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2013

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CAPSTONE PROJECTS

Mechanical Engineering Capstone Projects 2013 Categories CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN P1 Enclosure Design

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Student Team: Mason Maguire, Neil Prasad, Stephen Prendes, Jess Uskert Sponsor: PLUS Location Systems Advisor: Dr. Stalford

P2

Pressure Sensitive Check Valve

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Student Team: Garrett Glaze, Brett Hardy, Daniel Harp, William Harper, Han Phan, Matthew Spradlin Sponsor: Baker Hughes Advisor: Dr. Stalford

P3

Laparoscopic Device with 3D Capabilities

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Student Team: Cameron Ghafil, Jose Latorre, Rocky Vo, Austin Wickersham Sponsor: Dr. Hassoun Advisor: Dr. Altan

P4

Design and Manufacturing of a Moisture Sensor for Advanced Composite Materials for Life-Cycle Assessment

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Student Team: Ian Brindle, Tanner Jones, Ryan Power, Mark Wilson Sponsor: Dr. Altan Advisor: Dr. Altan

P5

Composite Seats for Multiple Stage Cementers

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Student Team: Adetunji Dahunsi, Erin Hillis, Holden Mitchell, Matt Summersgill Sponsor: Halliburton Advisor: Dr. Altan

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN CATEGORY: STUDIES S1 MEMS Cellular Force Sensor

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Student Team: Jesus Franco, Aaron Kannard, Benjamin Lobaugh, Mitchell Marrs, Kyle O’Connor Sponsor: Schlumberger Advisor: Dr. Stalford

S2

Design of an Electric Drilling Choke

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Student Team: Caleb Atchley, Austin Laskey, Andrew Nelson, Kaitlyn Painter, Gina Santangelo Sponsor: Mathena Advisor: Dr. Siddique

S3

Radial & Journal Bearing Test Bench

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Student Team: Alex Andre, Chase Harris, Dongil Kang, Oliver Ware, Steven Yung Sponsor: GE Oil and Gas Advisor: Dr. Song

S4

Design of Renewable/Alternative Energy Systems Student Team: Blair Ellington, John Harrison, Thu Mai, Patrick Voeller Sponsor: Dr. Song Advisor: Dr. Song

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2013

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CAPSTONE PROJECTS

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN CATEGORY: TEST T1 Rotary Seal Characterization

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Student Team: Shailendra Chauhan, Zack Hazelton, Alex Madkins, Jay McGrew, Quang Nguyen Sponsor: Schlumberger Advisor: Dr. Siddique

T2

Self Healing Hydraulic Leak

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Student Team: Nathan Cannon, Forrest Holland, Cory Miller, Ryan Proctor, David Robbins Sponsor: Schlumberger Advisor: Dr. Siddique

T3

Flex Hose Shear Design Improvement

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Student Team: Jeff Burton, Collin Meyers, Dangkhoa Nguyen, Joseph Orgill, Jared Wilson Sponsor: Schlumberger Advisor: Dr. Stalford

T4

Next Generation Large Bore Auto-Fill Float Equipment

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Student Team: David Hill Jr., Peter Staub, Hoang Tran, Trevor Valdez, Jason Woolard Sponsor: Halliburton Advisor: Dr. Altan

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN CATEGORY: VEHICLE DESIGN V1 Sooner Off Road

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Student Team: Matthew Akins, Taylor Basso, Spence Courtney, Nick Gill, Abe Munoz, Peter Poarch Sponsor: Dr. Siddique Advisor: Dr. Siddique

V2

Sooner Powered Vehicle

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Student Team: Paul Cagle, Mattie Gattenby, Kaleb Parks, James Stevens, Jimmy Walta, Jordan Whetsell Sponsor: Dr. Siddique Advisor: Dr. Siddique

V3

Sooner Racing Team

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Student Team: John Conder, Stanley Lewis, Robert Schwartz Sponsor: Dr. Siddique Advisor: Dr. Siddique

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN


2013

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CAPSTONE PROJECTS

CATEGORY: INTERDISCIPLINARY I1 Abrasive Test Bench

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Student Team: Caitlin Armstrong, Tony Ellis, Chris Swiderski, Josh Webster, Matt Zimmerman Sponsor: GE Oil and Gas Advisor: Dr. Song

I2

Pump Stage Analysis

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Student Team: Nik Bosnyak, Nadia Khan, Ryan Marsh, Joon Na, Tao Sun Sponsor: GE Oil and Gas Advisor: Dr. Song

