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ALMANAC 2020

$10 A R T S + C U LT U R E + E CO LO G Y + S P I R I T


Anthropocene is the proposed name for the epoch of human activities having significant global impact on Earth’s geology and ecosystems. The term is generally used, but not officially approved by scientific community.

The recognized subdivision of geological time is under debate within scientific community. Holocene is the name given to the post-glacial epoch of the past 10,000–12,000 years and Anthropocene would come after that. In this new era of anthropocene, the Age of human, nature is us and earth is in our hands as human activities impact on the environment on all scales. These impacts include the manufacturing of hazardous chemical compounds as well as significant geological forces such as land use changes, deforestation and fossil fuel burning. Humans are outcompeting natural biological, chemical and geological processes Crutzen, P. (2002). Geology of Mankind: The Anthropocene. Nature, 415, 423.


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A word from us Welcome to the 19th issue of Otway Life in the year 2020. We started out as a quarterly and now in our seventh year we proudly present our third annual publication. Every year it is unknown if there will be another issue as we are dependent on advertising revenue and keep the rates low to help our local, family-run or sole operator businesses. We extend a heartfelt thank you to all our supporters, past and present and also to readers who buy the hard copies for $10. The online version continues to be free.

“If we surrendered to earth’s intelligence we could rise up rooted, like trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke, Rilke's Book of Hours: Love Poems to God

Warmest regardsl

The year 2020 sounds so futuristic doesn’t it?

Nettie & Gill

By now we should have 20/20 vision about how to continue to live on this precious blue planet in a manner that sustains all life, human and more-than-human.

Contents

It is timely that 2020 is the International Year of Plant Health (IYPH) and we have included some information about what we can do to improve the health status of our oxygen/life giving vegetation. In this issue we also celebrate our local artists, remember history and share stories from country. We hope you enjoy these offerings in Otway Life Almanac 2020 and find some readings and images that both encourage and inspire you to hope in the Chinese Year of the Silver Rat.

The Team Publisher, editor & co-founder: Nettie Hulme Art Director & co-founder: Gillian Brew Advertising enquiries: Nettie Hulme E otwaylifemagazine@gmail.com F www.facebook.com/otwaylifemagazine B otwaylifemagazine.wordpress.com T twitter.com/otwaylifemag View Online issuu.com/otwaylife.magazine

Statement from the Heart

5

Aunty Bronwyn Razem

7

A Story from Country

9

History Note

11

2020 Year of the Metal Rat

14

The Tree

15

International Year of Plant Health

17

My Forest of Trees

21

A Sharing across the Timor Gap

23

On the rights of plants

25

Medicinal cannabis

29

Stringybarks

31

Art 33 Otway Sleepovers

55

Great Otway National Park

57

Boutique Boozeries

63

Sustainable Table

65

Cover: by Lynette Provan Parrott

The Good Life

75

Next issue 2021 Almanac, December 2020

Finding Felicity

77

Matters of the Heart & Spirit

79

Threatened species

83

Environment

85

Whale Watching

87

Music

89

Books & Writing

91

Disclaimer: The views expressed in Otway Life Magazine are those of its individual authors.

Otway Life Almanac 2020 is a not-for-profit publication that works on a full cost recovery model. Due the rise in postage costs we no longer offer subscriptions.

Printed by: Adcell Group on 100% recycled stock

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Contributors

LIBBY RICHES lives in Apollo Bay. She has a PhD in archaeology and is currently the Principal Consultant at True Places which provides services in natural and cultural resource management, strategy and planning and community engagement. trueplaces.com.au

DEBRA CHANT is a visual artist who documents people and place

SALVINA CONTI is a local artist and a member of Studio Forrest, a collaborative arts initiative. (pictured with headpiece artwork by Sally Fullegar)

KIT KLINE is the founder of Nature Based Therapy and is passionate about improving individual, family, community and environmental health. She is currently studying psychology at Deakin University and delivers workshops and the Diploma in Nature Based Therapy.

STEPHEN BROOKS

MERRILL O'DONELL

Stephen is an avid and passionate family and social historian.

I believe every person has a story and I love learning about people and

AMI HILLEGE along with her husband Frans are a couple of tree changers who found 'the good life' on a small 9 acre property in the Otways.

CINNAMON STEPHENS Surf Coast artist Cinnamon has exhibited widely and her distictive steel and copper sculptural and functional artworks can be found here and overseas.

recording their stories for future generations

Production Team

EDITOR: NETTIE HULME Otway Life Almanac 2020

DESIGN: GILLIAN BREW


Statement from the Heart 5

Uluru Statement from the Heart

Anangu artists (from left) Christine Brumby, Charmaine Kulitja, Rene Kulitja and Happy Reid with the Uluru statement canvas. Photo by Clive Scollay.

We, gathered at the 2017 National Constitutional Convention, coming from all points of the southern sky, make this statement from the heart: Our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander tribes were the first sovereign Nations of the Australian continent and its adjacent islands, and possessed it under our own laws and customs. This our ancestors did, according to the reckoning of our culture, from the Creation, according to the common law from ‘time immemorial’, and according to science more than 60,000 years ago. This sovereignty is a spiritual notion: the ancestral tie between the land, or ‘mother nature’, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who were born therefrom, remain attached thereto, and must one day return thither to be united with our ancestors. This link is the basis of the ownership of the soil, or better, of sovereignty. It has never been ceded or extinguished, and co-exists with the sovereignty of the Crown. How could it be otherwise? That peoples possessed a land for sixty millennia and this sacred link disappears from world history in merely the last two hundred years? With substantive constitutional change and structural reform, we believe this ancient sovereignty can shine through as a fuller expression of Australia’s nationhood. Proportionally, we are the most incarcerated people on the planet. We are not an innately criminal people. Our

children are aliened from their families at unprecedented rates. This cannot be because we have no love for them. And our youth languish in detention in obscene numbers. They should be our hope for the future. These dimensions of our crisis tell plainly the structural nature of our problem. This is the torment of our powerlessness. We seek constitutional reforms to empower our people and take a rightful place in our own country. When we have power over our destiny our children will flourish. They will walk in two worlds and their culture will be a gift to their country. We call for the establishment of a First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution. Makarrata is the culmination of our agenda: the coming together after a struggle. It captures our aspirations for a fair and truthful relationship with the people of Australia and a better future for our children based on justice and self-determination. We seek a Makarrata Commission to supervise a process of agreement-making between governments and First Nations and truth-telling about our history. In 1967 we were counted, in 2017 we seek to be heard. We leave base camp and start our trek across this vast country. We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.


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Sharing the cultural knowledge of traditional weaving

Bronwyn Razem

Gunditjmara Artist & Master Weaver

Otway Life Almanac 2020


Aunty Bronwyn Razem 7

Aboriginal people have a strong connection to the land. Country we call it. We know what to get and for what purpose. We use different sorts of grasses for weaving. Elders had no names for the grasses but knew which ones to get because they all had different heads. They identified them by their heads. They would walk into the bush and spot the ones to get. They are so easy to distinguish. Mum taught me how to recognise different grasses and how to cut and split them. She would take me to a special place near the lighthouse. It was Bruce Pascoe’s old property. If I told you exactly where it is I’d have to kill you! After we cut them she would tell me to split the grass. I couldn’t go anywhere unless we split them. I come from a family of traditional weavers. The cultural practice was passed down from my grandmother to my mother, to myself. It has kept us connected to each other, our culture, our community, our Country. Most importantly, the continuation of this tradition has given us a strong and independent voice in the modern world which we’ve used to build bridges, heal broken relationships and make new connections.

Connection is really the most important healing aspect the weaving brings. People experience that at our workshops. We all sit in circle —Meeting Place—where everyone is connected, equal and included. We talk about things that happen in our lives, laugh and joke. And in the process of the weaving, we become calm and more whole within ourselves. It’s like meditation. My current solo exhibition Camping on Country at the Koorie Heritage Trust tells the stories of families coming together and elders teaching the importance of being on Country—passing down knowledge and old ways. It’s all entwined. With every stitch we make, we are reminded of the importance of these connections: to the land, to the people and to our culture. That is where the healing is—in the wholeness. For more information about Aunty Bronwyn, her art and workshops check out these links: www.mirrnongminnie.com.au instagram.com/mirrnongminnie


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Otway Life Almanac 2020


A story from Country 9

A story from Country One Man's Trash Is Another Man's Treasure A Story by Richard Collopy as told to Debra Chant

Sitting here on this little hill is indeed very thought provoking. Memories of conversations about crazy antics that shipwreck survivors got up to, what the men did to each other when word got out of gold being found and other things best not spoken about. Of course there are many differing versions of the tales from not only the survivors, but also the helpers and those living nearby watching from bush retreats. I remember sitting in the tea-tree scrub on the coast with my uncle and a Swedish fellow who had jumped ship decades before. He had made his home from driftwood and whatever else on an isolated point in Bass Strait, and lived alone for at least forty years with only an odd guest for company. One particular story I'm thinking of has been told many times, but is worth telling again considering what plays out in reality and history seems to repeat itself today - you win some and you lose some. ...On one occasion many years ago before the shipwreck while collecting ochre not too far from here, Patti was heading back along an old track where he came across something of interest about the same size but completely different material to the broken axes buried beneath here. Initially it was hidden from prying eyes but then later for a while ended up high on a mantle-piece in the house by the Hopkins out of sight and out of mind, where it lost its gilded importance and eventually disappeared.

Soon after, word of gold got out and there was no stopping it. Journey after journey were ordered with provisions provided for at least the seven that were recorded, forcing upon us to provide locations and trackers to many parts of the Otways bush. And there were others who tried, maybe thirteen attempts in all or at least that many stories came out, but the 'prospectors' seemed to come back empty handed every time. Deep holes were dug all over the place, and not many stones were left unturned, the rumour could not be dispelled and some remained smitten with the 'fever'. No-one could say where 'the shiny one' went or ended up when it disappeared from the old house by the Hopkins, but the good thing was that we found the axes again, now they are popping up everywhere. It's that beautiful and long water road, those magical springs that provide the building blocks. Gorgeous crystals everywhere like glow worms playing out the same trick in nature fooling man into a false quest, programming possibly innocent youth to go to great lengths to find their fortune. A lot of different factors come into the creation of different stones. Halfway between here and there, and from the stones in the river to the stones on the hill, holds the dream that plays out - between power and money, and true riches. We are still wondering where you are little gold nugget...


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A Deans Marsh Story by Merrill O'Donnell and Stephen Brooks

Smith Homestead Deans Marsh

On a showery Sunday afternoon in May 1917, with cutting winds gusting from Bass Strait, Robert Smith was laid to rest in the picturesque little Bambra cemetery. The patriarch of the large Smith family and early settler of Deans Marsh had died after more than 55 years in the district. Following a service conducted by Rev. A J Pearce at the Smith family home, the funeral procession made its way up Smith’s lane before turning onto the cemetery road. Two hundred friends and relatives assembled at the grave to pay their final respects. Born 1832 in Formby, Lancashire, Robert, a widower, had married Irish girl Mary McMenamin in 1859 in the Barrabool Hills near Geelong. Two children were born there before the family moved to the then remote area of Deans Marsh in 1862. By 1865, according to Ron Millard’s “Deans Marsh Story”, there were 40 houses within a two-mile radius of Mackey’s Corner. The population had begun to rapidly expand and the foundations of this close-knit, strong little community had been established. A pretty timber homestead was built on the side of one of the undulating hills and by 1877 it accommodated Robert and Mary and their family of nine children. Robert cut a furrow with a plough shear to drain the marshy land and make it more productive, and possibly more habitable. The furrow eroded over the years and is now known as Deans Marsh Creek. Farming was strenuous work. Apart from the primitive tools that were used to fell the trees, plough the land and till the soil, traipsing over the steep hills added another dimension to every activity. Yet, like many others in the Otway Life Almanac 2020

district, the resilient Smith family endured all of the hardships and remained on their land, raising their family and living productive lives.


History Note 11

Robert and Mary Smith with 7 of their 9 children at the homestead

Life would become easier as a school was established, churches built and businesses began to open. The roads began to improve and, in time, a railway line was built from Birregurra. A common sight was the many tourists who would take a break and refresh at Deans Marsh before transferring to horse drawn coaches to travel on to Lorne. Community was always important and many social nights were held, where there was singing, reciting and playing of musical instruments. The Smith family was very musically talented and enjoyed entertaining their family and many friends. The family was also very religious, always observing the Sabbath, and it would have been a happy and momentous occasion when, in 1884, they were able to attend the first service that was held in the newly built St Pauls Church. Through the years 1888 to 1908, there was much cause for celebration with eight of Robert and Mary’s nine children marrying and many grand-children born. There were also times of grief when a daughter-in-law died shortly after the birth of her first child, and the heartbreaking death of daughter Emma’s fiancé, who perished in the ferocious 1901 Birregurra fires. In August 1909, Robert and Mary proudly celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. Sadly, their daughter Elizabeth had tragically died earlier that year from cancer, just days after giving birth to her eighth child. Elizabeth

was married to William “Bill” Lawrence and would never know that one of her children, a two-year-old girl she had left behind, would become the world famous opera singer, Marjorie Lawrence. Mary Smith died in 1924 and the family homestead was continually occupied until 1959 when Emma, who had remained unmarried, died. She had chosen to live there on her own and a lighted kerosene lamp each night would let her relatives know that she was okay. The Bambra Cemetery has been an important site in the Smith family history, with Robert’s descendants serving on the Trust for decades and the grounds still being cared for by Alan Smith, his great grandson. The remains of many other family members have been buried there since that cold autumn day when they laid their much-loved patriarch to rest.


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Unravelling the Past

The story of the Otways Federation Coverlet by Lauris Jephcott Near the beginning: the central Otway Ranges first European settlement was around 1884 by John Gardner on land near what is now Beech Forest. In response to a Government offer, people came to the Otways to take up land for farming. Early farmers faced great challenges, some of which persist today: hills are steep and thickly forested, land is fertile, rainfall is high and winters are long and cold. Many settlers ran small, mixed farms and included dairy cows in their mix. From quite early on farmers were bringing their excess milk and cream to one of a number of small butter or cheese factories in the area. This was around 16 years before the Federation of various states into the Commonwealth of Australia. By the time of Federation there were a number of growing communities in the area around places such as Beech Forest, Gellibrand and Lavers Hill. A railway from Beech Forest to Colac was opened in 1902, making a huge difference to life on the farm and domestically: produce could now be sent more quickly and easily to a major town for sale, and people could travel easily (if not very quickly) to a town for medical services, shopping and the like. Throughout Australia many communities marked the significance of Federation by creating pieces of domestic memorabilia such as quilts. The Otways coverlet is probably one such item: a fabric piece around 163 x 194cm composed of 20 joined hand embroidered squares. A backing probably of sheeting

fabric has been machine sewn to the panels. Each embroidered panel seems to relate to local people, listed either by full names or by initials. One square has the date 1903. The coverlet is believed to have been put together by a Mrs Perkins, wife of Otways resident ‘Bullocky Sam’ Perkins. When Apollo Bay & District Historical Society received it had come home all the way from Western Australia via a member of the Perkins family. The Otway Districts Historical Society was handed the coverlet around five years ago, as some of the names seemed to relate to the areas around Beech Forest and Gellibrand. The challenges since then has been to preserve the fabric and embroidery and to identify families and individuals represented on the coverlet – quite a task as most are recorded as initials only. A local history grant was received from Victoria’s Public Records Office in 2017 to undertake conservation and storage materials, and information from local family history researchers is beginning to fill in some gaps. However there is still a very long way to go before we can tell the definitive story of the Federation coverlet. Otway Districts Historical Society is dedicated to preserving and recounting the stories of our area: we have a photographic replica of the coverlet in the History Rooms at the Beech Forest hall (enter from Cliff Young Drive). The original coverlet is housed in air conditioned comfort at the Colac History Centre. The Beech Forest rooms are open on Tuesdays from 1.30 to 4pm, or by appointment. Phone 0417 399 565.


History Note 13

ABOVE: Names lovingly embroidered BELOW: Square representing a survey party


14 2020 Year of the Metal Rat

2020 Year of the Metal Rat RAT is considered a lucky astrology sign, making Rat year a time of abundance and good fortune. Social Rat loves the pack, so this year is ideal to work collectively to launch new strategies. Ventures begun in a Rat year are fortunate, but only if well planned. So plan, organize, then plan again. Rat is a doer who cares about performance, progress, and rewards. Anticipate scientific discoveries, medical breakthroughs, and an increase in technological inventions. Creativity flourishes, with advancement in everything from artificial intelligence to soil analysis on Mars. During a Rat year there is a focus on money for both personal and global finance, like the last Rat year 2008 of the global financial crisis. 2020 brings an even stronger focus on international markets, excessive wealth, and real estate because it’s a Metal year. Autumn and winter are the most fortunate seasons. METAL RAT Of the five Taoist elements Fire, Earth, Metal, Water, and Wood, this is the year of the Metal Rat. The element Metal represents money and the resources of Mother Earth such as gold and silver. Anticipate fluctuations in world economies and shifts of political power. There can be a financial reset of rich and poor, with more people raised out of poverty. But Metal also represents weaponry, and Rat year can bring collective militarization.

Rat year is a time of strong endings and fresh beginnings because Rat is the first sign of the Chinese zodiac that starts a new 12 year cycle. Anticipate scientific discoveries, medical breakthroughs, and an increase in technological inventions. Creativity flourishes, with advancement in everything from artificial intelligence to soil analysis on Mars. Otway Life Almanac 2020

Metal personality traits include strength, independence, focus, intensity, righteousness, and fluency in speech. The Metal personality is very determined and powerful. One born in a Metal year succeeds by being less opinionated, accepting change, and gracefully releasing the past. The element Metal rules the lungs in Chinese Medicine so take care of your lungs this year, especially in autumn. Source: https://susanlevitt.com


The Tree 15

The Tree by Nancy Cato

I am become a tree with eyes, as still As the straight, peeled saplings burning through the bush In sharp white flame. The golden honeyeaters Feed upside-down in blossom, the little fantails Flirt their fans before me unconcerned, And scarlet robins dart their restless fires From twig to twig, and I look into their bright eyes. I would shed my clothes like the shredded bark, And become as a white flame in this dark gully, Springing out of the bracken and maidenhair Unwaveringly bright. I would stand so long That my roots should feel down through the damp earth, My arms reach up till they caught the last gold light Now tinting the highest leaves: no longer restless, But rooted content in the one place for ever; No change but the slow march of the turning years, And the moving dome of westward-wheeling stars. Originally published in The Dancing Bough (Sydney: Angus and Robertson, 1957) Sourced from https://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/cato-nancy


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Plants are the source of the oxygen we breathe, and ultimately of all the food we eat so we must keep them healthy. The United Nations has thus declared 2020 as the International Year of Plant Health. The year is a once in a lifetime opportunity to raise global

awareness on how protecting plant health can help end hunger, reduce poverty, protect the environment, and boost economic development. It will also highlight the vital role of national and regional plant health organizations in protecting plants from deadly pests and diseases.

Events will be organized around the world to celebrate the International Year of Plant Health year and this guide will give you tips on what you can do to help.

Otway Life Almanac 2020


International Year of Plant Health 17

CALLS TO ACTION The general public should be aware of the risks involved in bringing plants and plant products – which may have pests and diseases - across borders. They should avoid ordering plants and plant products through channels such as e-commerce and postal services that can easily bypass regular phytosanitary controls. Media professionals can use their channels to help deliver plant health information, including in local languages, to the broadest possible audience. Schoolchildren should learn that plants can get “sick” and about environmentally friendly ways of keeping plants healthy without resorting to harmful pesticides. They can warn their family about the risks of travelling with plants and plant products. Farmers can prevent the spread of pests by using only certified pest-free seeds and seedlings; and regularly monitoring and reporting the occurrence of pests on their farms. They should adopt environmentally friendly pest management practices – including those based on biological approaches that do not kill pollinators, and beneficial insects and organisms.

Governments, policy makers and legislators need to prioritize plant health and protection, particularly policies and legislation related to the preventing pest outbreaks, promoting environmentally friendly pest management practices, monitoring and reporting, and facilitating safe trade. They should empower national and regional plant protection organizations by providing them with adequate human and financial resources. Donors need to be regularly informed about opportunities for investing in new and existing plant health initiatives and technologies. The private sector should promote environmentally friendly products and practices and invest more in phytosanitary research and development (R&D). The transportation and trade sectors should implement international standards, enforce existing phytosanitary legislation, contribute to the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) standard setting process and be aware of innovative technologies such as ePhytos.

NGOs and cooperatives that work directly with farmers need to raise their awareness of best practices for preventing and managing pests; and provide them with practical support in implementing these practices. They can coordinate actions among different plant health stakeholders especially at the local level.

DID YOU KNOW?

MORE PLANT PESTS ARE APPEARING EARLIER IN THE SEASON AND IN PLACES WHERE THEY WERE NEVER SEEN BEFORE DUE TO CLIMATE CHANGE.

Plant health in MAKE numbers PLANTS UP 80% OF THE FOOD WE EAT AND PRODUCE 98% OF THE OXYGEN WE

BREATHE. RESPONSIBLE FOR THE • Plants make up 80% of thePLANT foodPESTS weAREeat and produce 98% of the oxygen we breathe LOSS OF UP TO 40% OF GLOBAL FOOD CROPS, AND FOR TRADE LOSSES IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS EXCEEDING USD 220 BILLION ANNUALLY.

• Plant pests are responsible for the loss of up to 40% of global food crops, and for trade losses exceeding USD 220 billion in agricultural products annually THE ANNUAL VALUE OF TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS HAS GROWN ALMOST THREEFOLD OVER THE PAST

BENEFICIAL INSECTS ARE VITAL FOR PLANT HEALTH SINCE THEY POLLINATE MOST PLANTS, KEEP PESTS

• DECADE, The annual value of trade in agricultural products has grown almost three-fold over the LARGELY IN EMERGING CLIMATE CHANGE IS HAVING A BIG IMPACT ECONOMIES AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES, ON PLANT HEALTH. IT THREATENS TO REDUCE past decade, largely in emerging economies and developing countries, reaching USD 1.7 REACHING USD 1.7 TRILLION. IN CONTROL, MAINTAIN BOTH THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF trillion. SOIL HEALTH, RECYCLE CROPS, LEADING TO LOWER YIELDS. NUTRIENTS, AND MORE.

RISING TEMPERATURES ARE ALSO

EXACERBATING WATER SCARCITY, AND CHANGING THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PESTS, PLANTS AND PATHOGENS.

• FAO estimates that production must rise by about 60% by 2050 in order FAO ESTIMATES THATagricultural AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION MUST RISE BY ABOUT 60% to feed aBYlarger and generally richer population. 2050 IN ORDER TO FEED A LARGER AND GENERALLY RICHER POPULATION.

IYPH2020_Brochure_210x210mm_EN.indd 18

21/11/2019 16:23

IYPH2020_Brochure_210x210mm_EN.indd 19

WHEN YOU AS A PURCHASE A FO

IN YOUR LOCAL HOUSEPLANT FR AN IPPC STANDA WITH IT – USUAL DEVELOPED TRE OR DISEASE FRO FOR THE RIDE.


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©Pixabay

©Pixabay

HOW TO PARTICIPATE Make a #PlantHealth commitment Everyone can contribute to plant health. Get people talking about #PlantHealth and #IYPH2020 on social media in the lead up to the International Year by posting interesting plant heath facts on your channels. These will soon be available on our website and social media channels.

Join the IYPH Photo Contest Start practicing for the IYPH Photo Contest, set to launch in December 2019, and use your photography skills to promote plant health! The deadline for the contest will be announced shortly and professionals and amateurs alike are encouraged to join! Winning photos, with your name in the credits, will be showcased on the FAO IYPH website and exhibited at FAO headquarters and events around the world.

©FAO

©FAO/Sven G. Simonsen

©FAO

Organize an IYPH event Start planning your IYPH 2020 activity aimed at the general public – marathons, concerts, shows, farmer forums, festivals, fairs or tree planting ceremonies. You could also host a public lecture, panel or roundtable with government officials, educators, scientists, farmers and private sector representatives. A photo package and set of information materials, to give your event more impact, will be available for download on the IYPH website.

