Page 1

Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

1:54 PM

Page 1


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

1:55 PM

Page 2


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

1:56 PM

Page 3


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

1:56 PM

Page 4

Discover

Port of Ilwaco on southwest Washington's

Dining: D ining: Galley Ole Bob's Bob's G alley Cafe Caffe Portside TThe he P ortside Cafe Caffe Pub Salt P ub Lodging: L odging: Hotel Salt Hot el Charter Fishing: Char rter t Fishing: Coho C oho Seabreeze Seabreeze Pacific Pacific Beacon Beacon Shake-n-Bake Shake-n-Bake Sportsfishing Spor tsfishing

Shops/Gallerie Shops/Galleries: es s s: Books TTime ime Enough B ooks Don Don Nisbett Nisbett Art Art Gallery Gallery Marie Marie Powell Powell Art Art Gallery Gallery Purly Purly Shell Fiber Fiber Arts Arts Jessie's Jessie's Seafood Seaffood o Market Market Azure Azure Salon & Spa Ole B Bob's ob's Seafood Seaffood o Market Market ArtPort ArtPort Gallery Gallery Skookum Surff C Co. Skookum Sur o. Sportsmen’s Sportsmen’s Cannery Cannery Freedom Freedom Market Market RiversZen R iversZen Museums: M useums: Columbia Pacific C olumbia P acific Heritage Museum Heritage M useum Lewis Lewis & Clark Clark Interpretive Center Center Interpretive

Saturday Market at the Sa at turda urd rday M arket a t th e Port of Ilwaco, May-Sept. Po rt r to f Il lwac a o, M ay--Sept t. Plenty of vehicle and P lenty o f veh icle an nd trailer tr ra ailer parking parki a ng Self-service boatyard Self-s er rv vice bo oatya ar rd an d haul out f aci a lit ty, and haulout facility, iincluding ncluding 5 iindoor ndoor bays bays y

Visit Visit Us! s

Marine Supply: Marine Supply: y Marine Englund M arine

Amenities/highlights A menities/h highlig liig ght hts

Local L ocal Businesses Businesses B s

Long Beach Peninsula

Reserve Res erv er ve slips slips online online today: today y:

PortofIlwaco.com P ortofIlwaco.com Lear Learn rn more more about area a ttr ra actions & services: ser rvi v ces: attractions

VisitLongBeachPeninsula.com V isittLongBeachPeninsula.com

renowned for friendly, ren owned fo r fri en ndly, helpful service h elpful s er rv vice available Live bait bait a va ailable available port-wide Wi-Fi a va ailab a le po rt-wi - de Public transit Pub lic tr rans a it & taxi tax xi available a vai a lab a le

VisitLongBeachPeninsula.com V isitLongBeach hPeninsula.com

portofilwaco.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

1:57 PM

Page 5

46 North Farm, Olney, OR Trav Williams, Broken Banjo Photography

good.. llocal. ocal. food.

ST. 12TH ST T.

11355 355 Exchange E xchange Street Street Astoria, Astoria , OR OR (503) 325-00 027 • www .astoria.coop 325-0027 www.astoria.coop

14TH ST ST. T.

Open Daily Dailly . . . . . . 8am 8am – 8pm

FRANKLIN FRANK KLIN A AVE. VE. V

EXCHANGE ST. EXCHA ANGE ST T.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

1:57 PM

Page 6

our coast

Matt Winters Contributing editor Our Coast Magazine

OFFERS AN EMBARRASSMENT OF RICHES ater, water, everywhere: The sea-like Columbia River estuary and its Pacific Ocean coast are a daily celebration of life’s most essential ingredient. Pure, saturated blue shot through with rich layers of silvery gray — on a sunny morning our great river and the living ocean will spark life back into even the most parched soul. We have a hundred distinct kinds of rain, but ten thousand shades of light brought to life by ripples, surf, waves, and tides. Water — salt, fresh, and everything in between — is the all-star cast on this legendary stage. Members of the Chinook Indian Nation, who made this their home soon after the last ice age, see these waters as a source of unity, prosperity, and freedom. As comfortable on them as a bald eagle is in the air, we can only marvel at tales of their confident expertise. The beleaguered Lewis and Clark Expedition watched, bedazzled, as Chinook paddlers in a tiny canoe took off across the stormtossed estuary as if it were a placid backyard duck pond. In the 19th century, the Butterfly Fleet — an armada of two-man sail-powered fishing boats — gambled their lives here in an expert scramble for 80-pound salmon. Astoria, Ilwaco, and other river towns are artifacts from those exciting times, an era that rivals California’s Gold Rush for adventure, audacity, early death, and hard-won fortunes. For all of the Columbia’s beauty and mystique, it’s still the ocean that attracts most visitors. With a total of around 60 miles of public ocean beaches in Clatsop County (south of the Columbia) and Pacific County (north of the river), this is one of the Pacific Northwest’s most popular seashore playgrounds. Two-thirds of a century after Lewis and Clark dipped their swollen toes in the ocean, thousands of tourists began annual trips here via steamboat and locomotive. The seashore still attracts countless thousands of toe-dippers today, but also many who come to explore tide pools, walk or bicycle on dune trails, fly kites, dig clams, fish for surfperch, stormwatch, surf, beachcomb, or merely meditate on the timeless immensity of the ocean.

W

It may sound cutesy to describe our seaside communities as villages, but in terms of individualism and pride they definitely have something in common with the old villages of Cape Cod or the south English coast. From Cannon Beach or Arch Cape in the south, Seaside in the middle, to Ocean Park in the north, each is its own fiercely independent place. One of the pleasures of coming here is finding the place that best matches your personality or mood. Be sure to take a taste of several. It’s in the old riverside city of Astoria, miles from the ocean, where our love affair with water may be most evident. With the Columbia’s ship channel running just offshore, it’s a daily occurrence in Astoria to glance up from some errand and see a skyscraper-sized ship oozing silently by, a towering wall of color. Thanks to its Riverwalk, trolley and many riverfront restaurants and hotels, in Astoria it seems possible to step aboard a Robert Louis Stevenson novel, filled with pirates, Goonies, spies, and shanghaied sailors. The Columbia River Maritime Museum on the waterfront is nationally famous, and highly recommended. Cruise ship passengers, arriving on a morning after rains have swept every impurity from the air, must feel like they’ve passed through a magical veil into an undiscovered country. A Seattle magazine writer last year said Astoria is “a microcosm of the new Northwest,” a unique place that succeeds in preserving its gritty soul in the face of popularity that could otherwise tame and wreck it. Come see for yourself. Charter-fishing trips, sailboat races, and kayak trips all provide ways to get onto the river and the open ocean. But even without any access to watercraft, it’s easy to get down to water level, allowing the river’s light, sounds, and aromas to wash across your mind. Its river beaches are one of the underappreciated secrets of the Columbia estuary, particularly in the vicinity of Fort Stevens State Park and Warrenton. Those who live here love seeking out the many secluded places on the water’s edge. On the river’s North Shore, from Chinook to the old Quarantine Station at Knappton, summer months provide hundreds of informal picnic spots to look for the river’s mightiest tourists

— leaping humpback whales that travel in from the ocean from July through September in search of schools of delicious little bait fish. The north shore is special in all seasons. A few of us have for years conducted what we call Dismal Nitch Day, visiting some of Lewis and Clark’s obscure campsites in November, when the explorers nearly lost their lives versus a raging late-autumn storm. It puts our privileges into perspective. There’s lots more water and shoreline to discover. Willapa Bay — 260 square miles comprising the rich and healthy heart of Pacific County — provides a lion’s share of the West Coast’s oysters and hard-shell clams. It is home to the Willapa National Wildlife Our coast has Refuge complex, encompassing it all when it 11,000 acres of comes to outstanding habitat for more than 200 Pacific Northwest bird species, elk, scenery, otters, amphibians, and the largest profound history, concentration of delicious local black bears in the food, and continental United States. With the life-inspiring right local advice, activities. a visitor is far more likely to see a wild bear on the Long Beach Peninsula than in Yellowstone. Forming a sort of barrier island between Willapa Bay and the ocean, the peninsula has been a playground for Seattle and Portland since the 1880s. The travel website Expedia this year named the peninsula the best place in America to visit in August. It’s really wonderful in any season, but locals probably prefer September and the first half of October for pleasant weather and lighter crowds. Our coast here at the mouth of the Columbia has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to Pacific Northwest scenery, profound history, delicious local food, and life-inspiring activities. We love sharing it and invite you to come experience it.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

PUBLISHER Kari Borgen EDITOR Erick Bengel DESIGN DIRECTOR/LAYOUT John D. Bruijn ADVERTISING MANAGER Holly Larkins PHOTOGRAPHER Colin Murphey CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Matt Winters CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Erick Bengel Dwight Caswell Laura Cherau MJ Cody Heather Douglas Katie Frankowicz Dan Haag William Ham Ryan Hume Katherine Lacaze Lynette Rae McAdams Nancy McCarthy Colin Murphey Noel Thomas Brenna Visser Matt Winters

2:00 PM

Page 7

our coast

Number 7 • 2018 • www.discoverourcoast.com

FEATURES

60 Watercolors by Noel Thomas Wonderful local scenes by the local artist BY NOEL THOMAS

BUSINESS MANAGER Debra Bloom

DIGITAL MEDIA Crindalyn Lyster Travis Clark

BY LYNETTE RAE McADAMS

76

WRITE TO US 949 Exchange St., Astoria, OR 97103

Mysteries of the Columbia-Pacific A few local legends have roots in documented history BY HEATHER DOUGLAS

FIND BACK ISSUES Read up on back issues of Our Coast magazine at discoverourcoast.com/magazine

86

EO Media Group

The Coastal Road Sites to see along U.S. Highway 101 from Nehalem to Long Beach

ON THE COVER Wyatt Provenzano is surrounded by kites during the Washington State International Kite Festival in Long Beach. — COLIN MURPHEY PHOTO

20

The Liberty Theatre

26

Parks for All Seasons

Places on the North Oregon Coast to revel in the resurgence of records

Venue’s history is a three-act drama: a rise, a fall, a restoration

On days rainy, sunny, and in between, there’s a park to match the mood

Feasts. Eateries. Libations. Recipes.

32

Our Picks

36

Get Crackin’

Popular places, hidden gems — let these fabulous food finds inspire you

An ABC guide to eating crab in the Lower Columbia

46

Our Picks

50

Eclectic Tolovana house

56

My Coast

Reserve a room for some R & R, or gather inspiration for your home

Cannon Beach couple built house from other house parts

Hear why residents of the ColumbiaPacific region call our coast home

REGIONAL MAPS & DIRECTORIES

• Astoria/Warrenton Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 • Long Beach Peninsula Map . . . . . . . . . . 106 • Cannon Beach/No. Tillamook Co. Map 108 • Seaside/Gearhart Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 • Index of Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110-112 • Our Coast Business Directory. . . . 112-113

our coast moblie

dailyastorian.com • chinookobserver.com Some uncredited images from Thinkstockphotos.com

The Vinyl Frontier

+

VISIT US ONLINE discoverourcoast.com offers all the content of Our Coast magazine and more. Discover all the wonderful attractions, lively entertainment, and local quirks of the Columbia-Pacific region.

The Daily Astorian: 800-781-3211 Chinook Observer: 800-643-3703

14

Here are some of our favorite ways to have fun

Homes. Rentals. Hotels. Campgrounds.

GET CONNECTED Interact with us and the community at discoverourcoast.com

Our Coast is published annually by The Daily Astorian and Chinook Observer in March. Printed in Portland. Copyright © 2018 Our Coast. All rights reserved.

Our Picks

live & stay Astoria park captures a troubling past and hope for the future

EMAIL US support@discoverourcoast.com

12

66 The Garden of Surging Waves

FOLLOW US facebook.com/ourcoast twitter.com/ourcoast pinterest.com/ourcoastguide

do & see Artistry. Outdoors. Adventures. Pastimes.

eat & drink

MAP GRAPHICS Alan Kenaga

ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES Lisa Cadonau April Olsen Heather Jenson Andrew Renwick

DEPARTMENTS

BY MULTIPLE CONTRIBUTORS

Whatever the device, visitors can tap into the interactive tools they need to have a great stay discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:00 PM

Page 8

OUR COAST CONTRIBUTORS ERICK BENGEL Erick Bengel, the features editor at The Daily Astorian, presides over Coast Weekend, Weekend Break, and Our Coast Magazine. He is a former reporter at the Astorian and Cannon Beach Gazette.

HEATHER DOUGLAS MATT WINTERS

Heather Douglas is an educator, writer, and illustrator. She most enjoys hiking under old-growth trees with her husband and 17-year-old dog, Oscar.

Matt Winters has been editor of the Chinook Observer in Long Beach since 1991 and a frequent contributor to The Daily Astorian. His family homesteaded in the western Washington Territory wilderness in 1883, a background that informs his writing about Northwest history, wildlife, economics, and social issues. He and his wife live on Cape Disappointment, where he rejoices in daily walks with his indomitable wheaten terrier, Duncan.

MJ CODY MJ Cody’s travel column “Sleeping Around the Northwest” appeared in the Sunday Oregonian for more than a decade. She is currently working on a forthcoming book, Enduring Spirit: Photographs of Northwest Native Americans 1855 – 1934 (2019, OSU Press).

8 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

RYAN HUME A freelance editor and graphic designer, Ryan Hume is also a frequent contributor to Coast Weekend. His fiction has appeared in Tin House, Juked, The Portland Review, and other publications. He teaches writing at Clatsop Community College and is the faculty advisor of Rain Magazine. He lives in Astoria with his wife and daughter.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:00 PM

Page 9

WILLIAM HAM William Ham is a writer, actor, musician, broadcaster, bon vivant, and composer of long, self-aggrandizing lists who has called the Columbia-Pacific region home for the past 14 years, though the region has yet to call him back. His work has been published in a variety of publications both local and national and he was a contributor to the books Lost in the Grooves and Backstory 5: Interviewers with Screenwriters of the 1990s. He can be heard weekly on the award-coveting Wow & Flutter radio program late Wednesday nights on Astoria’s KMUN-FM. He can be seen on theater stages up and down the Columbia coast, often by invitation. He lives in Ilwaco, Washington, and denial.

DWIGHT CASWELL Dwight Caswell is a writer and photographer with several books to his name. He serves as pastor of Pioneer Presbyterian Church in Warrenton.

NOEL THOMAS Noel Thomas, a distinguished watercolorist, is a signature member of the American Watercolor Society and Northwest Watercolor Society. His work can be seen at RiverSea Gallery in Astoria. He lives with his wife, Pat.

KATHERINE LACAZE

KATIE FRANKOWICZ Katie Frankowicz is a reporter for The Daily Astorian, where she cover Astoria and Warrenton’s city governments and the environment. She moved to the coast nearly a decade ago and will probably never leave.

Katherine Lacaze, a freelancer of several years and first-time contributor to Our Coast Magazine, lives and writes in Seaside. She enjoys exploring the many topics produced by the coastal town and its neighboring communities, from arts and culture to environmental conservation and tourism. Her 3-yearold daughter, Juliette, is her sidekick, tagging along as they explore the Pacific Northwest.

MORE OUR COAST MAGAZINE CONTRIBUTORS Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 9


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:01 PM

Page 10

MORE CONTRIBUTORS BRENNA VISSER Brenna Visser is a reporter at the Cannon Beach Gazette. She covers everything from city politics, tourism management, and emergency preparedness to the occasional Corgi festival. When she’s not on the job, you can find her hiking in Clatsop County’s hills or feeding her caffeine addiction at any one of the area’s many coffee shops.

NANCY McCARTHY Nancy McCarthy’s journalism career spans 50 years, with the best portion of those years working on the North Oregon Coast. She is the former editor of the Cannon Beach Gazette and Seaside Signal and covered south Clatsop County as a reporter for The Daily Astorian for seven years.

LAURA CHERAU Laura Cherau is a freelance writer living in Astoria, Oregon. Her work has appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, BUST magazine, The Salinas Californian, Oregon Coast Magazine, and Atomic magazine. Currently she writes for Coast Weekend and Statehood Media.

LYNETTE RAE McADAMS A freelance writer on Washington’s Long Beach Peninsula, Lynette Rae McAdams has been living, working, and playing in the Columbia-Pacific region for almost 20 years. When she’s not writing about nature or history, you can usually find her happily immersed in research — either tucked into a corner at the historical archives, or exploring the forests and beaches of the coastline she adores.

COLIN MURPHEY Colin Murphey is the staff photographer for The Daily Astorian. He started his career in Montana nearly five years ago before eventually making his way to the Oregon Coast, where the warmer weather agrees with him. When he’s not photographing something for the paper, he’s looking for something to photograph for the paper.

10 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

DAN HAAG Dan Haag is a freelance writer/would-be-author who has lived on the North Oregon Coast for nearly 30 years. When not fretting over deadlines, he spends his free time supporting the local beer industry, chasing his dog down the beach, and doing his best to get lost in the woods.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:01 PM

Page 11

JULIE ADAMS P H OTO G R A P H Y

503.791.3515

|

JULIEADAMSPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

FAMILIES, WEDDINGS, PORTRAITS ON LOCATION AT THE COAST, PORTLAND,OR BEND DESTINATION WEDDING AND PORTRAIT PACKAGES Julie-Adams-Photography-772412532776918

@julieadamsphotography

Appointments Gladly Accepted!

Life Happens...

re! e H e ’r e W y h W ’s t a Th

Our friendly and dedicated Physicians and Physician Assistants are available for all of your routine healthcare needs, not just for emergency situations! If you’re suffering from a headache, toothache, earache, backache, any illness or injury, are in need of a refill of your prescription medications, or even a sports physical or DOT physical, our dedicated staff is here to assist you!

Keith Klatt, MD

WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MONDAY-FRIDAY 7AM-7PM • SATURDAY-SUNDAY 9AM-7PM

Mark Tabor, PA-C

We are located in the Park Medical Building East on Exchange Street. We accept most insurances, offer a cash discount and also accept the Oregon Health Plan and Medicare. Sally Baker, PA-C

We observe the following holidays & are closed on July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas & New Year’s Day.

2120 Exchange Street, Suite 111 Astoria, Oregon

Express Healthcare for Busy Lifestyles www.urgentcarenwastoria.com

Kenyon Solecki, PA-C

503-325-0333

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 11


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:01 PM

Page 12

do see

Artistry. Outdoors. Adventures. Pastimes.

ourpicks

Short Sand Beach Oswald West State Park, Oregon About 10 miles south of Cannon Beach is a large parking lot on the east side of U.S. Highway 101, and there you’ll find the trailhead for Short Sand Beach. This half-mile-long beach may be the prettiest on the Oregon Coast, but it remains relatively unknown. On a warm summer day you’ll find plenty of people there, but it won’t seem crowded, for Short Sand is a Mecca for those with surfboards, paddle boards, kayaks, and fishing rods. If the day is balmy, plan to arrive early, and on off-season days you may find you have Short Sand almost to yourself. A well-maintained path through primeval forest leads along and over Short Sand Creek. You find yourself walking beneath the branches of great moss-covered trees, and after half a mile of gentle slope you find yourself at a picnic area that looks out on Short Sand Beach and Smuggler Cove. There’s a waterfall at the north end of the beach, and to the south mist from breakers drifts past basalt and sandstone cliffs. One of the advantages of Short Sand Beach is the moderate gradient. As the tide goes out there are pools and shallows far enough back from the waves to be perfect for small children who want to build sand castles and splash in the water. And there’s plenty of driftwood just waiting to be turned into forts. Side trails take you through dense old-growth forest, and a trail of slightly more than two miles takes you to Cape Falcon.

Surfers and fishers enjoy Short Sand Beach at Oswald West State Park.

Another half-mile walk takes you to a monument that memorializes Matt Kramer, the journalist who was instrumental in preserving Oregon beaches. It has a beautiful view of Short Sand Beach. — Dwight Caswell

The Picture Attic Long Beach, Washington

Jean Nitzel picks out a frame to show a customer at the Picture Attic at 711 Pacific Ave. N. in Long Beach.

12 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Owners and longtime Long Beach Peninsula residents Jean and Bill Nitzel founded the Picture Attic in 1981 as a portrait studio, quickly establishing itself as the area’s premier location for senior portraits, wedding pictures, and family reunion photos. With the arrival of the digital age, this aspect of their business has faded away, but the Picture Attic continues to thrive as a source for custom picture framing and a resource for the fine artists throughout the region. The Nitzels pride themselves on their economical but highquality framing personalized for the specific needs of the customer, in addition to their rubber-stamping and scrapbooking supplies. But it’s their support and encouragement of local artists that accounts for their continued growth. Their gallery is the home of the Northwest Artist Guild, a group of more than 20 local artists whose work is promoted and exhibited on the premises. In addition, the Picture Attic offers regular classes and workshops in watercolors, seaglass windows, needle-felting, and alcohol inking, with new programs added regularly. Plans are afoot for a paint-pouring class and “Lunch Bunch Fridays,” where artists can bring their in-progress projects for an afternoon of work and socializing on site. Whether you are a novice or professional artist, or simply an aficionado of the local arts, the friendly and helpful staff at the Picture Attic is there to provide for your every need. — William Ham


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:02 PM

Page 13

The Columbia Pacific is a playground for every type of explorer, whether you’re an art lover, history buff, sports junkie, or wilderness nut. Here are some of our favorite ways to have an adventure when you’re out and about.

Get Lit at the Beach Cannon Beach, Oregon We often think of authors as Olympian figures, imbued with otherworldly talent — distant demigods occupying a lofty cultural perch. One of the appeals of Get Lit at the Beach — Tolovana Arts Colony’s annual three-day literature conference that takes place every spring in Cannon Beach — is that you feel as if you get to know these great minds on a down-to-earth level and realize they, too, are human — flawed, self-doubting, in search of inspiration, drawn to beauty, forced to face down obstacles and bad habits en route to becoming who they wanted to be. Get Lit ticket-holders enjoy a meet-and-greet, attend talks and book signings with the authors, and listen to a keynote speech. The event culminates in a public Q-and-A panel at the Coaster Theatre Playhouse, where the writers sit on stage and banter about their craft. A moderator, usually Cannon Beach’s own Terry Brooks — author of the monumentally successful Shannara series — asks them questions that touch on their journeys, their writing process, their successes and failures, and their advice for budding wordsmiths. What’s their daily routine? How do they know they’ve written something halfway decent? When is self-publishing a very bad idea? The dialogue is always edifying, entertaining, often thrilling. Guest authors have included such luminaries as Willy Vlautin, Nancy Pearl, Jim Lynch, Molly Gloss, and the much-missed Brian Doyle and Ursula K. Le Guin. These giants of Northwest literature hail from different backgrounds, pen fiction and nonfiction, create worlds set in rugged reality and pure fantasy. But they share a belief in the importance of their work and are invested in seeing their projects through to completion. After experiencing Get Lit, anyone aspiring to do something bold and meaningful — whether become a writer, musician, athlete, or entrepreneur — will come away feeling that their dream, too, is worth chasing. — Erick Bengel

The five guest authors of 2015’s Get Lit at the Beach gather onstage at the Coaster Theatre Playhouse. From left: Jim Lynch, Gail Tsukiyama, Nancy Pearl, Karen Joy Fowler and Terry Brooks. The 2018 event takes place May 18 through 20.

LightBox Photographic Gallery Astoria, Oregon

Patrons check out images on the walls of LightBox Photographic Gallery at 1045 Marine Drive in Astoria.

Since its founding in 2009, LightBox Photographic Gallery in Astoria, Oregon — owned and operated by Michael and Chelsea Granger — has exhibited brilliant photographers. Both local photographers and professionals from around the world have graced its walls — artists like John Wimberley who changed the game with his revolutionary chemical processing techniques, or Jody Miller, who studied with Ansel Adams and Arthur Ollman. Last June marked LightBox’s 100th exhibit. The inviting two-story gallery has new exhibits about once a month. In addition to selling film and photographic supplies, the gallery offers matting, archival framing, and printing services (both digital and traditional film), as well as photo restoration. LightBox also offers memberships to people who support its mission to educate and promote the photographic arts. Members meet on the first and third Wednesdays of each month to learn from each other and discuss and critique each other’s prints and images. Whether it’s alternative, historical, or modern methods you’re into, LightBox allows visitors to experience many voices and methods. “We’ve enjoyed each and every day meeting those who come into the gallery and to have experienced and shared the vision of so many unique and individual artists,” the Grangers said. The gallery is not to be missed by enthusiasts of the art form. — Laura Cherau Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 13


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:02 PM

Page 14

do see

the vinyl

FRONTIER PLACES ON THE NORTH OREGON COAST TO REVEL IN THE RESURGENCE OF RECORDS WORDS: ERICK BENGEL • IMAGES: COLIN MURPHEY

a

few years ago, North Oregon Coast shop owners who carry records noticed an odd trend: Vinyl was suddenly selling again, big time. The curious comeback of this antiquated medium — the so-called “vinyl revival” — allowed several stores to build upon their selection of new and used records. “It’s hot now,” James Kosharek, a musician and owner of Nehalem Music & Game, said. “It’s ridiculously hot.” These outlets deal in other offerings: antiques, clothing, instruments, music lessons, stereo equipment and fading formats such as 8-track, cassette tapes, and VHS. They don’t survive on records alone. But a surprisingly robust vinyl selection exists between Nehalem and Astoria, bolstered by a demand that, up until a decade ago, had nearly disappeared. “People are still shocked that (vinyl) albums exist,” Chelsea Johnsen, owner of Doe & Arrow in Astoria, said. “It’s a pleasant surprise for people.”

14 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Though demoted from staple to specialty item, vinyl albums never really went away; they just lay low.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:02 PM

Page 15

Richard Moore of Play It Again in Gearhart among a few of the 300,000+ records in his collection.

And it’s more than a trendy throwback. As Billboard recently reported, vinyl saw the 12th straight year of sales growth in 2017, accounting for 8.5 percent of all album sales. The No. 1 vinyl record in the U.S. last year? “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” The old is new again. In addition, a spate of deaths among musical icons, such as Prince and David Bowie, has helped spur record sales as people take another look at the late artists’ oeuvre. Lois Miner-Fleming, director of Bach ’N Rock in Astoria, said that, for a while, record buyers were “mostly older people who were sorry they lost their albums, or had sold them or thrown them away.” Things have changed. “Younger people are coming and starting to buy them more now, too.” Though demoted from staple to specialty item, vinyl albums never really went away; they just lay low. Some bands continued pressing to vinyl when most went digital-only. Enthusiasts kept collecting and caring for their stockpile. Meanwhile, a lot of good music was never transferred to CD. Now a new generation is finding something hip and fresh to love in the old and funky. “It was a novelty for a lot of these younger people to discover this different form,” said Greg Glover, co-owner of Commercial Astoria. Glover worked in the music business in New York for many years and remembers listening to his mother’s albums as a kid. “And, for some of us, it’s just never gone away.”

GROOVY Part of the appeal, of course, is that vinyl is … well … groovy, fashionable — a retro rush for young’uns, a nostalgia kick for baby boomers. Vinyl recalls the counterculture and cool lifestyle of the ’60s and ’70s. When Tom Schmidt, co-owner of Phog Bounder’s Antique Mall in Astoria, sees an album cover of the San Francisco band It’s a Beautiful Day — a group he saw at the Salem Armory Auditorium as a teenager — “my heart just goes, ‘Ahhhhh,’” he said, half sighing, half swooning. Listeners weaned on CDs often don’t know, and could never tell, that many vinyls sold today are basically CDs printed onto LPs — digital converted into analogue — rather than a reissue of the studio tapes. For discerning ears, though, the difference is plain. The sound of an original vinyl album, they’ll testify, is richer, deeper, fuller. “Vinyl captures all the undertones in ways that you can’t reproduce in a digital form,” Tim Fleming, Lois Miner-Fleming’s husband and co-director, said. For those who cavil about vinyl’s irksome pops and crackles, Schmidt has a piece of advice: “Get over it.” Better yet: Get a nicer copy and stereo, he said. With good equipment, treated honorably, the problem isn’t as pronounced. In fact, some music mavens consider those minor distortions part of the personal experience: The imperfections in one person’s copy — the scuffs and warps that make it distinct — won’t match someone else’s, Terry Erickson, owner of Christie’s Mallternative in Astoria, pointed out: “The whole thing is familiar; it’s like, ‘This is my record.’” A used record is like a used couch: comfortable precisely because the owner has loved it and worn it out. Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 15


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:03 PM

Page 16

do see Chelsea Johnsen thumbs through some of the records for sale at Doe & Arrow in downtown Astoria.