I3

Recycling

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Student Team: John Fraser, Josh Hardisty, Blake Horton, Whitney Leslie, Melissa Rood Sponsor: Hitachi IE Advisor: Dr. Siddique

I4

Bone Char Production

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Student Team: John Gage, Jared Kessler Sponsor: CCW

Advisor: Dr. Lai

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN INDUSTRY SPONSORS

21 CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN

CAPSTONE POSTER FAIR JUDGES

23 SIGN


2013

P1

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN

Enclosure Design

This report presents the final design concept and prototype RFID reader enclosure for the PLUS Location Systems capstone project. The enclosure is meant to be simpler, smaller, and more utilitarian than previous versions of PLUS enclosures while also being weather resistant. The PLUS RFID reader and antenna circuit boards can be mounted without causing drastic signal attenuation and there are two waterproof cable glands that allow CAT 5 cables to enter the enclosure while adhering to the NEMA 4 standard. The enclosure can be mounted in several orientations using standard mounting hardware and the circuit board stack up can be removed easily without the use of tools. The design incorporates 2degree draft angles on vertical surfaces while avoiding undercuts. The main body was designed in two identical pieces so that only one mold would be required to produce them. All objectives established by PLUS were met on the design.

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2013

P2

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN

Pressure Sensitive Check Valve

In the oil industry, various types of valves seal off sections of a wellbore in down-hole environments for maintenance, or any operations that require sections of a well to be isolated. A common problem during these operations occurs when a high pressure differential develops across the valve that isolates a section of the wellbore. Opening these isolation valves under this high differential can damage the valve. Currently, a common technique is to pressurize one side of the wellbore to equalize the pressure on the valve so it can open. This process can often cost companies up to 24 hours of production time. Our proposed solution is to place a hydraulically operated check valve in the wellbore that can quickly equalize this high pressure differential across the isolation valve. With our design, we estimate a significant reduction in downtime, while also opening the isolation valve under much safer conditions.

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2013

P3

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN

Laparoscopic Device with 3D Capabilities

This project involves the design and development of a fivemillimeter diameter, threedimensional, and articulating laparoscopic camera for use in minimally invasive surgery. The first part of the semester was spent meeting with Dr. Hassoun and researching to complete design of the laparoscope. The final design includes a 5millimeter shaft laser cut to create articulation for the tip of the scope, a 2.2-millimeter threedimensional capable camera with fiber optic lighting, and an Arduino Uno with a joystick to control motors that pull steel wires for the articulation. Delays have created problems with the overseas shipment of the camera and lighting assembly, but the team is continuing to work on creating the articulation for the laparoscope. Our biggest challenge has been working with the very small pieces of the articulating tip and finding a way to assemble these pieces. The project thus far has cost $8,540, mostly from the camera assembly and articulation machining.

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2013

P4

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN

Design and Manufacturing of a Moisture Sensor for Advanced Composite

Materials for Life-Cycle Assessment Moisture infiltration into composites causes serious problems regarding material strength. Moisture weakens composites by getting into voids between the fibers and the resin matrix. By the time the composite is saturated 5% by moisture, it loses 30% of its strength, in addition to the weight that is added to it by the moisture. Moisture content must be measured in composites to ensure that the composite parts are not compromised. Pieces are currently tested destructively: either cooked to evaporate the moisture (which damages the resin) or put under an x-ray. To measure the moisture nondestructively, we analyzed the uses of both fiber optics and magnetic resonance. Of the methods that were considered, these two methods were considered superior on the basis of cost, accuracy, and ease of use. One method (fiber optics) embeds a sensor into the material during construction and one is used without embedding (magnetic resonance).

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2013

P5

CATEGORY: PROTOTYPE DESIGN

Composite Seats for Multiple Stage Cementers

Cementing is an integral part in the drilling of an oil well. Accordingly, it is important that the process be fully optimized. Halliburton’s ES-II cementer allows the well to be cemented in multiple stages, with different stages activated and ended by sliding seats. Currently, these seats are made of aluminum, and require a significant amount of time to drill out before the well can be completed. The purpose of this project is to replace the aluminum with a composite material with comparable strength but requires substantially less time to drill through. Our team conducted research, evaluated previous designs, and performed thermal expansion tests, pressure tests, and microscopic analysis of utilized materials. Based on information gleaned, we designed two versions of a seat that are expected to meet all design criteria. These seats have been manufactured, and will be tested in the final week of April.