Otway Life Almanac 2020

Feature your story in the IYPH campaign Stories are a vital part of the IYPH campaign and we are looking for stories from government and private sector representatives, teachers, students, travelers, traders, farmers, foresters and citizens from all walks of life. Plant health affects everyone! Read the MY STORY brief and use the template provided to submit your story. A selection of stories will be featured online and at events and exhibits worldwide. Your story will help make the case for plant health!

Bring IYPH to your town or city, airports and seaports You may want to start approaching municipalities, outdoor advertisers, air and sea port authorities, or transportation companies to discuss the possibility of displaying IYPH products - such as the poster, banner or promo video we will be providing - on billboards, in airports, ferry ports, on buses or trams, in city subways, cinemas and more. FAO offices have worked successfully with public and private companies on similar campaigns, mostly on a pro-bono basis.


International Year of Plant Health 19

©Pixabay

©FAO

Young people: save the plants, save the planet! Include plant health in your lesson plans or calendar of youth activities for 2020 and stay tuned as we prepare to launch the IYPH Activity Book which will be available for download in early 2020. Schools or youth centres can use this material to educate youth about the importance of plant health and show how they can take simple actions to help keep plants safe. They can find out more about the strong links between plant health, environmental protection and climate change – all topics that will affect their future!

Engage the media Media professionals have the expertise and pull to spread IYPH messages widely and draw attention to plant health issues. Use your media contacts to start spreading the word about the IYPH on talk shows, discussion panels, at press conferences, media briefings and in radio or TV call-in shows. Tell them about the IYPH photo contest, set to launch in December 2019, and share ideas with the IYPH team on where you can place IYPH multimedia material. You could even organize a plant health media workshop where journalists have a chance to meet and make contact with plant protection officers, scientists, researchers, etc. We are preparing a “Plant Health for Media Professionals” brief to introduce them to the topic.

©FAO

Add the IYPH button to your web page Update your web page with the IYPH button (this will soon be available in six languages) and link it to the IYPH 2020 website. Ask your partners to do the same!

95552783

Key messages – International Year of Plant Health (IYPH) 2020

1. It is risky to bring plants and plant products across borders as this may spread plant pests and diseases. 2. Make trading in plants and plant products safe without setting up unnecessary barriers. 3. Keep plants healthy to protect the environment and biodiversity. 4. Protect, manage and restore terrestrial and marine environments to keep plants healthy. 5. Invest in plant health organizations and phytosanitary research and development. 6. Healthy plants are crucial for ending hunger and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. 7. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) provide guidance and lead global efforts to ensure plant health.

www.fao.org/plant-health-2020

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IYPH@fao.org


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My Forest of Trees by Nettie Hulme

We breathe out, they breathe in, they breathe out, we breathe in. Connected in the most tantric of ways. Trees and us, plants and non-plants and the one Great Breath. From the whimsy of The Faraway Tree of my childhood, to the mysterious Cyprus pines we climbed in the outer suburbs of Melbourne, to the scraggly Eucalypts letting off their steamy perfume on languid hot days, trees have loomed large both in my outer world and my imaginary life. These were trees who showed kindness and could console a young heart, sturdy trees to build a cubby house amongst, and wise trees to listen to when the wind gave them voice. I live on the north side of Forrest, in the foothills of the Great Otway National Park. From here these timbered ranges rise up, then sweep down through seventeen kilometres to the coast, where Wye River empties into the Southern Ocean. We have remnant trees keeping us company and occasionally one falls during a storm. The last one was several years ago and our ten-yearold grandson reported that he spoke to the tree who said her name was Charlotte. She told him that it was painful when she fell but that she is okay now, resting on the ground.

Otway Life Almanac 2020

Our grandson now lives in the sister hills of the Dandenong Ranges. He walks to school from home crossing another fallen giant, one that fords the Monbulk River. The trunk has been scored with symmetrical lines, no doubt to lessen the risk of walkers slipping. They remind me of the markings of the ancient Celtic language Omagh. I imagine that they are a shared language, providing an otherworldly guidance and protection for my grandson as he makes his journey towards his seat of worldly learning. The first place I lived in the Otways was up the top end of Bambra-Boonah Road where the forest becomes brooding and dark, falling into steep gullies. My first walk to the back of the house led me to two large Messmates, their roots entwined, who told me that they were the grandmother and grandfather trees. Other trees in my meditation include the ‘oldest tree in the Western District’. We happened upon it by pure chance while on a meandering drive north of Casterton. A small sign pointed the way to the longest living survivor of the ancient forest of towering eucalypts that once reigned over the entire region. Eventually a little used track led us to a fenced off portion of vast farmland where the twisted, thick white trunk of an eighthundred-year-old River Red Gum lived a lonely life.


My Forest of Trees 21

I am not sure whether to tell you about the last tree on my mind in case it becomes vulnerable through this exposure. She lives, camouflaged by a small cluster of young trees, somewhere along the Cape Otway Road where a gully cuts through farmland. If you look just at the right time as you drive past, you can glimpse sight of the matriarch in the middle of the circle. Her gnarly, bulbous trunk shows signs of a long life, a survivor of the many travails that must assail a tree that was once part of an older forest community. In Ireland they reroute roads to avoid fairy trees without drama. In Iceland they redesign highways to protect elf kingdoms with respect. In Australia, we still have to demonstrate, cajole and beg to protect ancient ‘birthing trees’ sacred to the Djab Wurrung people.

This brings me to my dream the other night in which three crone trees embrace each other in solace. Together they sing a lament: “... oh look what has been done to our community, but we at least we still have each other.” That dream reminded me of the night my grandson was born. I had a most visceral response to his birth. It was if I was an old tree whose roots had a sudden growth spurt, contorting and aching as they pushed deeper into the earth. Later I felt solid, more able to withstand any future storms. My grandson is journeying into adulthood now and my new roots have had time to settle. Whenever I can, I sit quietly at home with Charlotte, and focus on breathing in and out with my forest of trees.


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A sharing across the Timor Gap by Mike Robinson-Koss

During the dry season, Timor Leste is desiccated like a chip and signs of yet to be released monsoonal rains loom large- huge river beds gouged through mountain ranges with not one drop of water anywhere, parched hillsides with chocolate brown soil lifeless with the exception of stark ghostly white eucalypts proudly pushing their trunks up toward the baking tropical sun.

Our job is to educate and enthuse farmers so they will want to grow trees for all the reasons important to them.

For the Timorese people, this dry season challenge is quite serious as safe drinking water and fresh food becomes scarce as they head towards the wet. They call this the Hungry Season.

It’s October 2019, I find myself in Timor Leste with Bambra agroforester Rowan Reid and Deans Marsh photographer Mikala Robinson-Koss. We’ve volunteered our time at

Otway Life Almanac 2020

the invitation of Andrew Mahar, founder of the social enterprise organisation With One Seed (Ho Musan Ida) training farmers in our Master TreeGrower (MTG) program. The Master TreeGrower program has been running in Australia for over 20 years and has now been working in Africa, Indonesia and Oceania. This is our third venture into Timor Leste.

The With One Seed program started in the mountain district of Baguia where its local team has been extremely successful in nurturing farmers in their tree growing pursuits, and setting up community nurseries growing now in excess of 150,000 trees annually. The trees are measured by these Ho Musan Ida staff and the carbon sequestered is used by companies to offset their carbon pollution. The farmers see this as a win-win partnership- helping them with their conservation and financial concerns while giving something important to the rest of the world.


A sharing across the Timor Gap 23

Our job is to educate and enthuse farmers so they will want to grow trees for all the reasons important to them. Our training needs to use simple silvicultural and horticultural techniques and use equipment the locals have ready access to. Sharing knowledge, and being a good listener is also important as farmers in the program are experienced as well, and we learn as much as we teach. This two way sharing in each community takes a week and covers all things trees- propagation, seed collecting, tree measurements, pruning and thinning, ecological systems, conservation values, climate change and marketing of tree products. Each day is divided into ‘classroom’ sessions in the morning and practical visits to a property/nursery in the afternoon. Much of the forest was denuded during the Indonesian occupation thus these subsistence farmers are very keen to incorporate tree growing back into their existing food gardens that already include various vegetables plus taro, cassava, coffee, banana, breadfruit, coconut, mango, candlenut etc. Diversifying their farm productivity will help these farmers weather that annual Hungry Season.


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On the rights of plants Libby Riches - True Places

Increasingly within the fields of philosophy and ecology there is renewed interest in the idea that some form of consciousness or sentience is a ubiquitous condition of all existence. Not just humans or animals – all things. These are interesting and challenging ideas that extend our thinking beyond human rights and animal welfare to a more considered and respectful approach to the broader world around us. Places like the Otways can make such ideas seem intuitively correct. It is love for the forest as an organism, and the belief that it should have an inalienable right to its own existence, that has driven decades of successful community activism. That we might cause such a thing to cease to exist – to essentially take its life - is a wrongness cannot be allowed to stand. As we learn about the ways

Otway Life Almanac 2020

that plants behave and communicate, the notion that they might possess some form of consciousness becomes less fantastical and opens further space for a consideration of the notion of rights for plants. It is the similarity between human consciousness and that of other animals that leads to animal welfare advocacy. People recognise the spark of being and can relate to it. As we learn more about plants, we know that they also exhibit familiar behaviours such as communication, nurturing and pain response. If plants have a consciousness, it is almost certainly of a fundamentally different nature to our own, but perhaps it is time to abandon the hard line between plant and animal kingdoms and extend our compassion to all that is around us.


On the rights of plants 25

If, for example, we are to speak up against the trauma that Industrial agriculture inflicts on animals, we should also consider the trauma these systems inflict on plants. This trauma lies in the first instance in the clearance of land and the destruction of biodiverse ecosystems to support the establishment of plant monocultures. In a monoculture, plants are bereft of their natural connections with other plants. These webs of relationship are what helps them to communicate, thrive, reproduce, fight off predators and undertake the daily survival tasks that face any organism. Beyond plant to plant relationships, healthy plants require interaction with animals. Animals of all types and sizes work soil, help stop other animals from becoming

overabundant and provide nutrients that plants need. Conventional agricultural systems deprive plants of healthy relationships with both animals and other plants. We need to learn to look at our world as a complex series of interrelated systems, to abandon the hard distinction between plants and animals and work compassionately with the needs of all organisms. Advocating for the needs of our forests and natural places is one arm of this. Supporting agroecological and regenerative farming practices is another. Consideration of the rights and needs of plants is not only arguably the compassionate response to our non-human kin, but critical to maintaining the health of the system that we all inhabit.


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Arts

Plants release more carbon dioxide into atmosphere than expected A new study involving ANU and international collaborators has found plants release more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere through respiration than expected. Plants use photosynthesis to capture carbon dioxide and then release half of it into the atmosphere through respiration. Plants also release oxygen into the atmosphere through photosynthesis. Professor Owen Atkin from ANU said the study revealed that the release of carbon dioxide by plant respiration around the world is up to 30 per cent higher than previously predicted.

from the Research School of Biology and the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at ANU. "Currently, around 25 per cent of carbon emissions from the use of fossil fuels is being taken up and stored by plants, which is good, as it helps reduce the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. "Our work suggests that this positive contribution of plants may decline in the future as they begin to respire more as the world warms." The research is published in Nature Communications.

He said the carbon dioxide released by plants every year was now estimated to be about 10 to 11 times the emissions from human activities, rather than the previous estimate of five to eight times.

ANU collaborated with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology in the United Kingdom, Western Sydney University and several other leading institutions from the United Kingdom, United States and New Zealand.

"The study shows that as global temperatures increase, the amount of carbon dioxide released through plant respiration will increase significantly," said Professor Atkin

The ANU team led the study's data collection, which comprises measurements of carbon dioxide release by plant respiration from about 1,000 plant species.

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Professor Mark Tjoelker at Western Sydney University said changes to processes of photosynthesis and respiration in response to a warming climate would have profound implications in terms of the amount of carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels that plants can soak up. "Increases in respiration in a warming climate could portend a declining capacity of vegetation to absorb carbon emissions," he said. The study uses plant respiration data from about 100 remote sites globally, from hot deserts in Australia, to deciduous and boreal forests in North America and Europe, Arctic tundra in Alaska, and tropical forests in South America, Asia, Africa and Australia. Lead author Dr Chris Huntingford, from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, said these data combined with carbon cycling models provide unprecedented insights into the extent of global plant respiration and how future climates could affect this process.

The study shows that as global temperatures increase, the amount of carbon dioxide released through plant respiration will increase significantly. "The study highlights the need to review carbon budget projections, and how carbon flows in and out of plants across the world," he said. Reprinted with kind permission from the ANU


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Medicinal cannabis Please note: The information given on this page is not medical advice and should not be relied on in thisway. Individuals wanting medical advice on this issue should consult a health professional. What is medicinal cannabis / medicinal cannabinoids? Medicinal cannabis are cannabis preparations prescribed to relieve the symptoms of a medical condition, such as epilepsy. It is a quality-controlled product with specific levels of cannabinoids such as THC and CBD. For some people suffering from chronic or terminal illnesses, conventional medicines do not work, or do not work as effectively as medicinal cannabis. Also, for some patients, conventional medicines may work but cause debilitating side effects that cannabis can help to relieve.

called endocannabinoids along with a system of receptors in the brain and body, to affect things like a person’s mood, memory, sleep and appetite. Components of the cannabis plant, called phytocannabinoids, work by interacting with our body’s endocannabinoid system. For some people

suffering from chronic or terminal illnesses, conventional medicines may cause debilitating side effects that cannabis can help to relieve.

What are cannabinoids? The endocannabinoid system is a communication system that plays an important role in the human brain and body.1,2 It uses chemical messengers Otway Life Almanac 2020

The Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics at the University of Sydney recognises two major endocannabinoids produced by our bodies and eleven phytocannabinoids that they are actively studying.3 Research has found that the cannabis plant produces between 80 and 100 cannabinoids and about 300 noncannabinoid chemicals. It is thought that medicinal cannabis can treat various illness by acting on the endocannabinoid system.

Research is ongoing into how cannabinoids can treat or assist in the treatment of various illnesses.


Medicinal cannabis 29 Types and forms of medicinal cannabis There are two main forms of cannabis that can be used medicinally: • Pharmaceutical cannabis products that are approved by an organisation such as the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), including nabiximols (Sativex®).4 Sativex, which comes as a nasal or oral spray, has been approved in over 24 countries for treating spasticity due to multiple sclerosis. • Imported products from Canada or Europe, such as cannabis extracts in oils or tinctures. • Controlled and standardised herbal cannabis (plant products), such as the products produced in the Netherlands.

Why smoking cannabis for medical purposes is not recommended Smoking is a particularly harmful way of taking cannabis, mainly because carcinogenic substances are inhaled directly into the lungs. Smoking cannabis is not recommended by health authorities.5 It is understood that smoked cannabis will not be prescribed in Australia in part because a significant amount of cannabinoid content is lost during combustion, making it difficult to monitor the cannabinoid amount a patient has actually ingested. Additionally, evidence indicates that smoking in general has adverse health effects.4

Side effects As with other medicines, although cannabis may be a successful treatment for some people it will not be a successful treatment for every person. Although it is impossible to die from a cannabis overdose it can still have unpleasant side effects for some people who take it. These side effects may include things like dizziness, lightheadedness, and persistent drowsiness.6

Special Access Scheme Under the TGA Special Access Scheme, some forms of medicinal cannabis are currently available. The scheme provides for the import and supply of an unapproved therapeutic good to individual patients on a case-bycase basis. Recently, the TGA has made changes to its

Special Access Scheme that will make it easier for medical practitioners to prescribe cannabis-based medicines for patients in need, under certain conditions. For more information on access to medicinal cannabis, go to tga.gov.au/medicinal-cannabis-guidancedocuments

Current situation The Commonwealth Government controls all regulatory aspects of the cultivation of cannabis for medicinal purposes through one national scheme. Manufacture is a joint responsibility between the Commonwealth and the states and territories. Access to any cannabis products manufactured under the scheme will also be a joint responsibility, with supply being controlled by provisions under the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 working in tandem with state and territory drugs and poisons legislation. For more information on Australian federal legislation, go to odc.gov.au/qa

Victoria The Office of Medicinal Cannabis has been established within the Department of Health and Human Services and provides advice on access to medicinal cannabis in Victoria. Read more about the Victorian situation at www2.health. vic.gov.au/public-health/drugs-and poisons/ medicinalcannabis References 1. Scholastic. (2011). The science of the endocannabinoid system: how THC affects the brain and the body. 2. Murillo-Rodriguez, E., Pastrana-Trejo, JC., Salas-Crisostomo, M., de-laCruz, M. 2017. The Endocannabinoid System Modulating Levels of Consciousness, Emotions and Likely Dream Contents. CNS & Neurological Disorders – Drug Targets, vol.16, no.4, pp. 370-379. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2174/187152731666617 0223161908 3. Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics. Phytocannabinoids. University of Sydney. 4. Therapeutic Goods Administration. (2018). Guidance for the use of medicinal cannabis in Australia: Patient information: The side effects of medicinal cannabis treatment 5. Health Department, Australian Government. (2016). Narcotic Drug Amendment Bill 2016 public information paper. 6. Nugent, SM., Morasco, BJ., O’Neil, ME., Freeman, M., Low, A., Kondo, K., Elven, C., Zakher, B., Motu’apuaka, M., Paynter, R., Kansagara, D. 2017. The Effects of Cannabis Among Adults with Chronic Pain and an Overview of General Harms: A Systematic Review. Annals of Internal Medicine, vol.167, no.5, pp.319-331. Reprinted with permission from ADF

Other help, support services and resources Links to further help and support • adf.org.au/help-support/ Information on different types of cannabis • adf.org.au/insights/various-cannabis-use/ FURTHER INFORMATION DrugInfo • 1300 85 85 84 Free confidential information and advice about alcohol and other drugs (9am - 5pm, Mon-Fri) Family Drug Help • 1300 660 068 • www.familydrughelp.com.au (Victorian-based) Services are available to support those around you who may be affected by your drug use. As well as providing understanding, they can provide information about how best to help during treatment. Family Drug Support • 1300 368 186 • www.fds.org.au (Australia-wide)


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Stringybark is tough as boots (and gave us the word ‘Eucalyptus’)

Author: Gregory Moore, Doctor of Botany, University of Melbourne Few eucalypts are as versatile, varied and valuable as messmate stringybark. It was the first eucalypt to be scientifically named, and in fact gives us the name “Eucalyptus”. Gum trees had been seen and collected on earlier expeditions, but a specimen collected on James Cook’s third expedition to Bruny Island off the Tasmanian coast was sent to the British Museum, where the French botanist Charles Louis L’Heritier de Brutelle named it and then published it in 1788. L’Heritier named the specimen Eucalyptus obliqua, and so messmate stringybark is the first named and now type specimen for all Eucalyptus species. Because of the little caps covering the buds of this specimen, the name eucalypt was derived from the Greek eu, meaning “well”, and calyptos, meaning “covered”. Meanwhile, the asymmetrical or oblique leaf base gave us the description obliqua. The name stringybark comes from the fibrous stringy bark that grows on the trunk of the tree, but no one knows the origins of the name messmate, which is also applied to several other eucalypt species.

Humming with bees The flowers are small and white and often go unnoticed – but not by bees, which are often attracted to the trees in such large numbers that the trees seem to be humming. The fruits, or gum nuts, are also small at about 8mm across and usually occur in clusters of three, four or five. The juvenile leaves are quite large, almost heart-shaped, and up to 70mm wide and 100mm long, but the adult leaves are about 50mm wide and up to 200mm long with a sharply acute base on one side. E. obliqua is also commonly known as messmate, stringybark, browntop, Tasmanian or Tassie oak, or browntop stringybark. It is widely distributed through southeastern Australia, growing in Tasmania, Victoria, South Australia and much of New South Wales, almost to the Queensland border. It is usually a tall straight forest tree that can reach heights of 80m or more, and girths in excess of 10m. It grows in higher and wetter habitats and often grows around other eucalypts such as E. regnans, E. delegatensis, E. viminalis or E. radiata.

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The specimens that Cook’s expedition encountered on Bruny Island were huge forest trees, and there are still such specimens growing on the island today. They are well worth a visit along easily accessible tracks. Such giant specimens can also be found on the mainland in places such as the Otway Ranges. However, you can also find examples of E. obliqua growing in the coastal heaths of Victoria that are no more than a metre high and will maintain their short stature regardless of where they are grown.

A tough customer One of the great things about messmate stringybark is its environmental resilience. The species is renowned for its adaptations to stress, particularly fire. Its thick stringy bark protects the trunk during bushfires, and under the bark are dormant (or “epicormic”) buds that allow the rapid establishment of a leafy canopy after fire or other stresses such as grazing. These buds often sprout very soon after a fire and are the first sign the forest is beginning to regenerate. Many of these new shoots will not last very long, but usually enough will survive to reconstitute the tree’s canopy. If all the shoots fail, most specimens have a lignotuber (like a mallee root) that allows new stems and trunks to develop after very severe stress. So E. obliqua is truly a tough customer. During the most recent ice age, Tasmania and the mainland were connected by a land bridge that subsequently disappeared under Bass Strait. The populations of E. obliqua in Victoria and Tasmania were then connected but in the 10,000 years since they have been separated by the strait, the individual trees growing on the mainland have retained a lignotuber, while those in Tasmania did not. This reflects the better growing conditions in Tasmania for messmate stringybark, and less need or stress adaptations.

Good wood The timber of E. obliqua is highly prized. It was used by Indigenous communities, as scars on some surviving trees indicate, and its fibrous bark could be used for making fibre and in fires. Today, it is a fine quality hardwood that can be used for building house frames, furniture making or, of course, for wonderful Tassie oak wooden floors.


Stringybarks 31

It is not the densest or hardest eucalypt timber, but is hard enough to make beautiful and durable flooring that polishes to a rich honey or golden colour. Properly installed and maintained, these floors can remain in good condition for well over a century and many Australians will have fond memories of dancing on them. Messmate stringybark is one of the great trees of Australia for a variety of reasons. It has links to Captain Cook, is an economically important timber species, and is a great

survivor in the harsh Australian environment. With its wide distribution and adaptations to fire and other stresses, it is a species likely to cope well with climate change. After all, it is as tough as boots. Source: https://theconversation.com/stringybark-is-toughas-boots-and-gave-us-the-word-eucalyptus-100528


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presents the

43rd Annual

26th December - 5th January Open Daily from 10am - 4pm

Apollo Bay Community Centre (Formerly Senior Citizens Centre) 4 Whelan St, Apollo Bay

apollobayartshow.com


43rd Apollo Bay Art Show

The Apollo Bay Art Show first opened its doors in 1976 when Bob and Nancy Davis, with other members from the local Historical Society, took up the suggestion of Freda Amor to hold an art show fundraiser for the society. The very first show was held in the old Butter Factory in Hardy Street and was a resounding success. It then moved to the Catholic School in Noel Street before settling into its home at the Catholic Church hall in Trafalgar Street where it was an annual fixture for over 30 years. Apollo Bay Arts took over the running of the show in 2010 and moved to its current location in the Senior Citizens Hall in Whelan St, Apollo Bay in December 2015. Panels were modified to this new space and the arts community has adopted this space as home of the Art Show each year ever since. The local Arts Council, Apollo Bay Arts Inc, views the show as a good opportunity to both fundraise in support of local arts projects and to encourage a new generation of artists in their practice. In the nine years of managing the show, many changes have been introduced as the show has evolved. New co-ordinators in 2018-19 introduced the concept of selling unframed artworks and introducing 3D and sculptural pieces along with traditionally accepted works of painting, drawing and photography. The current committee aims to encourage local and regional artists to produce and exhibit a diverse range of works each year and gradually improve the facilities available to display these works. The venue of the Senior Citizens Hall has been recently re-vamped with funds from a Fire Ready grant obtained by the Neighbourhood House along with contribution from Colac Otway Shire. The new kitchen and large windows being replaced in the Hall area will provide added value and a fresh space to hold this year’s Art Show. Over the years, with funds from the Art Show, Apollo Bay Arts has given grants to Apollo Bay School for sculpture

Arts 33

projects, jewelry making, excursions to the Chooky Dancers and the Flying Bookworm Circus and provided a regular Art Prize at awards night. This year Arts Inc has supported a local student to undertake a mentorship with an established local artist and contributed funds to enable another local media student to produce video footage of a local band. In past years, the following projects have been funded - life drawing sessions and tutorage, local mural projects and prizes for the Apollo Bay Agricultural Show. The Preschool has recently received funds to host Mr. Ants to perform his “Great Recycling Adventure” and Studio Forrest was granted monies to help print flyers for a midyear Installation. This year the Show will run over Summer, opening on Thursday 26th December and will run until Sunday the 5th January, open daily from 10am -4pm. Apollo Bay Arts Inc thanks its many wonderful volunteers and looks forward to welcoming you along.