‘IT DEMANDS YOU’ Superior sonics aside, records also provide an experience more immersive than mere media consumption, from the large cover art you can put on display to the liner notes you can obsess over. Vinyl itself now comes in many colors, like Chuck Taylors. “My friends — myself included sometimes — will smell a record when we open it, the fresh seal,” said John Gentner, owner of Metal Head in Astoria. There are perks to having your music take up physical space in the world. The intimate ritual of pulling the record from its sleeve, placing it tenderly on a turntable, dropping the needle, and exploring the terrain of a full album — including flipping the LP over to enjoy Act Two — creates a tactile relationship with the object, something that clicking on a few stray singles doesn’t duplicate. “It demands you,” Glover said. And, Miner-Fleming noted, customers want to have a relationship with store owners as well. Indeed, the resurgence of vinyl has

16 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

led to the rebirth of the record store as a sacred site of musical nerdery. “They want to come in and talk and be social,” she said. “Much as the world seems to think it doesn’t, it does.” At Metal Head, Gentner interacts with customers from all professions, social echelons, and life stages. From dentists and lawyers to 20-year-olds between jobs, people from different backgrounds walk in and see eye-to-eye on music. It’s a “good equalizer,” Gentner said. If the same individuals showed up at a fast-food joint, it’s unlikely they’d bond over a shared love of cheeseburgers. But Electric Wizard? At a record store, that’s a built-in basis for human connection. Collecting records is once again part of growing up. Johnsen notices Astoria’s school-age crowds enter her shop, pumped that they get to buy them. On about the same day every month, a young men comes into Doe & Arrow with money he saved up to buy a record he really wanted (recently it was Bon Iver’s “22, A Million”). “That just wins my day,” Johnsen said.

There are perks to having your music take up physical space in the world: the intimate ritual of pulling the record from its sleeve, placing it on a turntable, dropping the needle and exploring the terrain of a full album.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:05 PM

Page 17

RECORD ROUND-UP BACH ’N ROCK

1606 Marine Drive, Astoria, Oregon A place to dig into older and esoteric music, Bach ’N Rock has thousands of new and used records in every genre, some of which were released more than a century ago. Their vast music collection also includes several thousand cassette tapes and other formats. They think of themselves as a music-andmovies store, carry odds and ends, and offer other services (Tim Fleming repairs and rebuilds instruments, for example). The store supports their nonprofit, Spay & Neuter Humane Association of Clatsop County, the oldest no-kill animal sanctuary in this part of Oregon.

CHRISTIE’S MALLTERNATIVE 1167 Marine Drive, Astoria, Oregon

A music shop with a healthy selection of mostly used records in back. This buysell-trade store also carries instruments (including a lot of guitars), stereo equipment, furniture, VHS, and video games.

COMMERCIAL ASTORIA

1269 Commercial St., Astoria, Oregon The record room houses a carefully curated vinyl collection with a broad selection, from classic rock to new wave to soundtracks. Greg Glover owns the shop with his wife, Alana Jevert-Glover — who is responsible for the front of the store — with gifts, jewelry, accessories, and new and vintage clothing.

Tim Fleming with some of his vinyl selection at Bach ’N Rock in Astoria.

DOE & ARROW

380 14th St., Astoria, Oregon Doe & Arrow follows a similar model: a women and men’s clothing shop featuring new and vintage wear, plus jewelry, home goods (candles, incense, Southwest-style blankets), and an eclectic variety of mostly new vinyl records ranging from punk and jazz to indie folk and hip-hop.

METAL HEAD

1126 Marine Drive, Astoria, Oregon

Antique stores, resale stores and thrift shops often have record racks amid their miscellany. Here are some local options:

A store that specializes in all things metal. Death metal and heavy metal are represented, but so are metal’s progenitors and progeny: ’60s hard rock, psychedelia, and subgenres, such as doom metal, speed metal, stoner rock and thrash. The store also sells collectible objects, including fantasy art, paintings, toys, cassettes, and clothing.

PLAY IT AGAIN Commercial Street Antiques & Collectibles 969 Commercial St., Astoria, Oregon

Phog Bounder’s Antique Mall 892 Marine Drive, Astoria, Oregon

Old Things & Objects 1015 Commercial St., Astoria, Oregon

Rag & Bone Thrift Shop 1011 7th Ave., Seaside, Oregon

Seaside Antique Mall 726 Broadway St., Seaside, Oregon

Spay & Neuter Thrift Shop 600 Broadway St., Seaside, Oregon

CARTM 34995 Nacarney Road, Manzanita, Oregon

1140 G St., Gearhart, Oregon A warehouse of records off U.S. Highway 101. Owner Richard Moore (who moonlights as an Elvis impersonator) said he has about 80,000 records in the building now, arranged on towering pallet shelves. (For his full collection, he says he stopped counting at 300,000). “You have to have something for everybody,” he said. His most popular LPs are the “glue-sniffing, head-banging stuff,” he said: Led Zeppelin, The Doors, Janis Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix. He has assorted other items, including VHS, 8-track, and reel-to-reel.

MICHAEL’S MUSIC

1347 Hemlock St., Cannon Beach, Oregon This music store carries a collection of about 100 records, and is poised to expand its selection of new ones. The store sells instruments, including a lot of guitars and ukuleles, and accessories for professional musicians: sheet music, instructional books, stereo equipment, amps, and PAs. Michael Corry, an accomplished local musician, also gives music lessons.

NEHALEM MUSIC & GAME

35990 North U.S. Highway 101, Nehalem, Oregon Nehalem Music & Game carries a full line of music media and instruments: about 2,000 vinyl albums, another 2,000 or so CDs, plus a couple hundred cassettes — and retro video games to boot. The store has many genres but specializes in hard rock and metal. Turntables, amps, and CD players are on offer. They also sell fanfare: shirts, patches, stickers, music magazines and rock history books. Kosharek, a bassist by trade, plans to launch his new record label for local hard-edged bands, Bandageman Records, later this year. He owns the store with his wife, Krysta Kosharek.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:05 PM

Page 18

Estate Jewelry, Diamonds,Art & Antiques

... is one of the most unique Cafes in the world.

It is located on the Columbia River in the West’s oldest cannery building historic n s abo t Cateri u

g

A

sk u

Hanthorn Cannery at the end of Pier 39

FREE APPRAISALS -no appointment necessary

Coffee Girl features friendly services, high quality espresso, sumptuous fresh pastries, unique breakfasts & lunches

A Value Seeker’s Paradise

THE OWNERS WOULD LOVE TO SHARE THE EXPERIENCE WITH YOU ASTORIA, OREGON

“oooooh...” ASTORIA

OREGON

THECOFFEEGIRL.COM

EN

2 4 H OU R S

ROYAL CAB L.L.C.

100 39TH STREET #2

“aaaaah...”

Downtown Astoria on 12th St. 503-325-7600 Wed-Sun

EK

503.325.6900

Top Prices for Gold & Silver

• O P

Mon-Thur 7am–4pm Saturday 8am-5pm Friday 7am-5pm Sunday 8am-4pm

Established 1996 Whether you’re in need of cab services or interested in taking a coastal tour...

E W • 7 DAYS A

Day or Night, Royal Cab has you covered! Open 24 hours/ 7 days a week!

www.royalcab.net • ALL VEHICLES EQUIPPED WITH BIKE RACKS • PET FRIENDLY • SMOKE FREE

Oregon 503-325-5818

NOISES OFF March 16 - April 21, 2018

cash & debit

THE ODD COUPLE May 4 - 24, 2018

Washington 360-665-3500

Come play with us in Cannon Beach

COMEDY / FARCE

COMEDY

BASKERVILLE: A SHERLOCK HOLMES MYSTERY

MUSICAL OF MUSICALS

June 22 - Sept. 1, 2018

June 29 - Sept. 2, 2018

MYSTERY/THRILLER/FARCE

MUSICAL/COMEDY/PARODY

DEATHTRAP

THE WIZARD OF OZ

LAUREN KINNAN

Nov. 16 - Dec. 23, 2018

SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 2018

Sept. 21 - Oct. 27, 2018

THRILLER 18 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

MUSICAL

2018 SEASON COASTER THEATRE P L A Y H O U S E 108 N Hemlock Street Cannon Beach OR 503-436-1242 | coastertheatre.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2018 Singer/Songwriter/Jazz Vocalist

ELLEN WHYTE Grammy Nominated Singer Songwriter


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:06 PM

Page 19

‡ 6($6,'( &DURXVHO0DOO ‡ ‡ 0RUHWKDQXQLTXHVKRSV %URDGZD\ 2SHQ(YHU\'D\

SOUL, InSPIRED

DFWLYLWLHVVXUURXQGLQJD IXOOVL]HGZRUNLQJFDURXVHO

‡

‡

‡

Fine F ine Sterling Sterlingg Je Jewelry welrry and Gemstones

0DOOKRXUVSRVWHGDWVHDVLGHFDURXVHOPDOOFRP

904 Commer Commercial cial St. • Astor Astoria ria OPEN D DAILY AIL A LY • 503.325.554 503.325.5548 48

‡

-RLQXVIRUVKRSSLQJ GLQLQJ IDPLO\IXQ IRUDJHVWR

WWW.TRAVELASToRIA.CoM

A taste to satisfy any appetite

Family Fun since 1931

Over 200 Games • Skee Ball Bumper Cars • Fascination 201 BROADWAY, SEASIDE, OR •

311 Broadway, Seaside

WWW.FUNLANDSEASIDE.COM

™ 12 LANE STATE OF THE ART BOWLING ALLEY

227 Broadway, Seaside

™ FULL SERVICE LOUNGE ™ SIX 10’ TELEVISION SCREENS WITH LIVE TV ™ OREGON LOTTERY

3518 HIGHWAY 101 N., GEARHART, OR •

WWW.GEARHARTBOWL.COM

215 Broadway, Seaside Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 19


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:06 PM

Page 20

do see

THE

LIBERTY THEATRE’S

COMEBACK VENUE’S HISTORY IS A THREE-ACT DRAMA: A RISE, A FALL, A RESTORATION WORDS: MJ CODY • MAIN IMAGE: COLIN MURPHEY

F

rom rocky, raucous beginnings in 1811, Astoria grew exponentially, yet citizens were still decrying its rough atmosphere a century later. One resident wrote in a letter to the Astorian Evening Budget in 1915 that it was a city of “mass contradictions and magnificent possibilities … tasty homes hemmed in by a jumble of shacks which, in most places, would have been eliminated ages ago as fire traps.” That “magnificent possibility” would eventually come to fruition, though at a terrible cost. As cynically predicted by the disgruntled writer, the fire of 1922 decimated Astoria, obliterating nearly 30 downtown blocks. But the fire became a rallying cry to rebuild, and by 1925 the construction of the Astor Building complex, with its offices, stores, dance studios, and centerpiece — the Liberty Theatre — not only signified the city’s revival, but created an architectural gem.

20 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:06 PM

Page 21

Beginning in 1992, the Liberty Theatre underwent a dramatic restoration and now serves as the centerpiece of downtown Astoria.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:07 PM

Page 22

do see

The Liberty Theatre’s opening day in 1925 • COURTESY LIBERTY THEATRE

UP FROM THE ASHES The Portland firm Bennes & Herzog, known for their extravagant movie palaces, combined elements of Romanesque and Italian-Renaissance styles to construct Astoria’s ornate 700-seat vaudeville stage and motion picture theater. Tuscan Doric columns, Moorish arches, gilded friezes, festooned pilasters, and a magnificent Wurlitzer organ with cathedral chimes weren’t quite enough ornamentation. The architects also commissioned 12 large mural-like canvases depicting Venetian canal scenes by Northwest artist Joseph Knowles, and a breathtaking, 8-foot-tall, 1,200-pound, iron-framed paper-and-silk Chinese lanternstyled chandelier by Portland artisan Fred Baker — all glamorous touches meant to transport the audience to a more romantic world. High school students worked as ushers wearing uniforms of yellow and black 22 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

blazers and slacks, complete with classic pillbox hats. Not a bad deal for young entrepreneurs who earned 27 cents an hour, plus tips. Vaudeville acts and silent movies were staples of the new venue, which also drew big-band names like Guy Lombardo and Duke Ellington, and headliners that included Jack Benny. It is said that even Al Capone attended an evening’s attraction. During World War II, the theater was packed with viewers eager to watch newsreels and buy War Bonds. Vaudeville remained the core attraction for 25 years, but as movie “talkies” arrived, it lost its appeal. The original exterior glass canopy was replaced by a modern double-feature neon marquee, and the Wurlitzer, now obsolete, was removed. A concession stand was installed in the lobby so patrons no longer had to walk around the corner to Kildahl’s café for popcorn, sodas, and candy.

Saturday matinees in the 1950s featured newsreels, cartoons, and serials like “Superman” or Westerns, a boon to parents to get the youngsters out of the house. “Every Saturday my parents gave me 50 cents — 25 cents for the movie and 25 cents for popcorn and candy,” remembered local resident Lois Barnum, who grew up in Astoria. “Upstairs were dance studios where most kids in town took tap, ballet, or jazz classes. In the 1960s, when I was in high school, there were rarely first-run movies, and the same feature ran for two or three weeks. If I had different weekend dates, I’d end up seeing the same movie twice, and sometimes three times. Going to the theater was really the only thing in town to do.” Until attractions in Seaside or Long Beach, Washington, provided competition, the Liberty Theatre was the main source of entertainment in the region, and regarded by many as “Astoria’s living room.”


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:07 PM

Page 23

DOWNWARD SPIRAL Despite the Liberty’s reputation as a valuable entertainment hub, within a couple of decades, the theater went into decline. “The theater was in the wilderness for a number of years,” Steve Forrester, former publisher of The Daily Astorian, said of the 1980s and early 1990s. “The absentee landlord, Edward Eng, used the complex as a tax break and let the theater go to near ruin. There was no heating and no cleaning, and people were living behind the stage curtain — you sometimes heard them, but you never saw them.” The upstairs balcony was partitioned into two plywood boxes with little soundproofing, according to Brenda Penner, a 30year Astoria resident. “At least a thoughtful carpenter protected the Venetian mural paintings by covering them with Plexiglas. There wasn’t a single row where seats were not broken or missing. Your shoes would cling to the sticky floors, and the main screen had a huge blotch on it, probably the impact of a thrown Coke.” It was so cold in the theater, Penner recalled, that people had to bring their own blankets to stay warm. What’s more, “there were peepholes in the walls of the women’s bathroom. It was so gross, we finally quit going,” she said. Leslie Duling McCollom, a student of Astoria High School in the 1990s (and niece of this author), said the theater in her youth was “yucky and spooky.” However, she said, “it was quirky and weird and fun, and one of the few places in town to hang out as teens.” The building suffered from neglect — the interior a wreck and the exterior an eyesore — and many residents feared the Liberty would become too dilapidated to save.

TAKING THE LIBERTY In 1992 a group of civic leaders, including Forrester, Michael Foster and Hal Snow, stepped in to save the theater by forming a nonprofit organization, Liberty Restoration, Inc. They attained national status as a “Save America’s Treasures Site,” and purchased the theater in 2000 with $1.3 million from the city’s Astor East Urban Renewal District funds. And the monumental task of restoration began. Volunteers began to clean and remove

The Liberty Theatre’s original glass canopy was replaced by the movie marquee in the 1950s. This is the marquee in 1956 with a Plymouth Belvedere in front. • COURTESY CLATSOP COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

alterations — finding that, remarkably, no major structural damage had been done, and the restoration would be mostly cosmetic. Mounds of what Forrester calls “fossilized popcorn” were removed from the orchestra pit light troughs. Knowles’ mural paintings were painstakingly revived from years of nicotine stains, the original exterior glass canopy was replicated, and the Chinese lantern chandelier was restored at a cost of $100,000 alone. Emigrant Romanian artisans, experts in decorative plasterwork, restored and reproduced medallions that were later gilded by Clatsop Community College historic preservation students. The challenge was not only restoring the theater to its former self, but simultaneously updating it into a contemporary performing arts center, a feat that required raising, as Forrester said, “only a few million more.” Through grants and donor gifts L.R.I. did manage to raise the $7.5 million cost of the renovation. Finally, in 2005, the glamor and excitement of 1925 was replicated with a sellout crowd for the grand reopening night.

IN 1992, A GROUP OF CIVIC LEADERS STEPPED IN TO SAVE THE THEATER BY FORMING A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION, LIBERTY RESTORATION, INC. Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 23


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:07 PM

Page 24

do see

The Liberty Theatre auditorium after restoration • COURTESY LIBERTY THEATRE

RISEN AGAIN Today, the Liberty is once again considered “Astoria’s living room,” a premier theater for the arts featuring regional and national performing artists, including music, theater, dance, and diverse cultural performances, such as the widely popular FisherPoets readings. More than 120 volunteers help to keep the theater running — from ticket-takers, to ushers, to the folks manning “Chez Jo’s” concession stand (though without the classic 24 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

blazers and pillbox hats). Theater Director Jennifer Crockett and Artistic Director Bereniece Jones-Centeno — who are musicians themselves — understand what widening the venue’s scope and bringing new sounds to the Liberty can mean. A Classical Series has been launched, and free events every month pack the house. They’re passionate about fostering education in the arts and access to all types of cultural experiences, especially for children. The second-floor former dance studio spaces are used by visiting orchestra

members, musicians, and dance troupes, who work with local high school students at no cost. Crockett hopes to encourage locals and visitors alike to feel that the Liberty is not an elite venue, but a place for everyone. “Things are going well,” Crockett said. “Donors are stepping up and sponsorships are filling gaps, although funding for a wide variety of performances, mounting productions, and workshops remains a challenge. But people seem really excited about the theater, and I hope that this is a start of a longterm love affair.”


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:08 PM

Page 25

Israel Nebeker, from the band Blind Pilot, performs onstage in the Liberty Theatre during a recording of Oregon Public Broadcasting’s State of Wonder. JOSHUA BESSEX PHOTO

A SAVED VENUE One person who shares Crockett’s sentiment is Israel Nebeker, the songwriter and frontman of the indie rock band Blind Pilot who now serves on the Liberty board. “I grew up going to movies there when it was spooky and cool,” he said. “It’s a building I’ve always known, and that first night playing there was a pretty big moment. Just like playing on ‘Late Night with David Letterman,’ performing at the Liberty was a dream come true. Every time we play there, even now, it’s significant for me; it makes me so happy. And it’s one of the bestsounding rooms I’ve been in: The sound is so alive and clear.” On the road, Nebeker has seen too many theaters that were once magnificent now shut down or demolished, he said. “It’s heartbreaking, the stories about how towns have lost these places. But Astoria didn’t let this happen. It means a lot to me that Astoria could save this great venue.” A century after that peevish 1915 letter to the editor, Astoria is once again striving to realize its many magnificent possibilities. One thing is certain: No cynic can complain about the splendid restoration of the Astor complex and the historic Liberty Theatre. The Liberty Theatre is located at 1203 Commercial St., Astoria, Ore. 97103. For tickets and information contact the website libertyastoria.org or call 503-325-5922.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 25


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:08 PM

Page 26

do see

off the beaten path

parks

for all seasons

WORDS: KATIE FRANKOWICZ • IMAGES: COLIN MURPHEY

On days rainy, sunny, and in between, there’s a park to match the mood

I

never owned a pair of rubber boots until I moved to the coast. I’d somehow made it through an Oregon childhood without any. We lived in valleys where it rained but rarely snowed and sidewalks were becoming more common. I had things we called “water shoes,” unflattering flexible slip-on shoes topped with mesh, equally suited for (according to my parents) wading through sandy tide pools or forging rivers with a fishing pole in hand. They were intended to get wet and, since we usually got them at twofor-one sales, they were meant to get torn apart. I did not have boots. When I first moved to Astoria, I hiked barefoot for an entire spring because it was easier to clean mud off my bare feet than off my tennis shoes. Then one day I stood in front of a display of boots at Englund Marine and realized there’s an entire world of products out there to 26 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

address the problem of wet feet, muddy trails, slippery docks, snow — just about anything. Who knew. Rubber boots expanded my horizons. I ventured out on nasty days, on days when I knew my favorite parks would be a mud slick. In the middle of winter, instead of picking my way across a stream rock by rock, I boldly strode. Because I could. Yes. I’m an idiot. Don’t be like me. If we only went outside on the nice days, we’d never leave home, and some places on the North Coast are better when the weather tilts stormy. Others shine in that moment after the clouds part — when your head will stay dry but the ground might still be soggy. Grab your boots and your raincoat, maybe a knit hat. No matter what the weather is throwing at you, the list on the following pages will help you find a park to match.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:08 PM

Page 27

Upper: One of the views from the park at Dismal Nitch where the Corps of Discovery made camp. Lower: A monument at Dismal Nitch commemorates the time spent at the location by the Corps of Discovery. The relief illustrates the hardships they faced there.

Sideways rain: Dismal Nitch Location: Pacific County, Washington. Just east of the Astoria Bridge on Washington State Route 401.

Some people (or just me) would argue that Dismal Nitch is actually best experienced in the middle of a rain burst. After all, this small wayside park commemorates a historic stop by the Corps of Discovery where the explorer William Clark noted “tremendious (sic) wind … lightening and hard claps of Thunder.” The Corps spent several wet, miserable days in this area in 1805 (the exact location is debated), their clothes literally rotting off their backs. Dismal indeed. On rainy days, it can be an especially still spot. You can hear the liquid “sloop” of glossy black cormorants ducking underwater to chase fish or watch a sea lion quest. A small path that begins at the park’s western entrance leads to a peaceful loop. Informative signs flesh out the story of the Corps’ time here.

The Corps of Discovery spent several wet, miserable days in this area in 1805.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 27


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:09 PM

Page 28

do see

Mild drizzle, misty conditions: Fort Clatsop’s Netul Landing Location: Clatsop County, Oregon. Outside of Astoria proper, on Fort Clatsop Road, just south of the Fort Clatsop Visitor Center on the east side of the road. Look for signs.

The replica of Fort Clatsop stands near a visitor center and trails designed to educate the public about the history of the region.

The mellow, flat Netul River Trail leads along the Lewis and Clark River from the main parking lot and takes you all the way to the Fort Clatsop replica and visitor center. Along the way, you cross several bridges with views of the slough and the chance to see river otters. You can break off from the trail early, cross the highway and connect to the South Clatsop Slough Trail. This trail climbs steeply and is a bit more rugged but connects to other trail systems in the park, including the popular Fort to Sea trail. A drizzly, misty day sets off this area to perfection, making moss and ferns gleam and encouraging ducks to quack and frogs to croak. Visit it on sunny days, too. There are no rules!

Along the way, you cross several bridges with views of the slough and the chance to see river otters.

28 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:09 PM

Page 29

Slightly overcast, pillowy clouds: Cape Disappointment State Park Location: Outside Ilwaco, Washington, about 18 miles from Astoria.

Sometimes all you need are some great clouds hanging like dreamy ships in the sky, and stabs of light appearing and disappearing through the trees. This park with its varied terrain, magnificent views, lighthouses, and rambling woodland trails doesn’t require sunshine for visitors to get their money’s worth. (However, definitely purchase an annual or day-use park pass here; the rule is enforced and comes with a hefty fine if you disregard it.) Head to the interpretive center first, up a winding road and past a turnoff to the Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station. At the center, you can learn about the history of the area or head outside and get sweeping views. During the spring, you can spot gray whales migrating north. Venture down nearby trails or continue to one of two of the park’s historic lighthouses. Head back to the western portion of the park to bike or walk the paved trail to Beard’s Hollow, a cliff-enclosed slice of beach. Make sure to stop at the North Head Lighthouse for more stunning views.

The hike to the lighthouse at Cape D rewards those who make the trip with expansive views of the mouth of the Columbia River.

The park has varied terrain, magnificent views, lighthouses, and rambling woodland trails. Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 29


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:10 PM

Page 30

do see

Sunny-ish: Black Lake Location: Ilwaco, Washington, on the way toward Long Beach off U.S. Highway 101.

If you’re already in the Ilwaco area for Cape Disappointment, might as well stop at this local recreation area. Black Lake is a small lake at the outskirts of a tiny city. A narrow trail winds around the lake, and if you’re lucky you’ll see the resident osprey family swooping for fish. The lake is stocked regularly, and you can reach a boat-launch area at a parking lot and trailhead by turning off the main road toward Sandridge Road and taking an immediate right turn onto Williams Street.

30 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Local fishermen take advantage of the fully stocked Black Lake.

A narrow trail winds around the lake, and if you’re lucky you’ll see the resident osprey family swooping for fish.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:10 PM

Page 31

Real nice and sunny: Fort Stevens State Park, Coffenbury Lake Location: Outside Warrenton and Hammond, about 10 miles from Astoria.

The path around the lake can get pretty muddy and even flooded in some spots, so save this area for a sunny day — unless you have your boots! Coffenbury Lake is a dune lake featuring two different picnic spots. Elk graze through this area so keep an eye out for herd sightings and hoof prints — and poop! The lake is not far from the historic Peter Iredale shipwreck on Sunset Beach. The four-masted steel ship ran aground on Clatsop Spit in 1906, and its rusted bones remain a tourist attraction. A paved path great for walking or cycling leads from the Coffenbury area to the shipwreck’s parking lot.

Fishing is a popular activity at Coffenbury Lake.

The lake is not far from the historic Peter Iredale shipwreck on Sunset Beach.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 31


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:10 PM

Page 32

eat drink Feasts. Eateries. Libations. Recipes.

ourpicks

MacGregor’s Whiskey Bar Manzanita, Oregon Mark Twain famously said that “too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” Keep that in mind as you plan your first visit to MacGregor’s Whiskey Bar, an establishment that holds good brown liquor in high regard. While whiskey has been a staple of the cocktail scene for years, only recently has it developed its own craft scene, with whiskey tasting bars and distilleries popping up with greater frequency around the country. It’s also taken on more of an international flavor and stretched beyond the more recognizable Scottish, Irish, and American brands. That’s a big part of the fun at MacGregor’s: You don’t have to be a whiskey drinker to enjoy something new. The knowledgeable staff is more than happy to provide a few recommendations and enjoy the educational aspects of their trade. Part of the perfect tasting is food, and MacGregor’s offers upscale tapas, including meat, cheese, pâté, and vegetable boards, along with a fresh soup-of-the-day, fresh-pressed coffee, and a dessert selection. The star of the show, of course, is whiskey, and the sky’s the limit at MacGregor’s, with more than 100 brown liquors on hand. That includes scotches from all six regions of Scotland, Irish whiskeys, American bourbons and ryes, Canadian blended

Lynn Kyriss pours a sample of whiskey at MacGregor’s Whiskey Bar in Manzanita. This well-received establishment, good for newbs and connoisseurs, can be found at 387 Laneda Ave.

whiskeys, and several choices from around the world. For a bit of fun, there’s even weekly Trivia Night. It’s the perfect place to warm up during a wet winter evening or relax after a warm summer walk on the beach. — Dan Haag

A Mighty Thai Manzanita, Oregon

Banh mi, a Vietnamese sandwich, is a staple on A Mighty Thai’s menu. The restaurant is located at 725 Manzanita Ave.

32 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

It happens to all of us. You’re heading down U.S. Highway 101 and your stomach reminds you it’s way past lunchtime. You’re hungry, but not craving a burger or hot dog. If you’re anywhere near Manzanita, you’re in luck! A Mighty Thai opened its doors in summer 2016 and coastal diners — eager for something other than the ubiquitous chowder-and-chips scene — can’t get enough. Immediately off the highway on Manzanita Avenue, this bustling little restaurant in the distinct yellow and orange building, offers a wide variety of traditional Asian dishes and different levels of spice settings: Pad Thai, Salad Rolls, Yellow, Red, and Green Curry, and Pho. There’s even a “Hangover Soup” featuring oxtail. A Mighty Thai’s offerings brim with exciting flavors and fresh ingredients, just right for fueling up for a trek to the top of nearby Neahkahnie Mountain. The interior is cozy with several tables and a full bar. On warm spring and summer evenings, patrons can take advantage of the newly expanded outdoor patio. Owned and operated by partners Joel Bernard (who also co-owns Sleepy Monk Coffee in Cannon Beach) and chef Joe Khongkhar Bongkhamsao, A Mighty Thai is the only Thai restaurant in the area. Judging by the reception thus far, locals and visitors alike are heartily embracing this addition to the North Coast palette. — Dan Haag


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:10 PM

Page 33

There’s no shortage of places in the Columbia Pacific to find a good meal. Whether you’re looking for homemade baked goods, a fine evening dinner, or some fresh seafood, let these fabulous food finds inspire you.