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2013

S1

CATEGORY: STUDIES

MEMS Cellular Force Sensor

Our device was designed in cooperation with Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) researcher Dr. Gary Gorbsky who is studying cell division and the effects of chromosomal misalignment. The design requirements are to manipulate and measure forces on chromosomes within a range of 10 to 0.001 nN. Through feedback from Dr. Gorbsky, we altered our design to be simpler which then yielded precise measurement capabilities and a larger off-chip displacement. With the new design requirements, the force measurement was able to be calibrated to approximately 1.4 pN/μm with a displacement scale of 1 μm marks over a ±500 μm. The off-chip range was extended to approximately 5mm. The current design meets or exceeds all design specifications. Furthermore, the ability to reliably sense and apply pN forces can apply to a variety of additional research fields such as the study of genetics, viruses or even thin film materials.

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2013

S2

CATEGORY: STUDIES

Design of an Electric Drilling Choke

In this design project our goal was to replace the existing hydraulic drilling choke with an electric one. In cold climates, the hydraulic fluid becomes very viscous and slows operation. In our design we incorporated an electric actuator, the Nook Rad 20048-xx, which retrofits into the existing Mathena choke. We designed a housing sleeve out of 6 inch NPS piping with three small ribs for support. The final design was created to be easily disassembled in the field. For support, an adjustable mount was added to the housing sleeve. During analysis a very fine mesh was used on the assembly, yielding a safety factor of 4.5.

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2013

S3

CATEGORY: STUDIES

Radial & Journal Bearing Test Bench

GE Oil and Gas commissioned an OU capstone team to design a journal bearing test bench to aid in the testing of new bearing designs in ESP applications. The primary need was to provide an analytical means to quantify the oil film stiffness as affected by the magnetic side pull induced by the induction motors. The team did this by measuring the force on the oil per distance of radial shaft eccentricity over shaft deflection. The force was based on the oil pressure discharged from the pump onto the shaft, and deflection was measured by placing four proximity sensors on either side of the test bearing orthogonally to each other and to the shaft. The bench also tested bearings under multiple conditions including rotational speed through a VFD, and temperature through space heaters in an environment simulating oil chamber. FEA was conducted on all load-bearing components to ensure successful operation.

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2013

S4

CATEGORY: STUDIES

Design of Renewable/Alternative Energy Systems

With electrical demand and fossil fuel prices increasing, the need for alternative energy sources has become a major concern for the public as well as the federal government and military. Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB) in Oklahoma City tasked our capstone group to find alternative energy sources to decrease their overall energy costs. The group researched four areas: piezoelectricity, solar energy, wind energy, and landfill gas projects. It was found that piezoelectric energy would not be a good option for TAFB due to the embryonic stage of the technology. Placing photo-voltaic solar panels on residential homes was found to save ~$735 per household with a 13.6 year payback period. Wind turbine systems capable of creating 2.5-8 GWh/yr were found to have 1315 year paybacks. Lastly, single landfill gas generator systems were found to produce 16 GWh/yr and save up to 78194 MM Btu/yr with roughly an 11 year payback.

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2013

T1

CATEGORY: TEST

Rotary Seal Characterization

Schlumberger requested the current 2013 Capstone team to determine the leak rate of different types of seals, Design of Experiment for testing seals and develop a predictive model from the results. Few additions for improvement to the previous setup were needed due high fluctuations in pressure, rpm, and an unclear way of measuring the leak rate. The addition of the step motor has decreased our fluctuation to ¹1 rpm. The installation of the MTS Temposonics sensor allowed readings of the oil level within the pressure cylinder up to 0.001 inch. The software, Diadem was used to interpret the data retrieved through Lab View. An industrial size nitrogen tank supplied a constant pressure of 100 psi. Each seal is aged in a furnace at 150°C for 50 hours after each test. Due to a few complications, data collection has recently started on April 11th.

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2013

T2

CATEGORY: TEST

Self Healing Hydraulic Leak

Schlumberger requested a project be done to research methods of creating a self-healing mechanism for hydraulic fluid leaks in subsea in-riser hydraulic equipment. We began this project by researching different potential methods of accomplishing this goal. After determining that the most viable options were liquid coagulants and suspended particulates, we constructed a test bench on which to test different solutions for their effects on a hydraulic fluid leak. We manufactured a controlled leak on this test bench, and collected data on the undeterred mass flow leak rates of clean hydraulic fluid and the leak rates of fluid with a coagulant or particulate mixed in. These data were compared, and we discovered that some of the solutions did help to slow the leak rate. In addition to looking at chemical methods, we designed and modeled a mechanical apparatus for helping to stop a leak at a fitting as well.