W: apollobayartshow.com Phone: 0418 448 007 E: apollobayartshow@gmail.com Follow us on social media ApolloBayArtslnc @apollobayartshow


34 Studio Forrest

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You are invited… into the metaphorical forest of the creative mind by Salvina Conti So read the invitation to Studio Forrest’s installation that was exhibited at the Forrest Hall in June 2019, travelled to the Makers Space in Colac in July and was reconfigured in August at the Red Rock Regional Theatre and Gallery in Cororooke. The installation was based on the theme- ‘Forest’ and was developed over a period of months through a series of collaborative brainstorming sessions and group art activities that explored ways of working and composing together. The group explored different media, ideas and techniques, sharing skills and sourcing expertise to extend knowledge and develop skills through workshops. The aims decided by Studio Forest were that the installation should be an immersive experience made of individual pieces that related to each other through ideas generated from the theme. Design elements based on colour, line, shared formats and linking forms were chosen so that a feeling of unity could be expressed through the diversity of individual works. Connections were made between the structures to conceptually turn them into one organism. Studio Forrest also aimed to create an art experience that would engage the senses and invite participation. Many of the works in the installation were suspended throughout the space; other works were placed on the ground and along the walls so that viewers as they moved through the installation were made to look around at different levels; up, down and through. Winding pathways were created by placing gathered leaves that also filled the room with the scents of the forest and by Gillian Brew’s paper fungi and illuminated mycelium creating connections between the pieces. The group contributed images to a video composed by Ros Jameson that was projected on two layers of billowing silk with a soundscape of birdsong playing. A variety of textures filled the room; the glint of Jan Veroudan’s coloured glass leaves, Kylie Pollock’s tree made of found crumpled paper with a small clay ceramic child holding the world by a thread. Catriona Ebeling’s rippling mosaic torso of Persephone, Gail Maddern’s illuminated blue paper moon. Sally Fullagar created headdresses weaving plants and found materials that commented on the effects of our intervention with the forest and invited

the viewers to try them on and view themselves. Lyndi Whalen’s magical woollen tree made of recycled and up cycled knitted and crocheted pieces represented her hopes and dreams for the environment. Thoughts on the memories stored in trees of times past, the cycles of the earth and moon, life and death were expressed in Lynette Parrott’s white trees with illustrations and lighted insets. Doris Hansen’s work ‘Cathedral’ expressed our spiritual connection to nature in a beautiful minimalist piece on found wood. Sandy Batten’s work explored the fragility and harshness of the land with exquisite transparent prints and floating printed sticks. Pauline Rostos contributed a poetic plea to her piece ‘creating a dream’. My work looked at the hidden forest, the small entities, lichen and the idea of hybrids. The bower at the entrance of the installation invited people to contribute anything blue and people were asked to leave any thoughts or concerns they had about the forest on boiled paper leaves created by the group. Studio Forest is an arts initiative aimed at developing collaborative, as well as individual artwork on selected themes. The group focuses on collaboration; alternative ways of displaying works such as installations, immersive artworks, and public participatory art to engage audiences. 2019 Studio Forrest included the following local artists: Sandy Batten, Gillian Brew, Mandy Bishop, Salvina Conti, Catriona Ebeling, Sally Fullagar, Doris Hansen, Ros Jameson, Gail Maddern, Peter Mitchell, Lynette Parrotte, Kylie Pollock, Pauline Rostos, Jan Veroudan, Lyndi Whalen Studio Forrest is a program of the Forrest and District Neighbourhood House and is a group of local artists who meet weekly to work together on collaborative artworks. Contact the Neighbourhood House on 5236 6597 or find us on facebook @studioforrest for more information about Studio Forrest Studio Forrest 2020. 


36 Artist Profile

Christmas – A Community Art Project Interview with artist Sue Tate

What is the inspiration behind the designs for the Christmas Banners? Personally, I don't celebrate Christmas in a religious or traditional way and I despise the commercial aspects of Christmas waste. But, I love the Christmas celebration, the gathering of family and friends, the feasting, the giving and receiving of handmade presents, the music, the stories and reminisces of celebrations past. I liked the fact that the Colac Otway Shire (COS) had chosen to install a re-useable, permanent structure for the banners. I wanted to create something different from our traditional northern hemisphere totems of Christmas, images that reflected more of our local experience of the summer celebration. I wanted to create something that could be used for more than just the Christmas celebrations. I live on the Otway coast and all summer long my garden is visited by superb blue wrens, king parrots, yellow tailed black cockatoos and sulphur crested cockatoos. I chose these birds to appear on the three banners. If we are lucky, some years the gums flower too and the trees just hum with the sound of visiting bees. So, of course the red flowering gum just had to be included.

Can you please share some of the techniques and processes used? Usually I work in textiles. I also paint and draw but this is the first time I used technology to create an artwork. Each image began as a photograph. The photos were cropped, simplified and merged together to form the base images for the banners. Then I simplified the colour pallet of each image to give a continuity across the four banners, enhancing the red, green and gold; the colours of Christmas. I used GIMP to create the art work for the banners. Luckily there are plenty of videos available on how to use this open sourced software. Otway Life Almanac 2020

Simple stuff really, but it meant I could easily manipulate the images to meet slight modifications requested by COS. If these designs were painted I just would not have been able to meet their brief.

What role do you think art can play in modern day society? Where do I start! Much has been written about the benefits the arts bring to a community. A staggering 98% of our population associate with art in some form or other, 48% as active participants in the arts. For me, the creative process, being able to make something with your own hands, that is formed from your imagination and skill is truly rewarding. And that creative process is not restricted to creating visual art.Cooking, gardening, sewing, knitting, leatherwork, carpentry, metal work, singing, playing an musical instrument .... all enrich our lives, give us purpose and pleasure. When we create art we do so mainly in our own homes. No one, apart from family and close friends know what we do. Our creativity remains hidden.


Arts 37

Recently the local artists from Lavers Hill, 26 of them including 7 students from the local school, held an exhibition as part of the Colac Otway Arts Trail. We just put a call out for local artists to deliver art works on the Thursday and Friday morning before the Art Trail weekend. We did not know what to expect and we accepted and hung it all, nothing was rejected.

arts strategy last year and one of their acknowledgements was that ‘arts are a source of pride for local Communities’ and there is a ‘ role of arts in celebrating the character and stories of the community.’ The strategy also states the council are committed to the integration of public art and design elements into future capital works & open space improvements. This means greater scope and opportunities for local artists to find their work being used to enhance public spaces with art and design.

A massive total of 107 artworks were exhibited, surprising ourselves and others at the depth of talent we had in the community. The hall looked amazing and carried a good vibe all the while our art was displayed.

What have your learned from this experience of working on a community art project?

We had over 110 visitors over the course of 2 days, mostly locals who stayed for ages looking at the exhibition and catching up with people they had not seen in a while.

From this experience, I realise why I made the decision nearly 50 years ago not to pursue a career in commercial art.

Sharing our creativity with others in this way, at a local exhibition, builds the community confidence as well as pride. We were able to show that art does not have to be high-end, it just has to be enjoyed.

I was surprised when my first banner, that of the sulphur crested and yellow tailed black cockatoos was selected from the 14 panels submitted by 7 local artists. But when the council requested a further 3 panels on the same theme I had my work cut out for me. But all in all, I did enjoy the process and I learnt heaps.

Everyone was enthusiastic and worked hard to pull the exhibition together and all want to do it again next year. It all goes to prove the positive force art has on a communities wellbeing. Another way art can be used in our community is through public art. The Colac Otway Shire council adopted a new

These banners break with tradition, they are loud and joyful, they will be talked about. I just hope they are enjoyed by most of the community.


38 Artist Profiles

The WeaverBirds

Chris Hoggard Ceramics

Nestled in the treetops of Aireys Inlet is a talented group of basket makers, fibre artists and sculptors.

Love for her garden is the driving force for Chris’s production of quirky ceramic garden ornaments and she loves to share her passion and skills with students.

The WeaverBirds, as they are known, come together to weave their magic, creating beautiful woven and stitched vessels and sculptural pieces, which are created from grasses, plant fibre, wool,wire, ropes, branches and found objects. Many pieces are formed from handspun string, made from recycled plastic bags, lolly wrappers, fabric and coloured telephone wire. Some pieces are Eco-dyed using natural dyes and a myriad of leaves and nuts, creating the wonder of nature at its best. These creations are not just baskets,they are pieces of art to be admired and enjoyed well into the future.

Recent Awards include: Emerging Artist Award in March at 2019 South West International Women’s Day Art Prize Warnambool Sculpture and 3D Works Award - October 2019 Birregurra Art Show. Chris runs morning, afternoon and evening classes for adults on Mondays and Tuesdays in her enchanting garden studio in Warncoort and the popularity of these classes is rapidly growing.

Next Exhibition for the WeaverBirds will be at The Art Space 2/103 Great Ocean rd. Anglesea from 14th January to 27th January 2020. 10am to 4pm daily.

One of Chris’s highlights this year has been curating an exhibition of her students’ work at Colac Performing Arts Centre. “Most of my students have never worked with clay and I am so impressed with their growing level of skill and their enthusiasm to take on more difficult projects as their confidence grows”. For information about ceramics classes, please go to: W: chrishoggardceramics.com.au

theweaverbirds@outlook.com Otway Life Almanac 2019 2018


Arts 39

Avys Hope Moving from Melbourne to Aireys Inlet in 2002 was a touch of 'Seachange', 'Always Greener' or just plain going home to the country. As a child growing up on a farm, the old saying: “You can take the girl from the country, but you can never take the country from the girl” applies. I have always had an interest in tactile arts and crafts, having knitted my way through the late eighties, making teddy bears in the mid nineties. My interest in ceramics/ mosaics started in the late 1990’s, mainly in the winter period as I have a busy life running a Caravan Park. My inspiration comes from nature, colors, different mediums and textures. The mosaics become organic, taking a shape and life of their own. My art can be placed either inside or outside. I was very fortunate to meet Cinnamon Stephens who collaborated in creates frames for my hanging mosaics. My first introduction to exhibiting was the Colac/Otway Art Exhibition in the gardens of historic "Narrighid" in 2004. I have continued to exhibit with Geelong Sculptors

Francisca Verwoert The act of painting and the hours spent involved with the process has a meditative quality about it and with music pumping while I work, I can express my joy of life. The materials I use matter and I have learned that only the best quality canvas and paint are sufficient to my needs and for the effects I crave. My method has evolved over the years. I start my paintings with loose splashes and gestures, oils thinly applied. I allow forms and figures to present themselves without prior planning or predictability and then spend many enjoyable hours shaping both the details and the whole. My images densely fill the canvas, my relation to nature being whimsical, with strange plant and animal forms emerging. Colour remains central to everything, melding with sensuous form. My paintings can be seen at Metropolis Gallery in Geelong, Qdos Arts in Lorne and at my always open studio 375 Great Ocean Road, Morengo #franciscaverwoert #metropolisgallery #qdosarts Apollobayartist

Inc. throughout Geelong – the Town Hall, Deakin University and this year at 101 Ryrie Arts. In 2009 Geelong Sculptures Inc was contracted to make a moving, touchable sculpture to commemorate the 200 year anniversary of Braille. “Do Touch Sculptures” is on display in reception at Vision Australia in Belmont. “My first solo exhibition in December 2018 at Eagles Nest Gallery was a great success and the Surf Coast Arts Trail in August 2019 was a great follow on performance at her beautiful space. NOW Avys is ready to share her studio to mosaic students. For further information on mosaic classes and art of sale contact Avys on mobile 0439 306 615 or email: avysmosaic@outlook.com


40

Colac Otway Arts Trail

by Vivienne Wheeler

The third Arts Trail is over for 2019 and what a success! Weather was great for the weekend of 19th and 20th October, enabling visitors to catch up with galleries, studios, community centres and artists from Lavers Hill to Apollo Bay and north to Forrest and Gellibrand. The ‘bus’ travellers had time for a leisurely view of potters, painters, textile workers and magnificent hospitality. We weren’t so lucky with the second weekend, overcast with some rain, but the enthusiasm had taken hold: artists in Birregurra and Colac and their surrounds, had a multitude of creative and colourful artworks on display. Many artists had delightful gardens and creative structures to look at. The markets, youth art and performance of a twilight lantern walk by performing group, “WildHoney” started this weekend at RRRTAG and drew a large crowd.

As well as the Trail winding all over the Shire, new events brought a larger audience: the ‘Art Walk on Murray’ proved to be a surprise event for local shoppers. Each artist was allocated a shop window to show their work, with a stencilled “A” on the footpath. There is a growing interest by businesses who are keen to participate again in 2020. And somewhere amongst the many windows participating was the challenge to find a tiny image of a football boot. The success of the Colac Otway Arts Trail was due to the hard work of many. Big thanks to all who participated. We look forward to returning in 2020, perhaps with new ideas for next year, to delight and inspire. Be involved. Check out the latest news here: www.colacotwayartstrail.com

COAT at Laver’s Hill Exhibition by Sue Tate We had an amazing weekend !!! Our aim was to create a full, busy and interesting exhibition that people could enjoy rather than make money. And we did that, in spades.  The hall looked amazing and we are proud of what we achieved. The hall was buzzing all weekend with happy conversation and companionship. We had 19 artists and 5 youth artists, 104 exhibits (not counting 3 scarecrows), 3 market stalls, 111 visitors, received $122.50 in donations for the hall and sold 5 art works to the value of $528.

Otway Life Almanac 2020

Sue Harrington and crew had about 8 children at the workshop ...that really was a highlight. Just thrilled that all ages were included. IMAGES David Simmonds


Arts 41

IMAGES David Simmonds

The Birth of Light

by Eloise Woods

IMAGES: Rebecca Hosking Photography

The WildHoney Elementals cast a spell over the audience in a celebration of art, creativity and community at the COAT RRRTAG performance.

A pathway of imagination was illuminated and tiny sparks gave birth to dreams in a never ending cycle ready to be born anew.

We entered a field of dreams...

The Birth of Light Project series was a culmination of five community sessions including costume making, choreography, dress rehearsals, and performance day.

First came the lantern parade to a celebratory awakening where two winged mythical creatures appeared and brought the local wildling children through a magical portal of light. It was a community celebration that shone a light on creativity, imagination, and hope.

The project was seeded by WildHoney and COAT and funded by South West Community Foundation. The concept was based around The Elementals Stilt Walking Act with a few surprise packages along the way!


42 Artist profile

Lynette Provan Parrott Cover artist for this issue Otway Life, we ask Lynette about her art practise Living in a delightful cottage in Barongarook, surrounded by gardens and natural bush, Lynette creates her art from what she sees around her.

When did you start creating art and what inspires you? As a little girl, my mother, also an artist, would take us down to the back paddock and part the grasses to show us the wildflowers. It was like discovering tiny treasures, so wildflowers have always been special to me and the spark to create my bush flower designs. My father never wanted me to have colouring books and encouraged me to create my own art as a child and I continued to draw and paint through school. At 18 I went to art school in Geelong and learnt a lot. Then I got busy with having a family but I always continued with my art which included illustrating books, interior design and window design. 15 years ago, after the kids had grown, I enrolled in an art course in Colac with Salvina Conti as tutor and I felt motivated to create the bush flower card designs which continue today. I usually only paint what gladdens my eyes and touches my heart, so I don't paint for profit but hope what I create will touch someone else and inspire them to want to buy the work. My portrait paintings are of people I know so I can capture the spirit in their eyes. It is so important otherwise the portrait looks dull and lifeless.

What mediums do you like to use? I explore most mediums although I prefer to work fast so I don't use oils. I like watercolours for the bush flowers as the medium suits their light and impressionistic style. I don't consider my works to be botanically exact as I prefer them to have heart rather than concise detail and I like to create a composition. I use gauche on more stylised artworks like my wooden painted leaves, to cut back to the main features and simplify the colour palette.

Otway Life Almanac 2020

What are you working on now? I am busy putting together Christmas orders to send to outlets. I have had work for sale at Federation Square and Australian by Design in the Block Arcade in Melbourne, Montsalvat in Eltham, The Wool Museum in Geelong, and places as far afield as Alice Springs and the Grampians as well as local outlets in Timboon, Apollo Bay, Ferguson, Forrest and Colac. I use my designs on a range of products including natural organic cotton tote bags, aprons and makeup purses, mirrors and bookmarks as well as cards. I recently branched out into Christmas designs on chocolate through Mandy at Platypi Chocolates which is exciting. My niece Monica Provan is a glass artist and jewellery maker and we have collaborated to produce a range of glass earrings and pendants that incorporate my artwork. I am pleased that two of my granddaughters, Syria and Claudia are accomplished emerging artists. I am a member of Studio Forrest art group and we are currently preparing for our end of year exhibition. I enjoy being in the company of the other artists where we can swap ideas and it inspires me to try new things. For more information about her artwork and products, please contact Lynette Parrott Ph (03) 5233 8379, Otway Ranges Victoria


Arts 43


44 Artist Profile

Cinnamons Art – Studio 66

ANGLESEA STREETSCAPE #LOOKUP! It was with initial excitement and then a sudden moment of panic that I set out to design ten welded metalwork artworks for our initial meeting with BATA (Business and Tourism of Anglesea) back in 2018. I had been invited to create a huge creative installation for my own home town!

The final artwork, the large full stop to the streetscape project is Dragonfly Moon, up the East end of the street by Anglesea Fruits. He is inspired by the masses of dragonflies that hover over your head down at Urquhart’s Bluff at the start of Summer.

The local traders’ group had decided that their Christmas decorations needed to be installed higher, out of harm’s way, and why not commission a local artist to come up with something a little more adventurous (and more permanent) than a tinsel star? We opted for the Shire’s light poles as the perfect vantage point to install these metal artworks. Stage two will be arranging some hard wired lighting for all year around.

I hope next time you visit Anglesea you make a point of discovering the ten artworks, and point them out to other visitors to our town. They are distinctively all about Anglesea, and proudly display our local native diversity, as well as the fact our town is full of creative talents!

Most of the original designs made it through the two year process, with a few designs that got revised and even completely changed as I became more informed about our brilliant local native diversity. Kookaburra and Kangaroo were the first obvious choices – perhaps a little too obvious …..I was reluctant to include a kangaroo, as it was so overwhelmingly obvious for our town. I overcame this creative dilemma by designing my own distinctive “Roo with Attitude!”

They are distinctively all about Anglesea, and proudly display our local native diversity

King Parrot – hangs cheekily upside down in search of fresh blossom, Weedy Seadragon –my creative talisman these days - stares straight out to the South Eastern oceans where he lives, and the Plover Pair – are famous in local wildlife protection circles for successfully raising their chicks out on Point Roadknight. The Sea Star rests in a rock pool with a shell and sea anemone…… I must admit this one was included not only for its local – ness but for its inspiring natural design. Distinctive local flora has also been included with the Gum Blossom placed perfectly amongst a flowering gum tree, and my most abstract piece – the Flying Duck and Spider orchids. Seeing these tiny, sculptural, proud local specimens on such a large scale has confused some viewers, but these were a lot of fun to create. I was proud to include a small piece of indigenous language in the streetscape with Kuarka Dorla. Most of you will recognize the name as being a walk in Anglesea from the river through to Japara – the Anglesea aged care home. This Waddawurrong name Kuarka Dorla was their name for what we now call Anglesea, it means – hunting ground of the Yellow Eyed Mullet. Otway Life Almanac 2020

I have some important people to thank because without them, this project would not have happened! Firstly to local art lover Rod Joyce and his network of Vic Pole engineers who magically helped me get the project off the sketch book pages by gathering the information required when all seemed lost Then to our generous sponsors: we had beautiful individuals who sponsored a single pole each – thanks to Peter from Anglesea IGA, Pauline and Michael from Seaside Seconds, locals Brian and Gayle Hardley and local environment protection group ANGAIR.

Then we had larger donations from the following visionaries: Big thanks to Tilly and her crew from the Anglesea Community Bank, The Anglesea Lions, Surf Coast Shire and of course BATA for their complete and unconditional trust and faith in me. I would also like to thank Shane and the boys from the Shire who helped Rowan install the artworks, to Caroline and Rob McKiernan from Firefly Giftware for their plaques and Phil for installing them beautifully Most of all to my husband and studio partner Rowan! For helping me keep up with deadlines, as well as forcing me to rest at times…..We have had a huge year in the studio - and this project, which took two years of my brain space - certainly kept us extra busy xxxxx Private and civic commissions are always welcome… we create art for indoors, outdoors as well as a new range of wearable art! To keep up with our creative projects go to our website or follow us on Facebook and Instagram. Cinnamons art – Studio 66 @cinnamons_art Website - www.cinnamonsart.com Email - cinnamonsart33@gmail.com


Arts 45

Anglesea Streetscape project group

Anglesea Streetscape launch

Kuarka Dorla in studio

Cinnamons Art - Studio 66 | Cinnamon + Rowan Stephens CREATIVE METALWORK - ORIGINAL - WELDED - HANDMADE

66 Niblick St. Anglesea, VICTORIA 0400 436 308 www.cinnamonsart.com


46

Colac Youth Art Group by Matilda Kerr

Young artists are excited by, and grateful for, the new art movement happening in Colac. The visual arts have always had a strong presence in Colac and in July 2019 it was given a permanent home for all artists of all ages: The Makers' Space - Colac Community Art Space. The Youth Art Group evolved soon after and has opened up opportunities including workshops, exhibitions and collaboration between others that were not possible previously for younger artists. This group is providing a needed safe and nurturing space for us to create and work with other artists. There have been many people researching, planning and gathering data over the years to create a dedicated space for community arts and their work has finally born fruit. ‘There was probably over 100 people who have worked on and contributed to creating this space,’ says Lynne Richardson. The dream of having a permanent space for artists was a specific goal for the group as previous temporary spaces for artists had not been successful. The Maker’s Space became permanent when the ColacOtway Shire leased a building and it was officially opened by Deputy Mayor Joe McCracken the space on October the 8th 2019. During an open day earlier in the same year, which was attended by many local artists, several young people asked if there would be anything available for young artists in the new permanent art space. This set things in motion and Lynne joined with Scarlett Cridland from the Youth Health Hub to make this idea possible. The Colac Youth Arts Group was born! While there were lots of activities available for dance or sports there was nothing for teenagers who liked the visual arts. When I heard about this group being created, I knew that I just had to join! Being able to create art by myself and with others in a community studio is a wonderful opportunity. During the first group events and catch up sessions that we had I was excited to meet other young artists with the same love and passion for art. We started off small, but now the group has many returning to each weekly session. The Colac Youth Art Group has given me and my newfound friends opportunities we never thought possible including the encouragement and support of more experienced artists as The Makers’ Space is truly cross-generational!

Otway Life Almanac 2020

When I heard about this group being created, I knew that I just had to join! Being able to create art by myself and with others in a community studio is a wonderful opportunity. Artists have been regularly attending workshops and offering a variety of art experiences and sharing their favourite techniques. In the first few months that the group has been active, many of these learning opportunities have been offered and gladly accepted by all young artists attending. Being able to sell my artwork with my friends from the group has also been an amazing experience. We had a stall at the Birregurra Market which was very successful and a lot of fun!


Arts 47

Youth Art Group: Every Wednesday 4.30-6pm at The Maker’s Space, 95-97 Gellibrand St, Colac

Workshops with our group are exciting, eventful and an experience that I love to be a part of every Wednesday after school. Each session is different, ranging from doing our own thing to participating in creative workshops with experienced artists. Recently the group was given the opportunity to show our artwork at the Red Rock Regional Theatre and Gallery. This was the first exhibition for many in the group. All events and Wednesday art sessions are organised by Lynne and Scarlett. They have done an amazing job at creating a friendly and creative environment for Colac. All the members are very grateful and appreciative of the work they do for us. Sharing materials, listening (and singing badly) to music and talking about the latest gossip and memes makes the atmosphere of the group enjoyable and uplifting each week and something we all look forward to.