Pilot House Distilling Astoria, Oregon Since opening their hip, cozy, small-batch craft distillery and tasting room in 2013, Larry and Christina Cary have been operating Pilot House Distilling at full stride, releasing 15-plus original liquors, liqueurs and mixes, including A-O Whiskey (an American whiskey), an absinthe verte, a Northwest aquavit, and — Oregon’s first canned cocktail — “Bloody Knuckles,” an Astoria (bloody) Mary. Their Painted Lady Gin, Barrelman’s Rum, and Diablo Azul (a small batch reposado-style Northwest agave spirit), not to mention their five flavors of Bar Pilot vodka, have become staples of local bar culture. It’s hard to believe all of this started out with a “little hobby that got out of control,” Larry Cary said. Last year their Columbia Absinthe and Diablo Azul tequila won the double gold award at the 2017 Seattle International Spirit Awards. Their Painted Lady Gin also won gold. With so many wins there’s no reason not to experience the fruits of their passion and ingenuity for yourself. In 2018, look for Pilot House to release a straight bourbon and a wheat whiskey under its A-O label, as well as at least one more canned cocktail, an “Astoria Mule” — Pilot House’s take on a Moscow mule — premixed and ready to drink right out of the can. They’re also continuing to work on a limoncello for future release. Pilot House’s tasting room offers flight samples as well as bottle sales. The place is a local treasure for the cocktail connoisseur — don’t miss it. — Laura Cherau

Pilot House Distilling, at 1270 Duane St., is, for the owners, a “little hobby that got out of control.”

Stanley’s Grill Seaview, Washington Seaview is renowned for its wide variety of dining establishments, from The Depot Restaurant to the 42nd Street Café & Bistro, but some of the best eating in town can be found in a modest-looking food truck just off the town’s main drag. Conveniently located alongside the North Jetty Brewery & Tap Room on Pacific Way (for which it serves as its unofficial kitchen), Stanley’s Grill offers a small but excellent bill of fare, prepared on site by proprietor Dani Wllger. Their burgers — a one-third pound of hand-pressed beef and available in Classic Cheeseburger or Bacon Bleu and served on a ciabatta roll — are available alongside items like their hard-battered fish and chips, BLAT (Bacon-Lettuce-Avacado-Tomato) sandwiches and an everrotating variety of daily specials. But the specialty of the truck is Stanley’s Porker Sandwich: a delicious combination of braised shoulder, off-bone ham, bacon, and pork belly sure to delight anyone whose palate hungers for carnivoral knowledge. And their sides are practically meals in themselves: hand-cut Filthy Fries topped with beef gravy and shredded cheese, and Thai Tots smothered in spicy peanut chicken sauce and finished with cilantro and green onions. Meals can be ordered to go or eaten on site; the North Jetty Brewery encourages patrons to bring their food inside to be washed down with their wide range of craft beers. (Stanley, incidentally, is the owner’s dog, who personally vouches for every item sold.) — William Ham Dani Henderson serves up a meal at Stanley’s Grill in Seaview. The specialty of the food truck at 4100 Pacific Way is Stanley’s Porker Sandwich.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 33


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:11 PM

Page 34

Families ! Welcome

• Sweet Baby Back Ribs, or Prime Rib Fridays & Saturdays 4 pm - close... with baked potato & choice of soup or small salad

OPEN MON-FRI 8:30 - 4

• Fresh Willapa Bay Oysters • Farm-raised Steamer Clams • Local Crab & Fish in Season • Free Samples • Custom Orders Welcomed • Pickled Salmon

• Nightly Dinner Specials

• Fresh Home-made Soups Daily • Hand-Made Specialty Milk Shakes in 21+ flavors & Soft-Serve Ice Cream • Sunday Breakfast Buffet • Outside (Pet Friendly) Dining Sausage, Bacon, Eggs Benedict, Biscuits & Gravy, • Kids Menu Specials - Includes a drink & treat! Fresh Fruit, Hash Browns, Coffee, Juice, Milk • Kite Room - Reserve for your next function and More. A LOCAL FAVORITE! (9-11am)

www.hungryharbor.com 313 Pacific Hwy, Downtown Long Beach, WA Free Wifi

SEASONAL SEAFOODS Located at 360 Dike Road on the Palix River in Bay Center

• “Good Old-Fashioned Food” Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Fish & Chips– your choice of Cod, Salmon or Halibut • Freshly Made Clam Chowder in a Sourdough Bread Bowl

Wholesale and Retail Sales

360-642-5555

Open Daily 10 am – 9 pm & Sunday 9 am – 9 pm Winter Hours 11 am – 8 pm & Sunday 9am – 8 pm

We also do rders” “To Go O

Downtown Waterfront

360-875-5519 Toll-free 888-905-9079

Visit our online store www.baycenterfarms.com

seafood@willapabay.org

We ship fresh seafood anytime

Breakfast and Bloody Marys - Daily 9AM to 3PM

Merry Time Bar

& Grill

(503)741-3410

21+

Incr ncredible edibble View, Vieww, OOutdoor utdoor PPatio, atio, AAward-Winning ward-Winning CCocktails ocktails

HHouse-Infused o -Infused Spirits ouse Spirits,, LLocal ocal Br Brews, ews, FFull ull Menu New Ne w YYork ork o SStyle tyle PPizza izza bbyy the SSlice lice - OOpen pen LLate! ate!

77 11th. St. St. @P @Pier ier 11, Astoria Astoria

995 Marine Dr., Astoria • 503-468-0852 www.merrytimebar.com

Making Sweet Memories in Cannon Beach for Over 55 Years!

TIONS TWO L&OcoCnA vienient) (easy

Freshest Homemade: Saltwater Taffy Chocolates Caramel Corn Caramel Apples & MORE!!

Wedding Treats & n w Gift Baskets Available! to n ow D ch ea B n o n an C We can ship candy directly to you! e id as Se & l al M et tl u O Check us out on Facebook for updates, specials & photos

Your Sweet Spot on Commercial! SPECIAL ORDERS GLADLY ACCEPTED WITH 48 HRS. NOTICE. 1184 COMMERCIAL ST, ASTORIA, OR 97103 TUE - SUN, 8:30 - 4PM • (503) 741-3660

34 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

256 N Hemlock • Cannon Beach • Seaside Outlet Mall www.brucescandy.com • 503-436-2641 • 503-738-7828


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:11 PM

Page 35

6DWXUGD\ $SULO  

Clam digging lessons Clam cleaning demo Clam fritter cook off Restaurant Chowder Competition Amateur Chowder Competition Beer garden Live Music & Entertainment Contests Informational Vendors K US CHEC T! OU

Something Fun for the Entire Family!

Greek-style Steamer Clams Astoria’s Own Chowder Manhattan Chowder Shark Burgers Fish Tacos Espresso & Ice Cream

Event times and locations may be altered based on clam tide approval

LONGBEACHRAZORCLAMFESTIVAL.COM L ONGBEACHRAZ A Z ORCLAMFESTIV O RCLAMFESTIV R A E VA VA AL.COM L OM

1335 Marine Dr., DT Astoria

Charlie’ Cha CCh har arlrlililiieie’s CHOP HOUSE

1313 Marine DDr.r. Astoria, 97103 Ast oria, OR 97 7103 503-741-3033 503-741-30033

(503) 741-3055

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 35


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:11 PM

Page 36

eat drink

GET CRACKIN’

AN ABC GUIDE TO EATING CRAB IN THE LOWER COLUMBIA WORDS: HEATHER DOUGLAS • IMAGES: COLIN MURPHEY

F

rom one-of-kind dishes, like Dungeness crab savory cheesecake or crab empanadas, to live crab from the tank or a grab-’n’-go crab cocktail for an impromptu picnic on the beach, there are quite a few

36 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

tempting ways to enjoy fresh, local crab in the Lower Columbia region. Grab your crab cracker and bib just in case: This crab safari may get a little messy. Behold, the ABCs: a seafood lover’s guide to eating crab on our coast.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:12 PM

Page 37

ALBATROSS & CO. 255 14TH ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

In the mood for Dungeness with a twist? Albatross Restaurant offers a Dungeness Crab Deviled Egg on their regular menu. The housemade Thousand Island filling is nestled inside a boiled egg, topped with fresh crab meat and smoked paprika. For a classic option, owner and chef Eric Bechard suggests ordering a half Dungeness crab in shell: “It’s served with housemade cocktail sauce, lime-chili mignonette, Old Bay mayo, crackers, and lemon; the customer does the cracking — very rewarding!” Bechard sources crab from Oregon and Washington through Northwest Wild Products and direct from local crabbers. Speaking of which …

BAKED ALASKA 1 12TH ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

Baked Alaska on the docks offers their Crab Mac ’n Cheese using locally sourced Dungeness crab from Ocean Beauty. Beau Hogge, the head chef, described the experience as such: “It’s a velvety cream Béchamel-style sauce using mostly asiago cheese. It’s topped with Parmesan, toasted breadcrumbs, and arrives to the table in a skillet, bubbling hot.”

The Dungeness Crab Deviled Egg dish at the Albatross Restaurant features a housemade filling with a generous portion of crab.

BELL BUOY 1800 S. ROOSEVELT DRIVE, SEASIDE, OREGON

Right off U.S. Highway 101 in Seaside, Bell Buoy has been a family-owned Seafood supplier for more than 50 years. Stop by for cooked whole crabs, crab legs and meat, and a crab cocktail to go.

BRIDGEWATER BISTRO 20 BASIN ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

The Bridgewater Bistro features local Dungeness crab in two different dishes on their dinner menu. Their unique appetizer is a savory cheesecake, which consists of crab meat folded into a base over a toasted pecan crust. The top is drizzled with a rich wild mushroom meunière butter sauce. “The dish is based on a similar one we had years ago in New Orleans,” owners Tony and Ann Kischner said. “However, our Dungeness crab is much more flavorful here on the Oregon Coast than the lump crab found in the Gulf.” The second dish is a Dungeness Crab Mac ’n Cheese with chunks of crab meat, and a mascarpone Mornay sauce cooked with crab stock and tarragon. All Dungeness is sourced locally from Ocean Beauty Seafoods in Astoria.

The Crab Mac ’n Cheese at Baked Alaska arrives at the table in a custom skillet.

CARRUTHERS RESTAURANT 1198 COMMERCIAL ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

At Carruthers, a fine-dining establishment in Astoria, Head Chef Daniel Brownson sources crab locally from Ocean Beauty to make their popular crab artichoke dip, which starts with whole roasted artichokes hollowed out to hold a creamy artichoke crab dip that’s prepared with a white miso base and topped with manchego cheese. It’s served with rustic bread and brown butter for extra dipping pleasure.

Fresh Dungeness crab at Bell Buoy is processed by Ryan Smith.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 37


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:12 PM

Page 38

eat drink CLEMENTE’S CAFE AND PUBLIC HOUSE 175 14TH ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

Co-owners and chefs Gordon Clemente and Lisa Tarabochia emphasize local, sustainable, and wild ingredients. Tarabochia, who comes from a multi-generational local fishing family, offers up her coveted family crab cakes recipe: Dungeness Crab Cakes served with a rémoulade and a house salad. Their Crab Louie is made with locally caught Dungeness crab and offered with a side of local seasonal vegetables and fruit, served with a housemade Louis dressing.

DRIFTWOOD RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 179 N. HEMLOCK ST., CANNON BEACH, OREGON

The Dungeness crab cheesecake at Bridgewater Bistro in Astoria is a savory take on the classic dish.

Venture down the coast to Cannon Beach, where the Driftwood Restaurant & Lounge features 100 percent Dungeness Crab sourced from Bell Buoy. Among other options such as a Crab Louie, crab cocktail, and crab roll sandwich, the “Crab Casserole” has been a menu standard for 30-plus years. The ultimate comfort dish features baked Parmesan, cheddar, and Dungeness crab. A second unique option is only offered on Fridays and Saturdays: a sautéed crab leg out of the shell with white wine, butter, and garlic.

FINNS FISH HOUSE 227 BROADWAY ST., SEASIDE, OREGON

If surf ’n’ turf is your fancy, head to Seaside to Finns Fish House. Add a “crab section” — which could be a half crab or simply a leg section — to any entrée, such as steak. They also offer whole cooked crab sourced from Ocean Beauty as well as a Dungeness Crab Melt with a large portion of local crab. For the pasta lovers, “Robin’s Favorite” is a panko-crusted chicken topped with Dungeness Crab and pepper jack cheese served over a white wine fettuccine Alfredo.

HANTHORN CRAB COMPANY The Dungeness crab artichoke dip at Carruthers in downtown Astoria is an artfully plated dish.

100 39TH ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

The Hanthorn Crab Company sits inside Pier 39 behind the Rogue Ales Public House. Owner Tom Hilton sells seasonal, fresh, local, sustainable live crab from the tank and whole cooked crab to grab ’n’ go. Hilton also makes a crab melt — what Astorians would call “clown bread,” he said. Another item to check out are the crab cakes with large portions of crab and very little binding — a recipe Hilton is particularly proud of — that can be purchased precooked or ready to take home and cook.

MO’S SEAFOOD AND CHOWDER 101 15TH ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

The crab cakes at Clemente’s Cafe and Public House in Astoria come with a stunning view of the Columbia River.

38 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Certainly not new to Oregon but definitely the ‘new kid on the block’ in Astoria, Mo’s Seafood and Chowder recently landed in Astoria on the Riverwalk near the Maritime Museum. While not strictly sourced locally, they do utilize local whenever possible and provide an affordable foray into crab eating here on the coast. Their signature crab dish is a “Hot Crab Melt” — a salad-style mix with a combination of Dungeness and rock crab topped with melted cheddar cheese served on toasted garlic Parmesan cheese bread.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:12 PM

Page 39

NORTHWEST WILD PRODUCTS 354 INDUSTRY ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

If cooking at home is more your speed, choose your own crab dinner out of the live tanks down on the docks at the West End Mooring Basin. Northwest Wild Products is one of a small number of outfits that offers a live-tank option as well as both retail and wholesale options. Their Dungeness Crab is local, wild, and sourced from local fishermen. For a no-fuss option, try their “Whole Crab Dinner,” which includes everything you need: a whole crab, homemade clam chowder, green salad with shrimp, and garlic bread to go.

In addition to grab ’n’ go live from the tank and precooked whole crab sourced from Puget Sound, Ole Bob’s offers an à-la-carte option to take on a picnic or to the beach.

The dish known as ‘Robin’s Favorite’ at Finns Fish House in Seaside is a decadent option with Dungeness over panko-crusted chicken.

OLE BOB’S SEAFOOD MARKET 151 HOWERTON AVE. S.E., ILWACO, WASHINGTON

Located at the Port of Ilwaco on the Long Beach Peninsula, Ole Bob’s is part seafood market and part “Galley Café.” In addition to grab ’n’ go live from the tank and precooked whole crab sourced from Puget Sound, they offer an à-la-carte option to take on a picnic or to the beach, or grab a picnic table and gaze at the boats in the port: a crab cocktail complete with utensils, crackers, and homemade cocktail sauce. To complete that picnic experience, grab a crab melt on sourdough bread with red roasted pepper sauce and cheddar served with homemade coleslaw. Manager and Chef Laura Villar recommends the crab cakes: “They are made with 85-percent crab meat and just a bit of breading to hold them together, served with a red pepper sauce — they are an old family recipe.” Crab empanadas are another unique offering, Villar added: “I am from South America and we do empanadas; we offer a crab empanada appetizer that people love.”

Dungeness crab at Hanthorn Crab Company at Pier 39 in Astoria.

PACIFIC WAY BAKERY & CAFE 601 PACIFIC WAY, GEARHART, OREGON

Heading back to the Oregon coast, in Gearhart you’ll find Pacific Way Bakery & Café. Try their Crab Louie served with a hardboiled egg, a creamy housemade relish-style Thousand Island dressing, and an ample portion of crab. A special dish on the dinner menu is the crab ravioli. The raviolis are handmade by a small company in Portland with local Dungeness crab. The simple but elegant dish is served with homemade Alfredo sauce, fresh grated Parmesan cheese, and another portion of fresh Dungeness to top off the dish.

Dungeness à la carte at Ole Bob’s Seafood Market at the Port of Ilwaco is sold live from the tank or precooked.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 39


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:12 PM

Page 40

eat drink PICKLED FISH

409 SID SNYDER DRIVE, LONG BEACH, WASHINGTON Pickled Fish sources their Dungeness crab right off the boat from local fisherman at the Port of Ilwaco. The Crab Linguini is made with fresh housemade pasta, butter fish sauce, preserved lemon, and local wild herbs. Crab cakes feature dill, horseradish, stoneground mustard, and panko bread crumbs. The restaurant also offers whole cooked crab during peak season with drawn butter, traditional Old Bay seasoning and a hint of coriander.

PIG ’N PANCAKE

146 BOND ST., ASTORIA, OREGON 323 BROADWAY ST., SEASIDE, OREGON 223 S. HEMLOCK ST., CANNON BEACH, OREGON The open-faced crab melt at Pacific Way Bakery and Cafe in Gearhart is just one of several crab dishes on the menu.

If you wake up in the morning craving crab, remember your ABCs and check out the Pig ‘n Pancake’s Dungeness Crab Omelette sourced local from Ocean Beauty topped with melted Tillamook cheddar and served with cocktail sauce. Three locations to try: Astoria, Seaside, and Cannon Beach. For later in the day, try their Crab Benedict, Crab Louie, or Crab Melt.

SILVER SALMON 1105 COMMERCIAL ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

Sourced local from Ocean Beauty, Silver Salmon features a Dungeness crab Brie appetizer dip, served like fondue with crostinis for dipping. Their signature seafood dinner called “Silver Salmon Supreme” is wild Chinook salmon stuffed with Dungeness crab cakes and shrimp.

Dungeness crab at Northwest Wild Products in Astoria is cooked by Tryan Hartill.

For the ultimate comfort crab dishes, try the Dungeness Crab Fettuccine or Crab Ravioli at T. Paul’s Supper Club. T PAUL’S URBAN CAFE & T PAUL’S SUPPER CLUB 1119 COMMERCIAL ST., AND 360 12TH ST., ASTORIA, OREGON

The Silver Salmon Supreme at the Silver Salmon Grille in Astoria features Dungeness crab prepared in a unique way. • COURTESY KYLE MCMULLEN

40 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Sister restaurants T Paul’s Urban Cafe and T Paul’s Supper Club are co-owned by longtime locals: uncle (Chadd-Paul Flues II) and niece (Teona Marie Dawson). The Dungeness crab in the Greek Crab Quesadilla is sourced from the local Bornstein family via Ocean Beauty, and the melty rich dish features feta, garlic, basil, sun-dried tomatoes, red onion, spinach, Monterey Jack and cheddar cheese. Come dinnertime at The Urban, the same dish is dressed up and becomes “The Fiesta,” which includes a bay shrimp topped salad and clam chowder. For the ultimate comfort crab dishes, try the Dungeness Crab Fettuccine, Dungeness Crab Melt on a croissant, the Dungeness Crab Ravioli and at The Supper Club, a Dungeness Crab “Scandahoovian” Mac that includes crab, garlic, three cheeses, elbow macaroni, and toasted bread crumbs.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:13 PM

Page 41

WARRENTON DEEP SEA CRAB & FISH MARKET 45 N.E. HARBOR PLACE, WARRENTON, OREGON

If à-la-carte is more your speed, Warrenton Deep Sea — a fish market near the Warrenton-Hammond Marina — has both live and cooked whole crabs to go, as well as crab legs and crab meat. A nofuss way to enjoy fresh Dungeness crab: Grab one of their crab cocktails and enjoy it at Fort Stevens’s Peter Iredale shipwreck.

Executive Chef Josh Archibald from the Wayfarer, just feet from the beach in Cannon Beach, says that to optimize freshness, the crab is delivered within hours of picking local from Astoria.

The Dungeness Crab “Scandahoovian” Mac at T Paul’s Supper Club in Astoria features three kinds of cheese.

THE WAYFARER RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 1190 PACIFIC DRIVE, CANNON BEACH, OREGON

Executive Chef Josh Archibald from the Wayfarer, just feet from the beach in Cannon Beach, said that “to optimize freshness, the crab is delivered within hours of picking local from Astoria — up to five days a week if we desire, and we always use 100 percent Dungeness.” For breakfast, check out their Crab Cake Benedict, which features their crab cakes on a housemade English muffin with poached Zweifel farm eggs and a housemade hollandaise sauce. For lunch, the Crab Sandwich features a toasted baguette with Boursin cheese and Beecher’s Flagship White Cheddar. For lighter fare, a crab cocktail with shaved celery and a horseradish vinaigrette rounds out lunch. Crab cakes, a staple at The Wayfarer, are served in some form for every meal; no bread or filling is used but rather a seafood mousse with heavy cream and prawns binds the cakes served with a housemade lemon herb aioli. Whole cooked crabs are also offered at dinner time seasonally from a featured fishing vessel. As crab season reaches full stride, crab boats are often within view from the Wayfarer dining room. Archibald said that “sometimes as many as eight or 10 crab boats can be counted on the horizon near Haystack Rock as the sun sets. Crab that is potentially only a few hundred yards away — that is a chef’s dream!”

The Greek Crab Quesadilla at T Paul’s Urban Cafe features locally sourced Dungeness.

The crab cakes at the Wayfarer Restaurant & Lounge in Cannon Beach feature a generous amount of Dungeness.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 41


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:13 PM

Page 42

TERVETULOA WELCOME

Since 1987

Voted Astoria’s Best Gift Store

Iittala Marimekko Jewelry Sauna Supplies Specialty Foods Souvenirs Gift items & much more 1116 Commercial St. Astoria, OR 97103 503-325-5720 1-800-851-FINN(3466) Open 7 days a week www.finware.com info@finnware.com

ZIP LINE TOURS

OVER A MILE OF ZIPPING

ENJOY A TOUR OF 8 ZIP LINES IN A BEAUTIFUL SETTING!

Sip-N-Zip

OPEN YEDAR ROUN

92111 HIGHLIFE ROAD WARRENTON, OREGON

503.861.9875 Reservations Required highlife-adventures.com

Camping & RV • Fishing & Hunting Crabbing & Clamming • Clothing & Boots & much more! Present this coupon at any Dennis Company for a

FREE

Tide Book

Offer good Jan. 1 - Dec. 31, 2018 Must bring in coupon to qualify.

Now a member of the Ace Hardware Network

VISITLONGBEACHPENINSULA.COM 42 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

www.denniscompany.com Long Beach • 201 Pacific Ave. N. • 360-642-3166 Raymond • 146 5th St. • 360-942-2427 Aberdeen • 220 N. Boone St. • 360-538-6727 Elma • 115 S. 4th St. • 360-482-2421 Montesano • 413 Pioneer Ave. W. • 360-249-4821


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:13 PM

Page 43

PIZZA -N- BURGERS We Deliver!

At the Beach next to the Golf Course W PAC E CA N K SEA FRE S FORFOOD H RID TH EH E OM E!

Ocean-View Condominiums Easy Walk to the Beach Indoor Pool & Jacuzzi Free High-Speed Internet Nightly Rentals Please call for our Off-Season Discounts

(800)547-0115 www.gearhartresort.com

3693 LIEF ERIKSON DRIVE • ASTORIA, OREGON (just east of Safeway)

BELL BUOY

Hours: Sun–Thurs 11am–10pm; Fri–Sat 11am–11pm

OF SEASIDE

FRESH SEAFOOD MARKET 738-2722 • 800-529-2722 1800 S. Roosevelt on Hwy 101 www.bellbuoyofseaside.com

The

BUOY’S BEST

FISH HOUSE

HALIBUT FISH & CHIPS 503-738-6348

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 43


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:13 PM

Page 44

Northwest No rthwest

Carriage Ca arriage g Museum Museum

R R

Come C ome gget et ccarried arrie i d aaway! waay! y

Over Ove Ov ver er 50 50

Open O pen e D Daily aily 100-4pm 10-4pm

0DJQLĂ€FHQWO\ 0DJQLĂ€FHQWO\UHVWRUHG 0 J \UHVWRUHG KRUV KRUVHGUDZQ UVHGUD UDZQ FDU FDUULDJHVFLUFD UULDJHVFLUFD   

Fun, F un, in interactive teractive exhibits exhibits ffor or aall ll ages! ages! Group Group and and school school ttours ours aavaliable! valiable! 314 A lder Street Street (At (A At Hwy Hwy 101 & SState tate R oute 6) Raymond,WA Raymond,W WA Alder Route (360) 942-4150 nwcarriagemuseum.org nwcarriagemuseum.org

Bring this ad in for $1.00 off admission!

N

Broker/Realtor

Family owned & operated since 1966

We are a full-service propane company where you will find... • Rent and install propane tanks • Tanks from 25 - 1,000 gallons • Gas Appliance System Check • Fireplaces • Propane Heaters (space or whole house) • On-Demand Water Heaters • Gas appliance installations

• High efficiency L.P. furnaces • Other Indoor and Outdoor Products • RV Parts and accessories • RV and Vehicle propane fill station • RV Dump Station • RV Pull Thru from Pacific Highway or Washington Ave North

Anchor Realty Two offices to serve you‌.Long Beach & Ocean Park

503-318-3816

1318 Pacific Hwy North • www.propanelongbeach.com We also do sheet metal fabrication

Schedule an appointment online today! Visit our website or call us toll free at

888-895-5509 Propane • RV Parts • Dump Station

rich@anchor-realestate.com www.longbeachwarealestate.com

Check out our new show room featuring gas appliances!

Trust your vehicle safety to the professionals at

DEL’S O.K. TIRE Moving Here?

We Get It!

You’ll need a

Get to The Point.

Expert Service. Guaranteed.

that really knows this community & lives to serve it.

We offer:

70 years of the same local owners putting you first!

503-325-2861

35359 Hwy 101 Business • Astoria Store hours: Mon-Fri, 8-6; Sat. 8-4 � Closed Sunday 44 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Checking & Savings IRA Accounts Home Loans Auto Loans Credit Cards & more! waunafcu.org 800-773-3236

Join Today!


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:14 PM

Page 45

Jamye Lu Lucier ucier Managing Bro Broker oker

360-904-6509 360-904-6 6509

jamye@pacreal.com jamye@pacrea al.com

Free F ree ssunsets unsets with with every everry ppurchase urchase

Making Waves since 1983 Your Community Voice in the

THE ONLY THING THAT HAS CHANGED IS OUR NAME! IS NOW KNOWN AS-

Formerly at 1055 Marine Drive Astoria Janitor & Paper Supply

Walter E Nelson Co.

Janitorial & Paper Supplies

Columbia Pacific 2240 Commercial St., Astoria The same great Service, Paint and Janitorial Supplies we have always offered our customers!

CoastRadio.org

REAL ESTATE SALES

CABINS TO OCEAN-FRONT HOMES SERVICING WASHINGTON’S LONG BEACH PENINSULA: LONG BEACH, CHINOOK, ILWACO, SEAVIEW, OCEAN PARK, NAHCOTTA & OYSTERVILLE. 800-349-5446 OR 360-642-3127 LONGBEACH@PACREAL.COM

VACATION AND SHORT TERM RENTALS VACATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES PROPERTY SECURITY, ALL NON-SMOKING HOMES. SELECTED PET-FRIENDLY. AFFORDABLE HOMES FOR UP TO 10 GUESTS! 888-879-5479 OR 360-642-4549 PRPM@PACREAL.COM

TOP SELLING OFFICE 2016 & 2017! LESLIE BROPHY TOP SELLING BROKER!”

www.pacreal.com Member NWMLS

Millpond Area

503-325-6362 • 800-344-1943 • MON-FRI 8-5pm

An Iconic Astoria Waterfront Hotel Relax and be immersed in Astoria’s maritime heritage. Spectacular Marina-View Balconies In All Rooms Four unique theme rooms depicting the cultural history of Astoria. 400 Industry Street | Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2013 www.astoriariverwalkinn.net Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 45


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:14 PM

Page 46

live stay Homes. Rentals. Hotels. Campgrounds.

ourpicks

Nehalem Falls Campground U.S. Highway 101, milepost 7, Oregon Looking to get away from crowded state parks? Need a break from the constant hum of RV generators? Located at milepost 7, Foss Road, outside of Nehalem, Nehalem Falls Campground is a quiet, shaded retreat nestled next to the beautiful Nehalem River and scenic Nehalem Falls. Large, old-growth Douglasfir, cedar, spruce, and hemlock ring the site and add a layer of serenity not found in larger parks. It’s a throwback to small, off-the-beaten-path campgrounds. Nehalem Falls Campground features 14 drive-in campsites, one group campsite, four walk-in tent campsites, vault toilets, drinking water from a hand pump, information boards, dumpster, and recycling. Each campsite has a picnic table, fire grate, and tent pad. The campground is usually staffed by a camp host. A day-use area offers a hiking trail, beach, and access to fishing and swimming. Like many coastal campgrounds, the camp fills up on summer weekends and by Friday afternoon is likely to be full. Camping is first-come first-served, and campers tend to come with their families and kids for the peace and quiet. It’s a great place to put up the tent, make s’mores, and unwind. — Dan Haag

The Nehalem River passes near the Nehalem Falls Campground southeast of Manzanita.

