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Our Coast Magazine 2018:OC18

2/28/18

2:33 PM

Page 92

CANNON BEACH HISTORY CENTER & MUSEUM CANNON BEACH, OREGON

hat puts the “Cannon” in Cannon Beach? At the Cannon Beach Museum & History Center (1387 S. Spruce St.), visitors can see the real cannon that inspired the town to change its name from “Ecola” in 1922. The iron cannon, technically called a carronade, and the capstan used to lift the ship’s anchor are from the decking of the USS Shark, a U.S. naval schooner that went down in the Columbia River in 1846. The cannon was discovered again in 1898 when changing tides carried it ashore in Arch Cape, an unincorporated town about five miles south of Cannon Beach.

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Visitors to the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum can catch a glimpse of the recovered cannon from the USS Shark.

NECUS’ PARK

THE BISTRO

CANNON BEACH, OREGON

People take a look at the new welcome pole carved by artist Guy Capoeman created in partnership by the Clatsop-Nehalem tribe and the city of Cannon Beach during a dedication on Friday at NeCus' Park. — DANNY MILLER PHOTO

eCus’ Park, which can be found right off the first exit into Cannon Beach, is nestled between the town’s former elementary school at 268 Beaver St. and a winding curve of Ecola Creek. Before becoming a city park, for centuries the area was a Native American village called NeCus’, which roughly translates to “where the tide flows swiftly out.” It was known as a welcoming place for members of the Clatsop, Nehalem, and Tillamook tribes to fish and trade. A 10-foot tall cedar welcoming pole created in partnership with the ClatsopNehalem tribe was erected in 2016 to honor the park’s past.

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CANNON BEACH, OREGON

Visitors to Cannon Beach who bring their four-legged friends will find a very dog-friendly menu at ‘The Bistro.’

annon Beach is already known as a dog-friendly destination. But one restaurant owner in town decided he would take it a step further. Jack Stevenson, the owner of the restaurant called “The Bistro” at 263 N. Hemlock St., has introduced a gourmet dinner option for dogs to his upscale menu. The “Bistro Dog Food Offering” lists an entrée of chicken, brown rice, sweet potatoes, carrots, peas, tomatoes, olive oil, and salt, all garnished with a sprig of parsley for $4.50. The dish is offered only to patrons who sit in the outdoor seating area, so it may not be the best rainy-day stop for Fido, but it is a good way to make a dog happy after a long journey in a car.

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Our Coast Magazine 2018  
Our Coast Magazine 2018