The young artists in the group have many different hopes and aspirations for their future in art. Of course, everyone hopes to be successful, which in my opinion is very possible for all of them. We have different dreams for our future including becoming a paleo-artist, a well- known artist, a teacher of art classes or having an active art hobby. With the amount of passion in the youth art group, who knows where it could lead? In the future The Maker’s Space could expand to include art studio spaces for professional artists. The development of a permanent home and a dynamic youth group is part of a growing art movement in Colac and surrounding areas which is really gathering pace. The Youth Art Group has been a huge success, spreading creativity, smiles and an enthusiasm for art for all people in Colac. The sessions are open to anyone wishing to join because there is always room for more so please come and join us!


48 Artist Profile

Cathy Donovan I was born in New York in 1957 and came to Australia in 1961. I have been painting since I was 12 years old and studied art at Melbourne University, majoring in textiles and painting. I have lived in both urban and country places and I love the bold dramatic colours of the Australian landscape. My first love was trying to capture the atmosphere and luminosity of scenes that appeared beautiful, with watercolour. Local birds always float into my art somewhere. Today, I can say more meaningfully that I am an artist, creative and living in the Otways.  Yesterday I shied away from calling myself a serious artist.  Moving to Apollo Bay has made space and a difference in my life, and I am (tentatively) developing a body of work for a solo exhibition at some stage. The thriving artistic community in Apollo Bay is really supportive, and it was through the Apollo Bay Arts Inc council that I was able to successfully apply to the Colac Otway Shire to get an etching press in the Bay in 2017. This was a turning point, and for the past few years I have been most interested in combining etched and collage art through printmaking, particularly collographs and monotypes. I combine textures, patterns and botanical fragments with etched lines to create the printing plate, and when printed, combine elements of drawing and painting. They are hybrid works rather than mixed media pieces and each print is unique. I am also trying merge watercolour and embossing (via printmaking) with mild success, as it seemed at first impossible. The Wye River fires a few years back were terrible, and the catalyst for me to begin exploring ways to interpret the impact that climate change is having here – the wild driving winds, buffeting smoke across Cape Patton from distant fires, the wild and rising seas eroding our coast  …..  and the birds that witness it all.  I am inspired by the works of contemporary printmaking artists.  David Hockney exhibited printed ipad paintings at the Victorian National Gallery and the colour and texture in his landscapes was stunning.  I met Sarah Amos at a few workshops in Castlemaine and her large scale collographs were full of texture and colour and helped me to link my textiles background.  Brenda Hartill draws on the structure of the landscape for her imagery and I learned from this to start my climate change series. I look back to the impressionists often, and love the monotypes of Degas’s ballerinas. Otway Life Almanac 2020

Rising winds

I work out of my studio at home, which is a converted bedroom. It is big enough for me and a sanctuary. It is my ‘room of one’s own’. My work will be in this year’s Apollo Bay Art Show in December. I teach watercolour painting and provide printmaking workshops locally. Through this I meet many wonderful and emerging artists and have made many friends. I believe that Apollo Bay is a loved and creative place that is enriched with artists of every kind.


Arts 49

Wye River fires

After the fires

Mike and Riley with parrots


50 Artist Profile

Andrew Strang I’m an occasional art photographer living in Apollo Bay, and in about 1976 my dad gave me a Fujica half-frame camera (and later, a Canon SLR) sparking a passion for colour slide photography. Since then my work has explored urban and natural settings through various combinations of innovation, visual fascination, and inner reflection. In 1977 I spent the summer at Apollo Bay with some musical instruments and the Fujica half-frame for recreation. There I started capturing details of the rural surroundings, including window reflections at the shearing shed I lived in. Moving to Fitzroy in the early ‘80s, I began using a tripod-mounted, twoway mirror in front of the camera; so though coincidental at first, reflection imaging soon became a uniquely customizable thing for me. And this eventually gave rise to the ‘Sliced Light’ series, which I think channels a predigital expressionism reminiscent of the work of artists like Feininger or Kandinsky. This work evolved further when I was living in St Kilda in the ‘90s, and began experimenting with transparency layers, where two or more slides are successfully combined in a frame, resulting in new compositions. Well known Australian photographer Jo Daniel, has described the Otway Life Almanac 2020

‘Sliced Light’ series as a “magical blending of imagery that plays with light, depth and perspective.” Following my 2003 return to Apollo Bay, I switched from 35mm slides to digital photography and began exploring the prehistoric shapes and colors of the local coastline (often with just a smartphone), to begin the ongoing “Littoral Years” series. Patient exploration and quiet observation can reveal subtle visual dimensions to photograph, then enhance in post-production with Google’s Picasa software (which I still use). I also enjoy adding imaginative titles sometimes, to hint at metaphorical interpretations. While there’s a dominant coastal theme in my digital photography, it’s as much a coincidence of friendships and geography than any strategic intention; and there might have easily been a Desert Years series instead, if friendship or landscape romance had attracted me to central Australia for example. So I’ve been exhibiting and selling work in the Otways since 2011, usually at Apollo Bay and occasionally at Birregurra and Cororooke. I’m also a regular participant in the Colac Otway Arts Trail and photos can be seen on Instagram (andrewstrang.photography) and at www.andrewstrang.com


Arts 51

IMAGES: P48 Surface

LEFT Grief Spooky Tooth

ABOVE Glyph Birregurra Bench Rock Flight


52 Artist Profile

Gayle Seach Contemporary Painter

Gayle has long been drawn to the Otways and South Coast. Idyllic school holidays were spent rambling around the cliffs at Aireys Inlet where her grandparents lived and later family trips looking for ‘good surf’ was a regular activity. The family connection is ingrained, her ancestors established the family farm at Bambra in 1848, where her father grew up (now the Hare Krishna Valley) and her grandfather even worked on construction of the Great Ocean Road in the 1920’s. Moving from the Dandenong Ranges to Apollo Bay 20 years ago seemed obvious. Four years at Art School in the 70’s gave Gayle a solid base of expertise in many aspects of visual arts, including classical life drawing, painting, design, textiles, screen printing, as well as behavioural science which she still finds fascinating. Being told by the head of the art department “If you want a job, do textiles or graphics, not fine art,” steered her towards a professional career in Otway Life Almanac 2020

illustration and textile design. This channelled her natural creativity into working to a brief for various companies, in Melbourne and the Netherlands. Painting ‘for herself’ these days makes Gayle happy and her substantial body of work has its own style. Images are simplified and distilled to evoke the essence of a ‘scape’, often with a graphic edginess. She considers her work semi abstract as a figurative element often creeps in, even if just the horizon, giving the viewer a point of engagement. The rolling steep hills, river valleys and distant jutting headlands of the Otways provide plenty of inspiration. Remnants of the past such as abandoned dairies, old boat hulls, and industrial sites have also become contemporary paintings. “I love how history is written on weathered and battered surfaces”. The challenge is to use these images without sentimentality. One concept will often become a series of works, but each painting is still unique.


Arts 53

Her own techniques of applying paint have evolved from years of practice and her textures and layers create a richness and depth that can’t be duplicated and need to be seen up close to be appreciated. Using quality acrylics, with vibrant colours (and no fumes!), suits her contemporary style. Quick drying, they facilitate her impatience and allow an increasingly loose (albeit messy) instinctive method. “I’m always looking for new ideas and would not find it challenging enough to be churning out the same thing all the time. Creativity is coming up with

the original idea, skills, knowledge and experience then inform the process of making.” Gayle’s work has won awards and hangs on walls in many homes on the Coast and Melbourne, some works have headed interstate and overseas. She has exhibited in Melbourne and locally and been highly commended as a finalist in various art prizes. (cv available). New works can be seen over summer and Easter in Apollo Bay at the Anglican Church Hall, (top of Main St) in a regular group venue, or visits to her Marengo studio can be arranged.

W: apollobaygallery.blogspot.com gayleseach_art E: gayleseach@gmail.com

ART EXHIBITION

23 Dec 2019 to 27 Jan 2020

paintings by Gayle Seach photography by Andrew Strang

open 10am daily Anglican Church Hall Nelson St (top of Main St) Apollo Bay

with Apollo Bay Indoor Market

Also open over Easter


54

Otway Sleepovers Advertorial

Otway Sleepovers Whether you’ve spent the day in the Otways beach combing, touring through the lush hinterland, visiting family and friends, or joining in a special celebration…you will need to rest your weary head at the end of the day. And you are spoilt for options from camping, glamping & self-contained holiday homes through to luxury B & B’s. You can sleep under the stars of the Milky Way, by a camp fire or snuggle into a cosy cabin. Whatever your desire or budget, Otway Sleepovers are the stuff of dreams. So come...lose your clock...and find the time...

OTWAY FIELDS GROW  EAT  REST

Stay a few nights in our beautiful cabin overlooking the Otways, explore the hinterland, the Great Ocean Road (GOR) and relax in your peaceful, quiet, romantic self contained cabin style accommodation for two. Included is a breakfast basket each morning featuring fresh farm free range eggs, a loaf of freshly baked bread and a selection of farm preserves. Local bacon is also provided. Depending on the season, you’ll find a few extras in your basket such as freshly picked berries or fruit. Your cabin comprises of a comfortable queen size bed, beautiful ensuite with full shower and a seating area with couch, table and chairs and a small kitchenette. There is an abundance of birdlife around the area and photography enthusiasts will love the photo opportunities. If you are enjoying a meal at Brae Restaurant, or Bespoke Harvest, we can provide transport to and from the restaurant, please check on booking. 85 Meadowell Rd, Gerangamete VIC 3249

OTWAY FIELDS GROW  EAT  REST

YOUR ESCAPE TO THE COUNTRY

www.otwayfields.com Tel 0418 757 028 Otway Life Almanac 2020


Otway Sleepovers 55 COTTAGES & EVENT CENTRE

King Parrot Cottages & Event Centre consists five cottages, a Lodge with Hall attached and campground in Pennyroyal on the northern slopes of the Otway Ranges. King Parrot is a popular destination for romantic getaways, family holidays or large family celebrations. The architecturally designed accommodation is fully self-contained, ranging in size from single to four bedrooms, accommodating between two and fourteen people. Each offers comfort, character and privacy in a rustic bush land setting, including stunning valley views. Activities include the salt-water swimming pool, games room with table tennis, fuse ball, air hockey, darts, board games plus mini golf course, suitable for all ages. Bush-walking tracks and waterfalls abound in the immediate vicinity and within close reach are the beautiful beaches along the Great Ocean Road, the wonders of the Otway National Park and the gourmet trail of berry farms, fine foods and farm produce. King Parrot is very popular wedding venue. Please give us a call to discuss options and obtain rates. Most pets are welcome by prior arrangement only.

Re

At Kin rainfor Phone: 03 5236 3372 Email: contact@kingparrot.com.au www.kingparrot.com.au

Cosy log fires Pillowtop beds Electric blankets Dogs welcome inside Home made treats Free range eggs Huge fenced yards Off leash areas Wild birds Bushwalks from your door

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Yours h Phone 195 Du Email c

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holidays for humans and hounds

Our co the spe

03 5288 7399 0419 114 786 stay@countrywidecottages.com.au www.countrywidecottages.com.au


56

Great Otway National Park ‒ Apollo Bay, Cape Otway and surrounds Visitor Guide

Breathtaking coastlines, dramatic cliff faces, deep valleys of tall forest and fern-clad gullies embracing spectacular waterfalls all feature here. From glow worms to fishing, you will be delighted with things to see and do in this incredibly beautiful part of the state.

Getting there Great Otway National Park is south of Melbourne via Geelong or Colac. From the east, approach Apollo Bay and Cape Otway along the Great Ocean Road (B100) by taking either Anglesea Road or Surf Coast Highway from Geelong. From Colac, approach through Lavers Hill (inland route C155). From the west, pick up the Great Ocean Road by approaching via Port Campbell (inland route C164). A daily bus service between Geelong, Lorne and Apollo Bay connects with train services to Melbourne.

Things to see and do Walking The Cemetery – 2.8km, 40 minutes return Starting at the far end of Lightstation Carpark near the information board, a gravel path leads uphill past a highpoint with a view of surrounds. Continue downhill, following the sandy track for approximately 10 more minutes to visit the historic cemetery.

Station Beach/Rainbow Falls – 8km, 3.5 hours return Walk through sand dunes and then down along Station Beach to the colourful cliff that is Rainbow Falls, which is spring-fed and trickles through algae to the rock platform on the beach below. Return the same way. This is an unpatrolled beach and swimming is not recommended. There are no litter, toilet or camping facilities. The unspoilt nature of this area depends on you to stay unpolluted and beautiful.

Parker Hill Campground and Stringybark Loop Walk – 3km, 1 hour circuit This walk can begin from Parker Hill or Point Franklin. The inland Stringybark Track to Parker Hill has high views above Parker Inlet. If time permits, take the steep steps down to explore the sheltered inlet. Return to Point Franklin via the Great Ocean Walk along the clifftop track, taking in distant views of Cape Otway Lightstation.

Great Ocean Walk – 104km, 8 days one way www.greatoceanwalk.com.au for detailed planning Weave your way through tall forests, coastal heathlands, beside wild rocky shores and along windswept clifftops with amazing views. Hike up to eight days or choose a day walk along this incredible onedirection walk from Apollo Bay to the Twelve Apostles.

Parks Victoria

Phone 13 1963 www.parks.vic.gov.au Otway Life Almanac 2020

Triplet Falls Walk – 2km, 1 hour circuit Enjoy the history and story of this rainforest, as told by the signs that lead you around the circuit walk. Look for the giant Mountain Ash trees along the way. Some of these trees are estimated to be more than 200 years old and have generated from a seed the size of a grain of sand. Listen for the falls as you walk through the ancient forest on a series of elevated walkways. Platforms provide you with spectacular views of Triplet Falls’s lower and upper cascades. Youngs Creek flows to the falls from Weeaproinah, which has the state’s highest average annual rainfall of almost two metres. The falls are even more spectacular after rain. Stay on the path while looking for the different mosses and fungi growing on the forest floor. They play an important role in maintaining this rainforest.

Little Aire Walk – 2.5km, 2.5 hours return This walk leads off the Triplet Falls track and passes through spectacular rainforest along an old logging winch line. View the falls from an eight metre platform.

Madsen's Track Nature Walk – 1.2km, 35 minutes circuit This 35-minute loop walk is an adventure into a world of ancient, mossy trees and cool fern gullies. Start at the Melba Gully Picnic Area and follow the information signs along the track and listen for the soothing sound of Anne’s Cascades.

Cape Otway Lightstation Cape Otway Lightstation is a wonderful place to visit with many reminders and stories of Australia’s maritime history. It is Australia's oldest working lighthouse operating since 1848. The lightstation was decommissioned in January 1994 after being the longest continuous operating light on the Australian mainland. Today the lightstation operates as a business and visitors can explore the lightkeeper’s house, accommodation, café, telegraph station displays and walks. Take a tour and explore this unique site. An entry fee applies.

Picnicking There are many beautiful places to picnic so plan your visit to get the most out of your day. Picnic areas with facilities include Shelly Beach Picnic Area, Blanket Bay, Aire River, Johanna Beach Day Visitor and Camping Area, Melba Gully Picnic Area and Sabine Falls.


Great Otway National Park 57 Great Otway National Park Apollo Bay and Cape OtwayPV

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www.parks.vic.gov.au Disclaimer: Parks Victoria does not guarantee that this data is without flaw of any kind and therefore disclaims all liability which may arise from you relying on this information. Cartography by Parks Victoria May 2018. For mobile App search for Avenza PDF Maps

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www.parks.vic.gov.au Disclaimer: Parks Victoria does not guarantee that this data is without flaw of any kind and therefore disclaims all liability which may arise from you relying on this information. Cartography by Parks Victoria May 2018.

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Great Otway National Park 59 Camping Some excellent national park camping opportunities include:

Aire River (East) and (West) Campgrounds Located on opposite banks of the Aire River Estuary are two campgrounds. The estuary is home to a magnitude of native and migratory bird species as well as an abundance of fish species making it a great place to go bird watching, fishing, swimming and canoeing. A boat ramp is available to launch small boats, canoes and kayaks. A short walk to the ocean beach follows the banks of the river. This is an unpatrolled ocean beach and not recommended for swimming.

Parker Hill Campground This small campground is set on a high forested hill overlooking the beach and the Parker River estuary. A walking track loop links it to Point Franklin and further on to the Cape Otway Lightstation.

Blanket Bay Campground This popular and often busy camping and day visitor area is located off Blanket Bay Road. All campsites are unpowered and suitable for tents, camper-trailers, campervans or recreational vehicles. A boat ramp and day visitor area are present here. Advanced bookings and payment are required year-round.

Johanna Beach Campground At the end of Red Johanna Road this camping area is separate to the day visitor area. Both access the stunning and rugged Johanna Beach. The open camping areas are sheltered by the main dune. Dogs on-lead are permitted at this campground. Advanced bookings and payment are required year-round. For further information or to book go to www.parks.vic.gov.au/stay

Otway Forest Park camping Go to www.delwp.vic.gov.au

Swimming and surfing Swimming is very popular at beaches along the coastline, however many beaches and rivers are exposed to unseen dangers such as currents, rips, reefs and logs. Beaches are not patrolled within Great Otway National Park. Surfers frequent a variety of beaches along this coastline including the world-famous Johanna Beach and the popular Apollo Bay. Parks Victoria recommends swimming only at beaches patrolled by lifesaving services. Beaches are patrolled by lifesavers when red and yellow flags are displayed.

Marengo Reefs Marine Sanctuary Marengo Reefs Marine Sanctuary protects 12ha of ocean waters. About 150m offshore, this sanctuary protects a reef system known as Little Henty Reef. Two sections of the reef are usually exposed at low tide and with calm seas when separated by a narrow channel known as ‘The Gap’. Visitors who choose to explore need to be prepared and experienced with offshore snorkelling and diving. For further information on Marengo Reefs Marine Sanctuary, visit www.parks.vic.gov.au

Waterfalls Many of the spectacular waterfalls found in the park are accessible by only a short stroll. Be sure to visit Triplet Falls, Beauchamp Falls, Sabine Falls, Hopetoun Falls and Melba Gully’s Annies Cascades.

Glow worms In the wetter parts of the Otway Ranges such as Melba Gully, colonies of delicate glow worms put on a spectacular light show best

appreciated at night. No torches please as this will disturb and shut down their glowing display.

Four wheel driving, trail and mountain bike riding Licensed drivers and riders with registered vehicles will find a range of formed vehicle tracks and roads on offer throughout the national and forest parks. This includes mountain bikes which are not permitted on walking tracks in this section of the park. Seasonal track closures apply to many tracks in Great Otway National Park. For more information go to www.parks.vic.gov.au Remember to always stay on the tracks and avoid muddy areas to reduce damage to the environment. Be considerate, slow down or stop for horse riders, cyclists or hikers. Parks are for everyone to enjoy. Be sure to plan your driving and trail riding tour routes using detailed topographical maps. Check the Parks Victoria website for the latest track conditions at www.parks.vic.gov.au

Fishing The coastline, as well as a number of streams and rivers which flow though the park, provide great opportunities for keen anglers. The Gellibrand River’s upper waters are popular with anglers seeking River Blackfish, Brown Trout and Black Bream near Princetown. Fishing is not permitted in marine national parks and sanctuaries. Check separate marine visitor guides for activity/boundary guidelines. Adults generally require a Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence, available from the Victorian Fisheries Authority at www.vfa.vic.gov.au, or your local fishing licence outlet.

Horse riding A wide range of roads and tracks are available for horse riding in Great Otway National Park. For more information on horse riding and for seasonal road closures, visit www.parks.vic.gov.au

Dogs in the national park Dogs are generally not permitted in Great Otway National Park, however there are a few specific areas that allow for dogs on leads – refer to Dogs in Otway Parks fact sheet for more information. Different land managers on the Surf Coast have different dog regulations – be sure to check signage whenever visiting beaches and parks in the region.

Be prepared and stay safe Great Otway National Park is in the South West and Central fire district. Bushfire and severe weather safety is a personal responsibility. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season or severe weather such as strong winds needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at www.emergency.vic.gov.au, on the VicEmergency smartphone app or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226. No fires may be lit on Total Fire Ban days. However, gas stoves may be used under certain conditions for food preparation. Be aware that strong winds can occur anytime, which can be hazardous with falling timbers on walking tracks. On Code Red Fire Danger Rating days and days of severe weather this park will be closed for public safety. Closure signs will be erected but do not expect an official warning. Check the latest conditions at www.parks.vic.gov.au or by calling 13 1963. For emergency assistance call Triple Zero (000). If there is a green emergency marker sign near you, read the information on the marker to the operator.


60

Great Otway National Park ‒ Forrest and surrounds Visitor Guide

This section of Great Otway National Park, along with Otway Forest Park, encompasses a stunning landscape including the undulating plains and plateaus of the hinterlands and the magnificent and towering mountain ash forests. Mountain bike riding and birdwatching along the peaceful walk at Lake Elizabeth are among a range of pursuits to be enjoyed here.

Getting there

Mountain bike riding

Two major roads connect Colac with Great Otway National Park and Otway Forest Park including Colac-Lavers Hill Road and Colac-Forrest Road. From the west, approach via Port Campbell along the Great Ocean Road.

The Forrest area caters for all levels of mountain bike riders with more than 60km of formed tracks and a 12km mountain bike loop linking Forrest, West Barwon Reservoir and Lake Elizabeth.

Things to see and do

Four wheel driving

Lake Elizabeth

Explore Lake Elizabeth and enjoy the beautiful forest surrounds. This lake was created in 1952 when one of the heaviest rains on record resulted in a massive landslide that dammed the East Barwon River and turned a remote forested valley into a lake.

Walking Lake Elizabeth – 2km, 1 hour return A colony of platypus resides at Lake Elizabeth. Tread lightly and you may spot one. Usually the best time for this is at dawn or dusk. This tall forest walk ambles alongside the river and leads to the lake. Dog owners should keep dogs on leads when visiting this area to reduce incidents of snake bite.

Picnicking Ideal and beautiful picnic areas include Lake Elizabeth Visitor Area, Otway Forest Park, Dandos Campground, Birnham Station and Stevensons Falls Campground.

Camping Lake Elizabeth Campground is tucked beneath tall eucalypts and sits on the bank of the east branch of the Barwon River. It is separate to the Day Visitor Area and 1km from the lake. This section of the park offers excellent dogs on lead camping opportunities. For more information and to book go to www.parks.vic.gov.au/stay

Visit www.delwp.vic.giv.au for more information. A range of formed tracks and roads provide four wheel drive access throughout the parks. Seasonal track closures apply to many tracks in the park. For more information call Parks Victoria on 13 1963 or go to www.parks.vic.gov.au

Fishing and hunting A number of streams and rivers which flow through the parks provide great opportunities for keen anglers. Adults generally require a Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence, available from the Victorian Fisheries Authority at www.vfa.vic.gov.au, or your local fishing licence outlet. Recreational hunting of game species in the Otway Forest Park requires a game licence issued by DELWP, contacted on 136 186, and is only permitted during officially notified seasons. Recreational hunting of pest animals in the Otway Forest Park does not require a permit. Hunters must be aware of restrictions.

Dogs in the Otways In this area of Great Otway National Park, dogs are permitted on leads only in the Lake Elizabeth Camping Area and the Lake Elizabeth Day Visitor Area and its adjoining walking tracks. Dogs are permitted in all areas of Otway Forest Park.

Be prepared and stay safe

Experience and enjoy the natural environment on horseback. Permits may be required for some sections of the park.

Great Otway National Park and Otway Forest Park are in the South West and Central fire district. Bushfire and severe weather safety is a personal responsibility. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season or severe weather such as strong winds needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at www.emergency.vic.gov.au, on the VicEmergency smartphone app or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226. No fires may be lit on Total Fire Ban days. However, gas stoves may be used under certain conditions for food preparation. Be aware that strong winds can occur anytime, which can be hazardous with falling timbers on walking tracks.