Bay Center Pacific County, Washington Midway along the shore of Willapa Bay, a road branches west from U.S. Highway 101 and takes you two miles to the tip of Goose Point Peninsula. There you will find a stop sign, a tavern, and docks where oyster barges offload their cargoes. A small hill overlooks this scene, and on that hill cluster houses and a small pioneer cemetery. You have found Bay Center. Willapa Bay is the most productive and ecologically diverse coastal ecosystem in the continental U.S., and Bay Center is the hub of oyster production. The site was a native encampment and trading ground long before and many years after the arrival of white settlers in the 1850s. The new farmers and fishermen built a town perched on the end of the peninsula, and oyster harvesting and processing companies were soon formed. Today one of every 10 oysters grown in the U.S. comes from the waters of Willapa Bay. Bay Center is a small fishing village from the past, and the tavern is the heart of the village. It’s called Dock of the Bay, and it’s here that a colorful crowd of locals gather. The kitchen serves half a dozen oyster dishes made from the freshest oysters you can find. Want napkins? Here’s a roll of towels. The beer of choice is Rainier. Nobody watches TV unless the Seahawks are on, and the jukebox is never used. Want to hear a round of tall tales? Ask about Mudflat Molly. On the hill above town is Bush Pioneer County Park, with picnic and camping facilities and a trail that leads down to a pretty beach that disappears at high tide. The park is operated by the Chinook Nation, and their office is next to the park. Bay Center is a fishing port out of time, and the roots run deep. — Dwight Caswell Oyster barges at Bay Center Harbor

46 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:15 PM

Page 47

If you’re visiting the Columbia Pacific overnight — or, as a local, taking a welldeserved staycation — you need a place to lay your head. Reserve a room for some R&R or gather inspiration for your own home: These places are aces in our book.

Shelburne Inn Seaview, Washington As the 19th century drew to a close, the wealthiest area of Washington State was Pacific County, where the Columbia meets the Pacific. Timber and fishing had made it so. Today there are few reminders of that time, but one can be found in the small town of Seaview at the south end of the Long Beach Peninsula. There you’ll find the Shelburne Inn, built in 1896 as a hostelry for businessmen, teachers, and summer tourists. David Campiche and Laurie Anderson married more than 40 years ago, and from then until 2017 they nurtured both marriage and inn. They furnished it with antique furniture, original art, and stained glass from Europe and America, creating a haven of bygone elegance with modern conveniences and a restaurant and pub of surpassing excellence. Laurie ran the “back of the house” while David was the host par excellence, always with a friendly word and an interesting story of doubtful authenticity. But there are changes at this venerable inn as new operators Brady and Tiffany Turner, who own the nearby Adrift Hotel, take over the establishment where they had their wedding reception. Much will also remain the same. “The Shelburne Hotel will be a place that will retain its rich history, but is alive with new possibilities,” Tiffany Turner said. “It will be warm and welcoming to guests, and comfortable and friendly for locals who are looking for a neighborhood haunt.” The Turners promise that the Shelburne will continue as one of the area’s finest restaurants, with a monthly seasonal menu to reflect nature’s offerings. The heart of the Shelburne is its traditional pub, classic cocktails, and local brews. And the hearty fare will not change. The Inn’s rooms will “meld times and eras to create something timeless,” Brady Turner said.

The Shelburne Inn, at 4415 Pacific Way, is considered one of the region’s finest hotels and restaurants.

“Conceptually, we want to take them back in time, but modernized for today’s travelers.” In short, the Shelburne Inn will remain what it has been for more than 120 years: the premier boutique hotel in the region — Dwight Caswell

Sandy Cove Inn Seaside, Oregon

“The Silver Screen” room adorned with theater seats and Charlie Chaplin decor. Guests at the Sandy Cove Inn, located at 241 Ave. U, can choose from a variety of themed rooms.

Located between Tillamook Head and the south end of Seaside’s promenade, Sandy Cove Inn offers a funky, laid-back way to stay at the beach. The owners purchased the hotel, formerly known as the Night Cap Inn, back in 2006, and is one of the few independently owned hotels in Seaside. Since then, the owners have renovated and redecorated each room with a different theme. Guests can choose to stay the night in rooms inspired by vintage games, like the Monopoly room. Travel to another era in the Victorian Room, which is adorned with period world maps and regal charm. Others are inspired by local sights and scenery, such as the surfer room or the Ilwaco Charter Room, which comes with its very own wooden statue of a salty sailor with a pipe in his mouth. Sandy Cove Inn loves to lean into the charm of nostalgia, which is most notably showcased by their impressive library of rentable VHS tapes. But for those less in love with the dream of the 1990s, the hotel also provides free high-speed wifi. For those who plan to venture outside, it’s a five-minute walk to The Cove, a secluded section of Seaside’s beach famous for being an ideal surf spot and birding location. The Osprey Cafe, U Street Pub & Eatery, and a general store called Ken & Sons Select Market are all just a few steps away. The Inn’s location strikes a perfect balance of being off the beaten path enough to avoid the crowds of people swarming downtown Seaside in the summer while also being close enough to all the attraction and amenities that bring people to the coast in the first place. — Brenna Visser Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 47


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:15 PM

Page 48

WE ARE YOUR ONE STOP

DIRT BIKE AND ATV HORSEPOWER SHOP SALES • SERVICE • PARTS APPAREL • ACCESSORIES • ATV’S MOTORCYCLES • NEW & USED 1035 Marlin Ave., SE Warrenton

503-861-2636

Mon–Sat: 9am-6pm Sunday: 9am-3pm

LandDRaceTech.com

Bonnie Carmack Realtor/Broker

USE REAL TY HTHO LIG

Buy and sell, with me, where value & waterfront living meet! call (360) 244-2161

bcarmack@lighthouseproperty.com http://www.facebook.com/BonnieLighthouseRealty Find all my listings at: http://bit.ly/1AEw3ox

F o r s y t h – e a

fine art ceramics home & garden decor

FRP

ZZZ

traditional toys

1124 Commercial Astoria, OR 503.325.2189 forsythea.com

6XUIVLGHRIILFH   2FHDQ3DUNRIILFH   Û /RQJ%HDFKRIILFH   

Visit seasidechamber.com to see our Membership Directory, Lodging Guide, Live Web Cams and Events Calendar March 17 Pouring at the Coast Craft Beer Festival pouringatthecoast.com July 4 Fireworks Show and Community events seasidechamber.com August 9-12 Seaside Beach Volleyball seasidebeachvolleyball.com Yuletide in Seaside "-/5Å‹/";C1>"->-01;2534@? ;99A:5@E&>11534@5:3 (Nov. 23), Gift Fair (Nov. 23-25)

Minutes from Downtown & Astoria Attractions

42 Rooms • 14 Deluxe Kitchens • Cable with HBO Columbia River View • Free Wireless Internet

Toll-free Reservations (866) 322-8047

Fridge, Microwave & Coffee in Every Room

503.738.6391 • seasidechamber.com 48 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

(503) 325-2921 • 59 W Marine Dr., Astoria

www.rivershoremotel.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:17 PM

Page 49

EST. 1980

NEW LITTLE KIDS GROUP SURF LESSONS!

Seafood & Grill Simply the finest seafood to be found... THE NORTHWEST’S ORIGINAL SURF SHOP

NEW COED BODYBOARDING CLINICS SURF WEEKENDERS | DAY CAMPS COED GROUP SURF LESSONS Book Your Event & Group Lessons at

www.nwwomenssurfcamps.com • (503) 440-5782 surfcamps@nwwomenssurfcamps.com

• Oregon’s Largest Selection of Surfboards & Wetsuits • Quality Apparel, Footwear & Eyewear • Kite, Kayak, Skim, Skate & SUP • Rentals, Lessons, Repairs & More! SEASIDE 60 N Roosevelt Dr (Hwy 101) 503-738-7888 CANNON BEACH 171 Sunset Blvd 503-436-9726 Cleanlinesurf.com

Critically Acclaimed Clam Chowder Award Winning Seafood 900 South Pacific Long Beach

(360) 642-4224

COME SEE • COME PLAY • COME ENJOY

Shilo inns: YOUR COASTAL DESTINATION MAKE RIDING THE BUS PART OF YOUR ADVENTURE!

SUNSET EMPIRE TRANSPORTATION DISTRICT Your experts in local transportation options to, from and at the Oregon Coast. From the Mountains to the Sea...

“We’ll take you there!” Schedules/Information: www.ridethebus.org 503-861-7433

SEASIDE, OR | NEWPORT, OR | TILLAMOOK, OR | OCEAN SHORES, WA | ASTORIA/WARRENTON, OR

“Affordable Excellence” WITH Free Wifi, Easy Parking, Pools, Exercise Rooms & Dining On Site or Close By! Kids stay free & dogs are always welcome!

SAVE 15%

b USING DISCOUNT CODE:"COAST" (VALID SUN-THUR) EXPIRES 12/31/18

Proud partner of the NWConnector Transit System: Seamless transportation from Portland to Astoria to Cannon Beach to Lincoln City to Newport to Yachats and back again! 3 or 7 day “all you can ride” NWConnector passes available for your COASTAL GETAWAY!

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 49


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:18 PM

Page 50

live stay at home

eclectic TOLOVANA COTTAGE

Cannon Beach couple built house from other house parts WORDS: NANCY McCARTHY • IMAGES: COLIN MURPHEY

A

t first glance, the house that Jerry built in Tolovana Park appears to be a beach cottage similar to others on Pacific Street. But look up: A tower stretches toward the sky. It’s a hint that this home may be just a little bit quirky. And the first step inside confirms that suspicion. The “Sea Horse,” named by its builder, Jerry Bosco, is 1,245 square feet of space built with house parts from Portland-area Victorian homes demolished in the 1950s to make way for new development. From the massive carved wood piece framing the alcove in the front room to the second-floor ceilings that once were door jambs, the little house has a surprise at every turn. “It’s one of those houses that keeps on going,” said Susan Tompkins, who with her husband, David Slansky, bought the house nearly two years ago from Bosco’s sister. Bosco died in 1987. “We love old houses,” Tompkins said. The couple renovated a Victorian house in Hillsboro, where they operate an adoption agency. While Tompkins and Slansky are putting their own style on the house, they are keeping Bosco’s original intention in mind. “We feel we’re finishing Jerry’s work,” Tompkins said. “All of these house parts — they’re so eclectic — none of them match. We always ask, ‘What would Jerry do?’ “We’re having a ball with it.”

50 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:19 PM

Page 51

ervation tower with The home features an obs st near Cannon Beach. expansive views of the coa

Homeowners David Slansky and Susan Tompkins COURTESY SUSAN TOMPKINS

Jerry Bosco, designer of the “Sea Horse” in Tolovana Park, strips paint at a Southwest Portland residence owned by Bosco and Ben Milligan. The men established the BoscoMilligan Foundation, an organization that promotes Pacific Northwest historic preservation. COURTESY BOSCOMILLIGAN FOUNDATION/ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE CENTER

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 51


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:19 PM

live stay

T

hey became interested in the house on a walk through the Tolovana neighborhood on the south end of Cannon Beach. “We saw the tower from the street and said, ‘Oh my God, there’s a Victorian there,’” Tompkins recalled. “We fell in love with the house before we ever got inside. Then we got to see the inside, and we were totally gone.”

PIECES OF HISTORY Even as a young boy, Bosco was interested in collecting pieces of history, according to his sister, Bonnie Schein. First, they consisted of family keepsakes. Then he started to come home with windows and door frames on his bicycle. “He was always bargain shopping and scavenging,” Schein wrote in an email. “The 52 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Page 52

co k was built by Jerry Bos The cottage in Tolovana Par in es from Victorian-style hom using materials recovered name to this day. Portland and still bears his

Portland wreckers who took down the Victorian houses for the construction of the Lloyd Center always called him to come help dismantle and carry stuff away. His estate had 100s of stained glass windows …” As kids, Bosco and Schein spent summers in the cabin their parents owned next door. Bosco’s father received the Sea Horse property as part of a business deal. In 1952, when he was 14, Bosco went from building playhouses to constructing a oneroom cottage on the property. He gradually added more rooms, with a curved staircase connecting the two floors. The tower also was an early addition. By 1957, Bosco’s house was well on its way, according to a “logbook” kept by a young neighbor to the west. Kathy Foster was in grade school when she described the house that “Mr. Jerry” was building.

The Portland wreckers who took down the Victorian houses for the construction of the Lloyd Center always called him to come help dismantle and carry stuff away.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:19 PM

Page 53

home’s The view from the ludes inc er tow on ati observ of ma ra an expansive pano n. ea oc the the coast and

She noted that he had spent “only about 30 dollars on his small model of an old house. He will get most of the lumber from the beach … Many of the windows are staned (sic) glass. Mostly all of them. “If you will look around the house,” she added, “you will see that various parts of the room have been carved upon. Mr. Jerry also above other things is a very good carver.”

NOT A STRAIGHT LINE IN THE HOUSE That first room was the “keeping room,” a kitchen with a fireplace on a raised marble hearth. The hearth may have come from a bank, just like the marble floor in the front room. A set of double doors — one set of several in the house — leads to the outside. Over the door is a panel with the words “Sea Horse” and “This is the house that Jerry built.” The door is also etched with a seahorse. Another set of double doors leads to the hallway. The old opaque glass doorknobs are attached, but the doorknob on one door is higher than the knob on the other door. That’s to be expected; there’s probably not a straight line in the house.

“He wasn’t a carpenter,” Tompkins said of Bosco. Thompson and Slansky have done some electrical work in the kitchen and installed a gas stove. But they kept the “captain’s nook” with the two paneled benches and a table. Here, they can gaze out a window, festooned with colored glass bullseyes, which Bosco created. The window curves out to resemble a window on an old ship. “It’s a cozy place to eat,” Tompkins said. A stained glass window on the other side of

the kitchen is one of the oldest windows in the house. A third window was etched by Bosco, who also taught art at Lincoln High School in Portland. Bosco and Ben Milligan formed the BoscoMilligan Foundation and the nonprofit Architectural Heritage Center in Portland, which seeks to preserve the Northwest’s historical character and promote the re-use of period homes and buildings. According to the foundation’s website, the National Park Service documents that the Bosco-Milligan Foundation’s collections of historic building artifacts are the largest in the West and among the five largest in the U.S. Wainscoting taken from other houses lines the walls throughout the Sea Horse, and most floors are composed of recycled fir boards. Arched and circle windows and small, narrow windows appear everywhere. Decorative corbels are attached to nearly all the walls, even when the wooden support brackets don’t support anything. The cottage in Tolovana Park was built using materials from 1950s-era Victorian homes demolished in Portland.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 53


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:19 PM

Page 54

live stay This Tolovana cottage features large windows allowing in generous amounts of natural light.

This must have been like a puzzle. He had a lot of pieces, and they had to go together somehow.

LIKE A PUZZLE All of the ceilings are different. In the kitchen, Bosco made a plaster of Paris mold of rectangular squares around the kitchen light. The chandelier in the front room is surrounded by gold leaf. Door jambs have been fitted together to create a dramatic effect in the guest bedroom upstairs.

“This must have been like a puzzle. He had a lot of pieces, and they had to go together somehow,” Tompkins said. Up the curved stairway, the bedrooms also embody the Bosco touch. The guest bedrooms, which once were sitting rooms, are surrounded by windows enclosed in Victorian-style door frames; several of the frames around windows and archways are decorated with ornamental wooden bullseyes in each corner. One guest bedroom has a gas stove, which replaced an original wood stove. Down two stairs is another sleeping alcove. They are separated by sliding double doors in Queen Anne style with colored glass. In the master bedroom, four full floor-toceiling windows fill the west wall, with a view of the trees and a new Victorian-style tool

Ornate chandeliers and oth er custom enhancements exis t throughout the cottage.

54 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

shed in front of the house. A glass case on another wall contains artwork; before the house was sold, it kept Bosco’s sculptures and pottery. A few of his sculptures remain in the home. Carved with a gingerbread of squares and rectangles, the wall behind the bed adds to the room’s whimsy. But the wall in the upstairs bathroom has a story to tell. It has a movable panel that, when Tompkins slides it up, reveals a secret shelf. “Supposedly this (wall) came from an opium den,” Tompkins said. She has heard the story that Bosco bought an old house for parts and at one time the house belonged to opium sellers who installed the secret “room.” “This is where they kept their loot — supposedly gold and pearls,” she said. That same bathroom features a vintage wooden toilet with the wooden tank positioned high on the wall and a pull chain to flush. There’s a clawfoot tub, too. Tompkins calls it an “original Jerry.” For those with a mathematical bent, the downstairs bathroom floor contains tiles with address numbers from former Portland houses arranged in the formula of “pi.”


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:19 PM

Page 55

‘WE HAVE HIT OUR DREAM’ But the home’s topmost detail — literally — is the tower. Reached by pull-down stairs in the center of the house, the observation tower consists of a 7-foot by 7-foot space surrounded by stained glass and clear glass windows for a view of the ocean a block away. “It’s a stunning view, Tompkins said. “There are Victorian carvings in the ceiling; it’s a tall ceiling about 15 to 20 feet high. I’d like to go up there in the winter and read.” People stop by the house all the time, she said. They say they knew Bosco and often tell stories about him. “I wish we had met him,” Tompkins said. “He must have been quite a character.” Although it needs work, the house that Jerry built will remain essentially as he conceived it. “This is our treasure,” Tompkins added. “We feel we have hit our dream.”

home The kitchen in the counter of nty ple s re featu stove nd space and a high-e and range.

BIG CREEK FISHING LODGE

Hot H ot tub tub,, S Sauna, auna, and W Wireless ir eless ac access c ess a available v ailable

®Ý‘Êò›Ù ÊçÙ^ãÊÙ®›Ý͊ ,ÊçÙÝ͗ 10-ϰdƵĞƐ-Sat ΨϱĂĚŵŝƐƐŝŽŶ dŚƵƌƐ&Z

——Ù›ÝÝ͗ 115 SE Lake St Ilwaco WA, 98624 360-642-3446

DƵƐĞƵŵ^ŚŽƉ ǁŝƚŚŐƌĞĂƚůŽĐĂů ŬƐĂŶĚĐƌĂŌƐ ǁǁǁ͘ĐŽůƵŵďŝĂƉĂĐŝĮĐŚĞƌŝƚĂŐĞŵƵƐĞƵŵ͘ŽƌŐ

Located on Lower Big Creek, Creek, just just off Highway 30 in Knappa, Knappa, Oregon Oregon Overnight Lodging, Reunions, Reunions, W eddings, & Business Business R etreatss Weddings, Retreats W Wee offer day use and over 1/2 mile of private private fishing. Our 3,000 sq.ft sq.ft.. facility can accommodate large large groups, sleeps up to 15.

Please visit our website website at www .bigcr g eekfishing.com g www.bigcreekfishing.com for rrates ates andd a vir tuall tour. tour. virtual 92878 W Waterhouse aterhouse R Rd, d, Astor Astoria ia -318-480 04 Oregon 97103 • 503 503-318-4804

OPEN 7 DAYS

• Serving Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner • Complete Facilities for Banquets, Meetings & Receptions • Wedding Parties & Rehearsal Dinners Welcome • Gift Shop • Locals favorite stop on the way to Portland or on your way here

503-755-1818

www.camp18restaurant.com

U.S. Highway 26 at Milepost 18, In Elsie

503.436.0208 239 N. Hemlock Cannon Beach

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 55


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:20 PM

Page 56

live stay

MY COAST

HEAR WHY LOCALS CALL OUR COAST HOME INTERVIEWS & IMAGES: COLIN MURPHEY

WATT CHILDRESS

Owner, Jupiter’s Books • Cannon Beach, Oregon I have owned this bookstore for 14 years. A bookstore has been in this location for 29 years. My wife grew up here and I started visiting in the late ’80s. In 2001, we moved here full-time. I fell in love with this bookshop when I first started coming to Cannon Beach. We would come in here and have great conversations with the owner at that time. And I’ve always loved books. This is an opportunity to visit with folks and share ideas and put good people together with good books. It’s very fulfilling as a lifestyle. There’s magic that happens when people come in here. Here’s where we get soaked in the brine of nature. I love the big forests, the rough surf, the barnacled rocks and pageantry of rain. (I) can’t think of a better place to read, write and converse about life off the beaten path. The mix of residents and visitors makes us ripe for revelation.

SETH TICHENOR

Professor, Clatsop Community College • Astoria, Oregon I grew up in Portland. But my grandparents were here and so I spent a great deal of time around here in my youth. There is a profound cultural and humane current that runs through this place, and I feel like it’s always been here. There was always a sense that this place was a town that was on the edge of the world. There were always all these people and artists coming through this small town. It’s wonderful. You can really make something happen here. This is a period of very interesting change here. Astoria goes through these great cycles where it’s booming and all these things are happening. And then something happens and things go into decline, but it never goes away. But it’s growing now. It’s a place with a great deal of culture. There’s a lot of change taking place, but every time that has happened it has left some kind of very rich mark on Astoria.

56 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:20 PM

Page 57

BERENIECE JONESCENTENO

Art Director, Liberty Theatre • Astoria, Oregon I came here first to work with the Astoria Music Festival and was just blown away by this town. I had never been to Astoria. I came from the Chicago area. I didn’t know anything about this part of the country and was just in shock at how beautiful it was. I read where someone once said that it’s a mixture of gritty and pretty and that’s what worked for me. That’s what I love about this area. You also feel like you can contribute to the community and see an immediate reaction to the work that you do. It’s not this massive place that I feel tiny in. A place like this, you really feel responsible for the people you live with. I want to be able to have an impact, and in this type of community I can do that.

ROSIE SAMP

Owner, Erickson Floral Co. • Astoria, Oregon My husband and I have been here since 1985. We came over to the coast and decided to get into the floral business. I don’t really know what else we would do at this point. We have seen a lot of changes in Astoria and especially in the downtown area. But we have longevity on our side. There’s always something going on here. We always try to welcome new visitors and introduce them to Astoria and tell people where to go and where to eat. There are a lot of people here who put a lot of energy into their products. There are so many choices here, so many opportunities. There are always possibilities around here. It just takes people with energy and good ideas. That’s why we love Astoria.

BILL AND SUE SVENDSEN

Proprietors, Peninsula Arts Center • Long Beach, Washington Sue: I think we always figured we’d end up at the coast. We took most of our vacations over here. We have a lot of history here. We found that there wasn’t much music here so we decided to start putting on some shows. People were so receptive to it. It was amazing how easy it was to build a community within a community, and we just fell in love with the people. Bill: When we got out here about eight years ago, there wasn’t much live music. For the first few years we rented the old train depot and within a couple years, we had outgrown it. Sue: It’s been fun. This is how we’ve met everyone out here. We came here without knowing anyone except our son and daughter-in-law. And it’s just so much better with a small community where you can get to know people.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 57


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

We’re looking out for you!

2/28/18

2:20 PM

Page 58

Discovery Coast Real Estate

For all your Real Estate Needs, visit

www.discoverycoastrealestate.com Search by City, Price, or Type – We have it all! 360-642-3325 • 877-637-1412 NWMLS

1711 Pacific Ave So., Long Beach, WA 98631

Play on the beach, kayak our rivers, HQMR\RXUÀQH dining.

3DFLÀF&RXQW\LVRSHQIRU EXVLQHVV 365 days a year!

Imogen Gallery 240 11th Street

3DFLÀF&RXQW\(FRQRPLF 'HYHORSPHQW&RXQFLO

§ KWWSSDFLÀFHGFRUJ 7KLVDGSDLGIRUZLWKORGJLQJWD[GROODUV

 

  

58 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Astoria, Or 503.468.0620 imogengallery.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:20 PM

Page 59

MARYANN SINKLER

Tina Chapman Real Estate Broker - Cannon Beach Beac ch Oregon ABR, E-STAR

If you’re ’ in i the th market k t to t buy b or sell s ll a home, h you’ve come to the right spot. Whatever Wh hatever your real estate needs, I can help you reach your goals with confidence. While visiting my w e b site, you can access the most current real website, estate data and search for homess throughout tthe he W estern U.S. And when the time time is right, Western ffeel eel ffree ree tto o c ontact me so that I can put the contact power of Windermere Realty Trust to work for you.

&DOO 7RGD\

503.440.9280 • MaryannS@remax.net

Integrity. Excellence. Determination. maryanns.remaxagent.com

Direct: (503) 440-9957 2IĂ€FH  [ 2IĂ€FH   [ WFRJ#DROFRP KWWSWLQDFKDSPDQZLWKZUHFRP KWWS WLQDFKDSPDQZLWKZUHFRP

Coastal Advantage CertiďŹ ed Pricing Strategy Advisor

Cannon Beach and Manzanita

WESTGATE Cabins & RV Park ON THE BEACH 7 Miles North of Long Beach

OPEN ALL YEAR

(360) 665-4211

Ocean Front Cabins DirecTV/WiFi • full RV hook-ups • fish/clam cleaning rooms restrooms/ showers • laundry • recreation room w/kitchen & fireplace

Klipsan Beach 20803 Pacific Way • Ocean Park, WA 98640

DISCOVER ILWACO FIRST FRIDAYS 5-7PM

JUNE 1ST • JULY 6TH AUG 3RD • SEPT 7TH

E

LO the mo P X at

ia R T O iv e R r

Y

Art Walk

Loyalty Days Childrens’ Parade

’S MILITARY REGON O HIS uth of the Columb RE

12pm • Downtown • May 5 2018

Firecracker 5K July 7 2018

Feel the Thunder Fireworks

At Dusk • Port of Ilwaco • July 7 2018

Slow Drag

5pm • Port of Ilwaco • Sept 7 2018

Crab Pot Christmas

Tree Lighting • 5PM • Dec 1 2018 Festivities After

SRUWRĂ€OZDFRFRP

Step Back Into History

O Y e a r -PRE N ound MAY-SE

P 10AM-6 T OCT-APRIL PM 10A M-4PM

Military Museum & Gift Shop • Memorial Rose Garden Living History Programs • Self-Guided & Guided Tours Underground Batteries

THE FRIENDS OF OLD FORT STEVENS, DQRQSURÂżWRUJDQL]DWLRQVXSSRUWVWKHPDLQWHQDQFHDQGSUHVHUYDWLRQRI WKH)W6WHYHQV+LVWRULFDO$UHD0XFKRIRXUIXQGLQJFRPHVIURPSURFHHGV IURPWKHPXVHXPVWRUHJXLGHGWRXUVVSHFLDOHYHQWVDQGFDPSZRRGVDOHV

503-861-2000 1863

www.facebook.com/DiscoverIlwaco

1947

Ft. Stevens State Park, Hammond, OR $5 State Park Day-Use Fee Museum Store Website OREGON’S DEFENDER

www.visitftstevens.com • foofs@teleport.com Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 59


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:21 PM

Page 60

WATERCOLORS BY

NOEL THOMAS

N

oel Thomas, an Astoria watercolorist, has been painting in and out of his 14th Street studio for 19 years. His favorite subject is the ships on the Columbia River, but running a close second is his love for Astoria landmarks and character buildings. Born in Longview, Washington, Thomas graduated with distinction from ArtCenter College of Design (then Art Center School) in Los Angeles in 1962. He pursued a career in advertising in New York City and L.A. In 1974 he moved back to Washington State, where he and his wife, Pat, began their business of building miniature houses for museums and collectors. In 1989 he returned to his lifelong love of painting and, in 2000, moved to Astoria. Thomas’ work has won numerous awards, including signature membership in the American Watercolor Society and Northwest Watercolor Society. His paintings have been exhibited in New York City by the American Watercolor Society. His work can be seen at RiverSea Gallery in Astoria and on the gallery’s website, riverseagallery.squarespace.com Thomas’ rich watercolors capture what is luminous and unique about his subjects: from a Venice canal, to his Astoria studio sink. When he’s not in his studio painting, he’s often seen around town sketching the local scene, cafe habitués, and musicians. “I’ve reached an age where I have no agenda — I’m willing to take more risks,” Thomas said of his work. “After all, it’s just a piece of paper.”

FISHING BOATS Fishing boats waiting to go to work. Many of these boats are nearly 100 years old.

60 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:21 PM

Page 61


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:21 PM

Page 62

ASTORIA Our streets go up and down, east and west. They pass fabulous Victorian and Bungalow homes, many of which have been restored.