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2013

T3

CATEGORY: TEST

Flex Hose Shear Design Improvement

Over the recent years, there has been a growing concern for the subsea drilling industry and the failure of blow-out preventers to successfully seal the well in an emergency. This report outlines Schlumberger measures taken to increase consistent and clean shearing of hydraulic pressure lines which control one of the valves responsible for sealing off the well. Results show the displacements and resulting stresses not only on the hose but the resulting forces at the fixed ends. Our design focuses on increasing the applied tension on the hoses as a method to increase clean shearing results. By designing a fixture that creates tension on the hoses and allows for a necessary installation rotation, the shear rams will be able to cleanly and consistently shear the hydraulic hoses and therefore successfully terminate the well from the drilling rig above.

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2013

T4

CATEGORY: TEST

Next Generation Large Bore Auto-Fill Float Equipment

One of the longstanding challenges that the oil and gas industry has faced is the ability to run casing at high speeds into the well without damaging the formation due to excessive surge pressure. The benefits of these auto-fill float systems are reduced surge pressures, increased pipe running speeds, system cannot be inadvertently deactivated, and configuration designs allow for multiple circulations after deactivation. The primary goal of the project was to redesign the current flapper valve implementing a more drillable material. The secondary goal of the project was to research and design a large bore auto-fill float equipment system that has a non-intrusive deactivation method. For the primary goal, we added a dome feature to the top of the current flapper valve and utilized a phenolic material to decrease drill out time. The secondary goal was accomplished using a secondary flapper valve system to deactivate the two piece primary flapper valve.

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2013

V1

CATEGORY: VEHICLE DESIGN

Sooner Off Road

The Society of Automotive Engineers, or SAE, hosts a Mini Baja competition every year which provides University of Oklahoma engineering students a chance to gain firsthand experience that involves designing, building, and racing mini Baja vehicles. This year’s design involved significant improvements to the suspension, frame, and powertrain. The front suspension utilized a dual A-arm design with air shocks to produce a more durable and lightweight system with increased handling and tuning capabilities. The rear suspension improved upon last year’s swing arm design by notching the five evenly spaced holes on each of the four faces of the swing arm which resulted in a significant increase in strength and rigidity. This year’s powertrain was designed to improve reliability, tension, alignment, and weight reduction by implementing new technology and building upon past successes. The frame design aimed to move the suspension tie locations to nodes and improve driver ergonomics.

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2013

V2

CATEGORY: VEHICLE DESIGN

Sooner Powered Vehicle

The Sooner Powered Vehicle team of the University of Oklahoma has designed, built, and tested a competitive recumbent bicycle. This year’s design focus included safety, comfort, innovation, stability, and durability, while seeking to achieve faster speeds than previous years. Three key features were introduced: an adjustable pedaling system, landing gear support, and full composite fairing with honeycomb stiffeners. A combination of experimental and analytical tools was used to design a safe, practical and highperformance bicycle. Structural and fluid flow analyses were performed to ensure rider protection from rollover and side loadings and to minimize aerodynamic drag force. We selected 4130 steel for the frame and carbon fiber composite reinforced with honeycomb stiffeners for the fairing to maximize rider safety. Several prototypes were fabricated and tested for process and performance verification. At the ASME HPV challenge the bike placed 7th overall, including a 5th place finish in design against 28 teams.

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2013

V3

CATEGORY: VEHICLE DESIGN

Sooner Racing Team

For the 2013 Formula SAE competition season, where university students are required to design, fabricate, and compete in a formula style race car against students around the globe, the three seniors of the Sooner Racing Team used their design of “Natalie” as part of the capstone program. The team has selected a 10” wheel and tubular steel space frame chassis design using a 550cc Aprilia engine coupled with an adjustable front and rear wing aerodynamics package. Redesigning for a new front push-rod suspension the 2013 frame decreased 8% in weight while gaining 50% in torsional rigidity. Additionally, with a new adjustable, rather than active, aerodynamics system there was a 20% system weight reduction along with a maximum lateral acceleration increase of 0.35g in steady state turns. Lastly, drivetrain design produced a 5lb weight reduction of rotating mass along with the implementation of an automatic torque biasing differential.