The Wonga and Barongarook areas in the Otway Forest Park are ideal for horse riding as there are a number of wide, slashed roadsides. For more information, see the Horseriding in the Otways Parks fact sheet at www.parks.vic.gov.au

On Code Red Fire Danger Rating days and days of severe weather this park will be closed for public safety. Closure signs will be erected but do not expect an official warning. Check the latest conditions at www.parks.vic.gov.au or by calling 13 1963.

Otway Forest Park is another great option for dogs on lead camping opportunities nearby. For information about Otway Forest camping areas including Dandos Campground, Stevensons Falls Campground and the mountain bike trailheads visit www.delwp.vic.gov.au

Horse riding

For emergency assistance call Triple Zero (000). If there is a green emergency marker sign near you, read the information on the marker to the operator.

Parks Victoria

Phone 13 1963 2020 Otway Life Almanac

www.parks.vic.gov.au


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Disclaimer: Parks Victoria does not guarantee that this data is without flaw of any kind and therefore disclaims all liability which may arise from you relying on this information. Cartography by Parks Victoria May 2018 For mobile App search for Avenza PDF Maps

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62 Advertorial Boutique Boozeries

Boutique Boozeries

Otway Life Almanac 2019


Boutique Boozeries 63 35 Main Street Beech Forest 3237 VIC Phone: 03 52359220 www.thebeechyhotel.com.au The Beechy Hotel, exemplifying the expression “Cold Beer, Warm Welcome”, is located on the main road through Beech Forest, 45 kms south of Colac and approximately 6 kms from the popular Otway Fly. A favourite haunt of locals from as far afield as Gellibrand, Lavers Hill and Johanna, it also welcomes tourists and day trippers with its focus on good old fashioned country hospitality. Under the management of Myles and Gwynneth Cowley since December 2013, the enthusiasm and attention to detail they bring to the running of the newly refurbished pub will ensure that your visit is a memorable one. A central wood burning heater roars throughout the winter months providing ambiance and warmth, whilst the views to the south from the expanse of windows are simply spectacular. The hotel accommodation comprises 4 rooms, each including a comfortable queen size bed and a set of single bunk beds.

Pennyroyal Raspberry Farm & Cidery is the oldest berry farm in the south west of Victoria, within easy access of the famous Great Ocean Road. During the summer berry season, we have a full range of raspberries, cultivated blackberries and many other varieties available for "pick-your-own". The Ciderhouse Cafe offers seasonally inspired lunches and snacks to complement a glass of our awardwinning Crucible Cider, perry or a berry gins. The farm, cellar door and cafe are open 10am4pm, daily during the berry season beginning 30 November (some exceptions - please check google for seasonal hours); cellar door and cafe open weekends through to Easter. Cosy, self-contained cottage accommodation for couples available year round. pennyroyalraspberry.com

www.thebeechyhotel.com.au

PE EN NN NY P YR RO OY YA AL L RA AS SP PB R BE ER RR RY Y FA AR RM M & F & C CIID DE ER RY Y

35 Main Street Beech Forest 3237 VIC Phone: 03 52359220 www.thebeechyhotel.com.au

CAFÉ & CELLAR PICK YOUR OWN FIND US: PICK YOUR OWN CAFE & CELLAR PICK DOOR: FIND US: DOOR: BERRIES: CAFÉ & CELLAR YOUR OWN 115 Division Road DOOR: 10am - 4pm BERRIES: 10am & | BERRIES: 10am - 4pm -| 4pm Weekends

115 Division Road Murroon VIC 3243 Weekends public 10am 4pm30 | 10am - 4pm Daily -Nov from 10am - 4pm |& holidays Daily from public from 03 5236 3238 Murroon VIC 3243 holidays & from November November endNov of Weekends public from until 30 30 until the3238 end of through Easter Daily pennyroyalraspberry.com 03 5236 2nd through April | holidays from November berry season (mid-Jan) November until end of season berry (mid Jan) Daily in season berry season pennyroyalraspberry.com Daily in berry 2nd through April | berry season (mid-Jan) with exceptions with exceptions Daily in berry season

CLOSED 3/10/17 December & Christmas Day

Check online for seasonal hours

* check google for seasonal * CLOSED 3/10/17 December &hours Christmas DayCLOSED CHRISTMAS DAY

* check google for seasonal hours *

FIND US: 115 Division Road, Murroon VIC 3243 Phone: (03) 5236 3238 pennyroyalraspberry.com


64

Sharing the passion Cheeselinks is an Australian business that is both familyowned and operated. The company was established in 1986 as Home Cheesemaking Supplies, specifically to provide quality cheesemaking ingredients and education to people who wanted to learn to make cheese in their own homes. Over time we have expanded and we now supply many of Australia's cheese factories with cultures, baskets, and other equipment. The name was changed to Cheeselinks in 1999, to reflect the increasing service provided to commercial manufacturers.

Cheese-making is more than an art... It’s a passion. There are few past-times more fulfilling than creating your own produce. At Cheeselinks, we help you explore the world of cheese-making to discover just how easy it is to produce delicious cheeses and dairy products in your own home. You’ll never forget the moment you first taste a slice of cheese you’ve created with your own hands that you can share with your family and friends. We stock a wide selection of cheese-making tools, equipment and ingredients to help you prepare delectable cheese products. If you’re not ready to try yourself, we also host a range of workshops to provide expert advice and guidance on how to make an assortment of cheese styles. Otway Life Almanac 2019

Come share our passion. Cheese and yoghurt making kits, cheese and yoghurt making cultures, rennet, recipes, hoops and baskets, wraps, cheesemaking workshops, basically everything you need to make sensational dairy products in your own kitchen. Cheeselinks is a family-owned business supplying everything you need to make delicious cheese and yoghurt in your own home! It's cheap and easy to start –check out www.cheeselinks.com.au for more information about workshops coming up in 2018.

I attended a Cheeselinks workshop run through the Forrest Neighbourhood House here in the Otways. It was a fabulous day and we went home proudly bearing our very own delicious cheese and bubbling with enthusiasm to have a go at home. The instructors were knowledgable, friendly and more than ready to answer questions and share all those handy hints you wont get on a YouTube video. There's something special about sharing the excitement of learning a new skill with a group of like-minded people, it was so good I signed up for another course! Gillian Brew, Forrest resident


Sustainable Table 65

Share the passion... at a Private Workshop If you have a group of people that want to make cheese, private workshops can be arranged to cater to your needs. As well as our standard workshops, there are a number of other workshops in our repertoire available on special

request, including Cheddar, Gouda, Swiss Cheese, Triple Cream Brie, Goat Cheese, Caerphilly and more! A corporate or private workshop is the perfect opportunity to customise your workshop and learn to make the cheeses that you most want to learn!


66 Advertorial Sustainable Table

SustainableTable The temperate climate and typography of the Otway Ranges provide an ideal setting for the sustainable production of food and other products for the local community. A ‘sustainable table’ is one that uses local food grown using ecological and ethical practices that: ™™Contribute to a thriving local economy and sustainable livelihoods; ™™Protect the diversity of both plants and animals and the welfare of farmed and wild species; ™™Avoid damaging or wasting natural resources or contributing to climate change; ™™Provide social benefits, such as good quality food, safe and healthy products, and educational opportunities. Please support these local industries and be healthy at the same time!

Otway Life Almanac 2019


Sustainable Table 67

The Calvert family has deep roots in Irrewarra. A Western District farming area near Colac, Calverts first farmed here in the 1840s. The bakery is in the restored stables of Irrewarra House – once filled with the aroma of horses and straw, it now exhales the heavenly aromas of freshly baked bread. Irrewarra is an Aboriginal word meaning “long spear throw”. Traditional home of the Kolak clan, Irrewarra is now famous for sourdough bread and Irrewarra bio-dynamic ice-cream.

Irrewarra Sourdough Bakery T. (03) 5233 6219 www.irrewarra.com.au

This is artisan bread at its finest. Rustic and pure, our bread is not tainted with commercial yeast or preservatives and is created in a time honoured tradition. Shaped by hand and baked on the stone floor of the oven, every loaf is the individual expression of our bakers’ hands. Never heavy or sour, our bread is the culmination of a 30-hour fermentation and proofing process. But the real proof is in the tasting.

www.irrewarra.com.au

phone

5232 1111


68

Sustainable Table

Otway Artisan Gluten Free is a small, regional, gluten free bakehouse dedicated to the production of the finest quality gluten free breads and pizza bases. We use a specially blended combination of premium quality gluten free flours which help give our breads and pizza bases that soft fluffy texture on the inside and golden crust on the outside. No animal fats or oils are used in any of our products and all of our products are dairy free and also 100% preservative free. Come and visit our bakery for some amazing, fresh out of the oven, gluten free bread and pizza bases. Our bakehouse is situated in the historic town of ‘Birre’ in the old bank building. The building was originally home to the Colonial Bank, built in the 1880’s and is full of character. Here we love to see strangers chat over a panini and locals regularly come in for a good coffee and good service. We are proud to be part of the rich tapestry of the Otway region and are truly passionate about creating handmade, healthy and wholesome gluten free products. They are sure to delight (and even surprise) those customers who are gluten intolerant, wheat intolerant, coeliacs or are just health conscious and enjoy great flavours! 7 7 M A I N S T R E E T, B I R R E G U R R A , VICTORIA 3242 --------------------------------------------------------------------P: +6 1 0 3 5 2 3 6 2 4 2 5 | M: 0 4 1 0 8 0 0 077

e: hello@otwayartisanglutenfree.com.au Otway Life Almanac 2019


Sustainable Table 69 Otway Prime is proud to be one of Victoria’s very first paddock-to-plate beef and lamb farmers and pioneers of what is now a growing trend for farmers to offer their produce directly to consumers. The beautiful Otway region with its cool, pristine, high rainfall environment provides the perfect backdrop for our farm business. Long growing seasons and plentiful water allows livestock to graze peacefully in paddocks sheltered by the national park. Over the years, Otway Prime has remained true to its original ethos of producing quality over quantity, valuing the land, the environment, being sensitive to animal welfare concerns and transparent with our customers. We are pleased to offer our customers the highest quality produce, both tender and full of flavour. It is meat as it used to be, before the days of overcrowded feed-lots and it is absolutely true that you can taste the difference. Keep an eye out for us. We can be found at many of the fabulous farmer’s markets in the greater Otway region, including South Geelong, Torquay, Airey’s Inlet and Apollo Bay. At these markets we proudly sit alongside some particularly talented local farmers and artisan producers. Take the opportunity to drop by for a visit during your summer holiday and savour not just Otway Prime’s grassfed, dry aged beef and lamb, but also some of the region’s wonderful and unique produce.

More details: www.otwayprime.com.au and we are on facebook too.

Direct from the farmer

We serve coffee, drinks, milkshakes, homemade pies, sausage rolls, pasties, cakes, slices, biscuits, bread, soups and salads, local produce, newspapers, milk, cheeses, butter, groceries, local meats, vegetables, fruit, handmade regional giftware and local homewares

OPEN for breakfast, lunch and takeaway dinner 7 days a week. 8am - 5pm

phone: 0428 112 212 email: udi@otwayprime.com.au

33 Grant Street, Forrest 3236 Victoria T: (03) 5236 6496 forrestgeneralstore.com.au


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Enchanted Tastes the flavours of Australia Getting started Hello! I’m Helen Bollenhagen and together with my husband Peter Rayner, we started a small market business in Darwin in 2011 called Enchanted Tastes selling Australian native herbs and spices. When living in Darwin Peter required a hip replacement leading to him being confined to the house and he started watching a programme call “Black Olive” featuring Mark Olive an Aboriginal chef. During one of the episodes Mark made a Wattleseed Cheesecake and this captivated Peter’s interest. We set about trying to find the ingredients in Darwin without success so we turned our efforts towards the internet and discovered Jude Mayle’s Outback Chefs web page. We contacted Jude and she sent us some samples to try. (Wattleseed, Davidson Plum paste and Lemon Myrtle) We fell in love with them so much we became Jude’s NT distributor! Our first market was at Berry Springs farmers’ market with a five foot table and a scattering of products.

How Foods are sourced Where possible our distributors use the communities to gather the products where they grow the best, as Aboriginal people have a vast knowledge of the foods and they know how to pick them when they are at their prime. Otway Life Almanac 2020

Now we are distributors for multiple companies from all over Australia including: Outback Chef, Tastes of the Bush, Barbusco, Livingstone Orchards and Bee Creek Honey. Except for the pasta all of our products are preservative, additive and gluten free. We know some of the owners personally and have first hand knowledge of how products are prepared and handled. The Outback Chef products are all mixed and packaged by hand and on several occasions Peter and I have assisted owner Jude with this process which has been a lot of fun and very educational. The Livingstone Orchards don’t use sprays and the fruits are sliced and dehydrated naturally within days of picking. These products can be found in our warm welcoming café: Enchanted Taste Café 69 Main Street Birregurra

Why we chose Birregurra. While we enjoyed being distributors, it had always been our dream to move from market stalls to our own shop. We searched the country high and low looking for a friendly town with a lot of potential and we found Birregurra! We knew how open and friendly the town was, as we have attended the festival and the monthly markets there. We have grown to love this little town and it was on top of our list. Birregurra is lively and welcoming. An up and coming town with a lot of potential which is what we were looking for to promote our products.


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Enchant your taste buds

try our broad range of gourmet and Australian Aboriginal Bushtucker products

Helen and Peter at their shop in Birregurra

Here’s our favourite recipe using the flavours of the Australia

Encrusted Crocodile/Chicken Thighs Steak 2 Crocodile Steaks ½ cup finely chopped parsley. Cracked Outback Chef Pepperberry to taste 1 Teaspoon of Outback Chef Lemon Myrtle Season with Outback Chef Saltbush Mix dry ingredients together Coat the crocodile/chicken thighs with the mix. Refrigerate for minimum of an hour- overnight is best Shallow Fry in Natural Macadamia Nut Oil for 2 minutes per side or cooked to your liking - can also be cooked on BBQ Serve with a crisp salad- using a macadamia oil and Raspberry balsamic dressing.

69 Main Street, Birregurra Phone 0415 457 485

Distributor of, Australian Native Herbs & Spices, Gourmet & Australian Products. Makers of Bush Herbs & Spices Cheesecakes, Cakes & Biscuits.

Online shopping

www.enchantedtastes.com.au


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Otway Harvest Trail

Happy cows, the key to artisan’s success

THE key to all award-winning food and drink is no secret – it’s the quality of the ingredients and the care with which they are handled. So, when Julian and Dianne Benson decided to become cheesemakers, their cows and farm practises were their first priority. Nearly 15 year on, Julian cites their ongoing focus on milk quality as the single biggest determining factor in their long list of awards, which culminated with national and international cheese awards in 2019. “First and foremost, we’re farmers and animal lovers. We started out determined to develop an on-farm, paddock to plate cheese enterprise that celebrated the way we farm and the quality of our milk,” Julian said. “We’re always striving for the perfect balance between mother nature and production. Our cows are grass-fed, have lots of paddock space and plenty of shelter. Happy animals save energy and that reflects in the quality of milk we make our cheese, bottled milk and gelato.” Otway Life Almanac 2020


Apostle Whey Cheese 73

Visitors looking on at the milking process 

Julian and Dianne with some of their award winning cheeses

Apostle Whey Cheese was conceived following severe drought in 2002 and 2003. Farming so close to the iconic Twelve Apostles meant visitors had often stopped at the dairy to see cows being milked.

This includes a range of farm-fresh bottled milk (Apostle Way Full Cream Milk) and Italian style gelato – both launched in 2016 with yet another expansion of the onfarm facilities.

After watching a TV program about cheesemaking, Julian and Dianne enrolled in some training and quickly realised there was an opportunity to value-add to their farming operation. It was after two years of research and experimentation that they build the initial boutique factory next to the dairy and opened the doors of their cheese shop in 2005.

The couple’s son Luke now manages the farming operations with his wife Susan. Their milk is regularly listed in the top 100 nationally for quality. It’s that rich, natural tasting, non-homogenised milk that gets piped straight from the dairy, underground and into their growing production facility.

From a couple of people turning 50,000 litres of milk into cheese in the early years, they now value-add more than 200,000 litres of their own milk.

Apostle Whey Cheese is open every day of the year except Christmas Day. The experience includes cheese tasting, watching the cows be milked, gelato, barista coffee, snacks and even a Mooternity Ward where, if you’re lucky, you might witness the birth of a calf.

APOSTLE WHEY CHEESE A key stop in the 12 Apostles Food Artisans’ Gourmet Trail 9 Gallum Road, Cooriemungle Just 18km inland from the Twelve Apostles and Great Ocean Road • Mention this advertisement for a FREE cheese tasting • Watch the cows be milked • Barista Coffee & Cakes • Bottled Apostles Way Full Cream Milk • Gelato made with our milk

We’re open 7 days a week Mon-Fri 8am-5pm, Sat-Sun 10am-5pm CLOSED Christmas Day only apostlewheycheese CALL 0437 894 337 E: sales@apostlewheycheese.com.au


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The Good Life by Ami Hillege

Worming your way …. It seems rather strange to me that 2020 is the first time that the “Year of Plant Health” will be celebrated globally under the directive of the United Nations. We should be focusing on ‘plant health’ every year! It does however shine a spotlight onto the way our soils are mined consistently by growing monocrops treated heavily with pesticides and herbicides worldwide. Healthy soils equal healthy plants. Never has ‘you are what you eat’ been more pertinent. Who wants to eat fruit and vegetables that have had masses of chemicals sprayed over them just so we can buy a perfect, blemish free piece of fruit in a supermarket? What can we do about it? We can begin by growing our own food. Of course we can’t grow all our needs, but we can make a difference by utilizing the space in our own back yards and balconies. Besides the pleasure of growing something from seed, the benefit is that you know where those carrots or lettuce heads come from. Even growing a few pots of herbs will make a difference to your budget and provide you with the exact quantity you need for a recipe. Before I grew my own herbs, I used to smart at paying for a bunch of parsley wrapped in plastic when I only needed a quarter of the pack. The remainder went all slimy in the bottom of the fridge! It was a waste of money and a waste of produce, especially when a recipe called for three different types of fresh herbs! So my advice is to start small and fill a few good-sized pots with a variety of herbs and place them near your kitchen door. This ensures that you’ll use your produce as it’s just a few steps from your chopping board. Of course any excess can be shared, swapped or placed on a community ‘grow cart’. It’s ok to pick a leaf of silverbeet with a few insect holes in it. It tells me there is bug life in my garden and that the food I’m growing will be safe for my family. Of course there are some bugs that really irritate me. Snails and slugs are a nuisance. However, in a small vegetable garden, they’re easy to keep at bay with a natural chemical-free spray such as garlic and chilli boiled together and the liquid sprayed on the affected plants. My approach is a little lazier. I plant more than I need. That way I’m happy to share with the critters in the garden and the leftovers are fed to happy chickens that in turn give me natural fertilizer in their manure. Otway Life Almanac 2020

A good compost heap is the key to creating good soil for your vegetables. If you don’t have the luxury of space to create a compost system, then a small worm farm is the perfect solution. You will have a vehicle to get rid of your kitchen scraps (excluding citrus, onions and meat) thereby reducing your waste, and also creating a valuable natural soil enhancer for your garden, whether it’s a backyard vegetable patch or a few herb pots on a balcony. How does it work? The aim is to feed the worms living in your worm farm and collect the juice that filters through the many layers of organic matter that the worms create. This juice is liquid gold in a food garden. I like to mix the worm juice to a ratio of 1:10 and sprinkle the diluted juice onto my vegetable garden. Some city councils now offer worm farms to their customers, however I made a small worm farm with a few very basic pieces of equipment. Firstly, I bought a big plant pot with a hole in the center of the base. I cut up a few pieces of hessian to line the bottom of the pot to stop the worms from escaping! Then I layered shredded paper, garden soil, straw, vegetable scraps and a spade of worms and soil from our compost bin into the pot. The pot was popped onto a few bricks to give it some height, and I put a container under the pot to catch the juice. A tip is to run a line of baling twine or string from the pot into the


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container so that the juice runs down the twine directly into container. In no time at the juice was filtering into the container below the pot. A watering can left close to the pot makes spreading the diluted worm juice easy and convenient. I find it works well with new carrot and radish seedlings. Carrots don’t like heavily composted soils, so the worm juice is ideal as a soil enhancer. I add vegetable scraps to the worm farm regularly and besides making sure it doesn’t dry out, the worms do all the work. During spring I usually plant a decent patch of carrots. A trick when sowing carrot seeds is to mix them up with radish seeds. The radishes grow much faster than the carrots, so within a few weeks you’re harvesting beautiful red spicy globes. Pulling them from the carrot patch at this stage gives the carrots a little more ‘shoulder’ room as they continue to grow. There is one challenge using this method. You’ll end up with far more fresh radishes than you can consume. What do we do with them all?! Pickles! So here is my favourite pickle recipe for freshly harvested radishes. Enjoy them on a salad sandwich, as part of a cheese platter or with barbecued meats. Oh, you can use the same brine if you want to pickle slices of zucchini, cucumbers or even baby onions.

Radish Pickle Recipe You will need a good bunch of washed radishes. Slice the radishes and pop them into a sterilized jar or two. Boil ½ cup apple cider vinegar and 1 cup of water. Add a tablespoon of sugar and 1½ teaspoons of salt to the mixture. Add some pickling spices if you wish. I like to add whole black peppercorns, yellow mustard seeds and a few fennel or dill seeds. Pour the hot liquid over the contents. Close the lids tightly and pop them into the fridge when they’re cool. Store the jars for a month before enjoying this delicious spicy pickle. My wish is that we all take our plant and soil health seriously. Grow a little, give a little and have a great year! Ami Hillege along with her husband Frans are a couple of tree changers who found 'the good life' on a small 9 acre property in the Otways. '​We keep a few cows and chooks. We grow most of our fruit and vegetables using organic principles and we love sharing and bartering excess produce with friends and neighbours around us. We're all about keeping our food miles low and eating local produce where possible. '


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Finding Felicity

Finding Felicity Felicity n. /fI’lIsIti

A state of well-being characterized by emotions ranging from contentment to intense joy… Renewing your relationship with the natural world, eating well, exercising and having healthy relationships are all pathways to felicity… In the Otway Ranges and surrounding area there are many innovative programs, services and events to aid your journey. Here are just some we have found…

Healing Services for Mind, Body and Soul Down a quiet dirt road in a peaceful bush setting is the beautiful sanctuary of Crow Kiah. It is here you will find Serra Manawey Healing, a holistic healing service to help ease the minds, bodies and souls of people seeking an alternative approach to personal health and relaxation. Serra Manawey is an experienced Energy Healer and Massage Therapist who believes true healing comes from treating clients on all levels. Offering a range of services including Balinese Intuitive Massage, Relaxation Massage, Energy Clearing Massage, Reiki, Crystal Healing and Sound Healing, there is something to suit each person’s needs. After a treatment clients are welcome to spend some time resting in the orchard or reflecting in the mystical labyrinth, a gift of space and time before returning to the world. Serra Manawey Healing Forrest. Ph: 0447309771 Email: serramanawey@gmail.com

www.serramanaweyhealing.com Otway Life Almanac 2019


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Chinese Medicine Colac Otway Chinese Medicine offers the best in physical therapies for pain, tension, and stress. Sports injuries, acute back pain, neck pain and headaches are all within the qualifications and experience of practitioners Andrew Broomfield and Shizu Aoki-Broomfield. Andrew is a Chinese medicine practitioner and registered acupuncturist, while Shizu is a highly skilled remedial massage therapist. Andrew and Shizu have been operating Colac Otway Chinese Medicine in their Hesse Street clinic for 16 years, placing them among the most experienced therapists in Colac and district. If you are suffering acute or chronic pain, from sport or work injury, arthritis, fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue, or pain and tension from unknown causes, come and try some therapy at Colac Otway Chinese Medicine. If you are unsure whether you would benefit more from acupuncture with Andrew, or massage from Shizu, give us a call, or drop in for a chat we'll and advise you what we think might work best.