CARGO SHIPS I love these old workhorses of the sea, waiting to go up the Columbia River to leave and load cargo from all over the world.

62 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:22 PM

Page 63

OLNEY FARM

SADDLE MOUNTAIN

This working farm in Olney grows organic vegetables for our markets and restaurants. It takes me way back in time.

Looking south from Coxcomb Hill, you can see the Lewis and Clark River, with Saddle Mountain in the distance, one of many stunning views from the town.

GILLNETTER A gillnetter, too old to work anymore, sits on the Astoria Riverwalk that runs along the Columbia shore and town.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 63


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:22 PM

Page 64

EAST AT SUNSET Looking east at sunset, Astoria reflects the golden light. Big Red, the red building out in the river was once a net shed where area fisherman stored their nets for the next season. The white building beyond was the Bumble Bee cannery — now you can enjoy a great cup of coffee there while you watch ships go by.

USCG CUTTER U.S. Coast Guard cutter, The Alert, docked near the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria.

64 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:23 PM

Page 65

City Lumber Vote V o otted d

BE ES ST T

t s a o c

503-325-0310 1414 Marine Dr. • Astoria www.smileastoria.com

Jeffrey M. Leinassar, DMD, FAGD

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

k e weend

Home Impr Imp provem oveme ent nt Stor Store for for o 2017

““We’re We’rre mor re than re ann more a lu llum lumb uumb mber mber lumber y rd ya rd” yard”

Your Project Headquarters

Founded 1904

The oldest lumberyard in Oregon

.com

Emergencies Welcome Available for Cruise Ship Guests • Convenient appointments before or after work or school • Gentle, trusting & caring dentist • Affordable, natural-appearing dentistry • Full Service Dentistry Accredited member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry® Committed to Excellence.

Lumber and Plywood • Building Materials Paint • Hardware • Electrical • Home Decor Lighting • Plumbing • Cabinets • Rentals Outdoor Living • Doors & Windows

Your local

GUIDE

to art, food, entertainment and fun

Seaside Golf Course

2142 Commercial, Astoria 325-4511 • 1-800-248-4511 www.citylumber.com FOLLOW US ON FOLLOW US ON Open Monday - Friday 7:30 am to 5:30 pm; Saturday 8 am to 5 pm; Sunday 9 am to 4 pm

?! k c Si ?! t r Hu

Columbia Memorial Hospital

Talk to a doctor 24/7 /7 • Full Bar • Space for Meetings • Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner • Happy Hours Specials 451 Ave U, Seaside 503-738-5261 www.seasidegolf.us seasidegolfcourse@gmail.com

Let the convenience of a 21st Centur Centuryy house ca call all gget ooner. you on the road to recovery sooner. • • • •

Board-certified doctors and nursee practitioners. Get treatment, prescriptions. G et a diagnosis, tr eatmeent, rreferrals eferrals and pr escription ns. Get caree anytime, anyw anywhere Washington Oregon. G et car where in W aashington or O regoon. N nd no hidden fees. Noo insurance needed an and

Go to columbiame columbiamemorial.org/care-now emorial.org/care-now w 2111 E Exchange xchange c Street, Streeet, Astoria, Astoria, s Oregon Oregon • 503-325-4321 503-325-4 4321

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 65


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

Completed in 2014, the Garden of Surging Waves in Astoria was built to celebrate and memorialize the history and heritage of Chinese immigrants in the region.

2:23 PM

Page 66


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:23 PM

Page 67

Chinese in Astoria

THE GARDEN OF SURGING WAVES Captures troubling past, hope for the future WORDS: LYNETTE RAE McADAMS • IMAGES: COLIN MURPHEY

O

n the corner of 11th and Duane streets in Astoria, tucked tight to the breast of the downtown core, a splendid but enigmatic city park is speaking volumes of history while barely uttering a word. At once beautiful and strange, it beckons and beguiles its guests, compelling them to sit, stroll, and explore in this seemingly out-of-context space where past and present converge. Completed in 2014, a legacy gift from the city of Astoria and the first phase of a larger redevelopment plan for Heritage Square, the Garden of Surging Waves seeks to honor and memorialize the Chinese community’s contributions to the Columbia-Pacific — a part of the region’s history that, prior to this project, was largely unknown. At its opening ceremony, on a cold spring day eight years in the making, then-Mayor Willis Van Dusen, the Garden’s champion, stood before a sizable crowd of well-wishers and told the simple truth: “What we are doing here today is dedicating a beautiful park that tells a story,” he said. “It is the story of the American pioneers that came from China to make Astoria, and the Northwest, a better place to live.”


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:23 PM

Page 68

Chinese in Astoria

Artist Suenn Ho is dwarfed by one of the elements of the Garden of Surging Waves in Astoria.

I

n tones that oscillated between adamant instruction and humble apology, he said that a proper account of the Chinese experience had been intentionally withheld from official records and, admitting the city’s mistake, vowed to correct it. “We’re telling it all in the Garden of Surging Waves,” Van Dusen said, acknowledging an uncomfortable past, “the good, and the not-so-good.” He stressed the need to recognize the Chinese for the frontiersmen they were: “every bit the same” as the pioneers that came by covered wagon. “This is a great day for Astoria,” he concluded, “and for the United States.”

68 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

“We’re telling it all in the Garden of Surging Waves, acknowledging an uncomfortable past, the good, and the not-so-good.”


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:23 PM

Page 69

A glance back From his part-time home near the shores of Willapa Bay, Shawn Wong pushed back his plate, took a sip of coffee, and folded his hands on the table in front of him. Hospitable and kind, he wore an easy smile and had been quick to laugh over an exchange of lighthearted breakfast banter. But when the conversation turned to the lives of his 19th-century kinsmen, his voice took on a softness. He began to speak more slowly, his every word measured and deliberate. “Most of them were poor farmers,” he said, “just boys — young and illiterate.” As a novelist, editor, and 30-year professor at the University of Washington, Wong has dedicated most of his life’s work to understanding the Asian-American experience — his own, as the American child of Chinese immigrants, and that of his forebears. With academic credentials that could stretch across the Pacific, his knowledge of the history is vast, and he tells it with a matter-of-fact sadness.

The words gently traced, splayed sky-high across the eastern archway, are memories from the elders of Astoria’s Chinese community — the children and grandchildren of immigrants who crossed an ocean to make their home at the mouth of the Columbia River. “The majority all came from the same region along the Pearl River Delta,” he said, “which was suffering from the same things that have always made people leave one place to seek another: famine and disease and political rebellion. That they left only to make money and return home is a common misconception — a myth. To leave China at that time was a great risk, an open betrayal against the Emperor, punishable by death.” “They didn’t want to go home,” Wong said. “They came here to make a better life for themselves, just like every other immigrant. They came here to become Americans.”

Shawn Wong, a novelist, editor and University of Washington professor

In the Garden Standing before the entrance to the Garden on a cloudless day, blue sky stretched above her like a canvas, Suenn Ho’s small frame almost disappeared into the mass of rusted steel that made up the towering screen behind her. Overhead, snippets of conversation, plucked from the narrative of daily life, blazed anonymously against the cerulean backdrop. “It’s our stories that bring us together,” Ho said, moving her hand across a section of rugged metal. “It’s in our stories that we discover the richness of culture, the richness of place.” The words she gently traced, splayed skyhigh across the eastern archway, are memories from the elders of Astoria’s Chinese community — the children and grandchildren of immigrants who crossed an ocean to make their home at the mouth of the Columbia River. Brief vignettes of day-to-day life, they speak of the common — work, study, mealtimes, play — and for Ho, the creative mind behind the Garden’s design, they were a perfect launching point. “The Garden of Surging Waves is an immigrant’s story,” she said, “like immigrant stories everywhere. These quotes are universal — the tale of the underdog, head down, trying to get by.” But as an urban designer, especially for public spaces, Ho feels she has a responsibility to contribute to the community in a way that is more than just a story. “The story is important, the story is the backbone,” she said, “but you have to move beyond it. You have to convey an attitude.” Of course, in order to move forward, it’s imperative to look back first.

••• THE GARDEN OF SURGING WAVES

In Chinese, the name for the Garden of Surging Waves is pronounced “C ng Láng Yuán.” In written form, two of the characters can also be used to express struggle or hardship. When you hear it spoken aloud, it sounds like a story: Beginning on a high, hopeful note, it lofts along, bright and musical. But then the tone dips down, becoming low and elongated — like one thing has slipped unexpectedly into something else.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 69


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:24 PM

Page 70

Chinese in Astoria

Chinese cannery workers in Astoria COURTESY COLUMBIA RIVER MARITIME MUSEUM

Facing facts Between 1849 and 1853, more than 300,000 people from across the globe made their way to California’s gold fields. Propelled by rumors of riches so plentiful you merely had to stoop to pick them up, they came with visions of wealth and dreams for a better, more prosperous future. Of these immigrants, 24,000 were Chinese. Welcomed at first, the tides soon turned. Greed and envy on the part of white forty-niners quickly turned to resentment, then violence, until finally prejudice against them was simply written into law: Chinese were prevented from mining, owning property, voting, and, eventually, testifying against their wrongdoers. Driven from the mines, they followed the paths of a new and booming western economy, laying the track of the great railroads that would unite the

70 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

continent. As the rails moved north, so did the Chinese. By the early 1870s, with the salmon-canning industry in its infancy, the rugged, sparsely inhabited Columbia-Pacific region was struggling under the demand for seasonal workers. Eying opportunity, contract laborers shifted their crews handily from railways to canneries. Eager for work, uncomplaining, adept at their tasks, and willing to accept a pay rate half of what the white working class demanded, Chinese crews soon dominated the employment pool. Industry on both sides of the river began to grow in direct proportion to the influx of Chinese workers. By 1881, more than 3,000 Chinese immigrants called the mouth of the Columbia home, churning out nonstop prosperity for the 25 canneries that boomed along the river’s banks.

Industry on both sides of the river began to grow in direct proportion to the influx of Chinese workers. By 1881, more than 3,000 Chinese immigrants called the mouth of the Columbia home.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:24 PM

Page 71

Artist Suenn Ho gives a tour of the Garden of Surging Waves she designed for the city of Astoria.

But life for them was far from sweet. “There’s no doubt the Chinese here had it very hard,” said Liisa Penner, archivist for the Clatsop County Historical Society. “Things were bad throughout the Northwest, but Astoria had a newspaper editor who made a special point of stoking sentiments against them.” Clinton DeWitt Ireland, publisher of the TriWeekly Astorian, exercised his powerful voice with precision and frequency, almost always at the expense of the Chinese. Excerpts from his newspaper editorials from the 1870s, saturated with bigotry and vitriol, are painful to read: “The great majority of Mongols who come here are simply articles of merchandise — not human beings within the definition of our organic law; a specie of personal property incapable of elevation to the dignity of free manhood.”

Inspired by Ireland’s strong campaign of hatred, which echoed the growing sentiment of the new West overall, local anti-Chinese societies sprang into existence, lobbying to curb immigration. Laws were passed preventing the Chinese from owning property or fishing. Special taxes were imposed, and if they couldn’t be paid, debts had to be worked off on public labor projects. Chinese citizens were even denied police protection. Discrimination intensified with time, culminating in the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, a federal law placing a complete moratorium on the immigration of Chinese laborers. It was the first law ever implemented that denied entrance to the U.S. based strictly on ethnicity. With every edict designed to drive them out, and new technology in the canneries outpacing

the need for human labor, in the decades following the turn of the 20th century, the Chinese population in Astoria, and throughout the West, began to decline.

••• An art form developed over 3,000 years, classical Chinese garden design blends objects of art and architecture in a setting balanced with the natural elements. Composed of choreographed glimpses of scenery, the garden should have cohesion, but isn’t meant to be viewed all at once; rather, its design should lead the visitor to consider each section separately, as if from a more distant, perfectly aligned window. When properly executed, it guides the viewer’s perspective so that each aspect of the garden can be elevated to the highest form of excellence.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 71


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:24 PM

Page 72

Chinese in Astoria

Suenn Ho gives a tour of the Garden of Surging Waves.

Crossing the threshold To properly enter the Garden of Surging Waves, you must pass through the Moon Gate. An ancient element of Chinese design, it serves as both the physical and spiritual portal to the park — a connection between two worlds, and a fitting marker for the experience of Chinese immigrants passing from one culture into the next. Inset into its rusted steel frame, handhammered bronze panels depict idyllic scenes of village life as the eye meanders over streams, across mountains, and into the heavens. At the base, a pair of sentinel lions stand watch. Considered the mightiest of guardians in Chinese lore, lions possess mythical powers to protect the people and structures they defend and are highly meaningful icons — especially here, in a space where every step is suffused with symbol. 72 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Laid out on a nine-square grid — the template of good fortune in Chinese design — the park is a mix of open space and quiet nooks, with stunning art at every turn. From the backside of the Story Screen, words from the experiences of a new world float above three bronze scrolls, permanently unfurled to reveal their ancient wisdom. Across the way, supporting a traditional Chinese pavilion, eight hand-carved granite columns swirl with majestic dragons encircled by wave and cloud motifs. In Chinese mythology, dragons control water and rainfall, ruling over ocean and sky. Symbols of power and strength, they harbor good luck for those who are worthy. Outside the pavilion, past a trio of coveted Scholar’s Rocks, another dragon — for a total of nine — marks the Platform of Heritage. Cast

in bronze, with a monkey sitting astride, it is an enlarged replica of an incense burner dating back to 200 B.C. — a reminder to the Chinese of their long and vigorous lineage. But mixed in with all the auspicious Old World fundamentals, new symbols, representing a new experience, also begin to emerge. Underfoot, elongated concrete pavers mimic the wood-planked floors of Astoria’s canneries, where Chinese immigrants worked 15-hour days processing the fish that launched the region into fame. Across them, two pairs of railroad tracks slice through the park, a fixed memorial to previously unrecognized public labor contributions, including work on every train line in and out of Astoria, as well as the building of roads, the city sewer system, and the jetties that still tame the mouth of the river today.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:24 PM

Within the pavilion, three colorful mosaic sturgeon swim beneath a delicate salmon lantern, all encircled by a rim of stainless steel — another tribute to cannery days. Overhead, traditional tiered brackets are hewn from local Northwest timbers. Enormous slabs of Columbia River basalt, polished to a high shine, serve as artful benches. Behind them, forming the western edge of the Garden, smaller blocks represent the early sea wall that can still be seen along Astoria’s Riverwalk — another accomplishment of the city’s earliest Chinese citizens.

••• In a Chinese garden, rocks symbolize mountain peaks and are emblems of virtue, stability, and endurance. Elevated to art forms, those that come from the Lingbi county of the Anhui Province of China are considered among the most special. Limestone that has been sculpted by years of pressure and erosion, they are judged by the peaks and valleys of their textures, their malleability, their transparency, and their abilities to reflect and refract the light.

Choosing a lens With so much symbol and history intertwined at every turn, it’s natural to look for explanation, and most parks would have a host of interpretive panels staged along the way. But here, aside from one glass plate that serves as a kind of useful key, lengthy words of instruction or elucidation are markedly absent. “I don’t think we have to know the meaning behind every single thing in order to make it meaningful to us,” said Ho, the mother of the Garden. “The park needs to be allowed to be the park it needs to be, and that’s going to be different for everyone.”

Page 73

Pointing to a line of benches that form the northern boundary of the square, she said, “If you need a quiet spot to rest or think, with a view of something beautiful, this is a place for that. But if you’re looking for a history lesson, you can find that, too.” Running the length of the park on the Duane Street side, the benches offer a visual display of time, starting with the arrival of Chinese laborers in the 1860s and spanning all the way through to the present. Permanently fixed in concrete, 24 bronze markers move through the decades, briefly summarizing important events and milestones — the tragic and the triumphant. Alongside dates that measure the rise and fall of the local Chinese population, specific events prompt different reactions: “1 Chinese tailor, 32 Chinese grocers, 7 Chinese farms,” reads one, noting growth and prosperity for Astoria’s once-booming Chinatown. Not far away, another speaks to the mounting political pressures of its day, capturing cries to “Expel the Orientals,” and quoting a shameful sign once posted on Astoria’s waterfront: “Chinese caught fishing will be shot.” But if the park is literally bounded by the accomplishments and atrocities of the past, its center, in fact its very beating heart, according to Ho, is all about transformation. “The Garden presents each of us with a choice,” she said, likening how she executed her vision for the project to the way a photographer might select a lens for the camera. “If you choose to, you can zoom in, looking at every microdot of pain, every slight, every discrimination. Or you can choose the fish-eye approach, stepping back, where the harshness of the edges are made more round, where your perspective is allowed to shift.”

••• THE BROKEN COLUMN Weeks turned into months, and still no one could account for the shipping delay: Eight granite columns from China and bound for Astoria were stuck at the port of Los Angeles. At last, the cause was revealed: One of the hand-carved mythical dragons — a figure so central to the Garden’s design — had been badly damaged on its arduous voyage across the Pacific. A replacement was ordered and on the way, but when the city of Astoria hosted an early unveiling of the artwork, all eyes stayed fixed on that broken column. “People were genuinely worried about it,” said Suenn Ho, the urban designer behind the Garden of Surging Waves. “They would pass by the healthy columns on display and go straight to the crippled one — caressing it, petting it — like it was an injured puppy.” Immediately, a symbol was born. “It became so obvious that we needed to keep it,” she said. A special brace was created to secure the broken pieces, allowing the misfit column to keep its destined place in the Pavilion of Transition. “After a long journey, with plenty of bruises and scrapes, it’s broken but still standing,” she said, “welcomed by its new family to be made whole once more.”

GARDEN OF SURGING WAVES DESIGNER

•••

Suenn Ho Suenn Ho is a Portland-based urban designer and co-principal at Resolve Architecture and Planning. The daughter of two Chinese students enrolled at Harvard, she was born in Boston, Massachusetts, but mostly raised in Hong Kong. Having returned to the U.S. as a student herself, she knows firsthand what it feels like to be an immigrant — even on her native soil. A Fulbright Fellow, with a master’s degree in architecture from Columbia University, her award-winning work encompasses a broad spectrum, with projects in both the municipal and private sectors. Whether she’s designing a public library, a grocery store, or an outdoor amphitheater, her philosophy, and that of her firm, remains the same: “To improve the built environment and the human condition.”


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:24 PM

Page 74

Chinese in Astoria

The logo for the Garden of Surging Waves, designed by Suenn Ho

•••

For David Lum, who founded Lum's Auto Center, the Garden of Surging Waves seems more like a “thank you” than an apology.

DID YOU KNOW? • In the 1890s, when its population peaked, Astoria had the largest Chinatown north of San Francisco. • Formally opened in 2014, the Garden of Surging Waves cost approximately $1.4 million and was funded by the city of Astoria and multiple grants, as well as private donations. Most of the major artwork was commissioned from a Sculptural Arts Company in Xian, China; the rest was created by Northwest artists and local craftsmen. • In Chinese folklore, evil spirits move only in straight lines, so all pathways through the Garden of Surging Waves are nonlinear or have objects fixed in place to disrupt direct motion — an ancient form of protection. • In the Garden of Surging Waves, native plants and grasses of the Northwest mingle with bamboo, Chinese maple and flowering plum — all eastern varieties believed to bring good luck. • Number plays an important role in Chinese design. In the Garden, look for repeated use of 3’s, 7’s, and 9’s — all meant to bring good fortune and prosperity.

74 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

As for Ho, she prefers the latter, and nowhere is that philosophy clearer than in the Garden’s focal point: the Pavilion of Transition. Open to the four directions, two sides — west and south — are blocked by the massive basalt benches, making it so that once you enter the structure, the only way through is to physically turn yourself in space. According to Ho, it’s a fitting metaphor — for the plight of the Chinese, and for life itself. “Sometimes the only way forward is to turn away from the suffering, away from the past,” she said. “Sometimes, the only way to move ahead is by simply deciding to, and making a conscious change.”

••• “To learn and to practice what is learned time and again is pleasure, is it not? To have friends come from afar is happiness, is it not? To be unperturbed when not appreciated by others is gentlemanly, is it not?” —from the “Analects of Confucius,” 500 BCE, embossed on a bronze scroll in the Garden of Surging Waves

The bright side For David Lum, the Garden of Surging Waves seems more like a “thank you” than an apology, and that suits him just fine. The feeling is mutual. “I didn’t get where I am today without help,” he said from his Warrenton office on the upper floor of Lum’s Auto Center, the successful business he’s spent a lifetime building. “Help from the family that came before me, and help from the community. I’ve lived my whole life in Astoria,” he added, a sense of pride in his voice. “We’ve invested a lot in each other.” Born in 1933, the youngest of six children, Lum is a collection of stories, many of them chronicled in his recent memoir, “What a Great Ride!” which tells his family history — from his father’s immigration to Astoria after San Francisco’s great Earthquake in 1906, to his own immediate family’s recent journey back to China, the land of his ancestors. “It was very humbling to make that trip,” he said. “It’s a great gift to know where you come from.” Wanting to bestow that same kind of feeling for his grandchildren, and those that might come after, was part of his reason for supporting the Garden. “I wasn’t for it at first,” Lum admitted, acknowledging that in the Garden’s infancy, its design phase, there were public opinions against it. “I didn’t want there to be any bad feelings,” he said. “I didn’t want anyone to feel offended.”


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:25 PM

“I have just gratitude and respect for this place, my home,” he continued. “I could tell you some things that are ugly, I suppose, but that’s everyone’s story. Even in the old days, things were much better here than they were in other places. We didn’t have the same violence they had in Tacoma or Seattle. We were lucky, and Astoria was different, special. I didn’t want it to seem like we were complaining … “But now I see that it is a celebration, a memorial to the contributions of the Chinese, and it makes me proud,” he said. “As a man of Chinese heritage, but also as an Astorian.” Lum wants his children and grandchildren to see what they have risen from. “And I want all of us to learn from the past.”

Page 75

venue for weddings and other intimate ceremonies, she said, as well as a place for Zumba groups, tai chi, and regular chess games. It even inspired the graduation project of one local high school senior, which culminated in an art installation of Chinese lanterns strewn throughout the park. More recently, though, it’s been the backdrop of multiple public gatherings more serious in tone. After the 2016 mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, which claimed the lives of 50 people, local groups made plans for a vigil, their point of rendezvous the Garden of Surging Waves. On Jan. 21, 2017, when more than 1,300 people gathered in Astoria for the Women’s March, uniting their voices with those across a nation, some met in the Garden, connecting first in smaller sets. And last September, when the federal government announced its plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, the legislation that protected the children of illegal immigrants, the screens of social media lit up once more with a cry for activism: See you in the Garden, 3 p.m. Meet in the Pavilion of Transition. Reflecting on the unique niche the park seems to fill, Cosby said it isn’t like any of the city’s other public spaces. “The Garden creates a feeling that really resonates with people, a way that makes them connect. And this will sound

strange,” she said, “but I think that somehow, it also makes them behave better.” With lots of public spaces out in the open night and day, city officials see plenty of vandalism, she explained, but never in the Garden. “I take that back, we did have an incidence of graffiti once,” she said. When they went to clean it up, though, they discovered it had been painted only with soap, and likely to have washed away with the first rain. “So even the vandalism is respectful,” Cosby said, laughing. “I think it creates a soothing energy,” she said, noting that, above all else, it adds a singular beauty to the city and “always keeps people talking.” For Shawn Wong, it’s the latter point that holds the most interest. “It takes more time for us to talk about the park than it does to walk around it,” he said, “and that is the great success of the Garden of Surging Waves.” Especially now, he added, as we continue to have a national discussion about race and immigration and the power of symbols. “That our reaction to it and our articulation of it goes on and on — that’s how a park like this creates its permanence — that it’s able to enter our dialogue, always a part of our continual conversation.” The ageless echo of the underdog, finding its way.

Chin, Art and Doug, Chinese in Washington State (Seattle: OCA Greater Seattle, 2013)

Ficken, Robert E., Washington Territory (Pullman: Washington State University Press, 2002)

Penner, Liisa, Chinese in Astoria, Oregon, 1870-1880 (Astoria, 1990)

Deur, Douglas, Empires of the Turning Tide (National Park Service, 2016)

Kirtley, Karen, ed., Eminent Astorians (Salem: East Oregonian Publishing Company, 2010)

Wong, Shawn, In This Place, History is Retrieved (Tacoma: Tacoma Art Museum exhibition catalog, Zhi Lin exhibit, 2016)

Here and now If there ever was a time when there was dissidence surrounding the Garden of Surging Waves, that time is over, according to Angela Cosby, director of Astoria’s parks and recreation department. And as time goes by, the park is “hitting its stride” more and more, she said. Now entering its fifth year as a public space, its use increases annually, and it’s also diversifying. In addition to its expected daily use in the downtown — a site for coffee breaks, play dates, and picnic lunches — the park has become a

ADDITIONAL SOURCES:

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 75


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:25 PM

Page 76

MYSTERIES

OF THE COLUMBIA-PACIFIC REGION A FEW OF OUR LOCAL LEGENDS HAVE ROOTS IN DOCUMENTED HISTORY WORDS: HEATHER DOUGLAS • IMAGES: VARIOUS SOURCES

The Columbia-Pacific has its share of outlandish legends. Creatures like the anthropoid Bigfoot, a ghostly ghoul nicknamed “Bandage Man,” and the sea monster “Colossal Claude” are rumored to haunt the region. Few of our popular folktales, however, are rooted in history … but some are. Here are four famous legends: the local lore, the known facts, and the enduring mysteries that continue to arouse the curiosity and fascination of locals and visitors. 76 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:26 PM

Page 77

UNDERGROUND ASTORIA

TRAP DOORS AND TUNNELS FOR SHANGHAIING THE LOCAL LORE Legend has it that sailors living it up in local taverns in the early 1900s were drugged and dropped through trap doors or led through a system of underground tunnels beneath downtown Astoria, only to wake up and find themselves as contracted deck hands on a ship sailing out to sea.

THE HISTORY While shanghaiing itself is a documented occurrence, the details of how it was practiced are debatable. However, there is one fact historians agree on: Astoria’s underground tunnels and conduits were absolutely not used as a passageway to kidnap and transport unwitting drunk or drugged men, according to local historians John Goodenberger and McAndrew Burns. The city’s downtown was reconstructed after the Great Astoria Fire of 1922, seven years after the Seamen’s Act of 1915 allowed sailors to escape contracts under certain circumstances. This made the act of kidnapping men to work on sailing ships much less realistic. “Although Astoria’s underground may have been used for nefarious deeds over the years, there was no market for shanghaiing and no need to use the underground for that purpose,” Goodenberger said. “Astoria’s underground was simply used for local businesses to access power, gas, and other utilities.” What about the trapdoor myth? Burns said stories of nefarious folks slipping people mickeys are just not true. “I’m not going to waste time making a strange cocktail and hope you will walk over to a trapdoor and hope no one sees you fall through,” he said. “If you’re going to kidnap someone, you get them really drunk, walk them out to the dock, and throw them on a ship.” Burns said it’s like the Hollywood Western cliche where cowboys pace, turn, draw, and fire: “It happened about twice in history. The O.K. Corral is the only really documented instance of that happening. What happens is this: I wait for you to turn around and walk out of the bar, and then I shoot you in the back. Or, we both draw, and we both have such bad aim we fire five times and someone gets lucky and shoots

the other in the gut.” The idea of conking someone on the back of the head, gathering three or four men, and taking an unconscious guy through underground Astoria is a Hollywoodmovie thing. “It’s not real,” Burns said. “I’ve never heard of any true historical documentation to back that up. But it’s a great story.” By the 1920s, shanghaiing was essentially over. Sailing ships were replaced with steamships, which required smaller, more specialized crews. “You couldn’t drag a farm boy off the streets and expect him to be an effective sailor on a steamship,” Goodenberger said. When it did happen, it probably went more like this: “We’re happy, we’re singing, we get you terribly drunk, and I walk A Clatsop County judgement roll listing charges against a William Delashmutt for “kidnapping” (aka shanghaiing) • COURTESY JOHN GOODENBERGER you out and I throw you on board,” Burns said. How much did this actually happen? “Is this a town where 1 out of 10 guys got shanghaied? No, that’s just silly. Was it was one out of a thousand? One out of a hundred? Possibly.”

THE ENDURING MYSTERY Trapdoors and mickeys aside, how much did shanghaiing occur at all? While organizing documents in the Astoria Library’s basement last year, Goodenberger came across old county judgment rolls that contained eyewitness accounts and jury decisions. One roll lists criminal charges against a William Delashmutt for kidnapping — also called “shanghaiing.” He served time for the crime. Yes, shanghaiing did occur, but the method and frequency are local mysteries. >>

ASTORIA’S UNDERGROUND TUNNELS AND CONDUITS WERE ABSOLUTELY NOT USED AS A PASSAGEWAY TO KIDNAP AND TRANSPORT UNWITTING DRUNK OR DRUGGED MEN.