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2013

I1

CATEGORY: INTERDISCIPLINARY

Abrasive Test Bench

This GE Oil and Gas sponsored capstone project consisted of designing a pump test bench that will simulate downhole abrasive environments. This will allow the effect of abrasives on the impellers and diffusers located inside the pumps to be tested and analyzed. A thoughtful and robust design for an abrasives test bench will allow our colleagues to characterize the effect of abrasives on their pumps during their operation downhole, and lead to advancements concerning pump wear and efficiency. Our project consisted of designing and/or sizing the following components: torque cell, thrust chamber, intake, flow meter, storage tank, discharge, choke valve, heat exchanger, pressure transducers, and temperature sensors. Three key components of interest for this project were the abrasive injection, abrasive filtration, and intake/outtake quick connect because they were areas that were improved upon from the previous GE abrasive test bench.

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2013

I2

CATEGORY: INTERDISCIPLINARY

Pump Stage Analysis

Electric submersible pumps (ESP) used in artificial lifts operate by rotating multiple impellers on a single shaft with each impeller stacked between a set of diffusers, forming a stage. In their functional configuration, the stages are compressed together and move axially as one stack. However, in some instances, the axial travel reduces due to dimensional tolerance stack-up. In this project, a statistical model for predicting the probability of failure to meet the minimum axial travel requirement was built to increase manufacturability of ESPs. The model was built based on several factors: distributions of measured critical dimensions limiting the axial travel, user input values, such as number of stages, presence of washers, and minimum axial travel, and deformation under compressive load on critical dimensions calculated using finite element analysis. The model then simulates the probability of meeting the minimum travel requirement and a probability curve is generated.

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2013

I3

CATEGORY: INTERDISCIPLINARY

Recycling

The Hitachi Recycling System Improvement and Standardization Project is a multidisciplinary project between the departments of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Currently, the Hitachi facility in Norman, OK is split into three departments: Manufacturing, Distribution, and Recycling. The Manufacturing department does most of its recycling within its department and requires little attention from the recycling employees. The Distribution Department regularly collaborates with the Recycling Department to recycle its materials. The present system of recycling has been operating inefficiently due to lack of prioritization and communication between the Recycling and Distribution Departments. This has led to an unfriendly work environment and unnecessary overtime. The Hitachi Recycling System Improvement and Standardization Project aims to increase recycling efficiency by adding prioritization of recycled materials and standardization of the recycling process. The Hitachi Capstone Team will present a proposal to Hitachi that outlines an augmented recycling system that will increase efficiency.

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2013

I4

CATEGORY: INTERDISCIPLINARY

Bone Char Production

The goal of this capstone was to investigate and improve upon the bone char production process. We built a model of the furnace used to char the bone. After setting up the finite element analysis (FEA) scenarios we compared the temperatures that were collected during charring and the temperatures provided by the FEA. This was done as a step to ensure an accurate scenario of the current process being used to char the bones. We have seen that our FEA models are producing similar temperature distributions to that of the field furnace. Based on the FEA scenario our initial hypothesis is if the original ignition points was changed this would allow the furnace to have a more even temperature distribution and allow for more control over the charring process. This should lead to increasing the efficiency of the charring process. However more data is needs to be collect to support our hypothesis.