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Chinese Medicine

For appointments at our Colac, Forrest, and Lorne practices: Phone (03) 52311799 M: 0438 816 170 or book online

colacotwaychinesemedicine.com

Nature Based Therapy Nature Based therapy is an emerging field in both complimentary therapies and holistic health treatment which is being incorporated into the practice of many medical and mental health professions. Occupational therapists, physical therapists, nurses, social workers and psychologists have used NBT practices as a complementary means of treating a variety of physical, emotional, and cognitive disorders. Nature Based Therapy uses nature as a tool to promote health and is based on the therapeutic use of sensory experiences which incorporates nature bathing, journaling, creative arts, holistic counselling, nature based diet, Indigenous philosophy, holistic health education and self-care into clinical settings that greatly benefit clients. There is a growing amount of evidence based research that suggests Nature Based Therapy has proven to be beneficial treatment modality for anxiety, depression, stress and other mental health disorders. By enabling people to reconnect with nature and experience its beauty, a sense of belongingness emerges, and life becomes more meaningful.

"Look deep into nature and then you will understand everything better " Albert Einstien

KIT KLINE - Nature Based Therapist T: 0415 926 334 info@naturebasedtherapy.com.au

www.naturebasedtherapy.com.au


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Nature Based Therapy incorporating

Health & wellness with plants by Kit Kline Plants are an important source of medicine and play a key role in health. Many medicines have been derived from plant-based sources and synthesised for medical use. We don’t need to tamper with nature to experience the healing benefits of plants. We can learn about plants and work with them to help improve our health and wellbeing. Chamomile is a good relaxant after meals. The herb is known for its properties of aiding digestion, boosting the nervous system and reducing stress, anxiety and tensions. A cup of chamomile tea will help in maintaining overall good health without the negative effects of caffeine and nicotine.

Lavender

Otway Life Almanac 2020

Lavender possesses anxiolytic and relaxing effects, and is also useful for treating migraines, stress, tiredness, depression, and helps people go to sleep. It is used internally or externally, the second of which is the most commonly chosen today, through aromatherapy, essential oils, or lavender flowers. There are also other ways we can bring plant therapy into our environments to feel the benefits of relaxation in nature. This is through biophilic design! Indoor plants can help improve our mental health. Research has shown that having house/work plants can assist in reducing stress, anxiety, and make us feel calm. They can also improve mood and self-esteem.


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Chamomile

Biophilic design seeks to connect our inherent need to affiliate with nature in the modern built environment. An extension of the theory of biophilia, biophilic design recognizes that our species has evolved for more than 99% of its history in adaptive response to the natural world and not to human created or artificial forces. We became biologically encoded to associate with natural features and processes. Aligning our workplace or home environment with nature and creating an eco-system which includes plant life can improve your general health and wellbeing. An example of this is the Peace Lily. This plant will reduce humidity levels because it is one such plant that, despite being watered, will also absorb

moisture from the air through its leaves. The peace lily also needs little sunlight to thrive, so indoor environments will prove no challenge to keeping this plant healthy. It is the perfect plant to have in your home in order to help decrease moisture in the air, with the bonus of purifying your air of certain contaminants at the same time. Next time you are feeling stressed and anxious and craving the tranquillity of the outdoors, why not bring healing plants into your environment? For more information on studying nature based therapy and learning more about plants and their uses please visit www.naturebasedtherapy.com.au or email Kit at info@naturebasedtherapy.com.au.

Peace Lily

Kit Kline is the founder of Nature Based Therapy and is passionate about improving individual, family, community and environmental health. She is currently studying psychology at Deakin University and facilitates workshops on NBT and delivers the Diploma in Nature Based Therapy.


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ACTIVATE

8 Psychological strategies to tackle climate change

A I Acknowledge feelings

Inspire positive visions

Create social norms

Value it

Time is now The Climate Change Empowerment Handbook Otway Life Almanac 2020

T Talk about it

Act

E Engage with nature


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ACTIVATE

8 strategies from psychology to tackle climate change Climate change is the biggest health threat in the 21st century. Already we are seeing climate disruption in many places on the globe, with far worse forecast.

These 8 simple but important insights from psychological science, summarised with the acronym A.C.T.I.V.A.T.E., help people come to terms and cope with the profound implications of climate change. We hope they will ACTIVATE the public into more effectively engaging with the challenge of climate change and participate in speedy societal change to restore a safe climate.

Acknowledge feelings about climate change to yourself and others and learn ways of managing feelings so you can face and not avoid the reality of climate change. Create social norms about protecting the environment so that people see that ‘everyone is doing it’ and ‘it’s normal to be green’. Talk about climate change and break the collective silence so that more and more people see it as a risk that requires action. Inspire positive visions of a low-energy, sustainable, zero carbon world so that people know what we are working towards and can identify steps to get there.

Value it. Show people how their core values are often linked to other values that are about restoring a safe climate, and that caring about these issues actually reinforces their core values. Act personally and collectively to contribute to climate change solutions and feel engaged and less despairing. Time is now. Show people that climate change is here, now and for sure so they see it is timely and relevant to them and impacts the things that they care deeply about. Engage with nature to restore your spirits and connect with the very places that you are trying to protect.

This booklet is part of the APS 2016 Presidential Initiative looking at how the science of psychology can help us to understand and participate in solutions to the ‘big issues’ facing the world today.

For more information visit psychology.org.au/public-interest/environment

The Climate Change Empowerment Handbook


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The Otway Ark

Threatened: Long nosed Potoroo

From whales to potoroos, how are the Otways threatened species are faring? Over the past three years, things have been changing in the Great Otway National Park. You might not notice it as you drive along the Great Ocean Road, but a landscapescale small mammal recovery project known as the “Otway Ark” is underway. Fox control is being undertaken and there’s a small army of researchers scouring the bush looking for signs of change or recovery. Earlier this month, over 100 researchers and land managers came together at the fourth annual Otways Threatened Species Forum to share data and insights from their work on the Otway Ark and a range of other projects across the Otways. The first results from the Otway Ark fox control program were presented by Claire Miller from Parks Victoria. The three years of monitoring data provided insight into the success of the baiting program in creating conditions

Otway Life Almanac 2020

that allow small to medium size mammals to persist. The data also informs recommendations for moving forward with the program. Sharing some very cute photos from the remote camera monitoring, Claire reminded those gathered of the Ark’s ultimate aim to conserve populations of small mammals, such as potoroos and bandicoots. One of the big challenges in the Otways is that the landscape is not all National Park, it’s a patchwork of land tenure that also includes Forest Park and private land. This means that despite fox control occurring within the National Park, it remains vulnerable to reinvasion from foxes on bordering properties. Emma Birnbaum detailed the success of the Conservation Ecology Centre in expanding the program beyond Great Otway National Park, onto private properties and into the Otway Forest Park, to achieve more consistent results in this landscapewide project.


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Threatened: Spotted quoll

Feral fox

Feral piglets

Emma also spoke on an emerging threat in the Otways, feral pigs, which have potential to cause significant ecological and economic damage if left unchecked. However, it’s not all doom and gloom. As Emma described, with swift, collaborative action between landowners and researchers, this threat can be effectively abated before feral pigs gain a strong foothold in the region. The first step is gaining preliminary information on pig distribution in the Otways. The community can greatly assist with this by reporting any pig sightings or signs of damage caused by If you’d like to know more, or attend future events, pigs on the app Feral Scan. It is available at feralscan.org.au. please email Jack Pascoe, Conservation & Research The Forum provides a platform for researchers and land managers Manager at the Conservation Ecology Centre at to present findings on a range of other projects in the Otways. jack@conservationecologycentre.org.


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Growing Trees to save Koalas

The Conservation Ecology Centre has embarked on creating the woodlands of the future by planting over 100,000 tree seedlings over the last few years, across 100 Ha of affected woodland areas at Cape Otway. THE PROBLEM Koalas face a number of conservation challenges which vary dramatically across their range. In this region, koalas are threatened by habitat declines, particularly in manna gum woodlands and there are very real fears for the welfare of koalas as their food trees die. The Great Ocean Road’s coastal woodlands are in crisis and urgent action is needed to protect them. Koala over-browsing has caused drastic decline of woodland health and extent. In some areas the dieback is so severe that it has caused entire canopy death and koalas too are suffering. Habitats are changing beyond recognition, as woodland is replaced by invasive species. The ecosystem is further threatened by the absence of low intensity fires, which is a vital component of many Australian woodlands. The combined result is that more than 70% of the Manna Gum community has been lost over the past 20 years.

Through wider application of these techniques, woodland areas can be effectively managed, allowing koalas access to healthy trees, while ensuring protection where necessary. We have shown that these techniques are successful – they enable canopy recovery. Now we need to apply them across wider areas. Careful research of this woodland ecosystem will be vital as low intensity prescribed burns are reintroduced into the landscape, allowing the CEC to identify an optimal fire regime. Critical canopy species, fire dependant germinators and floral and faunal diversity will be enhanced, while invasive species will be reduced. We have pioneered mosaic burning with the CFA over the last two years, have measured the diversity of herbs and native grasses and noted natural germination of Manna Gums. This is a positive start for an ambitious research program which will be critical for managing our remnant vegetation and the newly planted woodland to achieve a critical mass of protected habitat.

The decline of the Manna Gums has been accelerating and without intervention we will lose this unique and rare habitat type, along with the koalas and the many other plants and animals that rely on it.

We can’t do this without your help though. We desperately require funding in order to develop this program and save koalas.

THE SOLUTION

You can assist our Conservation & Research Team in annual surveys to monitor the koala population and the habitat condition, join in with habitat restoration efforts like the Big Otway Tree Plant and learn more about volunteering.

With no time to waste, we have embarked on creating the woodlands of the future by planting over 100,000 tree seedlings over the last few years, across 100Ha of affected woodland areas at Cape Otway. It is vital to protect young or ailing trees from overbrowsing and to shield mature seed trees for future revegetation efforts. We are trialling large-scale methods to minimise koala browsing on selected trees.

Otway Life Almanac 2020

HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED

When possible, land is purchased and kept in trust to secure long term habitat security for koalas. We welcome you to join us in creating this legacy – please contact us for more details on larger projects. Source: www.conservationecologycentre.org


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IMAGES from the 2019 Big Otway Tree Plant © Emma Catherine Studios

www.conservationecologycentre.org


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Whale Watching at Cape Otway Lightstation

Victorian waters are home to a stunning diversity of marine mammals including whales, dolphins and seals, and Cape Otway is a perfect vantage point for whale watching between May and October. At the Lightstation we celebrate these amazing creatures year-round in our Whale Interpretive Area. Annually, 25 species of whales migrate past the Lightstation including Southern Right Whales, Humpback Whales, Blue Whales and Killer Whales (Orcas). Many breed and socialise here before heading off to feed in sub-Antarctic waters. Southern Right Whales give birth to young in sheltered bays along the south-west coast of Victoria.

Art and Sculpture at Cape Otway Lightstation Apart from interpretive information to help you learn more about whales and how we can protect them, we have some large scale works of art celebrating these amazing mammals. There is a geoglyph sculpture which is a full-scale Southern Right male adult, formed within the natural landscape, created with local limestone, and sandstone, featuring a weathered steel fluke. We also have a baby Southern Right Whale carved from a cypress tree. Visit the Lightstation for a chance to see these magnificent whales in their natural habitat and learn how to distinguish them from the their blow (cloud of mist of spray formed when whales exhale as they surface); learn to recognise their shape and behaviours. Source: www.lightstation.com/explore-cape-otway/whale-watching

1140 Lighthouse Road, Cape Otway, Victoria 3233 T: 03 5237 9240 E: keeper@lightstation.com www.lightstation.com Otway Life Almanac 2020


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A musical heritage by John Frizon

"Music hath charms that soothe the savage breast� The most ancient of cultures recognised the power of music whether individually for meditation and introspection, or communally to achieve a common bond and pass on stories and knowledge. Since European settlement of the Otway Ranges, musical entertainment has been a popular pastime. Early settlers would travel many miles to attend a good "knees up� in someones home or shed or one of the many community halls that were built as the settlements flourished. Early pioneers invariably included at least one family member with some musical training and these skills were passed on during leisure periods long before the invention of the radio or the television. As civilisation advanced in our "neck of the woods� musical training became more specialised and music teachers would travel around the ranges. One intrepid teacher comes to mind, Mrs Barbour. A resident of Krambruk North on the Wild Dog Rd, (when the road was barely wide enough for one vehicle), she would drive her tiny Morris Minor to students' homes to teach piano.

Otway Life Almanac 2020

This involved travelling the entire Otway area from Lavers Hill to Bambra and everywhere in between on narrow roads in all weathers, sharing the road with log trucks, milk trucks, and roaming livestock. She survived all this without accident except for once, while parked to allow a farmer to herd his cattle past her on the Wild Dog, her vehicle was pushed sideways off the edge by an impatient heifer. She was a little late for her lessons that day. The year's end would be celebrated with a concert at the Deans Marsh Hall where the students would exhibit their skills to the parents, interspersed with comedy skits and small dramatic scenes rehearsed in the weeks prior. This type of training by dedicated teachers no doubt added a richness to the locals' lives that may not be appreciated as much as it ought. Today there is a resurgence in learning and participating in musical adventures. Fine instrument makers have found their way into the area and community singing and instrumental groups can be found throughout the ranges. John learnt piano from Mrs Barbour and music has continued to play an integral part in his life.


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Players and dancers at the Forrest 'Shed'

Shared music at the 'Shed' Volunteers are the heroes of our small towns, organisations such as the CFA, CWA, school councils, sporting clubs, management committees of small halls and other public assets, progress associations, the list goes on, all are dependent on dedicated volunteers and their freely donated time.

It is easily seen that rural people depend on the community in which they work and dwell to provide access to services. Maintaining an inclusive and supportive culture in any environment is essential for all, whether a workplace, sporting or special interest club, or a family. One of the challenges of community organisations is finding a common interest among a population with diverse history, skills, and experience. The principle of inclusiveness sometimes requires a fresh look at a need which has not been addressed by another organisation. A bit of market research in our town of Forrest soon found support for the idea of a communal music program. "Everyone likes a sing along�. The Forrest Men's Shed decided to fill this need and for the last 12 months it has been hosting a series of musical jam and singalong sessions on the second and fourth Sunday afternoons of each month. These sessions have proved to be successful in bringing people together and participants have travelled from afar to join in.

The style of music is BlueGrass, which is played on stringed instruments and is very easy to pick up. The simple upbeat tunes and harmonies lend themselves to community style playing and singing, and all skill levels are welcomed. Even if you have never played with others in a group, you will be supported as you learn. Participation is open to everyone whether you can play an instrument or not and joining in the singing is encouraged. Some of the more enthusiastic members of the group have gained a level of confidence and skill where performances are now being organised at local functions, community groups and retirement villages. Other activities at the 'Shed' have also benefited from the increased participation and a new sense of purpose is emerging. The Forrest Men's Shed has a Facebook page and is keen to attract new members to participate in the newly opened facility with its workshop spaces. The question we like to ask is "How can we make the 'Shed' relevant to you?" John Frizon is the president of the Forrest Men's Shed. Anyone is welcome to become member or join in the activities of the 'Shed', please email fdms3236@gmail.com for more information.


90

Devils Grip

Book Review by Jenny McNamara Devil’s Grip: A true story of shame, sheep and shotguns by Neal Drinnan I’ve always thought that everyone has a story and Neal Drinnan and Bob Perry have a tale that will keep you up late into the night. I finished it in one sitting and was gobsmacked at the content! It’s about so much more than a triple murder. The devil’s grip is a flaw in sheep, an indentation in the spine that often goes unnoticed by show judges. But like all flaws it will eventually be discovered. Such a fabulous title and a great metaphor to describe the many flawed characters in this real life drama. This non-fiction book came about after a casual mention, by Neal’s partner Peter Fairman, as they drove in the Barrabool Hills one day, of triple murders which took place nearby. The other major player and key to the telling of the story was a Carlisle River farmer, Bob Perry, coincidentally already a customer in Neal’s bookshop. Neal’s first foray into this genre makes me hope he writes more. It’s like he’s sitting down in front of you with a glass of red spinning a great yarn - except it’s all true! It’s the story of Darcy Wettenall and his climb from poverty to running the most famous sheep stud in Australia at the time. Through this he attains undreamed of privilege and status. It includes his rise to power and success in the sheep world, his secret lover, his deceptions, his bullying and in the end - unfortunately for him - his manipulation of vulnerable people. Three people are gruesomely murdered. But it’s also the story of Bob and Neal and a history of gay men growing

Otway Life Almanac 2020

up in a society where there was such guilt around not being ‘proper.’ Their history and personal journeys are so honestly related and hit a chord with me having grown up in Melbourne. I remember the angst and hidden secrets of my gay friends at that time. It relates in honest detail their history and personal journeys of coming out and of wanting and sometimes getting acceptance by family and friends but not necessarily by the society they lived in. This is a gripping, brave and courageous story of lives and lies interwoven, told with such revealing honesty and compassion. Neal has a beautiful way with words. I thoroughly recommend this marvellous read. (Marvellous: causing great wonder, extraordinary!) Neal Drinnan is an ex- Lavers Hillite, renowned author and owner of Cowlick Bookshop in Murray St Colac. Devil’s Grip is available at all good bookshops or signed copies online at www.cowlick.com.au.


Books & Writing 91

Thus Spoke the Plant Book Review by Melissa Lindeman

After all, the future of the earth is not something we are encouraged to feel hopeful about; feelings of despair and helplessness the more usual direction in which we are guided. The author is a scientist, who initially specialised in animal behaviour and then turned her attention to the plant community. Gagliano has pioneered a new field of inquiry – plant bioacoustics – which is quietly, but quickly helping to transform ecological research. Using Western scientific method, she has demonstrated that plants communicate; that they can learn; that they have cognition. Gagliano developed what to research, and how, by taking guidance from the plants themselves through Shamanic practices. Her unconventional approach was not received well by the scientific community. Her description of the dispiriting reactions from colleagues provides insight into the scientific academic world that immediately garners respect for what she has now achieved. She struggled to be taken to be seriously, but persisted. This is of course how scientific paradigms are shifted – by someone challenging the status quo with approaches and findings that are unexpected, even unwelcome. Gagliano has since published many peer-reviewed papers, meeting the rigorous academic standards for scientific journals. In this book, she writes with a lyrical touch, carrying the reader along on her spiritual and scientific journey. A journey she states can co-exist. Monica Gagliano took a breath and leant into the microphone. She gazed off into nothing and no-one in particular and spoke not a word for what seemed like several minutes. This act, in response to being offered the last word on a discussion panel, addressed one of the main themes of her book “Thus Spoke the Plant”; that we must listen to what is going on all around us, including to plants. The gesture was captivating. So is her book.

Gagliano has pioneered a new field of inquiry – plant bioacoustics – which is quietly, but quickly helping to transform ecological research.

Gagliano, an ecologist, was speaking at the NT Writer’s Festival, held in Alice Springs earlier this year. The session “Regeneration and Return” promised a discussion where scribes of all kinds (agrarian, ecological and literary) would share their insights and antidotes and consider the question: is it too late to save the earth? I attended the session, needing a boost on the day after the Federal election, but not really expecting to get one.

All books change us in some small way. Gagliano’s left me a little dazed at first, and then feeling that something profound had happened to me, as if I could suddenly see a previously unseeable world. I felt enormous gratitude for her work. It is a book that offers us a reason to trust that nature will provide the world with a way forward; as long as we can truly listen to what it has to say. Something Indigenous peoples have been doing for eons, a point she makes throughout.

Gagliano’s book will appeal to those who take guidance from the universe, intuition, Indigenous knowledge, or ‘other worldly’ states. But it will also appeal to those who trust in the Western scientific tradition. It is the stuff that challenges accepted world views. Monica Gagliano, PhD. 2018. “Thus Spoke the Plant: a remarkable journey of groundbreaking scientific discoveries & personal encounters with plants”. North Atlantic Books, Berkeley, California.


92

Sarah Remembers Sarah Remembers is inspired by the true story of Nan who lived on a dairy farm at Chapple Vale and holidayed with her family over many summers at Torquay. Nan and her grandchildren watched and waited for the tide to retreat before searching, the world left behind, for cowrie shells – just as Nan had done as a child. Now Nan’s great, great grandchildren enjoy this simple pastime. And the cry, I’ve found one! Look I’ve found one! is still as exciting to hear as it was decades ago. Although, summers did end, the cowrie shell continues to link six generations of Nan’s family. And the search and the joy of discovery keeps the memory of past generations alive. Susan Richards (Beech Forest), brings life to Sarah’s story with beautiful, vintage style, water colour illustrations. I hope Sarah Remembers prompts other families to remember and retell their own stories. IMAGES Top Right: Author Julie Edmonds and Below far Right: illustrator Susan Richards Right: Showing off cowries Otway Life Almanac 2020


Books & Writing 93


To Market to Market

94

2019 COLAC OTWAY MARKETS & EVENTS APOLLO BAY Apollo Bay Seafood Festival 2019 Friday 14 - Sunday 16 February Apollo Bay Community Market Every Saturday Apollo Bay Farmers Market Third Sunday of the month e� � � � LoV L�nE BIRREGURRA SEPTEMBER 2019 FEBRUARY 2020 Birregurra Sunday 2nd Sunday ofSAT every month from to AprilMarket PLUS Easter Sun SAT 7, 14, 21, 28 Market Torquay Farmers Market 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 November Torquay Farmers Otway Harvest FestivalTorquay 2019 Cowrie Market Friday 24 January SUN 15 MON 3, 10, 17, 24 Lorne Monday Night Market Birrigurra Festival 10 & 11 October SUN 2 Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market OCTOBER 2019 & Art Show lOvE COLAC5, 12, 19, 26 SUN 9 Aireys Inlet Market SAT Torquay Farmers Market AnGlEsEa Colac RSL SUN 16 Torquay Cowrie Market SUN 6 - Show n Shine Winchelsea Growers and MakersSaturday Market 29 February Colac KANA Festival 2019 Saturday 21 March MARCH 2020 SUN 20 Torquay Cowie Market Colac Sunday Market at the Showgrounds Third Sunday of the month SUN 1 Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market SUN 20 Aireys Inlet Market Colac Otway Arts Trail Sat 24 & Sun 25 October, Sat 31 Oct & Sun 1 Nov SAT 7 Anglesea Primary School Fair SAT 26 Freshwater Creek Steiner School Fair e� FORREST � � � LoV SAT 7, 14, 21, 28 Torquay Farmers Market NOVEMBER 2019 L�nE SEPTEMBER 2019 FEBRUARY 2020 Otway Odyssey 2019 Saturday 22 February SUN 8 Aireys Inlet Market SAT 2 Aireys Inlet Market SAT Forrest 7, 14,Soup 21, 28Fest Torquay Farmers Market 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Torquay Farmers Market Sunday 7thSAT June SUN 8 Anglesea Riverbank Markets SAT 2 Aireys Inlet School Fair SUN GELLIBRAND 15 Torquay Cowrie Market MON 3, 10, 17, 24 Lorne Monday Night Market SUN 15 Torquay Cowrie Market SAT 2 Lorne Foreshore Market 2 Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market OCTOBER 2019 Gellibrand River Blues and Blueberry Festival Saturday 28SUN February FRI20-22 Deans Marsh Festival Market lOvE SAT 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Torquay Farmers Market SUN Aireys Inlet Market SAT KAWARREN 5, 12, 19, 26 Torquay Farmers Market SUN 9 AnGlEsEa SUN 3 Anglesea Riverbank Markets Torquay Cowrie Market SUN Otway 6 Growers and Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market Makers Market 4th SundaySUN ofAPRIL each16month, 2020 Echidna House SUN 3 Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market MARCH SUN WYE 20RIVER Torquay Cowie Market SUN 2020 5 Winchelsea Growers and Makers market SUN 17 Torquay Cowrie Market 1 Winchelsea GrowersMarket and Makers Market SUN Wye 20River Ride Aireys Inlet Market Sunday 19 SUN January SAT 11 Lorne Foreshore SUN 17 Aireys Inlet Market SATSUN 7 12 Anglesea Primary School Fair SAT RUNS 26 & MARATHONS Freshwater Creek Steiner School Fair Aireys Inlet Market SUN 24 Deans Marsh Farmers Market SAT 7, 14, 21, 28 Torquay Farmers Market S NOVEMBER 2019 Otway Trail Run - Old Beechy Rail Trail TBA SUN 12 Anglesea Riverbank Markets DECEMBER 2019 8 Aireys Inlet Market SAT Great 2 Ocean & Otway Aireys Inlet Market Classic Ride Saturday 18SUN April SAT 4,11,18, 25 Torquay Farmers Market SUN 1 Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market SUN 8 19 Anglesea Riverbank Markets SAT Great 2 Ocean Road Aireys Inlet School Fair Running Festival Weekend 16-17 May SUN Torquay Cowrie Market SAT 7, 14, 21, 28 Torquay Farmers Market SUN 15 Torquay Cowrie Market SAT Run2 Forrest Trail Run Lorne Foreshore Market Sunday 7 JuneMAY 2020 SAT