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 77


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:26 PM

Page 78

ASTORIA BRIDGE

A KIDNAPPING AND ACCIDENTAL BURIAL DURING CONSTRUCTION A TOLLBOOTH WORKER CALLED AUTHORITIES WHEN SHE SPIED A KIDNAPPING VICTIM BOUND IN THE BACK OF A CAR.

THE LOCAL LORE Two well-known legends involving the Astoria Bridge — which spans the 4-mile width of the Columbia River and connects Oregon and Washington— tell of a tollbooth worker who foiled a kidnapping and of a man accidentally buried inside a concrete bridge support.

THE HISTORY In 1987, when tollbooths still operated on the bridge, tollbooth worker Peggy Kile called authorities when she spied a kidnapping victim partially covered and bound in the back of a car, according to a newspaper clipping dated May 8 of that year. The victim whispered “Help” to Kile three times while her kidnapper “fumbled in his pockets for the $1.50 toll charge to cross the span.” A sawed-off shotgun was later found in the car. The victim was freed and the

perpetrator ultimately charged with theft, kidnapping, and possession of a firearm. Old newspaper archives confirm this. “When we were getting ready for the 50th anniversary of the Astoria-Megler Bridge, it was definitely a fact that tollbooth attendants were telling us that they were calling on kidnappings,” Burns said. As for the myth of a bridge construction worker who fell and was “buried” in one of the bridge supports while concrete was poured during construction: “We could not substantiate that myth,” he said. “Many of the men on our panel for the 50th anniversary of the AstoriaMegler Bridge said something like, ‘I don’t know, but Bill told me about it.’” What was substantiated, according to Burns, were several major accidents. One included a supervisor knocked off the bridge by a falling bucket during construction and died. A crew member broke his back from a fall — a barge

happened to be underneath him — but survived. Another substantiated story is that of a stray dog who accompanied the workers to the top of the bridge. The workers fed and played fetch with the dog during breaks. One day the stick was thrown too far, and the dog jumped to its death.

THE ENDURING MYSTERY Local experts are fuzzy on the burial legend. Goodenberger recounted stories from local sources in which a worker was knocked into the bridge support as concrete was being poured. His coworkers, the story goes, watched helplessly but could do nothing. “We interviewed about 15 guys on a panel, and they swear everyone knows there was a guy who fell in.” Yet when he and his fellow researchers scoured the newspapers in preparation for the bridge’s 50th anniversary, they couldn’t find anything specific. >>

Local historians John Goodenberger (left) and Clatsop County Historical Society executive director McAndrew “Mac” Burns (right)


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:26 PM

Page 79

The Astoria Bridge at dusk • CRINDALYN LYSTER PHOTO


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:26 PM

Page 80


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:27 PM

Page 81

THE CURSE OF TERRIBLE TILLY

HAUNTED AND INHABITED BY GHOSTS: TILLAMOOK ROCK LIGHTHOUSE THE LOCAL LORE The Tillamook Rock Lighthouse — a derelict structure built in 1879 on an isolated rock 20 miles south of the Columbia River bar and a mile off Ecola State Park in Cannon Beach — is thought to be cursed. Legend has it that “Terrible Tilly” has driven inhabitants to madness, is haunted by ghosts, and houses human remains.

THE HISTORY The construction of the Tillamook Rock Lighthouse was an answer to the vast number of ships lost in maritime trade at the treacherous Columbia River Bar, known as the “Graveyard of the Pacific.” “Tilly” was built amid secrecy because a handful of locals disapproved of its construction. Since then, the ocean conditions around it have claimed many lives. The first notable death was surveyor John Trewavas, who was swept into the churning sea during the lighthouse’s construction, never to be seen again. In 1881, just weeks before completion, thanks to fog and punishing winds, the Spanish ship Lupatia sailed too close to Tilly. All 16 men were killed and washed up on Indian Beach, save for an Australian Shepherd found by a work crew stranded on the rocks, whimpering. The dog was later adopted by a Cannon Beach family. When the Coast Guard took over the station in the 1930s, Tilly became a station for five single men at a time. The late James Gibbs — who wrote both a fiction and nonfiction account of his time on Terrible Tilly — remarked in a video interview that waves around the rock would “erupt like a volcano,” and that men who lodged there went stir crazy. Tilly’s residents also reported hearing footsteps going up and down the lighthouse stairs. Elaine Trucke, a local historian and executive director of the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum, said that, now and then, someone will tell her they’ve seen people on the

lighthouse roof from the shore. But “the roof is caved in,” she said, “and what you probably see is a sea lion or a pelican.” The “haunting” story originated with Gibbs’ experience. According to his nonfiction account, he lived in fear of being murdered by one of the other men. In his bunk one night he bolted awake to hear a repetitive “shhh” sound. A soft sensation made contact with his face and he pushed the perpetrator away in fear. A goose had somehow gotten in through an open porthole window; the “shhh” sound was the bird dragging a broken wing. Though the ghost myth had a simple explanation, most people choose to remember Gibbs’ fictional account of the story in which it was a ghost (instead of a goose) that terrified Gibbs. Tilly was decommissioned in 1957 and sold to a party in Las Vegas with alleged mob ties and plans to build a casino that never came to fruition. And the human remains? There is truth there. In 1980 real estate developer Mimi Morissette purchased Tilly for $50,000 and turned the abandoned lighthouse into a columbarium. But Eternity by the Sea was stripped of its license in 1999 by the Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board due to allegedly improper record keeping and urn storage. As far as Trucke knows, the human ash is still in the lighthouse, which remains a registered cemetery with the state of Oregon. For almost two decades, Terrible Tilly has been home to cormorants, sea lions, and a host of endangered sea birds. It is part of the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge complex.

THE ENDURING MYSTERY No one knows where the 16 men from the Lupatia are buried. Trucke said the men could be buried in the Seaside cemetery. “Still,” she said, “I just don’t see them carrying 16 bodies over Tillamook Head in a wagon.” >>

TERRIBLE TILLY’S RESIDENTS HAVE REPORTED HEARING FOOTSTEPS GOING UP AND DOWN THE LIGHTHOUSE STAIRS.

Local historian and executive director of the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum Elaine Trucke hears stories of people being seen on the lighthouse’s roof. Tillamook Rock and Lighthouse LEFT PAGE: OREGON HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTO ABOVE: SEASIDE MUSEUM PHOTO

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 81


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:28 PM

Page 82

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse from Ecola Point • NEAL MAINE PHOTO


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:28 PM

Page 83

THE LOCAL LORE Longtime residents have wondered for decades if a man who appeared in Astoria in the summer of 1971 and introduced himself as a wealthy Swiss Baron named “Norman de Winter” went on to become the infamous unknown skyjacker D.B. Cooper later that year.

THE HISTORY A handful of Astorians vividly remember a man named Norman de Winter, a grifter who conned locals and promised many a trip in his plane to a party in Europe over Christmas, then disappeared. While in town, de Winter even placed an order for $10,000 worth of custom pottery from local sculptor Paul Hoffman that was never paid for. De Winter allegedly turned up a short time later in Corvallis, where he attended a college party. At the time, Peter Roscoe, an Astoria restaurateur and former city councilor, was working as a bartender at a taproom (what is now the Merry Time Bar and Grill). “That’s where I used to see Norman de Winter,” Roscoe said. “I never really trusted him. He had a phony accent and told everyone he had an airplane at the airport. He said he was going to take his newfound Astoria friends to a gala party in Switzerland. Then he just disappeared.” On Nov. 24, 1971, an man dressed in a dark suit and black tie who called himself “Dan Cooper” hijacked a Boeing 727 Northwest Airlines flight from Portland to Seattle. After showing the flight crew a briefcase he claimed contained a bomb, he held the passengers and crew hostage. He demanded the crew land in Seattle, where he released the passengers, and requested $200,000 in cash and four parachutes. He then ordered the crew to fly him to Mexico. About 45 minutes into the flight, Cooper sent the flight attendant to the cockpit and parachuted out of the plane somewhere north of Portland with the marked ransom money. The media mistakenly called Dan Cooper “D.B. Cooper.” The name stuck, and his exploits became the stuff of legend. After the skyjacking, a sketch artist’s rendering of Cooper’s face appeared on television. Roscoe remembers saying to a friend, “Isn’t that Norman de Winter?”

NORMAN de WINTER

A STRANGE VISITOR ARRIVES IN ASTORIA

LONGTIME RESIDENTS HAVE WONDERED FOR DECADES IF A MAN WHO APPEARED IN ASTORIA IN THE SUMMER OF 1971 BECAME THE INFAMOUS SKYJACKER D.B. COOPER.

Astoria restaurateur and former city councilor Peter Roscoe remembers the mysterious so-called Swiss baron “Norman de Winter” who he believes became infamous skyjacker D.B. Cooper.

THE ENDURING MYSTERY While there are endless theories on every aspect of the skyjacking, the identity of Norman de Winter, the so-called Swiss baron, is also a North Coast mystery. Roscoe, former Astoria Mayor Willis Van Dusen, local Marian Soderberg, and the town of

Astoria appear in the History documentary “D.B. Cooper: Case Closed?” which offers a private investigator’s theory about the de Winter/Cooper connection. The Cooper case, still unsolved, was

officially closed by the FBI in 2016 due to a lack of physical evidence. And the identities of D.B. Cooper and Norman de Winter — and whether they were one and the same master criminal — remain a mystery.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

EXPERIENCE... The Astoria

2:29 PM

Page 84

ASTOR STREET OPRY COMPANY

Column

Awesome

B I S T R O Views!

Gift Shop

34TH Season Musical Melodrama

Shanghaied IN Astoria July 12TH THROUGH September 1ST Thursday THROUGH Saturday AT 7PM Sunday Matinees: July 22ND, August 5TH & 9TH at 2PM

live music

thurs-sun. night and sunday brunch

isitor’s Center b y o ur V Stop & sweatshirts, Shirtsards, books & postc r all ages! gifts fo 503-325-2963

WWW.ASTORIACOLUMN.ORG Like us on Facebook Friends of the Astoria Column

Tickets on Sale ONE HOUR before all shows ***Reservations Recommended*** For tickets, visit our website www.astorstreetoprycompany.com or call: 503-325-6104 129 West Bond Street | Uniontown | Astoria

Vicki McAfee David McAfee

open every day lunch . dinner. sunday brunch 503.325.6777 • bridgewaterbistro.com on the river • 20 basin st • astoria or

READERS CHOICE

BEST WINE SHOP

Cannon Beach’s Best Selection of Oregon and Washington Wines

124 N. Hemlock St., Cannon Beach • (503) 436-1100 www.thewineshack.wine

Your partners in care, close to home. Clatsop Care Health & Rehabilitation Clatsop Care Retirement Village (503) 325-0313 (503) 325-4676 Clatsop Care In-Home Services Clatsop Care Memory Community (503) 468-0906 (503) 994-2060

84 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:29 PM

Page 85

Come and experience reasonable prices with epic views

Art Cards • Artisan Crafts • Gallery

Astoria Crest Motel sits on nearly three acres, overlooking the Mighty Columbia River. We feature “Epic” views, continental breakfast, meeting space for events up to 50, meal functions to 32 and outdoor space that can expand to even larger groups.

The Perfect Ocean Getaway One and two bedroom cottages surrounded by charming gardens and relaxing patio areas. Private path to waters edge. Pet friendly.

5366 Leif Erikson Drive Astoria, OR 97103 503-325-3141 • 800-421-3141 www.astoriacrestmotel.com reservations@astoriacrestmotel.com

2209 Boulevard North, Long Beach

1-800-646-2351 www.theanchoragecottages.com

JEWELRY • HOME DECOR • CARDS ORNAMENTS • SANTAS

Visit our store and shop where it’s

CHRISTMAS ALL YEAR LONG THINK LOCAL! SHOP LOCAL 405 Broadway in Seaside • 503.738.8854 Located inside the Pig ‘n Pancake • heronsnestgifts.com

MONDAY - FRIDAY 9AM-5PM

1133 COMMERCIAL STREET ASTORIA

503.468.0308

NO

APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

EMERALD HEIGHTS APARTMENTS 503-325-8221 FAX 503-325-8179 emeraldheights@charter.net emeraldheightsapartments.com Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 85


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:29 PM

Page 86


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:30 PM

Page 87

regon’s famously rugged coastline stretches over 363 marvelous miles of crashing waves, windswept vistas and mammoth, jutting sea stacks. Those breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean outside the window are available thanks to U.S. Highway 101. Whether hugging headlands, teetering on the edge of craggy cliffsides, or burrowing deep through dense old-growth forest, 101 faithfully traces our zigzagging coastline from border to border, connecting unique coastal communities rich with character. And every inch of beach along the way is free for anyone to explore. Because of a landmark state law passed in 1967, every beach in Oregon is public land. This is truly the People’s Coast and open for wanderlust.

O

Prior to the construction of 101, long before roads sluiced through the Coast Range, Oregonians felt that pull to visit the sea, especially when the valleys heated up during summer. But getting here was no easy task. As recently as the turn of the 20th century, inland Oregonians would take a boat ride down the Columbia River, exiting at Astoria or sometimes Fort Clatsop. From there, you could walk, hire a horse and coach, or take the local rail the 17 miles or so to beachfront resorts in Gearhart and Seaside. Just a few years later, you might see a Model T or Packard combing the sands beneath Tillamook Head or trying to traverse the dreaded onelane road blasted into the headland at Hug Point, which could only be accessed at low tide and was the single entry and exit point to the community of Arch Cape. Beach driving splashed into vogue in 1912 after Gov. Oswald West declared all beaches in Oregon public highways for a simple reason: There was no other major road on the coast. This all changed in 1921. Due to popular demand, Gov. Isaac Lee Paterson promoted the idea of a coast highway, and the state’s highway department rolled up its sleeves and started a design. Much of the road was complete by 1926 when the highway was officially dedicated as U.S. Route 101, but the passage still needed plenty of bridges and tunnels to become truly continuous. It would take another decade before work on all of the bridges was complete, but there was still one passage that kept the entire West Coast from being connected: the treacherous mouth of the Columbia River. For many years after the road was complete through California, Oregon, and Washington, the only way to cross the Columbia was by ferry. This would finally be rectified in 1966 when the Astoria-Megler Bridge opened. Back in 1931, the state officially renamed the route the Oregon Coast Highway, as it is still called today. In 2002 the famous road was promoted to become a National Scenic Byway-All American Road. And scenic it is! Now, there’s nothing more quintessentially American than a road trip, and, of course, it is just as much about the stops and the people you meet along the way as it is about cruising with the windows down, a salty breeze in your hair. As you plan your next trip, let Our Coast’s writers show you the quirky and can’t-miss stops along the North Coast and Southern Washington Coast. From majestic Oswald West State Park near Manzanita, Oregon, to the world’s largest frying pan in Long Beach, Washington, Our Coast will be your guide to every stop worth stopping at as you glide through the Lower Columbia, mile after historic mile on a road built to please. — Ryan Hume


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:31 PM

Page 88

ALDER CREEK FARM NEHALEM, OREGON

NEHALEM VALLEY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MANZANITA, OREGON

Karen Small is just one of 40 volunteers who take care of the gardens at Alder Creek Farm.

he Lower Nehalem Community Trust formed with a specific mission: to preserve land in its natural state and instill conservation values among community partners in the Nehalem region of the North Oregon Coast. Alder Creek Farm stands at the forefront of the Trust’s efforts and serves as an important hub for many of its activities, including the annual Harvest Festival in the fall and Living Locally Gala in the spring. Located at 35955 Underhill Lane, the farm hosts a community garden, greenhouse, ethnobotanical trail, native plant nursery, and a 50-acre wildlife sanctuary on the north edge of Nehalem Bay. The garden’s organic berries, vegetables, herbs, fruit trees, and ducks are tended by 40 volunteers who share the harvest among themselves and with the families served by the North County Food Bank.

T

A chunk of beeswax from a mysterious shipwreck recovered from a local beach sits in a case at the Nehalem Valley Historical Society.

he Oregon Coast is a living, breathing history class. On any trail head or beach, it’s easy to imagine you are following in the footsteps of the area’s natives and settlers. What came before the shops, hotels, and restaurants? Who walked the trails and fished the rivers when it was for work rather than recreation? Thanks to the volunteers at the Nehalem Valley Historical Society, the answers to those questions and more are right at your fingertips. Be warned: If you walk through their doors, you risk losing a whole day stepping back in time. The space, housed beneath the Pine Grove Community House at 225 Laneda Ave., boasts an impressive array of items and an ever-growing document collection. They also maintain an online archive to make materials available to anyone, anywhere. Stories fill the space: the grounding of the windjammer Glenesslin on the rocks surrounding Neahkahnie Mountain; a possible visit to Nehalem Bay by explorer Sir Francis Drake; beeswax from a shipwreck. Of course, with all the nearby shipwrecks over the centuries, visitors are always eager to ask about lost gold.

T


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:31 PM

Page 89

NEAHKAHNIE OVERLOOKS here are few vistas along 101 more dramatic than the Neahkahnie overlooks that pepper the cliffside of the road. Above towers Neahkahnie Mountain itself: Grand, mysterious, and spiritual, it has served as a watchful guardian for thousands of years. Some 500 feet below stretches the panorama of the rolling Pacific Ocean and the communities of Manzanita, Nehalem, and Wheeler, with narrow Nehalem Bay serving as a centerpiece. On a clear day you can see the communities of Rockaway Beach about 15 miles south, and Oceanside nearly 40 miles farther. With several overlooks of various sizes, there’s plenty of room to pull over and snap a few selfies. Time your visit just right, and there is no better spot to watch migrating whales as they head south in winter and return north in spring.

ANN EMERY PHOTO

T

Stunning overlooks on Neahkanie Mountain provide panoramic views of Manzanita.

OSWALD WEST STATE PARK

Cliffs at Oswald State Park offer visitors expansive views of the Pacific Ocean.

his park, which bears the former Oregon governor’s name, is full of moss- and fern-covered trails. The crashing surf is always foamy, the beach always pristine. Surfers bob expectantly in the water, waiting for the perfect moment to practice their art. Dogs pace anxiously back and forth, waiting for their masters’ return. For a closer look, take the spiral path down to the beach and stick your bare feet in the soft, cold sand. If one of the waiting dogs invites you to throw a stick, oblige. Explore the trail to Cape Falcon. There, climb through brush and spiderwebs to the high bluff and survey this glorious kingdom while basking in the sun.

T


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:32 PM

Page 90

HUG POINT ARCADIA BEACH

A stream above Hug Point adds to the natural beauty of the location.

hile perfectly suitable for a romantic destination, this beach five miles south of Cannon Beach was named when the beach was used a public highway. At low tide you can walk the original stagecoach road, where wheel ruts can still be seen in the rock. Travelers had to “hug� the point carefully to avoid getting swept off to sea, which is how Hug Point got its name. The area, tucked away in a nook between two bluffs, includes forested picnic areas, a restroom, and a short walkway to the beach.

W

Arcadia Beach lies just south of the city of Cannon Beach and offers visitors a long stretch of sand and surf.

flat, sandy expanse shaded by a lofty forest grove defines Arcadia Beach. The beach, which sits less than a mile south of Cannon Beach, stretches for more than a mile between two headlands. The area, like many along the North Coast, offers expansive views, and also features ample parking, public restrooms, and a picnic area for a quick road-trip pit stop. About half a mile north during low tide, ambitious beachgoers can walk to Silver Point, named for the color of the spruce trees on the sandstone bluffs.

A


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:33 PM

Page 91

TOLOVANA BUNNIES

SOUTH CANNON BEACH, OREGON

hile not as prevalent as they once were, off the third exit into Cannon Beach, travelers who visit Tolovana State Park or any of the surrounding restaurants and hotels may see an odd number of bunnies hopping around. The story of how these bunnies infiltrated the town is a little fuzzy, but at least the black-and-white ones can be traced back to the Swigart family, whose bunnies either escaped or were let go in the 1980s. An article from The Daily Astorian shows a bunny crossing in Tolovana dating back to 1969. What is known is that the rabbits did what rabbits do, and before long hundreds were hopping across Cannon Beach.

W

One of the legendary Tolovana bunnies comes out of hiding for a brief moment.

HAYSTACK ROCK

CANNON BEACH, OREGON

Humans aren’t the only visitors to Haystack Rock during the summer season.

owering 235 feet, Haystack Rock is hard to miss. The sea stack is the most Instagrammed landmark in Oregon, and was formed underwater between 10 and 17 million years ago. Lava flow from a volcanic eruption in what is now Idaho seeped through the sediment and reerupted through the seafloor to create the rock. Now, the rock is home to the largest puffin colony in Oregon, a host of tide pools that contain sea creatures like sea stars and anemones, and a natural wonder to about 100,000 visitors from all over the world.

T


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:33 PM

Page 92

CANNON BEACH HISTORY CENTER & MUSEUM CANNON BEACH, OREGON

hat puts the “Cannon” in Cannon Beach? At the Cannon Beach Museum & History Center (1387 S. Spruce St.), visitors can see the real cannon that inspired the town to change its name from “Ecola” in 1922. The iron cannon, technically called a carronade, and the capstan used to lift the ship’s anchor are from the decking of the USS Shark, a U.S. naval schooner that went down in the Columbia River in 1846. The cannon was discovered again in 1898 when changing tides carried it ashore in Arch Cape, an unincorporated town about five miles south of Cannon Beach.

W

Visitors to the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum can catch a glimpse of the recovered cannon from the USS Shark.

NECUS’ PARK

THE BISTRO

CANNON BEACH, OREGON

People take a look at the new welcome pole carved by artist Guy Capoeman created in partnership by the Clatsop-Nehalem tribe and the city of Cannon Beach during a dedication on Friday at NeCus' Park. — DANNY MILLER PHOTO

eCus’ Park, which can be found right off the first exit into Cannon Beach, is nestled between the town’s former elementary school at 268 Beaver St. and a winding curve of Ecola Creek. Before becoming a city park, for centuries the area was a Native American village called NeCus’, which roughly translates to “where the tide flows swiftly out.” It was known as a welcoming place for members of the Clatsop, Nehalem, and Tillamook tribes to fish and trade. A 10-foot tall cedar welcoming pole created in partnership with the ClatsopNehalem tribe was erected in 2016 to honor the park’s past.

N

CANNON BEACH, OREGON

Visitors to Cannon Beach who bring their four-legged friends will find a very dog-friendly menu at ‘The Bistro.’

annon Beach is already known as a dog-friendly destination. But one restaurant owner in town decided he would take it a step further. Jack Stevenson, the owner of the restaurant called “The Bistro” at 263 N. Hemlock St., has introduced a gourmet dinner option for dogs to his upscale menu. The “Bistro Dog Food Offering” lists an entrée of chicken, brown rice, sweet potatoes, carrots, peas, tomatoes, olive oil, and salt, all garnished with a sprig of parsley for $4.50. The dish is offered only to patrons who sit in the outdoor seating area, so it may not be the best rainy-day stop for Fido, but it is a good way to make a dog happy after a long journey in a car.

C


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:34 PM

Page 93

CIRCLE CREEK CONSERVATION CENTER

The habitat reserve at Circle Creek features several trails.

he 364-acre Circle Creek parcel, located on a recovering floodplain, is one of the North Coast Land Conservancy’s largest habitat reserves, and its most publicly accessible property. A couple of trails meander through Sitka spruce wetlands and across a pasture; they are open from dawn to dusk, conditions permitting. The property is home to a variety of native wildlife, including beavers, migratory songbirds, a herd of elk, nesting bald eagles, and more. To get there, head west on Rippet Road, between Seaside and the junction of 101 and Oregon Route 26. Before hiking the property, make sure to sign a release form found inside the refurbished barn, at the entrance to the site.

T


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:35 PM

Page 94

GRAVE OF THE UNKNOWN SAILOR SEASIDE, OREGON

THE COVE

SEASIDE, OREGON

f you travel down Ocean Vista Drive in southern Seaside, you’ll happen upon an obscure yet evocative landmark: a white flagpole surrounded by a square wall with the inscription, “Found on the beach. April 25, 1865.” Against the pole rests a stone bearing the grave’s only other source of information, the cryptic phrase: “Known only to God.” While not the most visually breathtaking monument, it is lovingly maintained by a small neighborhood group, and the simplicity adds to the mystery. Various tales about the grave’s inhabitants have seeped into local folklore. The most widely accepted, according to amateur historian Gloria Linkey, comes from Inez Hanson’s book, “Life on Clatsop.” From a ship anchored in the ocean, three sailors of unknown nationality came ashore to collect fresh water, and they met a local, Mr. Hobson. As they headed back toward their ship, a storm commenced, so Hobson and other Seaside residents built a fire on the beach to guide them. However, the following day, their bodies washed ashore. Not only would this cause heartbreak for loved ones waiting for the sailors’ return, Linkey said, but the captain also had “no idea that they were buried and the town would take care of that gravesite like it does.” Shipwrecks, however, are a common part of the Pacific Northwest’s history.

I

Waves roll over rocks at The Cove.

n the southern end of Seaside’s beach, ribbons of sand and rock are gently hugged by the towering Tillamook Head to create a treasured destination that is loved by locals as a spot for watching the sunset, taking a walk, wading in the ocean, and surfing the waves. Nearly a mile from the downtown core, the Cove works as a natural refuge, providing seclusion and serenity. If you venture a short distance from the beach, west of Ocean Vista Drive and Avenue W, you will stumble across a path that takes you to a garden of painted rocks containing a bench, known unofficially as Painted Rock Beach. To get to the Cove from Highway 101, head west on Avenue U until you reach the small parking lot at the end (look for a flag post and Tides By the Sea). From there, reaching the beach requires merely a short walk.

O

GILBERT INN SEASIDE, OREGON

he highly rated Gilbert Inn, a Victorian-style bed and breakfast, is not only one of the loveliest structures in Seaside, but a historically significant one. It was established in the late 19th century by Alexander Gilbert, an important player in the founding and development of Seaside as a resort town. One of his crowning achievements was acquiring the property used for Seaside’s Promenade and subsequently donating it to the city, so the beach would remain accessible to the public. At one time the mayor of Seaside, Gilbert was integral in developing the downtown business district known today as the Gilbert Block. Now the boutique inn at 341 Beach Drive boasts 11 guest rooms and period furnishing that transports visitors to a bygone era.

T


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:36 PM

Page 95

THE PROMENADE SEASIDE, OREGON

easide’s 1.5-mile oceanfront Promenade — more commonly referred to as “The Prom” — is a cherished paved esplanade used year-round for walking, biking, and skating. Peppered with benches, you can park yourself to experience a lovely view of the ocean across vegetated dunes. The boardwalk assumes a particularly picturesque atmosphere after dusk, when the town’s iconic lamplights, evenly spaced along the stretch, are illuminated. Near the Prom’s halfway point is the Turnaround — a place for vehicle inhabitants to safely glimpse the beach while switching directions on Broadway Street, Seaside’s main thoroughfare — where stands a statue of explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Traveling the Prom is a convenient precursor to dipping into side streets for coffee, a bite to eat, or a ride on the Carousel Mall’s eponymous attraction.

JOSHUA BESSEX PHOTO

S

NECANICUM RIVER SEASIDE, OREGON

here are several different ways to experience the Necanicum River, which splits Seaside into North and South and feeds into the Pacific Ocean at an estuary between Seaside and Gearhart. If your aim is simply to relax alongside the calming water — or watch salmon jumping through the surface, as some locals do — you can do so at Quatat Park, located at 493 Oceanway just north of Broadway. The marine park has picnic tables, deck seating, and a public boat ramp to give explorers access into the river. Other picturesque views of the Necanicum can be enjoyed off one of several bridges that cross the body of water at various locations throughout town, including Broadway and Avenue U. The bridge at 12th Avenue is a particularly popular spot for dangling crab pots into the river or casting fishing lines. If you want to use your own kayaks, stand-up paddleboards, or other equipment, you can also put in at Cartwright Park on South Franklin Street.

T


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:42 PM

Page 96

LEWIS AND CLARK NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK CULLABY LAKE

Cullaby Lake is an easily overlooked park with tranquil settings.

itting just east of the 101 outside of Warrenton, Cullaby Lake is the largest lake on the Clatsop Plains. This shallow body of water covers 220 long, narrow acres, feeding the Skipanon River. It is the central feature of Cullaby Lake County Park, which has a boat ramp, barbecue and horseshoe pits, and the Lindgren Cabin, a Finnish-American heritage site. Built in 1922, the cedar homestead opens its doors to visitors on holidays and weekends during the summer with rustic demonstrations of life on the plains. A $3 day-use fee for the park also pays for admission to the cabin. The fishing is good, too. Rainbow trout are stocked annually and rub fins with crappie, bullhead catfish, and largemouth bass.