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2013

INDUSTRY SPONSORS

Industry Sponsors

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2013

INDUSTRY SPONSORS

Industry Sponsors

Dr. Hassoun

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2013

CAPSTONE POSTER FAIR JUDGES

Charles E. Baukal Jr. (John Zink Institute) Charles E. Baukal, Jr., PhD, P.E., is the director of the John Zink Institute, which is the training organization for John Zink Co. LLC (Tulsa, OK) that makes industrial combustion equipment for a wide range of industries. Dr. Baukal has over 30 years of experience in the field of industrial combustion in the metals, minerals, petrochemical, textile and paper industries. He is an inventor on eleven U.S. patents and has authored three books, edited ten books, and written numerous technical publications. He holds BS, MS and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering and an MBA, and is a member of ASME, ASEE, and the Combustion Institute. He is a member of several advisory boards and an adjunct engineering instructor at Oral Roberts University, the University of Oklahoma, the University of Tulsa, and the University of Utah. Parker Berry (BP) Parker Berry is the Engineering Team Lead for the Gulf of Mexico Subsea Construction Team at BP. His current work includes design reports for construction equipment, rigging design, purpose built subsea tooling, riser pull-in equipment and subsea tool testing. He previously spent four years working on the Galapagos project in the Gulf of Mexico. Prior to working on Galapagos, he worked an offshore rotation as an Operations Engineer on the Pompano Platform and spent a year supporting the Wamsutter Natural Gas Project in Wamsutter, Wyoming. Parker holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Degree from the University of Oklahoma (2006). Grady Buckhalter (GE Oil & Gas) Grady joined Wood Group, ESP in 2007 after ten years at UPS in various management roles in Engineering, Operations, Human Resources and Safety. At Wood Group, ESP Grady was part of the Business Process Improvement Team, where he managed multiple projects achieving cost reduction through improved processes or leveraged new technology. In 2010, Grady joined Engineering as a Project Manager with responsibility to coordinate cross functional teams in the development and release of new products to the market. Wood Group, ESP was acquired by GE in 2011 and renamed Artificial Lift reporting into the GE Oil & Gas business unit. Grady earned a B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering from Oklahoma University and a M.B.A. degree from Oklahoma Christian. John Burris (Baker Hughes) John Burris is the Engineering Supervisor for the Sustaining and Value Engineering team for Baker Hughes (2012-Present). He coordinates investigations and implements corrective actions for the Safety Systems group in Broken Arrow, OK. Previously John worked as a design engineer in new product development for downhole high pressure/high temperature equipment. His area of expertise is subsurface safety valves (emergency shutoff valves) Mr. Burris holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma (2007). Mitch Burrus (University of Oklahoma) Mitch Burrus was a Test Manager for Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International, Canoga Park, Ca. (1957-1996, Retired) and Adjunct Instructor, University of Oklahoma-(1997-2007, Retired). Mr. Burrus holds a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma (1957) and is a Registered Mechanical Engineer in the State of California. He spent his entire Industrial career with Rockwell in Test Management on the Atlas, Apollo, and Space Shuttle Programs. He has received a “Snoopy� award from the NASA Astronaut program for his work on the Apollo program and a Presidents Award from Rocketdyne for a special assignment to conserve propellants for the Shuttle program. He has extensive experience in resume writing with over 25 years of hiring college engineering graduates for Rockwell. After retirement from Industry, he became an Adjunct Instructor at the University of Oklahoma Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department. He taught Mechanical design, capstone classes, and served as one of the Sooner Racing Team Advisors for nine years before retiring again in 2007.

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2013

CAPSTONE POSTER FAIR JUDGES

Jeff Catron (Tinker Air Force Base) Jeff Catron is the chief of the engineering resource management and workforce development division. As such, he is responsible for overseeing the professional development of the logistics centers 1400 scientist and engineers and for managing the directorate's facility, equipment and fiscal resources. His past duties have included leading Air Force efforts to lease, occupy and utilize the former General Motors Oklahoma City assembly plant; serving as the Technical Director of the 76th Maintenance Wing where he was responsible for coordinating the engineering activities within the wing and for applying emerging technologies to improve industrial processes. He has also served as the Engineering Division Chief for the USAF VIP/SAM aircraft fleets which included the VC-25A "Air Force One", E-4B, C-20, and T-43 aircraft. While in this position, he was responsible for all engineering aspects associated with sustaining the Operational Safety, Suitability and Effectiveness (OSS&E) of these fleets. Andy Chancellor (Oklahoma Gas & Electric) Andy holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma (2007). He has worked at OG&E as a Power Plant engineer, Supervisor of Technical Support at OG&E's Horseshoe Lake and Redbud Power Plants, and currently is acting in the role as Supervisor of Plant Maintenance. As the Supervisor of Plant Maintenance at OG&E, he is responsible for helping to ensure the plant performs in an efficient and reliable manner by developing a maintenance program that reduces equipment downtime and analyzes equipment failures. Ron Fowler (Hitachi Computer Products - America) Ron joined Hitachi Computer Products in Norman, OK last year as a Principal Engineer where he has been designing and developing specifications for industrial automation equipment and packaging. Prior to joining Hitachi, Ron worked for ARINC, an aerospace contractor, at Tinker Air Force Base. He led the equipment specification, purchase, installation and relocation team to transform the Air Force’s maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) operations for jet engines and aircraft. Ron began his career with Magnetic Peripherals and later Seagate Technology designing and building automated assembly equipment to produce hard disk drives. Ron holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and a Master in Business Administration. Scott Hoyte (GE Oil & Gas) Scott began his career at Bently Nevada, a company specializing in asset condition monitoring, which was subsequently acquired by General Electric in 2002. At Bently Nevada, renamed Optimization and Controls, Scott was the Manager of Advanced Technology. In 2004, Scott moved to GE Energy headquarters in Atlanta, GA, where he was responsible for operations, strategy and advanced energy generation concepts for GE Energy. In 2007 Scott took on the role as Manager Advanced Controls where he was responsible for developing and applying digital technologies, advanced algorithms and software to improve the performance, reliability and life of GE Energy machinery. In 2012 Scott assumed the role of Director and General Manager Artificial Lift Engineering, in this role Scott leads the technology development and engineering support for the GE Oil and Gas’ Artificial Lift business. Scott has earned a B.S. degree in Aeronautics from the University of North Dakota, a M.S. degree in Computer Science from the University of Nevada Reno and a M.B.A. degree from Indiana University. Ashley Kishino (Schlumberger) Ashley Kishino, Program Manager in Schlumberger’s EMS (Engineering, Manufacturing and Sustaining ) group in Houston, has been with Schlumberger for 31 years. His career with Schlumberger began as a Field Engineer after graduating in 1981 from Queen's University in Canada in Mechanical Engineering. After working in a number of field locations in the US on land and offshore, he moved to the Schlumberger Technology Centers in Houston in 1989. He progressed through a variety of engineering, manufacturing, sustaining and management positions in areas including downhole Pressure and Sampling tools, Subsea, Downhole Testing, Artificial Lift, Perforating, Conveyance and now Engineering Business Systems and IT. Holder of 13 US patents, Ashley's other hobbies include motorcycles and running marathons.