SUN 8, 29 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

Aireys Inlet Market Torquay Farmers Market

FRI20-22 Deans Marsh Festival Market SAT 2, 9, 16,29,30 Torquay Farmers Market SUN SUN 3 Bellbrae Primary School Mayfair Market

SURF SHIRE MARKETS 2020Market SUN COAST 15 Torquay Cowrie

SUN

3

Anglesea Riverbank Markets

JANUARY 2020 Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market

SUN 3 WED SUN 17 THU SUN 17 SAT SUN 24 SAT

Anglesea Riverbank Market Torquay Cowrie Market 2, 9, 16, 23 Nightjar Festival Torquay Aireys Inlet Market 4 Anglesea Riverbank Markets - Twilight Deans Marsh Farmers Market 4, 11, 18, 25 Torquay Farmers Market

DECEMBER 2019

SUN 5, 12, 18, 26 1 SAT 11 SAT 7, 14, 21, 28 SAT 11 SUN 8, 29 SAT 18 SUN 15 SUN 19

Aireys Inlet Market Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market Anglesea Uniting Church Fete , Anglesea Torquay Farmers Market St Luke’s Anglican Church Fete, Torquay Aireys Inlet Market Aireys Inlet Market - Twilight Torquay Cowrie Market Torquay Cowrie Market

SAT 25 WED 1, 12

Lorne foreshore Market Anglesea Riverbank Market

SUN

JANUARY 2020

FEBRUARY 2020

2, 9, 16, 23 Nightjar Festival Ve� Torquay � � � LoFarmers SAT 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Torquay Market L�nE RUARY 2020 SAT 4 Anglesea Riverbank Markets - Twilight 3, 10,Market 17, 24 Lorne Monday Night Market 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 MON Farmers SAT Torquay 4, 11, 18, 25 Torquay Farmers Market SUN 2 Night Market Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market 3, 10, 17, 24 Lorne Monday SUN 5, 12, 18, 26 Aireys Inlet Market 2 Winchelsea9Growers and Makers Market SUN Aireys Inlet Market lOvE SAT Aireys 11Inlet Market Anglesea Uniting Church Fete , Anglesea 9 EsEa AnGl SUN 16 Torquay Cowrie Market arket SAT Torquay 11 Cowrie Market St Luke’s Anglican Church Fete, Torquay 16 THU

APRIL 2020

1, 12

SUN 3 SUN 5

Aireys Inlet Market Winchelsea Growers and Makers market

SAT 6 SUN 12 SAT 6,13,20,27 SUN 12 SUN 7 SAT 4,11,18, 25

Lorne Foreshore Market Lorne Foreshore Market Aireys Inlet Market Torquay Farmers Market Anglesea Riverbank Markets Aireys Inlet Market Torquay Farmers Market

JUNE112020 SAT

SUN 19 Torquay Cowrie Market Prior to attending a market listed in this brochure, Please confirm

date2020 and times with information on individual market website / MAY

facebook pages. SAT 2, 9, 16,29,30

Torquay Farmers Market

SUN

3

Bellbrae Primary School Mayfair Market

3

Aireys Inlet Market

LoVe� � � �SUN E L�n

JUNE 2020

SAT

lOvE 6t�qUaY

Lorne Foreshore Market

SAT

6,13,20,27

Torquay Farmers Market

SUN

7

Aireys Inlet Market

lOvE AnGlEsEa

lOvE t�qUaY

lOvE Ys�iNlEt

� AiRe lOvE Prior to attending � AiReYs�iNlEt a market listed in this brochure, Please confirm

date and times with information on individual market website / facebook pages. 18 Aireys Inlet Market - Twilight SUN 1Growers and Makers Market Winchelsea Growers and Makers Market 1 Winchelsea SUN 19 LoVe� Torquay Cowrie Market lOvE � � � Primary Anglesea School Fair SAT 7nE Anglesea Primary School Fair air 7 t�qUaY SAT 25 L� Lorne foreshore Market lOvE lOvE 7, 14, 21, 28 Torquay Farmers SURFMarket COAST MARKETS ARE PLASTIC SURF WISE m�iAc COAST MARKETS ARE PLASTIC WISE SAT 7, 14,Market 21, 28 Torquay Farmers m�iAc

RCH 2020SAT

Market 8

ht Market 8

MARCH 2020

Aireys Inlet Market

SUN

8

Anglesea Riverbank Markets

SUN 8 rs and 15 Makers Market Torquay Cowrie Market vE lO SUN 15 Deans Marsh Festival Market t 20-22 AnGlEsEa FRI20-22 arket

IL 2020 5

SUN

BYO BAG, DRINK BOTTLE & COFFEE CUP

BYO BAG, DRINK BOTTLE & COFFEE CUP

Aireys Inlet Market

Anglesea Riverbank Markets Torquay Cowrie Market Deans Marsh Festival Market

lOvE � AiReYs�iNlEt

Winchelsea Growers and Makers market

APRIL 2020 rs and arket 11 Makers Market Lorne Foreshore Market

School 12 Fair

s

SUN 5 Aireys Inlet Market

WINCHELSEA

Winchelsea Growers and Makers market

MARKETS

2019-20

su


... Fiesta Fantastica Gellibrand River

95

28-29 FEB - 1 MAR 2020

Blues and Blueberry Festival The beautiful town of Gellibrand River in the Otways, is set to party and celebrate The Blues and its scrumptious Blueberry season. Friday Night 28th February 2020 6pm to10pm Music at The Otway Tourist Park, with amazing local bands showcasing the young and the more experienced. Making for a fun night for families, locals and visitors Saturday afternoon, 29th February, Noon to 8pm The Main event held in The Otway Tourist Park Featuring; The Black Swans of Trespass, The McNaMarr Project, Dreamboogie and the Rhythm X Revival. Sunday 1st March 9.30 to 2pm Creative Market where you can buy all your Blueberries, plants and Blueberry produce. Great food, kid’s activities and performers, a stage with fantastic talents and quality creative stalls to tempt everyone. The Gellibrand River Blues and Blueberry Weekend, come and enjoy the delightful picturesque Gellibrand showcasing its very best! Always the Last weekend in February! For more information: www.bluesandblueberryfestival.com.au Phone: (03)5235 8357 or (03)5235 8348

Torquay Cowrie Market is a not for profit community market run by Surf Coast Arts Inc. This iconic market is nestled amongst the majestic trees overlooking Zeally Bay on the Torquay Foreshore. Always a friendly atmosphere with two stages featuring local music and entertainment. The Cowrie Market specialises in quality local art, craft, jewellery, vintage, plants and fresh produce. A great meeting place and never disappoints. m.me/torquaycowriemarket http://www.surfcoastarts.com/torquay-cowrie-market.html If you want to join in email; cowriemarket@yahoo.com.au tell us about yourself!


Experience & enjoy...

96

Apollo Bay Surf & Kayak operates in the beautiful environment of Apollo Bay on the Great Ocean Road. On our doorstep we have the Otway National Park and the Marengo Marine Sanctuary, which hosts a Seal Colony.

Learn to Surf, Seal Kayaking, & Walk Apollo Bay Surf & Kayak / Walk 91 can provide you with surf lessons and surf hire, kayaking to the seals and kayak hire, SUP (stand up paddle board) lessons and hire, snorkeling hire, body board hire. Alternatively explore the Great Ocean Walk ™ with Walk91. We provide transport on the Great Ocean Walk, rental and transfers of camping gear & food and water drops,, B&B accommodation and Inn to Inn walking. PLEASE NOTE WE DO NOT RUN DAILY. Call for availability

BLUE SKY ARE YOUR LOCAL OUTDOOR EXPERTS Blue Sky is a network of independently owned and managed Australian outdoor retail stores each offering knowledge only a local could have. We have developed close relationships with trusted, premium brands and continually strive to bring you innovative, quality equipment that offers exceptional value for money. Blue Sky are dedicated to satisfying your outdoor equipment needs at the right price with free expert advice! The next time you're heading out you'll need Blue Sky for all your camping, fishing and outdoor needs!

www.blueskyoutdoor.com.au

KAYAK to the SEALS

at the Marengo Seal Sanctuary

OL5

we have all your outdoor, leisure and camping needs covered

76 Murray St Colac Phone: 5231 2347 Email: colac@blueskyoutdoor.com.au Contact Mark 0405 495 909 www.apollobaysurfkayak.com.au Otway Life Almanac 2020

...and keep the kids entertained with an extensive range of games and toys instore.


the great times the Otways has on offer

97

all the joy of cycling without the huff and puff... • Easy to ride Electric Power Assisted bicycles • Great family fun, childrens bikes & toddler trailers available • E-bike tours under the koalas with coast views • No licence required • Bookings essential • 1 hour guided Eco-tours • Great value for money

Contact Nathan Swain at

0413 971 736

E nath@otwayebikes.com.au W www.otwayebikes.com.au 2020 Victoria School Holidays Dates

2020 Victorian Public Holidays

Period Term 1 - 9 weeks

Start Tues Jan 28

Finish Fri 27 March

Date

Day

01 January

Wednesday New Year’s Day

School Holidays

Sat 28 March

Mon 13 April

27 January

Monday

Australia Day

Term 2 - 11 weeks

Tue 14 April

Fri 26 June

9 March

Monday

Labour Day

School Holidays

Sat, 27 June

Sun 12 July

10 April

Friday

Good Friday

Term 3 - 10 weeks

Mon 13 July

Fri 18 Sept

11 April

Saturday

Day after Good Friday

School Holidays

Sat 19 Sept

Sun 4 Oct

12 April

Sunday

Easter Sunday

Term 4* - 11 weeks

Mon 5 Oct

Fri 18 Dec

13 April

Monday

Easter Monday

2020/2021 Summer School Holidays

Sat 19 Dec

Tue 26 Jan 2020

25 April

Saturday

Anzac Day

8 June

Monday

Queen’s Birthday

TBA

TBA

AFL Grand Final Holiday

3 November

Tuesday

Melbourne Cup Day *

25 December

Friday

Christmas Day

28 December

Monday

Boxing Day Holiday

*Senior Years may have different finishing dates in term 4 The information above is relevant to Victoria government state schools. Independent and Catholic schools term dates can vary from school to school. Check directly with the relevant school to find out the correct term date information. Otway Health is your local health and community services provider, located in Apollo Bay. We offer expert quality care in the following capacity:

• urgent care unit • in-home support • community health and wellbeing programs • residential care • allied health

Holiday

The urgent care unit operates 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. For more information go to otwayhealth.org.au or contact our Reception Team on (03) 5237 8500. 75 McLachlan Street, Apollo Bay, 3233


98

2020

APOLLO BAY – VICTORIA

LAT 38° 46ʼ S APOLLO BAY – VICTORIA

Time

0430 1030 WE 1624 2216

1

JANUARY m

1.98 0.70 1.57 0.53

2 0500 1104

1.96 0.70 TH 1706 1.60 2254 0.67

3 0529 1138

1.93 0.72 FR 1753 1.62 2330 0.83 0554 1.89 1212 0.74 SA 1849 1.63

Time

0425 1016 TH 1634 2213

7

1.24 1.60 0.71 1.69

8 0259 0705

1.29 1.47 WE 1513 0.63 2321 1.74

9 0434 0950

1.25 1.34 TH 1615 0.52 0015 0553 FR 1119 1713

10

1.81 1.14 1.30 0.38

11 0102 0649

1.87 1.01 SA 1222 1.31 1805 0.26

12 0145 0735

1.93 0.88 SU 1316 1.37 1857 0.18

0228 0816 MO 1407 1947

13

1.99 0.77 1.45 0.16

14 0308 0858

2.03 0.68 TU 1456 1.54 2037 0.20

15 0346 0937

2.05 0.62 WE 1545 1.62 2126 0.30

Time Time

0515 0425 1112 1810 1016 SU 2330

mm

Time

2.00 0424 2.06 0.37 1034 1.95 0.57 SU 1710 0.80 2255

16

1

1151 0.35 MO 1903 1.89

0615 1.92 0023 0529 1.93 1216 0.49 0547 1138 TU0.72 1243 SU 1924 1.79 2009 1753 1.62

0057 0538 0709 1135 1319 WE 2105 1822

0501 1056 1104 0.70 0012 0538 2.00 0534 1.83 18 1135TH0.50 1210 0.58 0627 1726 1706 31.60 FR18 1822 1.78 1907 1.72 1232 TU SA MO0.67 2258 2254 2001 2342 0.78

17

2

20 0029 0653

1.13 1.72 MO 1328 0.75 2114 1.65

m

1.99 0.63 1.79 0.85

1056 0.53 1139 0.61 FR 1726 1.75 SU 1816 1.77 0500 1.96 2258 0.61 2347 0.95

5 0009 0615

6 0051 0630

m Time

1

19

0.99 1.81 SU 1248 0.75 1959 1.63

Time m

2.06 0456 0430 1.98 0.57 1109 1.70 1732 1030 SA0.70 0.44 2313

Time m

m Time

0451 1.94 0456 1.99 1045 0.54 1750 1.95 1109MO0.63 2315 0.84

2020

Time m Time m

m

1.92 0.27 2.06 0.79

0443 0515 1058 1800 1112 WE 2337

Time

0446 1.63 2.00 1040 0.33 1.84 TH 1800 0.37 0.85 2320

Time m m Time 1.58 0359 0424 1.94 0.39 1007 1.81 1034 FR0.54 1719 0.87 2259 1710 1.95

APOLLO BAY – VICTORIA

MAY

m

Time Time

0523 0451 16 1 1 16 16 16 1 16 1 1100 1045 1816 SA 1634 1.70 1810 1.95 1750 1624 1.57 1732 1.79 SA SU TH WE SU MO 2352 0501 2.04 0517 1.92 0550 1.89 0528 1.80 0504 0.80 1.53 0534 1.48 0446 1.86 2213 0.44 2330 2216 0.53 2313 0.85 2255 0.84 0630 0437 1.46 2315 17 2 17 17 2 17 2

4

0144 0643 TU 1415 2221

LONG 143° 41ʼ E Times LAT 38° 46ʼ S LONG 143° 41ʼ E and Heights of High and Low Waters Times and Heights of High and Low Waters Local Time MARCH FEBRUARY JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

4

3

FR

1.04 1.71 0.55 1.65

1819 SA

0.95 0103 2330 0.83 1.81 0600 MO 1302 0.49 WE 1322 0554 1.89 2030 1.78 2121

1.11 1.58 0.52 1.60

1.19 0316 0009 0.99 1.55 0700 0615 FR1.81 0.50 1522 1.78 2337 1248 0.75

1.17 1.31 0.43 1.62

5

0153 202342 0806

2.04 0.53 0.91 1.76 1.75 0.37 0.61 1.80

16

1124 0.28 1102 0.48 MO 1747 1.89 TU 1838 1.93 0517 1.92 2355 0.85 2326 0.88

1

1131 0.32 TH 1842 1.71

2 1050

1122 0.54 FR 1853 1.69

17

1.01 0521 1.63 0036 2.00 0534 1.83 1.60 0648 1203 0.39 0.50 WE 1915 1.66 1210TH0.58 0.42 1247 1.70 2029 1.78 1907 1.72

4

0124 0.96 0747 1.51 0.38 FR 1340 0023 1.04 2136 1.55

1.00 1.38 0.57 1.57

3

MO

1.10 0032 0.78 1.45 0538 TH 1416 0.49 TH 1242 0615 1.92 2215 1.64 2017

5

19

0.92 1.51 0.43 1.66

20

0110 0.93 0.91 1.38 0803 1.76 0.47 SU 1318 1.54 2100 0.37

5 0622

20

18 4 TU

2

0053 0012 0607 0627 1300 SA 2039 1232

19

0154 1.80 0.98 2001

3

TU

0251 1.33 0931 SU 1309 0.60 MO 1501 0057 2058 1.01 1.54 2206

16

0.47 SA 1803 1.73 1.86 2343 0.90

0550 1.89 0446 1151 1139 0.61 1102 0.48 0006 0.95 0605 1.66 0011 0.35 0.88 0504 1.75 0534 181.77 3 0529 1.89 3 1131 1204 0.34 1.45 18 0638 1816 1747 31.89 1142 MO 1903 SU 0.43 MO 1.40 1211 0.72 1930 1.79 1211 0.37 1828 1.78 SA WE0.95 FR TU 1857 SU 2347 2326 0.88 1932 1.60 1954 1.62 2358 0.92

2

1.49 0.36 1.81 0.86

1.04 0042 0504 1.75 1.39 0705 1131 MO0.43 0.91 1250 1.60 2003 1828 1.78

4

1.08 2358 0.92 0200 1.46 0854 1.04 1422 TU 0521 1.63 1.64 2115

5

17 1146

18190605 1204

0154 0.93 0914 1.46 0.82 TU 1407 2105 1.68 WE 1930

0.92 1.57 0.96 1.72

m m

1.51 1.92 0.69 0.27 1.81 0.94 2.06 0.79 1.50

0.90 SU 1908 1.76

0528 1124 0046 1.44 1838 0754 0.64 TU18 1244 1.69 MO 2355 2006

17

Local Time LAT 38° 46ʼ S LONG 143° 41ʼ E Times and Heights of High and Low Water APRIL JUNE

20 0305 1021

1.80 0.28 1.01 1.93 1.54 1.10 0.85 1.73

1.06 1.66 1.64 0.34 1.27 1.72 1.79

1.04 1.79 1542 1.33 WE 0036 0.92 2201 1.72

Time

Time m

m Time

0015 0558 0443 1.58 1.63 1130 0.84 0730 0.33 1.86 TU 1213 MO 1825 1058 1857 1800 1.84

1

1

16

WE

2337 0.85 0.85 0104 2 0028 0722 1.65 17 0841

m

Time Time

1 16 0446 1040 0.95 1.69 1.22 1.83

TH

0.97 1.77 TU 1234 1.03 WE 1315 1.37 1.53 1917 0504 1.83 1948 1.75

0005 0717 WE 1216 1840 1800

2320 0100

2 0831

TH 1327 0534 1935 1131 0.32 1122 0159 0.95 0.81 0202 1842 1.71 1853 3 0131 18 3 0944 1.86 0849 1.78 0942 TH FR

2

17

TH 1438 1.44 2048 1.67

WE 1357 1.18 2020 1.80

0006 190.88 4 3 0011 0529 1.45 18 0638

0240 1005 TH 1524 2128 FR

4

FR 1453 2043

0342 1109 FR 1638 2233

5

0254 0.73 1038 1.94 1.23 FR 1604 2147 1.77 1211 0.37

1932 1.60 0.61 0345

0.88 1.95 1.41 1.60 SA

0.76 2.09 1126 2.02 1.19 SA 1713 1.31 0053 0.93 1.75 2241 1.55

20

0308 1045 SA 1617 2154 1211

1954 0410

5 1145

SU 1728 0110 2300 0709 1.60 0648 1.51 0607 1.38 0803 1212 0.74 1216 0.49 0547 1.71 1203 0.39 0416 1.05 1.09 0156 1.16 0321 1.15 0238 1.08 0.99 0116 1.01 0400 0.97 0316 0.83 0437 0.48 0430 0.62 0506 210.55 6 0228 21 0122 1247 0.43 1300 0.47 1318 1849 61.63 1924 1.79 6 0603 1243 1915 61.66 0926 1.33 0910 1.31 0846 0.42 1.36 21 1046 0739 0622 1.44 21 6 21 6 WE 1319 TH SA SU SA1.68 SU21 TU 1.40 WE 1.61 1205 2.20 1210 2.07 1237 1115 1.94 1021 1.77 1457 0.70 1444 1.70 0.70 TU 1631 1.10 TU 1355 0.50 TH 1414 0.48 FR 1536 0.55 SA1.65 MO FR 1330 0.41 1.12 SU 1805 1.20 1657 1.66 1.32 WE 1549 1.02 TH SA 1741 2039 MO 1825 2105 2029 1.54 2100 2009 2327 1.62 2248 1.55 2211 1.62 2302 1.71 2141 1.78 2232 1.58 2134 1.49

4

19

4

0600 22 7 220029 1050 0653 1704 SA SU MO 1302 1959 1.63 2030 0412 1.21 0458 1.10 0033 0231 0840 WE 1500 2250

5

23 0955

20

8

1.43 1015 1.20 1636 0.37 TH 1614 0.48 0051 SA1.13 2357 1.80

23 0708

19

4

0153 22 7 0354 7 1030 0806 1610 TU 2312 TH 1416 WE 2215 1.78 2121 1.60 1.66 0628 1.02 0405 1.05 0453

1.10 0502 0221 1.06 0.95 0103 1.11 1.29 1039 0652 1.29 1.81 SA 1439 0.45 0600SU1.58 0.57 1642 2358 2252 1.51 0.49 1322 0.52

5

1.09 1.32 0.78 1.60

20

23

8

8 1142

1.00 1200 1.43 0936 1.23 0.48 MO 1801 0.81 SU 1207 1.33 0122 1.09 SU 1607 0156 1.16 1815 0.56 2359 1.60

21

0123 0056 1.83 0144 1.24 0704 0712 1.01 0643MO1.60 1300 SA 1220 1.37 1843 1824 1415 0.71 TU0.40

25

7

10

2221 1.69 1.87 0207 0.90 0750 1358 SU 1318 1.41 TU 0259 1.29 1916 0.39 1938

26 0145 0756

11

8 0705

1.47 1.91 0247 1513120.63 27 0228 WE0.82 0831 0832 1450 MO 1408 1.48 2321WE1.74 2003 0.41

9

13

29 0335 0936

1.80 0206 0231 0.85 0810 0840 1.39 TU 1400 0.27 1955 WE 1500

2225

1.91 0.74 1.55 0.28

0240 262250 0839

1.98 0403 0.72 0954 1630 WE 1532 1.65 FR1.81 0015 2126 0.54 2205

14

1.82 0053 1.19 0.84 1.55 TU 0630 1.57 1250 0.60 1830 0.50 FR

10

7

1.78 1.90 0140 0.78 0717 1442 1.71 1350 WE WE 0412 1.21 2035 0.65 1928

11

23 0955

21

0133 1.73 0316 1.17 0731 0.82 0700WE1.31 1348 1.54 1941 0.47 1522 0.43

25

2337 1.62 1.87 0206 0.69 0800 1.76 TH 1427 0458 1.10 0.50 2020

26

8 1015

2428

2.09 0.46 1.93 0.56

2020 0.55

2113 0.70

2.06 0335 0603 0.54 0937 1111 1.84 FR 1557 0.44 2148 FR 1724

29 0400 1006

1.99 0300 1.13 0.66 1.37 FR 0845 1.92 1531 0.75 2108 0.44 SU

13

9

1.99 0339 0.60 0926 1633 1.96 SA SA 1618 0056 1.83 2222 0.80 2153

14

1.79 0048 0600 0629 0.88 1050 1330 1.76 FR 1906 0.84SA 1704

2210

1.87 0.81 1.92 0.86

11 0130 0713

23 1228

1.96 TH 1821 1.08

6

7

26

28

1744 0.30 2.05 0329 0.37 0927 2.15 1612 SU1.80 0123 0.67 2204

29

21

2039 0.77

1915 1.07

1.64 25 1.09 0.46 1.32 2.21 0.78 0.98 2358 0126 1.60 1.61

22

26 0708

0.37 2.18 TU 1429 1.02 2027 0.91

0628 1.23 23 1200

2413

1.89 0.53 2.11 0.84

2046 0.88

1.89 0227 1.74 0.25 0819 0.91 2.22 TU 1525 0.77 2118 1.44 MO

28

9

1910 0.57 1.80 0257 0.25 0854 1629 1.82 2.10 WE 1601 TU 0206 2200 0.78 2149

14 0328 0918

29

2107 0.81

1.69 0532 0.95 0304 0.36 0855 1137 1.34 2.11 WE 1606 0.84 1727 0.47 2146

13

1.61 0346 0.31 0937 2.01 1647 0053 TH1.73 0.83 2227

14

2101 0.86

24280052 0702

1.70 1.55 0.31 0.95 2.06 1.59 0.84 1857 0.83 0318 1.53

1.68 0239 0.30 0829 2.09 TH 1544 TU 1301 0.80 2136 1.62 0.39 1.98 0.82

29 0910

1621 0133 FR 2212 0553 1.14 0712 1.01 0704 0.85 0810 0.84 0630 0.82 0731 0327 1.54 2.00 0440 2.07 0415 2.01 0355 1.83 0406 1.69 0430 1.56 1348 0400 1119151.30 1300 1400 1250151.54 FR0.68 SA 1220 1.37 15 1006 MO 0.30 TU 0.31 WE 30 0404 301.39 1008 1032 0.40 0957 0.44TU15 0959 1.57 0.30 30 0930 30 1019 0.52 0953 1718 1.97 1646 2.06 1713 0.60 1.95 TH 1639 1.90 1713 SA0.38 1824 0.40 SU 1704 2.14 1843MO0.27 1955 1830 FR0.47 1941 TH 1612 1.72 WE 1730 1.88 SA 1700