S

The current version of the replica of Fort Clatsop was built in 2006 after the previous version was destroyed by fire in 2005.

he only national park on Oregon’s North Coast offers 125 acres of timeless rainforest, rivers, lakes, and trails all centered around a replica stockade styled after the one built by the Corps of Discovery when they landed here more than 200 years ago. In December 1805, Fort Clatsop became the winter encampment of Lewis and Clark and their team of explorers as they tried to weather the soggy climate. The modern Visitor Center includes the replica of the fort as well as an interpretative center with a bookstore and film-viewing area. There are programs and activities for all ages slotted through the summer. The park’s most popular trail is the Fort to Sea Trail, which begins its 6.5 mile journey at the Visitor Center and carries hikers across the top of Clatsop Ridge, down through woods and dunes, and lets them out at Sunset Beach in the throes of the Pacific Ocean.

T

CAMP RILEA pilling over 1,800 acres south of Warrenton, this highly regarded military facility provides a deluge of natural environments for both the Oregon and Washington National Guard to train in a variety of combat situations, including aerial and amphibious assaults across three miles of pristine coastline. They even have a complete Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) site — essentially a fake town complete with church and city hall that used to be called Millersburg before it was rebuilt to mirror an Afghani village during the Iraq War. Camp Rilea has a fully hooked-up RV Park and cottages (including wifi) available to veterans and all types of armed forces personnel. Even civilians can get a taste of base life with a visit to the Port Light Cafe, which boasts great service and a military-grade slice of prime rib on the weekends.

S


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:43 PM

Page 97

FORT STEVENS STATE PARK HAMMOND, OREGON

etween the Civil War and the end of World War II, Fort Stevens served as the primary military defense operation along the mouth of the Columbia River, along with Fort Canby and Fort Columbia across the way in Washington. Today Fort Stevens is a 4,300-acre park offering yurts, cabins, and fully loaded campground, as well as freshwater swimming in Coffenbury Lake, miles of rugged coastline to comb, and much, much more to explore.

B

The beaches at Fort Stevens State Park are a popular recreation spot in the area.

BATTERIES

FORT STEVENS STATE PARK, OREGON

Battery Russell is a popular site for visitors to Fort Stevens State Park.

ou can explore the remnants of the Fort Stevens battery, which for nearly 100 years was the first line of defense for the area. Large cannons that could blast half-ton shells nine miles out to sea were kept beneath walls of concrete and earth when not in use to conceal their positions. Fort Stevens has the notable distinction of being the only place on the U.S. mainland attacked during World War II when a Japanese submarine shelled the fort nine times on the night of June 21, 1942. Carved slyly into the slope of a hill so that its second-story roof is level with the plain and hidden from view, the old fort’s barracks are still intact and the Japanese shelling caused no significant injuries or damage. During the summer you can take an underground tour of the battery and visit the old military brig as well.

Y


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:44 PM

Page 98

PETER IREDALE

FORT STEVENS STATE PARK, OREGON ver since this four-masted steel bark ran aground on Clatsop Spit the night of Oct. 26, 1906, it has been drawing onlookers and generations of tourists intent on seeing a shipwreck in the Graveyard of the Pacific. Though captain and crew walked away from the wreck with nary an injury, the years have proven not to have been kind to the Iredale. Of course, decade upon decade of beating tides and ferocious winds have eaten away much of the ship’s former glory, but the position of the Iredale has left it to battle more than just storms. In 1942, it survived bombardment as a Japanese submarine fired wildly at Fort Stevens, missing the ship completely. It would spend the rest of World War II wrapped in barbed wire in case of an invasion. Then in 1960, a Clackamas County man named Cliff Hendricks laid claim to the salvage rights, boasting of an inheritance from his father who bought them up in 1908. As legal shenanigans reached an apex, the shipwreck was put under 24/7 armed guard, which included rotations from many local mayors and leaders of civic and social groups. Eventually the skirmish ended when a record turned up showing that Hendricks’ father had resold the rights some three days after purchasing them, so the younger Hendricks had no claim. And so, the rusty hull of the Peter Iredale is still there, beckoning onlookers as she has for more than 100 years.

E

The wreck of the Peter Iredale is a popular attraction at Fort Stevens. JOSHUA BESSEX PHOTO

MARITIME MEMORIAL PARK ASTORIA, OREGON

The Maritime Memorial Park serves as a reminder of those lost at sea and on the Columbia River.

king out a living amid the treacherous waters of the Graveyard of the Pacific requires an iron temperament and about 700 pounds of gall. This quaint park located on the Riverwalk in the massive shadow of the looming Astoria-Megler Bridge honors those brave enough to spend their lives testing these unpredictable waterways as well as members of the Coast Guard who lost their lives trying to make passage on the Columbia safe. The park itself is small and has benches and picnic tables from which to take in the breathtaking view. The memorial is composed of individual plaques with an individual’s name, birth date, and the date of their passing, as well as a short designation of how their lives revolved around the maritime industries, such as “Gillnetter” or “Oysterman.” Names denoted with an anchor identify souls lost to sea. Signage in the park also commemorates the Ghadar Party, the radical nationalist movement to free India from British rule. The Ghadar Party’s first meeting took place at the nearby Finnish Socialist Hall in 1913.

E


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:45 PM

Page 99

ASTORIA’S VICTORY MONUMENT ASTORIA, OREGON

SKIPANON CANNERY WARRENTON, OREGON

The Doughboy Monument stands as one of the most iconic memorials in Astoria.

Workers process seafood at the Skipanon Cannery.

eafood lovers shouldn’t speed past Warrenton without a visit to Skipanon Brand Seafood. Located west of 101, take the Warrenton-Astoria Highway until you see signs that will lead you to the old floating cannery, still bobbing upon the river from which the brand takes its name. Local hook-and-line-caught Albacore, sturgeon, and all manner of salmon are offered fresh, smoked, or canned. Some of their signature cans include Jalapeño Albacore and Smoked Pepper Sockeye. While the cannery store is only open during the fairer seasons, this family-owned operation supplies many local merchants with their goods, and their products can also be snatched online. And if you have already got the fish, know that Skipanon also does custom canning.

S

nce you spin through the roundabout to enter Astoria, take a moment before you leave Uniontown to appreciate this 10-foot bronze salute to the boys who trounced the Kaiser in World War I. Sitting atop a triangular concrete structure done up in a Spanish colonial style, “The Doughboy,” as the locals call it, rises above the corner of Marine Drive and Columbia Street amid a five-way intersection and is surrounded by a thin moat of grass. The statue, fully titled “Doughboy Over the Top at Cantigny,” is a replica of the Chicago-based sculptor John Paulding’s tribute to the first European victory of U.S. soldiers in 1918. The American Legion paid less than $5,000 to construct the monument and dedicated it on July 21, 1926, in front of an audience of 5,000 people, one day before the Astoria Column had its own dedication ceremony.

O

ASTORIA-MEGLER BRIDGE ounding up the onramp on the way out of Oregon, the AstoriaMegler Bridge is still an engineering site to behold. At 4.1 miles long, the oft-revitalized project spans the width of the Columbia River between Astoria, Oregon, and Point Ellice, Washington, and is still the longest continuous truss bridge in the nation. The bridge has the honor of joining the entire West Coast of the United States between the Mexican and Canadian borders, as it was the last link of 101 to be completed. When it opened in July 1966, more than 240,000 cars crossed the iconic bridge in the last five months of that inaugural year and it now carries more than 7,000 vehicles a day.

R


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:46 PM

Page 100

ST. MARY MCGOWAN

PORT OF ILWACO ILWACO, WASHINGTON

on’t turn to take the short-cut to Long Beach on Alternate Highway 101. Stay straight on regular old Highway 101 until you reach Ilwaco. Turn left on Elizabeth Ave S.E. and follow signs to the Port. Ilwaco is at the end of one branch of Highway 101. Another fishing town, its waterfront has undergone some major renovations in the last couple of years. The marina has always been a busy place with several charter companies in operation, a fleet of commercial boats and numerous sport and pleasure boats. Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company continues to provide business for a number of local fishermen and has a small store.

D

The St. Mary McGowan church is still in use to this day during certain months of the year.

t. Mary McGowan looks both adrift on the side of the highway and perfectly at home. Built in 1904, the pale blue-gray church at 354 U.S. Highway 101 seems to reflect the moods of the Columbia River that stretches in front of it and rests near what was once a Chinook Indian village and is now known as the Station Camp site. The area’s history is commemorated with interpretative signs and a looping walking trail that leads off from a parking lot on the church’s west side.

S

CHINOOK fter St. Mary’s, be sure to take some time to wander around Chinook. Neither city nor town, this is one of the few places at the mouth of the Columbia River where “fishing village” is still perhaps the best descriptor, and 101 serves as the main street. Chinook is dominated by the fishing industry. During the summer, anglers flock here to launch for the popular Buoy 10 salmon fishery. During the winter and spring, crabbing boats come and go from the tiny Port of Chinook and Bell Buoy Crab Company. Watch for signs for the historic Sea Resources fish hatchery as you head north through town. A small operation run by a single caretaker, the hatchery is not always open but remains a good spot to stretch your legs and read up on local history. In recent years, a new pub and restaurant have opened up here right off 101, providing more reasons to linger in this small community.

A


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:46 PM

Page 101

ILWACO SHIPYARD

WILLAPA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

ILWACO, WASHINGTON

nstead of continuing on to Ilwaco, turn onto Alternate Highway 101 after Chinook. Turn right onto Highway 101 towards Raymond/South Bend. The stretch of Highway 101 that leads to the wildlife refuge winds through forest and fields with sudden glimpses of the back of Willapa Bay: sloughs weaved through with grasses, creeks that suddenly slice through tide-tracked mud, sunlight tracing leaf shadows onto the pavement. The refuge office and interpretive center sit right on the side of the highway with views of the bay and the edge of Long Island. The center features hiking trails and an Art Trail. There are places to picnic, and there’s a good chance of seeing wildlife, from river otters to elk and, of course, the many types of migratory birds that stop in the area.

I

he shipyard is maintained by the Port of Ilwaco, and, on any given day, boats of all kinds and from all over are in dry dock for repair work. The shipyard, located just past the main waterfront when you travel west along Howerton Way, was part of a massive effort by the port to expand its offerings and improve its operations. It is one of the few places at the mouth of the Columbia where fishermen can haul out their boats to do their own repair and improvement work. At the waterfront end of the shipyard, a hoist pulls boats from the water. Nearby, at Christmas time, an impromptu Christmas tree made of stacked crab pots lights the way.

T

WORLD’S LARGEST FRYING PAN LONG BEACH, WASHINGTON

BLACK LAKE

his lake is actually black. For such a small body of water it can be surprisingly deep and is regularly stocked with fish. A narrow trail goes around the backside of the lake and has been improved by local students over the years. It can be muddy in the winter, but is worth a ramble. You can find it heading north up First Avenue Keep as you pass the shipyard and continue toward Long Beach. Keep an eye out for black bears.

T

echnically, this stop at Pacific Avenue and Fifth Street S.E., isn’t on 101 but if you’re looking for classic roadside attractions, the case could be made that the World’s Largest Frying Pan and Marsh’s Free Museum across the street are things that might “emotionally” be part of a 101 trip. Who knows if the enormous frying pan forged decades ago is actually the world’s largest — it has proclaimed itself to be thus, and we’ll respect that. The pan stands as a reminder of the city’s annual razor clam festival. Across the street, the free museum offers even more bizarre offerings from a two-headed calf to Jake the Alligator Man.

T

ILWACO, WASHINGTON

An attraction known as ‘The World’s Largest Frying Pan’ can be seen just off Highway 101 in Long Beach.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:47 PM

Page 102

M U E S U M E E R F S ’ H S R MA Come in & ur Ask for yo

FREE!

free! e r a s e l smi d n a hs g Come see our u a l d n na e oddities! t t o g r o ef r a Including: s e l b u o r • 8 Legged Lamb re t e h A Few Quotes From some of Our Visitors w e c a l Ap • 2 Headed Pig Seashell

You gotta’ see J a k e the alligator man!

“1 of 10 great places for monstrous encounters”

– USA Today

“A truly fun place to browse and shop, with something bizarre around every corner. Outstanding music box and vintage arcade collection. Something for everyone.” – People Magazine “Marsh’s Free Museum is a world class side show” “Scientists’ call bizarre creature the missing link.” Join Jake’s Fan Club at: www.marshsfreemuseum.com

“Going to Marsh’s Free Museum is a bit like watching Ben Hur. Every time you do you see something new.”

– Tacoma Tribune – Weekly World News

• 2 Headed Calf • Jake– The Alligator Man • Shrunken Head • Large Music Box Collection • Vintage Arcade Items • Wild Animal Mounts

–Daily Astorian

So interesting some people never leave!

• Fine & Unusual Gifts! • Check out our New Exhibits for 2017 • Ask for your FREE Tide Guide & Sea Shell!

Peninsula’s #1 Family Attraction! MENTION THIS AD FOR A FREE WOODEN NICKLE GOOD FOR 10% OFF ALL PURCHASES!

Beach Souvenirs •Seashells • Salt Water Taffy

OPEN 7 DAYS • AMPLE PARKING DOWNTOWN LONG BEACH, WA • 360-642-2188


2/28/18

2:48 PM

Page 103

Oregon’s home of craft-brewed conversation.

'ȡ6ț2Ȯ(Ȫ$ȫ7ȧ5ȡ$ 3ș5ȣ6 5ȝ&Ȫ(ș7ȡ2Ȧ Take a cycling class at the Recreation Center. Slide down the big red slide at the Aquatic Center. Go for a hike on Cathedral Tree Trail. Find inspiration at Youngs River Falls. Jump for joy at Port of Play. The six mile Astoria Riverwalk Trail will lead you to fun, adventure, and great eats for the entire family.

opb.org

For more information, visit AstoriaParks.com

d

Iȫ&ȧVȝ5

Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

RENT STAND UP PADDLE BOARDS BI-WEEKLY PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT CHILD CARE LARGE POOL & FITNESS CENTER HISTORIC ATTRACTIONS HIKING TRAILS #AstoriaParks

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 103


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:48 PM

Page 104

Astoria-Warrenton region Go to discoverourcoast.com to explore hundreds more attractions, restaurants, merchantss and places to stay on Our Coast. Click o on a map button to find contact info and links for that pl at location, for a day trip with nearby dining, lodging and things to tion ti on,, plus our recommendations fo o do. 1. F Fort Stevens State Park — 100 Ridge Road, Hammond PACIFIC

2. F Fort to Sea Trail — Fort Clatsop to Sunset Beach 3. F Fort Clatsop — 92343 Fort Clatsop Road, Astoria

WAHKIAKUM

4. U Uppertown Firefighters Museum — 2986 Marine Drive, Astoria 5. A Astoria Column — 1 Coxcomb Drive, off 15th Street, Astoria

h. Wash. Ore.

6. L Lower Columbia Disc Golf Course — at Clatsop County Fairgrounds, 9 92937 Walluski Loop, Astoria 7. C Columbia River Maritime Museum — 1792 Marine Drive, Astoria

Region in detail

CLATSOP CLATSO

8. A Astoria Aquatic Center — 1997 Marine Drive, Astoria 9. Clatsop C County Heritage Museum — 16th and Exchange streets, Astoria 10 10. F Fort Astoria — 15th and Exchange streets, Astoria 11. L Liberty Theater — 1203 Commercial St., Astoria

TILLAMOO TILLAMOOK

12 12.. O Oregon Film Museum — 732 Duane St., Astoria 13. F Flavel House — 441 Eighth St., Astoria 14 14.. M Maritime Memorial Park — 200 W. Marine Drive, Astoria

Fort Stevens State Park

Liberty Theater 2016 marked the 90th anniversary of the Astoria Column. mn. mn.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:48 PM

Page 105

FORT COLUMBIA STATE PARK

101

CLARK’S DISMAL NITCH

STATION CAMP

Legend

401

U.S. highways

TON HING WAS GON ORE

State routes City, rural routes

Clatsop Spit

Jetty Lagoon

Co

oad yR Jett

Astoria Megler Bridge Fortt Stevens Stev vens e ens

R

Rivers Lakes, open water Mott Municipal areas

Detail,l, below

I Island

Cities, townships

1

5 101

Warrenton

Astoria Regionall Ai iirport Airport

SE 12th Place

BUS

101

d Roa

er kee Riv loos Wal

ad

Ro

an e

ek L

CSF

Road an og ark

s& wi

202

ad n. Ro

le Mt Sadd

Cl

R i v er

e

Alan Kenaga/EO Media Group

lin e

CSF

er

ad Ro

Tucker Cre L

Cullaby Lake Co. Park Cullaby Lake

Manion Driv

2 miles

CSF

Pip e

CSF

CSF

Le

1

6

ad Ro ks c i W

lm

sop

Sunset Beach State Rec. Site

202

Pa

is & Clark R oad Lew

2

Fort Fo F ort Clatsop Cl C latsop

t Fort C l a

Camp Rilea Military Res.

3 FORT T CLATSOP CLAT TS P TSOP NATIONAL NATI ONALL HIST TORIC HISTORIC PARK K

Day John

oa d op R iver Lo Youngs R

Ocean

0.5

30

S BUS

1011

CSF

lluski Loop Road Wa

ad

104

Youngs Bay

Lois Island

CLATSOP STATE FOREST

Old Youngs Bay Bridge

iver Young s R

e Ro

Pacific

105

Ridg

Camp Kiwanilong

0

3300

4

Astoria

104

FORT FOR RT STEVENS STEV VENS STATE PARK

Trails, walks

Parks and forests 101

Hammond

ia lumb

State boundary

iver

C L AT S O P C O .

101

Colu

mbia

Astoria Riverwalk

Downtown Astoria River

101

11th Street e eet

Grand Avenue

10 10th 0th St Street treeet

Franklin Avenue

30

treeett Stre St Duanee S Du treeett Str g Stre h ge Exchan Exc

9

A nnuee Fraanklin Ave

Street 17th S

500 feet

rand Avenue W. G

12 1133

7

Riverwalk

1 11 S reet 144thh St

N

30

Ninth S Street Stre eet

W. E Exchange Street W h

Asto ria

30

Eighth Street St t

Duane Street

Sev Seventh venth Str Street reeet

Commercial Street 30

Sixthh Street Strreet S

Bond Street

Fifth Street

14

Third Street

W. Marine Drive

8 JOHN WARREN WARREN N FIELD

Sister Green Mountain 1,723 ft.

R.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:48 PM

Page 106

Long Beach Peninsula Go to discoverourcoast.com to explore hundreds more attractions, restaurants, merchants and places to o stay on Our Coast. Click on a map earby dining, lodging and tthings to do. button to find contact info and links for that location, plus our recommendations for a day trip with nearby

PACIF PACIFIC

WAHKIAKUM WAHKI h. as W e. Or

Region in detail

CLATSOP

1.

Leadbetter Point State Park — Ocean Park, Wash., 19 miles north of Seaview

2.

World Kite Museum — 303 S.W. Sid Snyder Drive, Long Beach, Wash.

3.

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum — 115 Lake St. S.E., Ilwaco, Wash.

4.

Port of Ilwaco — 165 Howerton Ave., Ilwaco, Wash.

5.

Knappton Cove Heritage Center — two miles past the rest stop north of the Astoria Bridge on Washington state Route 401

6.

Fort Columbia State Park — U.S. Highway 101, two miles west of the Astoria Bridge in Chinook, Wash.

7.

North Head Lighthouse and Cape Disappointment Lighthouse — within Cape Disappointment State Park

8.

Cape Disappointment State Park — two miles southwest of Ilwaco, Wash.

9.

Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center — Cape Disappointment State Park, two miles southwest of Ilwaco, Wash.

10. Discovery Trail — Ilwaco to north end of Long Beach, Wash. TILLAMOOK

11. Cranberry Museum — 2907 Pioneer Road, Long Beach, Wash. 12. Willapa Interpretive Art Trail — near Refuge Headquarters in Willapa National Wildlife Refuge 13. Appelo Archive Center — 1056 state Route 4, Naselle, Wash.

72 years serving visitors in Long Beach

303 Sid Synder Drive, Long Beach, WA 360-642-4020 www.worldkitemuseum.com A great destination for fun for all! Experience the history and art of kites through video and interactive elements. Make your own kite and fly it here on the world’s longest beach! Visit today!

A Great Place to Enjoy the Beach!

Featuring:

• Bold heroes and story characters on kites from Japan • Delicately painted Chinese silk kites • Kites that saved lives in WWII • Exhibit featuring Kite Surfing, Buggying, Land Boarding and other extreme kiting sports

LARGE GRASSY SITES • GROUP MEETING HALL WALK TO DOWNTOWN • STROLL TO THE BEACH WIFI & CABLE TV ACCESS

For Reservations: 360-642-2711

Visit Our Museum Store for:

Admission Includes Kite Making!

www.driftwood-rvpark.net Kites soar over 1408 PACIFIC AVENUE N., LONG Long Beach Peninsula 106 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

BEACH, WA 98631

Open Daily, 11am to 5pm April through September Open Friday - Tuesday 11am to 5pm October - March

• Kites for flying on the beach • Books about kite making, flying & history • Postcards, T-shirts, jewelry & posters


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:48 PM

Page 107

BUSH R PIONEER COUNTY Y PARK

Palix R oad

PACIFIC PINES STATE PARK 274th Place

U.S. highways

ole R oa d

ater Lakes, open water

R St Stree Street et

Ocean Park Timberland Library

ips Cities, townships

R iver

land

Z Street

500 feet

dR

o ad

e venu on A wert

S.W. Av Second Avenue

13

Ho

Ri ver

Deep

Chinook

100

IlIlwaco waco wa o

9 8 CAPE C CAP PE 7 DISAPPOINTMENT D DISA A OINTMENT APPO T

Baker Bay

STATE PARK S AT STA TE P ARK

WASH IN

C Cape Disappointment Disapp Dis appointment men en Lighthouse Lighthousse

Vall e

Detail, below right

GTON

OREG

ON

N

Orego egon g n Avenu Av e N. Wash shing hington ton o Street S N.

Orego regon g n Avenue S. S Wash W ashing hington ton o Streett S S.

S.E.

101 ILWACO CITY PARK

Baker Bay

4

500 feet

y

d R oa

Nort North N rthh Head He LLighthouse Ligh htthhouse se

100

Cedar Street N.E.

Lak Lake Street S.E.

Main Mai ain in Street St Stre Stre treet S.W 4ett S.W.

101

1100

Occeea ean Beach Blv B d.

Spruce S Spr uce Street r E. E

3

Naselle Naaselle aselle ll

Long Beach eacch

He a

1103 003

E. y S. r Wa arbo ter H Elizabeth Ave. N.E. Ou

WNWR W

101

N.

Sid S Snyder Snyde de D Drive

Advent Ave. N.E.

PA C I F I C C O .

Beach Hospital

Avenue N.E. Brumbach Brum

Ocean HO

4

101

Marsh’s Free M useum Museum

Ilwaco High Hiigh School

Ilwaco

oad ver Pa rpa l a R

12

Willapa Bay

11

Seaavie iew Seaview

Ocean Beach each Blvd.

Discovery Trail

N

Na WNWR NWR WR

Worl World orld orl d Kite Kite Kit Museum & Hall of Fame

Boouleevard Boulev ard Avenue enu

g Is

Sandridge Road

ha

Discovery Trail

Lon

Chetlo Harbor

CULBERTSON CU PARK

Stoplight

2

i le R sel

P a ci fi c O ce a n

er Riv

Long Beach Boardwalk

N

em

Seco cond nd St Stree Stre t N. S S cond Street Second Stree S S. Thirdd Street S S.

So ut h

el

WILLAPA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Peninsula Course Golf Cours se

Pioneerr Road

h

N

Nahcotta Chann

Cranberry Road Roo

Stoplight

Bolstad Avenue

Ro ad Mid em dle h a R i v er Ne mh a

101

LOOMIS LAKE STATE PARK

Fifth Street N.

a

rt h

m Ne N.

No

Ocean Park aarkk

Sixth Street N.

103

Pacifi cific if c Ave Avenue

Nemah

Nah Nahcotta

227th Place

Pacific Ocean

Detail, above right

N 500 feet

Long Lon ng Beach ng B

Joe oee JJohns ohhhns Road

Detail, right

ROD RUN FIELD

Oysterville

103

103

Ocean Park Area Chamber of Commerce

103

Surrrfside Surfside Golfllf Course Gol

Klipsan Beach

103

Idaho d ho Avenue daho Aven

S t ackp

as Municipal areas

Bay

PACIFIC PINES NE ES RK STATE PARK

Ba Avenuee Bay

sts Parks and forests

Willapa a

Oysterville Road

U Street

OCEAN PARK 262 2ndd Place Plac Pl l e 262nd

103

Sandridge Road

Rivers 101

Vernon V Ve er Avenue

Trails, walks

270th Place NAHCOTTA

Willapa Bay

Pacific Ocean Pac

o u t h boundaryy SState

272nd Street

K Place Park a Avenue

nd

es City, rural routes Be

LEADBETTE LEADBETTER POINT STATE PARK

Surfsidee

Port of Peninsula

State routes

WILLAP WILLAPA PA P NATIONAL NATIONA NA AL WILDLIFE E REFUGE

1

Ocean Park/Nahcotta

Legend

1011 10

0

0.5

1

2 miles

401

Alan Kenaga/EO Media A dia Group

6 Chinook

5

Grays Bay S Our Coast 2018W•A discoverourcoast.com • 107 E. H.

OR


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2:49 PM

Page 108

G to discoverourcoast.com to Go explore hundreds more attractions, restaurants, merchants and places to stay on Our Coast. Click on a button to find contact info and map b links for that location, plus our recommendations for a day trip with nearby mend dining, lodging and things to do. dinin

TILLAMOOK

i cu m

n

CLATSOP CLATSO

Cannon Beach Junction

ca

WAHKIAKUM WAHK Wash. ree.. Ore. O Ore

Ne

Cannon BeachNorth Tillamook County region

PACIFIC

Region in detail

2/28/18

26

101

ECOLA STATE PARK

Ra

da

rR

Ri ve r Klootchie Creek Campground

oa

1

d

Cannon Beach

CLATSOP STATE FOREST

TOLOVANA BEACH STATE RECREATION SITE

Detail, tail, ow below left

Tolovana Park

1. Ecola State Park — off U.S. Highway 101, two miles north of Cannon Beach

Haystack Rock

2. Hug Point State Recreation Site — 5 miles south of Cannon Beach

TATE ARCADIA BEACH ST STATE REATION SITE RECREATION

3. Oswald West State Park — U.S. Highway 101, 10 miles south of Cannon Beach

HUG POINT STATE REATION SITE TE E RECREATION

4. Cape Falcon — in Oswald West State Park, 10 miles south of Cannon Beach

C L AT S O P C O .

CSF

2 Hug Point State Recreation Site

101

5. Neahkahnie Mountain — in Oswald West State Park

CLATSOP STATE FOREST

Onion Peak 3,064 ft.

6. Haystack Rock Awareness Program — offshore at midtown Cannon Beach

Rock R Mountain M 2, 2,004 ft.

4 5

E. Monroe St.

ad

Pacific

TILLAMOOK STATE FOREST

Shor t Sa nd C

OSWALD D WEST STATE E PARK

ad Ro

S. Hemlock Stree t

3 r rossov e

N. Spruce Street

Pac

101

Sunset unset B Blvd. lvd vd.

Haystack Rock

Arbor A b Lane L

6

E. Blv Sun d. set

Legend

Riv er

U.S. highways

County boundary

NEHALEM BAY STATE PARK

Nehalem Bay

S. Pacific Street

S.. Hemlock Street S

Rivers 101

Wheeler

Lakes, open water Parks and forests Municipal areas Cities, townships

53

Roy Creek Park

City, rural routes Trails, walks

1,000 feet

Nehalem

Manzanita

State routes

HAYSTACK H HAY STACK HILL STATE S TATE PARK

0 0.5 1

2 miles

Alan Kenaga/EO Media Group

Nehalem Spit

7

rk

No r

Road Creekk R E C Elk

ha Ne rk o F N. Nehal

em

th F o

Ro

Ocean

N

R iver

nue

m

e

Av

le

Cannon Beach

m

El

LES SHIRLEY PARK

ific O cean

7. Cannon Beach History Center & Museum — 1387 S. Spruce St., Cannon Beach

101

TILLAMOOK CO.