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2013

CAPSTONE POSTER FAIR JUDGES

Samuel Kucera (Baker Hughes International) Sam Kucera is a Design Engineer for Baker Hughes (2011-Present). While employed at Baker Hughes, he has been in New Product Development, working with high pressure/high temperature subsurface safety and barrier valves and associated downhole accessory tools. Mr. Kucera holds a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics with a Minor in Math (2009), as well as a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (2011), both from the University of Tulsa. Robert Marvel (GE Oil & Gas) Robert Marvel is a Mechanical Engineer with GE Oil & Gas Artificial Lift located in Oklahoma City. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering and a Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, both from the University of Oklahoma. His thesis focused on Simulation of Heat Transfer in Porous Media. He has designed, developed and tested products for surface pumping systems and electric submersible pump systems (ESPs) since 1998. He is currently the Lead Project Engineer for a high power density ESP motor used to recover heavy crude oil from extreme temperature environments. His current research efforts include heat transfer in ESP motors, high stability bearing design and ESP rotor dynamics. He holds two United States patents that relate to the power systems of ESPs and his work on bearing design and rotor dynamics has been accepted for publication by the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Kristian Olivero (Tinker Air Force Base) Kristian Olivero is the Technical Director for the Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Air Logistics Complex, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma. As the Technical Director, he oversees technical activities for a 9,500 personnel team responsible for over $3B in revenue for the Air Force Sustainment Center. The complex performs programmed depot maintenance on the KC-135, B-1B, B-52 and E-3 aircraft; expanded phase maintenance on the Navy E-6 aircraft; and maintenance, repair and overhaul of F100, F101, F108, F110, F118, F119 and TF33 engines for the Air Force, Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard, Navy and foreign military sales. Additionally, he is responsible for the maintenance, repair and overhaul of a myriad of Air Force and Navy airborne accessory components, and the development and sustainment of a diverse portfolio of operational flight programs, test program sets, automatic test equipment, and industrial automation software. Tyler Quance (Tucker Energy Services) Tyler Quance is a Stimulation Field Engineer at Tucker Energy Services, Stimulation Division- a startup venture based out of McAlester, Oklahoma. He currently works in fields from the Texas Panhandle/Western Oklahoma to Southeastern Oklahoma to Northeast Texas. He received his Bachelor of Science from the University of Oklahoma in 2012. Michelle Rodriguez-Pico (Oklahoma Gas & Electric) Michelle holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma (2003), a Master in Business Administration from the University of Central Oklahoma (2007) and certified in Occupational Health and Safety -Industry Standards from the Eastern Kentucky University (2009). Michelle began her professional engineering career with Johnson Controls Inc. (formerly York International) in 2003 as a Manufacturing Engineer. During her career with Johnson Control she held different roles as Lead Manufacture Engineer, Project Manager and Six Sigma Black Belt project expert. In 2007, Michelle accepted a position as Process/Maintenance Engineer with OGE at Horseshoe/Mustang Power Plants. She was responsible for Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), assisting and advising plant manager regarding daily optimization of plant and system processes to meet plant operations. In 2009, she took a position as a Process/Maintenance Wind Engineer managing two wind farm sites located in Woodward, Oklahoma where she transitioned into management in 2011 working as the Renewable Manager for all the OGE wind turbine assets. With needs in cost performance efforts in the company, at the end of 2012, Michelle transferred to her current positions as Lead Performance Consultant for senior level executives, directors and subject matter experts throughout the organization to analyze, recommend and help support significant business performance change.

