm Sunday 10:30am to 6:30pm Public Holidays 10:30am to 6:30pm

Summer Kerbside Collections O U R

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SMU AMGMAE ZR I TNI M E E 2S 0 21 07 1- 52 -0 21 08 1 6


side Collections

007

Bond Street Bin 1

TAIRUA Monday to Friday 12:30pm to 5:30pm Saturday 10:30am to 5:30pm Sunday 10:30am to 6:30pm Public Holidays 10:30am to 6:30pm WHITIANGA Monday to Friday 8:30am to 5:30pm Saturday 10:30am to 5:30pm Sunday 10:30am to 6:30pm Public Holidays 10:30am to 6:30pm

Do not remove from this address

Tue 1

MATARANGI Monday to Friday 12:30pm to 5:30pm Saturday 10:30am to 5:30pm Sunday 10:30am to 6:30pm Public Holidays 10:30am to 6:30pm COROMANDEL Monday to Friday 11am to 4:30pm Saturday 10:30am to 5:30pm Sunday 10:30am to 6:30pm Public Holidays 10:30am to 6:30pm

THAMES Monday to Friday 8:30am to 2:30pm Saturday 10:30am to 5:30pm Sunday 10:30am to 6:30pm Public Holidays 10:30am to 6:30pm

www.tcdc.govt.nz/rts

www.tcdc.govt.nz/kerbside

C O OR U O M E LO MS A U M R A CN OD R NM D EE RL T IMM AE GS A 2Z 0I 1N 5E- 220 01 16 7 - 2 0 1 8

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Our Council supports levy on single-use plastic bags We’ve come out in support of a small, compulsory fee being paid at shops for single-use plastic bags – the bags that are used to carry shopping home and then usually end up in landfill or littering our beaches and reserves. Our Mayor Sandra Goudie has joined the campaign of New Zealand mayors that is urging the Government to impose such a levy at the point of sale. “These single-use plastic bags are impacting on our local environment and are a real detriment to our ‘clean, green’ image and even more so in the picturesque Coromandel Peninsula,” says Mayor Sandra. “You don’t have to drive far to see the effect of these plastic bags, they are littered along our roadsides and on our wonderful beaches,” she says. After the UK introduced a 5p levy in October 2015, plastic bag usage dropped by 85% within six months.

What can be recycled? GLASS:

Only glass bottles and jars can be recycled. Put them in your plastic Council crate for Kerbside collection, not your wheelie bin. It doesn’t have to be a TCDC crate, it can be from another Council. Other types of glass, such as drinking glasses, dishes, light bulbs, decorative objects, etc, can’t be recycled. If you need a Council crate, you can pick one up for $15 at any of our service centres; or if your old crate is damaged and no longer usable, bring it in to one of our offices and we’ll replace it for free.

PLASTIC:

We can only recycle hard plastics with a number from 1 – 7 inside a triangular recycling symbol (a triangle made of arrows). Soft plastics, such as shopping bags, can’t be recycled in the Coromandel but some shops in Auckland and Hamilton have collection bins for them. Check the www.recycling.kiwi.nz website for locations.

PAPER, CARDBOARD AND CANS:

All of these can go in your wheelie bin to be recycled. We don’t have the facility to recycle TetraPak containers.

ANYTHING ELSE:

If it can’t be recycled, put it in your blue bag for Kerbside collection. Remember, recycling and blue rubbish bags can be dropped for free at any of our seven Refuse Transfer Stations (locations and hours on previous page). Our Kerbside collection schedules and Refuse Transfer Station (RTS) hours are also on our website at www.tcdc.govt.nz/kerbside and www.tcdc.govt.nz/rts


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FLUSH YOUR TAPS The Ministry of Health reminds all of us to flush a mug of drinking water from our taps every morning to help remove metals that might have dissolved in plumbing fittings overnight. The Ministry recommends this simple precaution for all households in New Zealand, including those on public and private water supplies.

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BE FIRE WISE –

if you can’t control it, don’t light it We have a Total Fire Ban in the Coromandel – including public conservation lands, forests and offshore islands – from 20 December 2017 to 8 February 2018 or until later if conditions warrant.

fire suppression at hand (like a fire extinguisher or a pressured water supply) and the fire is totally extinguished when you are finished.

If you see an out-of-control fire, call Fire and No outdoor fires are permitted in this period unless Emergency New Zealand on 111. in compliant fire devices. Compliant fire devices are permanent structures such as pizza ovens and outdoor Smoke not causing hazard or nuisance fireplaces like the one in the (appropriate weather conditions) Spark arrester diagram. Big organised fireworks displays, cultural cooking fires such as hangi and other outdoor fires like bonfires all need a permit. Permits are not required for gasfuelled barbeques or portable gas cookers and stoves. Find out more about fire permits, bans and exemptions on our website www.tcdc.govt.nz/fire or call our Customer Services team on 07 868 0200.

A ball of chicken wire stuffed into chimney can serve as a spark arrester

Chimney

Fire must be supervised

Non- combustible materials 80mm

500mm

500mm

750mm Non- combustible surface

(eg gravel, concrete)

Be fire smart and make sure your NOT TO SCALE fire is supervised at all times, you have adequate means of Example of an outdoor fireplace that complies with the new bylaw.

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A safe distance from combustible materials

Appropriate fire suppression

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Harcourts We’ve got the Coromandel covered

Harcourts Whangamata

Harcourts Whitianga

Harcourts Tairua

P: +64 7 865 9400 | F: +64 7 865 9047 E: whangamata@harcourts.co.nz www.whangamata.harcourts.co.nz

P: +64 7 866 4981 | F: +64 7 866 4982 E: enquiries.whitianga@harcourts.co.nz www.whitianga.harcourts.co.nz

P: +64 7 864 7822 | F: +64 7 864 7852 E: tairua@harcourts.co.nz www.tairua.harcourts.co.nz


PROUDLY ROUNDING UP THE BE ST

NZ HAS TO OFFER

EVERY DAY!

THAMES


Photo: Felicity Jean Photography

Our Coromandel Magazine 2017-18  

Our Coromandel Magazine is Thames-Coromandel District Council's annual magazine. It provides news and information on council projects, event...

Our Coromandel Magazine 2017-18  

Our Coromandel Magazine is Thames-Coromandel District Council's annual magazine. It provides news and information on council projects, event...

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