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:49 PM

Page 109

A couple enjoys a bicycle ride in Seaside Gearhart Lane Hillila Road

N. Marion Avenue

Summit Avenue

N. Cottage Avenue

GEARHART GOLF LINKS

101

Ocean

S. Ocean Avenue

Pacific Way

1

3. Sunset Empire Park & Rec. District — 1140 Broadway, Seaside side 4. The Turnaround — west end of Broadway, Seaside

Lew is &

Gearhart G Pacific Ocean

ECOLA STATE PARK

6

N

cu ani ec m

0

R

r

0.5

1

2 miles

S ad d

Cannon Beach Junction

i ve

Beach D rrive

SADDLE MOUNTAIN PAR STATE PARK

l e Moun tai n

Twin Peaks 1,621 ft.

H

Providence Seaside Hospital

Avenue S 101

Legend U.S. highways State routes

SEASIDE GOLF COURSE

City, rural routes State boundary Trails, walks Rivers

R oa

d

Davis Point 1,559 ft.

g Ed

o ew

Broadway oad y

Avenue Ave A ennue en ue G

Street

ne River

S.

C L AT S O P C O .

101

202

Lewis & C lark Riv er

Seaside

7

Kla ska ni

CLATSOP STATE FOREST

Sister Green Mountain 1,723 ft.

SEASIDE S E AS

S. Wahanna Road

iv er

Stree S. Downin t g

Cla rk

rk

g un

sR

od

Roa d

o S. F oad Saddl nR e M o u ntai

Yo

3

5

7. Tillamook Head — five miles southwest of Seaside

Area in detail

ELMER FELDENH FELDENHEIMER NA STATE NATURAL AREA

4

6. Saddle Mountain State Park — off U.S. Highway 26, eight miles northeast of Necanicum Junction

101

Fifth Fifftfth Fif th Avenue A e

2

5. Seaside Carousel Mall — 300 Broadway, Seaside

TILLAMOOK

N. Wahann a

ve d ay Dri oll a

2. Seaside Aquarium — 200 N. Promenade, Seaside

Region in detail, below

Lewis and Clark Road

12tth Av 12th Avenue ven

1. Seaside Museum Mu & Historical Society — 570 Necanicum Drive, Seaside

CLATSOP

N. H

Ne ca nicum Dr ive

WAHKIAKUM AHKIAKUM sh. Wash. ee.. Ore.

Avenue

GEARHART OCEAN STATE PARK

Go to dis discoverourcoast.com to explore hundreds more attractio attractions, restaurants, merchants and places to stay on Our Coa Coast. Click on a map button to find contact info and links fo for that location, plus our recommendations for a day ttrip with nearby n dining, lodging and things to do.

C PACIFIC

G Street Seaside Municipal Airport

Pacific

Seaside-Gearhart region

GEARHART

Lakes, open water Parks and forests

N 1,000 feet

Municipal areas Cities, townships

26

Necanicum Junction

Alan Kenaga/EO Media Group


our coast advertiser index

Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:49 PM

Page 110

ANTIQUES

DAY SPA

Phog Bounders Antique Mall .............112 892 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 338-0101 www.phogbounders.com

Spa at Cannery Pier Hotel ...................112 No. 10 Basin Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 338-4772 www.cannerypierhotel.com/spa

APARTMENTS

DENTISTS

Emerald Heights Apartments, LLC.......85 1 Emerald Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-8221 www.emeraldheightsapartments.com

Klemp Family Dentistry.......................112 1006 W. Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 468-0116 www.klempfamilydentistry.com

ARTS, CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT Astor Street Opry ....................................84 129 Bond Street Union Town Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-6104 www.astorstreetoprycompany.com Astoria Scandinavian Midsummer Festival......................................................84 P.O. Box 34 Astoria, OR 97103 www.astoriascanfest.com Clatsop County Historical Society......116 P.O. Box 88 Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2203 www.cumtux.org Coaster Theatre Playhouse....................18 108 North Hemlock Street Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 436-3602 www.coastertheatre.com

Jeffrey Leinassar, DMD, FAGD...............65 1414 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-0310 www.smileastoria.com

Wauna Federal Credit Union.................44 P.O. Box 67 Clatskanie, OR 97016 (800) 773-3236 www.waunafcu.org

Clatsop Care & Rehab Center................84 646 16th Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-0313 www.clatsopcare.org

Astoria Sunday Market........................113 Downtown on 12th Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-1010 www.astoriasundaymarket.com

Columbia Memorial Hospital................65 2111 Exchange St. Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-4321 www.columbiamemorial.org

Astoria/Warrenton Chamber Of Commerce.........................19 111 W. Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-6311 • (800) 875-6807 www.oldoregon.com

Ocean Beach Hospital............................44 1st Avenue North Ilwaco, WA 98624 (360) 642-3181 www.oceanbeachhospital.com

Funland.....................................................19 1201 Broadway Ave Seaside, OR 97138 funlandseaside.com

Sunday Afternoon Live........................112 2001 Fowler Road Raymond, WA 98577 (360) 875-5123 www.sundayafternoonlive.org

Ilwaco Merchants Association..............59 P.O. Box 193 Ilwaco, WA 98624 (360) 642-0771 www.ilwacowashington.com

Wiegardt Studio Gallery ........................11 2607 Bay Avenue Ocean Park, WA 98640 (360) 665-5976 www.ericwiegardt.com

Long Beach Peninsula Visitor’s Bureau........................................42 3914 Pacific Way Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-2400 www.funbeach.com

OSU Clatsop County Extension ..........113 2001 Marine Drive #RM210 Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-8573 extension.oregonstate.edu/clatsop

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Astoria Parks & Recreation..................103 1997 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-7027 www.astoriaparks.com

Liberty Theater........................................25 1203 Commercial Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-5922 www.liberty-theater.org

EDUCATION

Seaside Chamber of Commerce...........48 7 N. Roosevelt Drive Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-6391 www.seasidechamber.com

HEALTH CARE

Friends of the Astoria Column..............84 1 Coxcomb Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2963 www.astoriacolumn.org

Del’s OK Point S .......................................44 35359 US-101 Business Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2861 www.pointstire.com/astoria

(continued) Seaside Carousel Mall ............................19 300 Broadway Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-6728 www.seasidecarouselmall.com

FAMILY, COMMUNITY & CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS

Friends Of Old Fort Stevens ..................59 P.O. Box 138 Hammond, OR 97121 (503) 861-1470 www.visitftstevens.com

AUTOMOTIVE

FAMILY, COMMUNITY & CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS

Ocean Park Area Chamber of Commerce .......................114 1715 E. Bay Avenue Ocean Park, WA 98640 (888) 751-9354 www.opwa.com Pacific County Economic Development Council......................................................58 Grays Harbor College-Riverview Campus 600 Washington Ave Raymond, WA 98577 (360) 875-9330 pacificedc.org

110 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

Peninsula Pharmacies............................45 101 1st Ave S Ilwaco, WA 98624 (360) 642-3133 101 Bolstad Ave Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-3200 www.penpharmrx.com Seaside Wellness Center......................113 2609 US 101 Suite 203 Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 717-5284 www.seasidewellnesscenter.net Urgent Care NW – Astoria.............11, 113 2120 Exchange Street, #111 Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-0333 www.urgentcarenwastoria.com

LODGING & TRAVEL

LODGING & TRAVEL (continued)

MUSEUMS

(continued)

Boreas Bed & Breakfast Inn.................113 607 Ocean Beach Boulevard N. Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-8069 www.boreasinn.com

Garibaldi Maritime Museum ..............113 112 Highway 101 Garibaldi, OR 97118 (503) 322-8411 www.garibaldimuseum.org

Big Creek Fishing Lodge ........................55 92878 Waterhouse Road Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 458-6512 www.bigcreekfishing.com

Marsh’s Free Museum ..........................102 409 Pacific Way S. Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-2188 www.marshsfreemuseum.com

Columbia Inn.........................................111 495 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-4211 www.columbiainnastoria.com Gearhart By The Sea...............................43 1157 N. Marion Gearhart, OR 97138 (800) 547-0115 www.gearhartresort.com McMenamins-Gearhart Hotel ..............43 1157 N Marion Ave Gearhart, OR 97138 (503)717-8159 www.mcmenamins.com/gearhart-hotel Shilo Inns..................................................49 30 N. Prom Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-9571 900 S. Holladay Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-0549 1609 E. Harbor Street Warrenton, OR 97146 (503) 861-2181 www.shiloinns.com

Northwest Carriage Museum ...............44 314 Alder Street Raymond, WA 98577 (360) 942-4150 www.nwcarriagemuseum.org World Kite Museum & Hall Of Fame.......................................106 303 Sid Snyder Drive West Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-4020 www.worldkitemuseum.com

PUBLIC BROADCASTING Oregon Public Broadcasting...............103 7140 SW Macadam Portland, OR 97219 (503) 445-1874 www.opb.org

RADIO STATIONS Coast Community Radio........................45 1445 Exchange Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-0010 www.coastradio.org

REAL ESTATE & CONSTRUCTION

The Anchorage Cottages.......................85 2209 Ocean Beach Boulevard North Long Beach, WA 98631 (800) 642-2351 www.TheAnchorageCottages.com

Bonnie Carmack......................................48 Lighthouse Realty 710 Pacific Avenue S. Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-4461 www.lighthouseproperty.com

LUMBER MILLS

Maryann Sinkler......................................59 RE/MAX Coastal Advantage 219 N Hemlock Cannon Beach, OR 97110 www.remax.com

Hampton Lumber.................................103 9600 SW Barnes Road #200 Portland, OR 97225 (503) 297-7691 www.hamptonlumber.com

MUSEUMS Cannon Beach History Center & Museum..............................................113 1387 South Spruce Street Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 436-9301 www.cbhistory.org

Discovery Coast Real Estate ..................58 1711 Pacific Ave Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-3325 discoverycoastrealestate.com Jamye Lucier ............................................45 Pacific Realty 102 NE Bolstad Avenue Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-3127 www.pacreal.com

Astoria Crest Motel.................................85 5366 Leif Erikson Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-3141 www.astoriacrestmotel.com

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum ....55 P.O. Box 153 115 Lake Street Southeast Ilwaco, WA 98624 (360) 642-3446 www.columbiapacificheritagemuseum.org

Astoria Rivershore Motel.......................48 59 W. Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2921 www.rivershoremotel.com

Columbia River Maritime Museum....2, 3 1792 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2323 www.crmm.org

Pacific Realty............................................45 102 NE Bolstad Avenue Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-3127 www.pacreal.com

Astoria Riverwalk Inn.............................45 400 Industry Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2013 www.astoriariverwalkinn.com

Cranberry Museum & Gift Shop ...........59 2907 Pioneer Road Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-5553 www.cranberrymuseum.com

Rich McQuerry.........................................44 Anchor Realty 31605 I Street #B Ocean Park, WA 98640 (503) 318-3816

Lighthouse Realty...................................48 710 Pacific Ave S Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-4461 www.lighthouserealty.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

REAL ESTATE & CONSTRUCTION

Page 111

RESTAURANTS, FOOD & BEVERAGE

RESTAURANTS, FOOD & BEVERAGE

REATAILERS & SPECIALTY SHOPPING

REATAILERS & SPECIALTY SHOPPING

(continued)

(continued)

(continued)

(continued)

(continued)

Tina Chapman .........................................59 Windermere Real Estate 255 N Hemlock Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (800)676-1176 www.windermere.com

Fulio’s ........................................................49 1149 Commerical Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-9001 fulios.com

Seaside Fultano's ....................................19 215 Broadway Street Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-5612 www.fultanos.com/seaside-fultano-s.html

Cannon Beach Leather...........................55 239 N, Hemlock Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 436-0208

RiverSea Gallery......................................85 1160 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-1270 www.riverseagallery.com

RESTAURANTS, FOOD & BEVERAGE Bell Buoy...................................................43 1800 S, Roosevelt Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-2722 • (800) 529-2722 www.bellbuoyofseaside.com

Gearhart Bowl & Fultano’s Pizza...........19 3518 Hwy 101 North Gearhart, OR 97138 (503) 738-5333 www.gearhartbowl.com Geno’s Pizza & Burgers...........................43 3693 Leif Erickson Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503)325-4927

Seasonal Seafoods..................................34 306 Dike Road Bay Center, WA 98527 (888) 905-9079 www.baycenterfarms.com Table 360 Bakery & Bistro......................34 1184 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 741-3660 www.table360bakery.com The Pelican Pub & Tap Room ................35 33180 Cape Kiwanda Drive Pacific City, OR 97135 (503) 965-7007 www.pelicanbrewing.com

City Lumber .............................................65 2142 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-4511 www.citylumber.com Cleanline Surf Shop................................49 60 N. Roosevelt Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-7888 171 Sunset Blvd. Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 436-9726 www.cleanlinesurf.com

Bridgewater Bistro..................................84 20 Basin Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-6777 www.bridgewaterbistro.com

Human Bean-Seaside.............................43 1545 N Roosevelt Drive Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-5405 www.thehumanbean.com

Camp 18 Restaurant...............................55 42362 Highway 26 Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 755-1818 www.camp18restaurant.com

Hungry Harbor Grille..............................34 313 Pacific Avenue Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-5555 www.hungryharbor.com

4 Seasons Clothing .................................58 1405 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-8200

Inferno Lounge........................................34 77 11th Street Astoria, OR 97103

A Gypsy’s Whimsy...................................84 1130 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 338-4871

Forsythea Home & Garden....................48 1124 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2189

Charlie’s Chop House..............................35 1313 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 741-3033 charlies-chop-house.business.site

McMenamins-Sand Trap Pub................43 1157 N Marion Ave Gearhart, OR 97138 (503) 717-8159 www.mcmenamins.com/gearharthotel/sand-trap-pub

Active Enterprises, Inc............................44 1318 Pacific Avenue North Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-2102 www.propanelongbeach.com

Golden Whale Jewelry, Inc. ................113 194 N. Hemlock Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 436-1166

Charlie's Chowder House.......................35 1335 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 503-741-3055 charlies-chowder-house.business.site

Merry Time Bar & Grill ............................34 995 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 468-0852 www.merrytimebar.com

Doogers Seafood & Grill ........................49 900 S. Pacific Avenue Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-4224 doogersseafood.com

Pelican Brewery & Tap Room................35 1708 1st Street Tillamook, OR 97141 (503) 842-7007 www.pelicanbrewing.com

Finn’s Fish House.....................................19 227 Broadway Street Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-8330 www.finnsfishhouse.com

Pelican Brewing Company ....................35 1371 S. Hemlock Street Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 908-3377 www.pelicanbrewing.com

Coffee Girl.................................................18 100 39th Street, Suite 2 Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-6900 www.thecoffeegirl.com

REATAILERS & SPECIALTY SHOPPING

Astoria Cooperative Grocery...................5 1355 Exchange Street, Suite 1 Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-0027 www.astoria.coop/ Bikes and Beyond.................................113 1089 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-2961 www.bikesandbeyond.com Bruce’s Candy Kitchen............................34 256 N. Hemlock Street Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 436-2641 Seaside Outlet Mall Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-7828 www.brucescandy.com

Dennis Company.....................................42 201 Pacific Avenue N. Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-3166 www.denniscompany.com Finn Ware..................................................42 1166 Commercial St Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-5720 www.finnware.com

Imogen Gallery........................................58 240 11th Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 468-0620 www.imogengallery.com Jonathan’s LTD.........................................18 332 12th Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-7600 L & D Race Tech........................................48 1035 SE Marlin Ave Warrenton, OR 97146 (503) 861-2636 www.landdracetech.com Luminari Arts...........................................85 1133 Commercial St. Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 468-0308

Seaside Carousel Mall ............................19 300 Broadway Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-6728 www.seasidecarouselmall.com Seaside Outlets .....................................114 1111 N. Roosevelt Drive Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 717-1603 www.seasideoutlets.com Terra Stones .............................................19 951 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-5548 The Herons Nest Gifts.............................85 405 Broadway Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 738-8854 www.facebook.com/TheHeronsNestGifts The Picture Attic....................................113 711 Pacific Highway North Long Beach, WA 98631 (360) 642-4770 www.thepictureattic.com The Wine Shack .......................................84 124 N. Hemlock Street Cannon Beach, OR 97110 (503) 436-1100 www.beachwine.com Video Horizons......................................113 750 Astor Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-7310 www.videohorizons.formovies.com Walter E Nelson ..............................45, 113 2240 Commercial Street Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-6362

C olu m bia Inn A storia, • W alk to R estau ran ts & S h o p p in g • C o ffee in R o o m s • H B O • S o m e R efrigerato rs & M icro w aves • N o n -S m o k in g R o o m s A vailab le • C o vered P ark in g • W I-F I A vailab le • 24 H o u r W ak e-U p C alls • C o m m ercial R ates A vailab le • D irect-D ial P h o n e

503-325-42 11 B etw een 4th an d 5th S t • 495 M arin e D rive A storia w w w .colum biain n astoria.com

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 111

our coast advertiser index

www.longbeachwarealestate.com

2:49 PM


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

RV PARKS & CAMPGROUNDS

2:50 PM

Page 112

SPORTS & RECREATION (continued)

SPORTS & RECREATION (continued)

Driftwood RV Park................................106 1512 Pacific Avenue N. Long Beach, WA 98631 (888) 567-1902 www.driftwood-rvpark.net

Highlife Adventures ...............................42 92111 High Life Road Warrenton, OR 97146 (503) 861-9875 www.highlife-adventures.com

Port of Ilwaco.............................................4 165 Howerton Avenue Ilwaco, WA 98624 (360) 642-3143 www.portofilwaco.com

Westgate Cabins & RV Park...................59 20803 Pacific Way Ocean Park, WA 98640 (360) 665-4211 www.vacationwestgate.com

Lor’s Tours ..............................................113 47 SW Gardenia Ave Warrenton, OR 97146 (844) 567-8687 www.lorstours.com

Seaside Golf Club....................................65 451 Avenue U Seaside, OR 97103 (503) 738-5261 www.seasidegolf.com/

SPORTS & RECREATION

NW Women’s Surf Camps ......................49 P.O. Box 425 Seaside, OR 97138 (503) 440-5782 www.nwwomenssurfcamps.com

Gearhart Golf Links.................................43 1157 N. Marion Gearhart, OR 97138 (503) 738-3538 www.gearhartgolflinks.com

TRANSPORTATION Royal Cab of Astoria ...............................18 P.O. Box 101 Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-5818 www.royalcab.net

TRANSPORTATION (continued) Sunset Empire Transportation District ......................................................49 900 Marine Drive Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 861-7433 http://www.nworegontransit.org/agencies/sunsetempire-transportation-district/

WINERIES Westport Winery Garden Resort........111 1 South Arbor Road Aberdeen, WA 98520 (360) 648-2224 www.westportwinery.com

our coast BUSINESS DIRECTORY

ANTIQUES

PHOG BOUNDERS ANTIQUE MALL 55+Vendors Antiques • Nautical Items Glassware • Vintage Decor 892 Marine Drive, Astoria OR 97103

(503) 338-0101 MORE THAN JUST ANTIQUES!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

DAY SPA

LOCATED AT THE HISTORIC RAYMOND THEATER MASSAGE, FACIALS, BODY TREATMENTS

323 3rd Street Raymond,WA. 98577 Visit our website for upcoming events SUNDAYAFTERNOONLIVE.ORG

360-836-4419

NO.10 Basin Street Astoria, OR 503-338-4772 Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. CANNERYPIERHOTEL.COM

DINING

112 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

• Authentic Finnish sauna • Mineral therapy hot tub • Gift certificates available

DENTISTS

KLEMP FAMILY DENTISTRY We help keep families smiling!

Total Dental Excellence Come and see how comfortable dentistry can really be... 1006 West Marine Drive, Astoria (503) 468-0116 www.klempfamilydentistry.com


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

EDUCATION

2:50 PM

Page 113

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

MUSEUMS

RETAILERS & SHOPPING

RETAILERS & SHOPPING

CANNON BEACH HISTORY CENTER AND MUSEUM

GARIBALDI MARITIME MUSEUM

GOLDEN WHALE JEWELRY

Preserving the Maritime Heritage RIWKH3DFLÀF1RUWKZHVW Focusing on Captain Robert Gray and his historical vessels

Bridal • Gemstones • Silver Gold • Navaho • Earrings 14kt Gold & Sterling Charms Quality jewelry in gold and sterling silver by nationally known artists

OSU Clatsop County Extension Office

2001 Marine Drive, Room 210 Astoria, OR 97103 • (503) 325-8573 Offering educational programs, services, activities, and materials available within Clatsop County for all ages. Clatsop4HExtension or extension.oregonstate.edu/clatsop/

LODGING BOREAS B OREAS BED BED AND B BREAKFAST REAKF FAST INN N

SSeattle eatttle KING5 KIN NG G5 TV TV Evening Evening M Magazine’s aga azine’s “Top 5 B est B&B ince 2009 “Top Best B&B”” ssince • SSpectacular pectacular O Ocean cean V Views iews • Five Five R Romantic omantic SSuites uites • Private Private Hot Hot Tub Tub By By The The D Dunes unes • Gourmet Gourmet Breakfast Breakfast Included Included • Concierge Concierge Service Service i 607 Ocean Ocean Beach Beach Boulevard Boullevard N. Long Beach, WA L ong B each, W A 98631 360-642-8069 BOREASINN.COM B OREASINN.COM

Experience Cannon Beach’s Unique History With... • Interactive Exhibits • • Acoustic Series • • Engaging Lectures • • Gift Shop & More! • • Home to original Cannon of Cannon Beach •

RETAILERS & SHOPPING

RETAILERS & SHOPPING

The Picture Attic

“Physical Media” alive and well in Astoria

And the

1387 S. Spruce, Cannon Beach 503-436-9301 • www.cbhistory.org

112 Hwy 101, Garibaldi, Oregon (503)322-8411 Open April through October, 10 am to 4 pm (Weekends in March & November), Gift Shop

194 N. Hemlock • Cannon Beach (503)436-1166 • (800)548-3918 OPEN DAILY

garibaldimuseum.org

If you are looking for something unique, Visit the Golden Whale

RETAILERS & SHOPPING

SPORTS & RECREATION

WALTER E. NELSON CO.

is the premier excursion company in the Pacific Northwest. Cruise lines, river cruises and specializing in custom tours is what we do! Twelve passenger shuttle bus can accommodate two wheelchairs, including operable lift.

Northwest Artist Guild Invite you to an Artist Reception 2nd Sat. of every other month Starting in February, 2018 5:30 pm The Picture Attic 711 Pacific North, Long Beach 360 642-4770

SPORTS & RECREATION

DVD/Blu-Ray/VHS/Video Games Over 30,000 titles to rent! Over 1000 titles on sale under $10! Locally owned and operated for over 30 years 750 ASTOR ST. ASTORIA 5033257310

VIDEOHORIZONS.FORMOVIES.COM Like us on Facebook for new release updates and daily specials!

Lor’s Tours

Janitorial & Paper Supplies

2240 Commercial Street - Millpond Area Astoria 503-325-6362 • 800-344-1943 YOUR LOCAL JANITORIAL & PAPER SUPPLY STORE

Visit us at lorstours.com or call (844) 567-8687 to schedule a tour today!

TRAVEL

our coast MOBILE

SERVICE • SALES • RENTALS Since 1988, the leader in bicycle sales, service & rentals on the North Coast. 503.325.2961

1089 MARINE DRIVE

ASTORIA, OREGON HOURS: MON-SAT 10-6 SUNDAY 12-5

WWW.BIKESANDBEYOND.COM

On any device, visitors can tap into the interactive tools they need for great stay.

discoverourcoast.com

Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com • 113


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

)RUJRWWHQ7UHDVXUHV  $QWLTXHV &ROOHFWLEOHV

2:50 PM

Page 114

2FHDQ3DUN$UHD 2FHD DQ  3 DU N  $U HD H D 6::DVKLQJWRQ¶V%HDFK %D\ 6: ::DV DVKLQJWRQ¶VV %HDFK %D\

  %D\$YH 2FHDQ3DUN 

IRUJRWWHQWUHDVXUHVPDOOFRP  

2FHDQ3DUN595HVRUW  56W  2FHDQ3DUN

6KDNWL&RYH&RWWDJHV

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

/RFDO(YHQWV  /RFDO(YHQWV

RSUHVRUWFRP  

6WUHHWVLGH7DFR#  2FHDQ3DUN %D\$YH 2FHDQ3DUN 

VWUHHWVLGHWDFRRFHDQ  

6XUIVLGH*ROI&RXUVH  -3O  2FHDQ3DUN

VXUIVLGHJROIFRXUVHFRP  

2\VWHU%HDFK 595HVRUW 

3$$ $QQXXDO6SULQJ$UW6KRZ 3$$$QQXDO6SULQJ$UW6KRZ :RUOG¶V/RQJHVW*DUDJH6DOH :RUOG¶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

%D\$YHQXH 32%R[ 2FHDQ3DUN:$   KWWSRSZDFRP RSFKDPEHU#RSZDFRP 2FHDQ3DUN  .OLSVDQ 6XUIVLGH 1DKFRWWD 2\VWHUYLOOH

%D\ $YH

 56W  2FHDQ3DUN

2FHDQ3DUN 

R\VWHUEHDFKUYFRP

2FHDQ3DUN7DWWRR

 

 

114 • Our Coast 2018 • discoverourcoast.com

VKDNWLFRYHFRP   

:LHJDUGW6WXGLR  *DOOHU\ %D\$YH 2FHDQ3DUN 

HULFZLHJDUGWFRP $SULO $SULO 0D\ 0 D\\ --XQH  XQH  --XO\ XO\ --XO\ XO\ --XO\ XO\ 7%' $XJ $XJ 6HS $XJ6HS 6HS  6HS  2FW 2FW 2FW 2F W 1RY 1RY  

2FHDQ3DUN$UHD&KDPEHURI&RPPHUFH

2FHDQ3DUN7DWWRR

3DUN$YH  2FHDQ3DUN

:LOODSD%D\  ,QWHUSUHWLYH&HQWHU WK6W 1DKFRWWD

 

/RQJ%HDFK3HQLQVXOD 7UDGLQJ3RVW  3DFLILF+Z\  2FHDQ3DUN  /RQJ%HDFK3HQLQVXOD7UDGLQJ3RVW

 

-DFN¶V&RXQWU\6WRUH 9HUQRQ $YH  2FHDQ3DUN

MDFNVFRXQWU\VWRUHFRP  

2FHDQ%HDFK+RVSLWDO 0HGLFDO&OLQLFV   )LUVW$YH 1RUWK

,OZDFR

3RUWRISHQLQVXODRUJ R\VWHUKRXVHKWPO

RFHDQEHDFKKRVSLWDOFRP

 

 


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:51 PM

Page 115

UVQTGUoĭıīCTMKPIoġTGGĞQWRQPĝQQM

YYYUGCUKFGQWVNGVUEQOt ģKIJYCěVJĜXGĮGCUKFGĪTGIQP

ĝĜįģ  ĝĪğĴ IJĪĭĦĮ o ĝĪĪĦIJĜĭĠģĪİĮĠoĝĭİĞĠlĮ ĞĜĩğĴ ĦĤįĞģĠĩ o ĞĜĭįĠĭlĮ o  ĞģĭĤĮįĪīģĠĭ  ĝĜĩĦĮ o ĞħĜĤĭĠlĮ o ğĜĤĮĴ ĨĜĴlĮ ĮĜĩğIJĤĞģĮģĪīoğĭĠĮĮĝĜĭĩ ğĭĠĮĮĝĜĭĩIJĪĨĠĩoĠğğĤĠ ĝĜİĠĭoġĜĨĪİĮġĪĪįIJĠĜĭ ĪİįħĠįoĢĩĞ oģĠħħĴģĜĩĮĠĩo ĦĤįĞģĠĩĞĪħħĠĞįĤĪĩoħlĠĢĢĮ ģĜĩĮĝĜħĤīħĜĴįĠijĠijīĭĠĮĮo ĩĤĦĠ ġĜĞįĪĭĴ ĮįĪĭĠ o ĪĮģ ĦĪĮģĝlĢĪĮģoīĠĩğħĠįĪĩo īĠĭġĠĞįħĪĪĦoĭĜĞĦĭĪĪĨ ĮģĪĠĮoĭİĠoTHE WINE & ĝĠĠĭģĜİĮoįĪĦĴĪįĠĭĤĴĜĦĤ oıĜĩģĠİĮĠĩoĵİĨĤĠĵ

APRIL-DECEMBER Monday-Saturday 10-8, Sunday 10-6 JANUARY-MARCH Sunday-Thursday 10-6, Friday-Saturday 10-8


Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:51 PM

Page 116

Our Coast Magazine 2018  
Our Coast Magazine 2018