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2013

CAPSTONE POSTER FAIR JUDGES

Daniel Schmidt (Halliburton) Daniel Schmidt is a mechanical design engineer in the Casing Equipment group for Halliburton Energy Services in Duncan, Oklahoma. Daniel holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma (May 2012). Daniel's recent projects involve testing stage Cementing tools, and designing and testing Sub-Surface Cementing plug sets, as well as acting as a Technical liaison for the Halliburton sponsored OU Capstone teams. Mark Simpson (Hitachi Computer Products - America) Mark holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering for Oklahoma State University (1980). He is a registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma. Mark began his career in the computer Hard Disk Drive business with Magnetic Peripherals Inc. in Oklahoma City as a mechanical design engineer. He also held various engineering and management positions within Seagate Technology, a leading Data Storage Company. Over his 33 year career, Mark has had the opportunity to perform both product and assembly equipment design and evaluation. Today, Mark is the Component Engineering Manager for Hitachi Computer Products, Inc. In this role, he is leading the engineering effort to develop and improve the U.S. supply base required to manufacture mechanical components for Hitachi's product line. Omkar Solapurkar (Cameron International Corporation) Omkar Solapurkar is a Product Engineer at Cameron's Distributed Valves Division (2010 - Current). He has a Bachelor of Engineering from VTU, India and came to the US in 2007 to earn his Masters from the University of Oklahoma. He is interested in robotics, and currently works on designing check valves. At Cameron, he is responsible for product development and assisting in procurement, manufacturing and planning. He has experience working with tools used for CAD modeling (AutoCAD, Inventor), analysis (Ansys-Structural & CFD) and ERP (SAP) Joseph Soliz (Hitachi Computer Products - America) Joe holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma (1990). He is a member of IEEE and ASQ and began his engineering career with Hitachi Computer Products, Inc. in 1991 as a systems engineer supporting Disk Array Storage Devices. Today, Joe is part of Hitachi’s Senior Management Team responsible for incoming inspection and field repair quality for some of the world’s leading enterprise and mid-range storage products, manufactured in Norman. Over his 21-year career with Hitachi, Joe has performed or supported product evaluation, testing and configuration, and reliability analysis and testing. Additionally, Joe frequently travels overseas to Japan and Europe to participate on global teams responsible for standardization and supplier improvement. Todd Stair (Halliburton) Todd Stair is a mechanical design engineer for Halliburton Energy Services in Duncan, Oklahoma. Todd holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma (May 2011). He is currently involved in several projects dealing with cementing tool R&D, international field support, and intellectual property development. Rob Standridge, D.Ph. (Health Engineering Systems) Rob Standridge graduated from the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy in 1993. Since that time Rob has started several successful enterprises around the Norman area. Around 1997 Rob became a selftaught computer programmer, began a software company, and now sells his various software programs in every state and numerous countries around the world. In 2006 Rob acquired the rights to a very unique German pharmacy compounding product, the Unguator, and has since developed several products that complement the Unguator. In addition Rob has two pharmacies, a healthcare training company, and some other interests in the community. Rob is currently the State Senator for Cleveland and Oklahoma Counties including the University of Oklahoma.

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2013

CAPSTONE POSTER FAIR JUDGES

Thong Vu (Hitachi Computer Products - America) Thong Vu is a Test Engineering Department manager at Hitachi Computer Products, Norman, OK. He graduated from University of Texas at El Paso and hold a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. Prior to Hitachi, Thong’s experience includes working at Rockwell International (El Paso), Smith and Nephew Dyonics (Edmond) and White Rock Networks (Dallas). Currently is responsible for test equipment and process hardware/software for all products at Norman Hitachi facility. Mr. Vu is also part of the global management team to lead the development of process standardization and improvement with automation and simplification.

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2013 Capstone Project Summary Slides