10

2203 0.64

0102 0431 2.01 1039 0.65 0649 FR 1651 1.77 1222 2239 SA0.74

31 11

25

2248 0.68

1.87 1.01 1.31 1805 0.26

0145 0756 SU 1318 1916

26

10

1.87 0.90 1.41 0.39

2235 0.73

25

2236 0.83

0207 1.91 0419 310.74 1027 0750 TU 1722 2306 TU 1358 1.55 1938 0.28

11

1.73 0.37 1.96 0.83 WE

26

10

2239 0.81

0240 0839 1442 2035

1.90 0.78 1.71 0.65

2222 0.83

0140 0717 WE 1350 1928

11

© Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteorology 0228 1.91 0247 2.00Predictions 0309 0221 0145 Astronomical 1.93 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Tide Caution: are of1.96 secondary quality 0.82 0.63 when 0908 0801 0735 Times are in local standard time 0.88 (UTC +10:00)0831 or daylight savings time0832 (UTC +11:00) in effect0.72 1.48Quarter 1.37 Moon Phase Symbols Full Moon Moon MO 1408 First Last Quarter WE 1450 1.71 TH 1520 1.83 TH 1443 SU 1316New

12

12

27

2003 0.41

1857 0.18

0228 0816 MO 1407 1947

13

1.99 0.77 1.45 0.16

0303 0904 TU 1452 2046

28

1.94 0.76 1.56 0.46

27

2030 0.34

0327 0914 TH 1540 2119

13

14 0308 0858

29 0335 0936

14 0403 0954

15 0346 0937

30 0404 1008

15 0440 1032

2.03 0.68 TU 1456 1.54 2037 0.20

2.05 0.62 WE 1545 1.62 2126 0.30

1.98 0.72 WE 1532 1.65 2126 0.54 2.00 0.68 TH 1612 1.72 2203 0.64

31 0431 1039

2.01 0.65 FR 1651 1.77 2239 0.74

2.06 0.54 1.84 0.44

2.09 0.46 FR 1630 1.93 2205 0.56

2.07 0.40 SA 1718 1.97 2248 0.68

12

2113 0.70

0335 0937 FR 1557 2148

28

29 0400 1006

1.99 0.66 1.92 0.75

1.99 0.60 SA 1633 1.96 2222 0.80

25

2307 0.87

1.87 0.69 1.76 0.50

26

13

0.37

1.99 1.79 0.83 0.88 1.53 1.76 0.48 0.84 1.94

2250 0.84

0206 0452 31 1039 0800 1740 SU TH 1427 2334 2020

2330 1.51

0528 0154 0.38 0513 0.48 0.98 1255 2.25 1250 2.11 0622 1.33 SU 1836 1.03 MO 1847 1.08

7 8

5

7 20 0251 0931

22

0001 0600 TU 1324 1915 1501

SU 1309 0.60 MO 1.54 2206 0026 2058 1.70 0015 1.50 0055

23

8 0649

21

1.87 1.55 0.64 0.81 1.90 1.92 0.85 0.86

2012 0.89

2005 0.91

2038

0504 0.90 1.64 0144 1.54 0230 10 0354 0.32 25 0727 0.30 10 0823 1144 1030 1.54 2.15 TH 1447 2.12 FR 1520 1610 0.74 0.84 2043 0.85 2116 WE 1733 2346 1.74 0245 2312 1.62 0228 1.57 0315

22

7

0200 0751 WE 1504 2054 TU

11 0837

26

0.40 0814 0.36 2.08 FR 1525 2.10 TH 1544 0453 0.77 2133 0.83 2119 0.82

8 1142

1.78 0330 1716 1.61 0315 0.75 12WE 0920 0.51 27 0900 FR 1622 2.03 2213 0.83

1.62 TH 0.47 SA 1602 2.08 2158 0.79

1.85 1.61 0404 13 0417 1001 0.67 28 0945 9 0003 0543 0.63

11 0905

23 0539 1228

SA 1553 2152

0401 1821 12 0945 SU 1624 2228

0023 1.66 0451 0.62 1023 0611 SA 1700 1.99 SU 1639 2.06 MO 1652 2.01 TH 1240 FR 1305 2252 0.86 2236 0.76 2302

14 0511 1043

1814 0.76

1.62 0500 0.85 1031 1.95 MO 1716 1.93 SU 1736 0048 2332 0.91 2318

29

24 13 1.71 0.79 2.02 0.74

1900

14 0546 1101

0055 TU 1716 2338 0629 0.49 0641 1.64 0605 1.76 0648 1330 2.18 1340 FR SA 15 0615 30 15 1125 1.04 1120 0.97 1143 0.76 1938 1.90 TU 1756 1.96 MO 1815 1906 WE 1736

10

25

11 0130 0713

26 0126 0713

1.97 0.38 SA 1416 2.27 1954 0.77

SU 1415 2013

© Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteorolog 0211 Tide 1.95 0157 1.98 of Predictions 0235 is1.91 Datum Lowest Astronomical 0745 tim 0.56 are in local 0829 0.72time (UTC0756 Times standard +10:00)0.30 or daylight savings 1501 2.28 First 1449 1.95Phase 1502 2.03 NewSU MO Quarter FRSymbols Moon Moon

27

2020 0.55

0300 0845 FR 1531 2108

2332 1.73

6

1.43 1.00 1.91 0211 1.95 0157 1.75 0223 1.75 1801 1.57 0.81 1207 1607120.48 MO27 0202 SU12 SU 0.45 0756 1.33 0.30 27 0745 0.72 0812 0.26 0747 0.31 1501 0.56 2.28 MO 1449 2.18 2.03 SU 1815 2359 TU1.60 1525 2.20 WE 1506 2.12

1.92 0249 0126 0.63 0837 0741 2.10 MO 1545 0.85 2121 MO 1310

19

2.16 0616 0.31 0556 0.37 1836 1.08 1.17 2.25 TU 1330 2.12 SA MO 1341 0228 0238 0.99 1926 0.95 1927 0.98

1.85 0502 0049 0.33 1039 0630 2.33 MO 1351 0.89 1951 SU 1642

11

8 0936

23 1238

4

WE 1406 0416 1959 0910 1.31 0846 1.36 1046 0115 1.67 0100 1.51 0145 1.85 0013 1.68 1457 0.70 1444 0.70 1631 SA MO TU 9 24 9 24 0.42 0553 0.59 0704 0.29 0641 0.31 0738 2.30 SU 1315 1.55 2.21 2.21 WE 1409 2.13 2248 1.62 2302 TU 1424 2211 TH 1445

1850 0.94

1.93 0055 1.82 1.10 0221 1.06 0058 0.49 25 0641 0.68 10 0642 1.29 0652 1.29 2.18 SA 1340 2.18 SU 1359 0.76 1938 0.57 1439 0.45 1939 SA 0.99 2252 1.51 1.97 0126 1.80 0142

0.87 22 1.00 2.07 1.38 1.25 1.70 0.57 2136 0518 1.57 0.73

20

0.55 1224 2.18 1758 FR 1.01 0.98

8

2250 1.71

0442 0.70 0124 1200 2.00 0747 1752 1.02 FR 2333 1.82 FR 1340

1.81 0.38 0713 0.56 0727 0.27 1416 2.27 SU 1415 2.21 SA 1443 MO 0033 0405 1.05 2.29 1954 1.66 0.77 2013 0.93 2025 0.85

2057 0.86

0302 2.04 0034 1.70 0858 0.46 0612SA0.98 1537 2.09 2131 0.61 1153 1.26

2221 1.77

0417 70.96 1129 1.51 TH 1659 2319 0.38 1.55 0508

1.15 0116 1.33 0603 1.40 1.85 0023 1.81 0011 0.55 1330 90.41 0.63 24 0611 FR 0.80 0556 2.01 FR 1305 2.10 1314 1.62 2134 1.49 SA 0.76 1900 1.05

1.20 23 0708

1.43 2.00 0309 1.96 1.98 0235 1614 0.48 12 0221 1636 270.37 TH27 SA 0.56 0801 0.63 0908 0.72 0829 1.71 TH 1520 1.83 2357 1.80 TH 1443 1.95 FR 1502

2030 0.34

0327 0303 1.94 0434 1.25 0914 0904 0.76 0950 TH1.34 1540 TU 1452 1.56 2119 2046 1615 0.52 TH0.46

28

6

5

1.78 WE 1716 0.75

0321 0926 0739 1.68 0622 1.44 0630 1.72 0603 1.13 0532 0.95 0034 1.70 0126 1.74 0052 1.70 1355 0.50 9 1137 1414 1328 90.75 24 1111 240.48 9 0003 0543 0612 0.98 0741 0.91 0702 0.95FR 1536 TU24 TH 1.34 MO1.37 1240 1153 1.26 MO 1310 1.44 1301 1.59 FR 1724 0.44 MO 1727 0.47 TU1.58 TH 2327 2141 1.78 2232 2114SU1.65 1814 1744 0.30 1910 0.57 1857 0.83

6

0504 0.99 0.90 1.10 0032 1.54 22 1144 1.79 1.45 0538 0.74 WE 1733 1.10 1.74 2346 1.77 0.49 TH 1242 1.64 2017 0.77 0539 0.90

19

2.04 0.46 2.09 0.61

12

2039 0.77

2057 0.86

0302 0858 SA 1537 2131

28

1.92 0.63 2.10 0.85

0249 0837 MO 1545 2121

13

1.89 0.25 2.22 0.77

28

29 0329 0927

14 0328 0918

29 0257 0854

15 0415 1006

30 0355 0957

15 0406 0959

30 0327 0930

2.01 0.30 SU 1704 2.14 2235 0.73

1.83 0.44 MO 1646 2.06 2236 0.83

1.80 0.25 TU 1629 2.10 2200 0.78

2046

0227 0819 TU 1525 2118

14 0339 0926

2.05 0.37 SA 1618 2.15 2153 0.67

1.89 0.53 SU 1612 2.11 2204 0.84

27

1.69 0.30 WE 1713 1.95 2239 0.81

WE 1601 2149 TH 1639 2222

31 0419 1027

1.73 0.37 TU 1722 1.96 2306 0.83

© Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteorology Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide Caution: Predictions are of secondary qua Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect Moon Phase Symbols Full Moon New Moon First Quarter Last Quarte

Otway Life Almanac 2019


SEPTEMBER

Time

– VICTORIA m

15 30 13 57

0.95 1.69 1.22 1.83

04 41 15 48

0.97 1.77 1.37 1.75

59 44 38 48

0.95 1.86 1.44 1.67

54 38 04 47

0.88 1.95 1.41 1.60

45 26 13 41

0.76 2.02 1.31 1.55

30 10 05 30

0.62 2.07 1.20 1.51

m

LAT 38° 46ʼ S LONG 143° 41ʼ E Times and Heights of High and Low Waters APOLLO OCTOBER BAY – VICTORIA NOVEMBER

Time m Time 41ʼ m E m LONG 143° 46ʼTime S APOLLO BAY – VICTORIA 0059 2.10 0446 0.81 0115 1.97 0244 0.58 0446 0.80 Times and Heights of HighLAT and 38°Low 46ʼ S Waters LONG 143° 41ʼ E 1129 1.69 0712 1.06 0632 0.95 1035 1.59 1144 1.68 Local Time Times and Heights of High and Low Waters MARCH JANUARY 1.73 WE 1609 1.00 TH 1734 0.93 FEBRUARY FR 1727 0.77 SU 1305 1.75 MO 1240 Time

m

1

0.58 1.68 1.04 1.41 Time

2 16 1

1

2

16

20201

Time LATm38°

17 116

16

2

17

17

16

Time

2

11 17 1616 2

16

1

17

1

12

116 17

116

216

2

17

2

17

2020 2020 Time

m

m

16 2020

0130Time 2.12 Time 2.07 Local Local 0713 0.93 1.09 Local Time APRIL 1.54 1.55 WE 1300 1851 0.16 0.52 TimeDECEMBER m Time Time m Time mm 2.11 0443 2.13 2.10 0130 0446 2.12 01260218 2.07 1.63 0.95 0713 0.93 0737 1.09 0.98 1058 0803 0.82 0.33WE 1.73 1300 1040 1.54 1258 1.55 1.52 TU TH 0.32 1851 1800 18411352 0.52 1800 1.841.54 WE TH 0.16 0.39 2337 1941 0.850.12 2.22 0201 2.11 0218 2320 2.13

1 1 17

1616

2

17

1021 1.84 1014 1.64 0725 0.87 0811 0.98 0803 0.82 0831 1.89 0858 1.80 1200 1.76 1128 1.72 1212 1.79 0553 0.79 0750 1.02 0233MO2.27 2.11 WE 13340302 0548 0.611.37 SU 0508 1.83 1.99 0225 1600 0.56 1.20 MO 1530 0031 1.18 1329 1.73 1.52 2.11 1805 0.95 0115 0.88 1807 0.862.16 1337 1.75 TU0236 TH 1352 1.54 TH 1327 1.26 FR 1332 WE TH 1704 SA 1234 1.79 0550 FR1.89 1.80 1.530.74 0501 2.04 0517 1.92 0500 1.86 0.80 2130 1.85 1.47 2044 0626 1.28 1913 0.20 19150849 0.39 1941 0534 0.12 1935 1.79 2345 1.53 1.57 1815 0.61 1923 0528 0.62 0814 0844 0.88 0504 1245 1802 1.851.601.961214 0.86 06482326 0.77 0825 0.950446

18 0.48 17 11243 0.28 2 18 3 2 1104 18 3 18 17 1151 30.35 2 1102 1131 0.32 17 1122 1139 0.61 0.70 17 1056 0.53 1246 21.86 TH 1410 1.49 FR 1441 1.53 TH 1841 0.89 FR 1749 0.74 SA SU 1319 1.87 TU 1408 1.72 WE 1415 1.70

0202 0942 FR 1453 2043

3

0.61 1.96 1.30 1.69

0151 0.73 17061.821.60 TH 0957 SA 1459 22541.360.67MO 1845 1.46

3

18

0040 1.67

0350 0.47 0314 0.49 0548 0.61 0508 0.56 0031 1.83 0115 1903 1.89 1726 1.75 1816 1.77 1245 1.85 1.85 0626 0.86MO 0648 1124 1111 1836 1.71 SU MO FR 1.86 0.79 18591214 0.46 1954 0.501747 1841 0.89 1319 1722 1.10 1648 1.08 TU 0.61 TH2347 FR 1749 0.74 SA 1246 1.86 SU2326 2258 0.95 1836 0.79 1859 2243 1.46 2226 1.32

18

3

0024 1.79

18

0111 1.98

3

0203 2.17

18

0258 2.18

1.99 0225 1.89 0.13 0.77 0825 TU 1959 1.87 TU 1408 0.88 0.46 1954

3

0317 2.23

0233 2.16 1838 1.93 0814 0.95 1952 1415 1.72 WE0.85 2355 1959 0.50

18

2.27 0236 2.11 0302 1.710.14 0.80 08442030 0.88 0849 TH 1842 FR 0.29 1.70 TH 1410 1.49 FR 1441 0.13 1952 0.29 2030

3

0311 2.08

18

0344 2.06

2.11 1853 0.74 1.53 0.14

m

1.58 0.39 1.81 0.87 1.48 0.54 1.69

0317 2.23 03110933 2.08 0344 0006 2.06 004019 1.67 1.79 0111 1.980.890504 0455 0.57 0.44 0421 0.43 0258 0605 2.18 4 1.66 0012 4 0011 0.880.69 0538 2.00 0534 1.83 0529 1.934 1.75 40.74 192.170900 40.5306353 0250 19 4 0804 40.91 0915 0.80 19 0.650.63 0602 0.88 07390024 0.76 0859 19 0203 4 0308 0933 0.69 1051 1.85 0602 0.57 0804 0.88 3 0739 0.76 1045 2.02 19 1220 1.90 19 1200 1.80 34 0635 0.65 1918 0859 0.89 19 0900 0.74 3 4 0915 0.80 1918 18 0627 1.76 1.451.54 0638 1135 0.50 1415 1.89 1210 0.58 0.43 18 1.66 1204 0.34 1445 1.47 05291528 1320 1138 1.92 0.721255 1.96 1401 1.90 1437 1.671131 1458

0.95 1.40 0.72 1954 1.62 2.01

TH1.90 WE 1437 1.67FRTH 1458 1.66 FRSA SU 0.97 WE 1445 1.47 SA 1528 1.54 1.92 SA 1255 1.96 1.25 SU 1624 1.27 SA TU 1818 1.01 WE 1740 FR 1320 MO SU 1415 1.89 MO 1401 SA 1617FR 2348 1.49 2333 2005 1.44 MO 2045 0.11 20302117 0.23 2117 0.22 1913 0.84 0.61 2005 0.710.40 1942 0.32 2154 1.62 2025 1930 0.40 1232 0.37 1.79 0.370.22 1822 1.78 1907 1.72 1753 1.78 0.11 1913 0.841.391.621831 0.71 19421831 0.32 2025 2045 2030 0.23 TU WE FR 1211 SA 1211 SA 0.61 FR 2145 TU 1828

0410 1145 SU 1728 2300

5

0.44 2.07 1.15 1.58

2342 0.78 23300.520.83 0551 0.44 0348 0520 0.39 1141 1.89 1306 1.99 1.94 1245 0246 1.91 0.93 TH 1824 0840 MO 1728 1.16 WE 1902 0.61 0615 1.92 0.86 2252 1.38

20 1.80 50115 5 0125 0717 0554 0.71 20 1.890653

20

5 0125

1.80

20 20

2001 0115 1.99

0246 51.80

2.08

0.92 0330 0249 2.27 202358 5

2.14

520

1932 1.60 0424 0400 2.15 0346 2.03 2.03 0.70 09470424 0.75 2.01 1014 0.67 1.60 1521 1.45 1.54 SA SU 1614 0110 0.75 0053 1014 0.930.67 0.15 2110 0.23 2202 0.35

13 0.48 50 2.11 47 1.08

0400 2.15 0346 2.08 2.27 0330 0717 0.71 02490653 0.61 0840 0.892.14 0827 0.74 0943 0930 0.82 1351 1.98 0827 2.02 1443 1.890.82 1442 1.88 1541 1507 1.61 FR0947 SA0023 TU0521 0943 0.89 0.74 0930 0057 MO1.01 0036 0.92 1.04SU 1333 1.63 TH0.70 1945 0.78 1913 0.49 2035 0.63 2024 0.22 2130 2059 0.31 1521 1.98 0.74 1442 1.88 1507 1.611203 FR 1541 SA 1.51 SA 1351 1212 SU 1333 2.02 MO 1443 1.89 0709 TH 1.60 1216 0.49 0547 TU 1.71 0.39 1.60 0648 0205 1.92 20240204 2.13 0320 2.130.31 0334 2.28 0442 0404 2.06 0506 0.37 0443 0045 0.49 1.57 0031 2035 1.61 2130 0.15 2110 1945 0.780.411.631913 0.63 0.22 2059 1319 0.42 1247 0.43 1849 1924 1.79 1243 0.55 1915 1.66 WE TH SA SU TU WE 1237 2.09 1226 1.95 0756 0.78 0742 0.65 0915 0.87 0913 0.72 1024 1002 0.78 0642 0.48 0614 0.40 1419 2.01 2.03 1509 1.86 WE 1521 1.82 1624 1.54 SA1.66 SU2009 FR 1536 2029 MO 1825 1.05 TU 1815 1.04 TH 1346 1.99 FR 1324 2.01 2105 TU1.70 1.65MO 1411 0442 2.04 0422 0205 2349 1.921.42 0204 2.13 2.28 0404 1941 2.13 0.87 1905 0320 0.75 2015 0.73 03341955 0.39 2105 0.542.06 2107 0.17 2215 2132 0.27 1024 0.68 1020 0756 0.78 0742 0.65 0915 0.87 0913 0.72 1002 0.78 0242 2.00 0353 2.13 0418 2.20 1.96 0533 0124 1.77 0524 0001 1.57 0153 1.10 1.00 00090.330.99 0134 1.66 0029 0.95 0103 1.11 0251 2.19 0032 0.96 0440 0124 1624 1.54 1419 1308 2.012.01MO 1411 1.86 1.82 1536 0832 WE 0.83 15210827 0.70 0948 0.851.54 0955 0728 2.03 0.55 0705 0.46 0600SU 0.34 0.76SU 1559 1105 SA0.71 TU 1509 FR 0806 WE 1.45 0615 1.811955 0653SA 1.81 0600 1.58 0538 1.51 1033 1445 2.00 1.99 1534 1.790.27 1421 0.39 2.03 1402 2105 2.08 1606 0747 1.47 SU1.38 1710 MO TU 1447 TH 1600 1.73 WE 1857 TU 1324 2.09 2215 SA0.25 2150 2015 0.730.94 FR 0.54 2107 0.17 2132

15 56 30 27

1.50 0.37 2.12 0.98

0242 0055 1.58 0649 0.36 0832 WE 1406 2.09 TH 1445 MO0.89 1959

00 41 09 05

1.51 0.31 2.13 0.91

44 27 47 43

1.54 0.30 2.12 0.85

28 14 25 19

1.57 0.36 2.10 0.82

15 00 02 58

6

19

4

21

6

1915 0.96

7

8

9 0145 0738

21

22 5

7

6

21

7 20

22

5

4

6

6

57

21

19

5

21

6

2220

7

20

4

19

21

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522

21

6

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720

6

4

5 20

20

19 0803

1.45 0607 SU 1614 1.381.54

2.04 04222202 1.97 0.35 0.23 0.47 0502 SU 0.68 SA 1300 1020 0.73 1053 1.54 1559 1.45 SU 2039 1.54MO 1701 1.97 0.25 21500502 0.29 1.96 2245

6

21

21 1053

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0458 1.92 1.92 0154 0.98 0539 1.45 MO 10531701 0.73 1.56 0.70 1131 0622 1.330.52 1.46 1.49 TU 1754 0.29 MO 16392245 2231 0.41 2258 0.40SU 1309 2326 0.57 0.60 MO

22

57

23 0624 0810 22 80827 0.830.31

23

7

8

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87

23

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723

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1.96 1318 0.67 1.56 2100 0.52

1.04 1.39 0.91 1.60

1.92 2220 0251 0.70 0931

2045 0.67 2135 0.45TH 1242 2150 0.16 1946 0.66 WE 1322 0.28 1416 0.49 1302 0.49 0.52 2035 0.38 2208 TH 0.31 FR 1340 SU 1248 0.75 2016 MO 0.83 2215 1.64 1.57 1.541.92 1959 2030 1.78 2121 1.60 1.55 1.92 0458 1.92 2058 2.001.501.630251 2.13 04180336 2.20 0440 0524 0318 2.03 2.17 0427 2.061.962017 0218 2.19 1.75 0215 0353 1.91 0042 0501 2.08 0515 2136 1.85 0607 1.82 05320539 1.87 0615

23

1.08 1.46 1.04 2206 1.64 1.88 1.57 0.72 1501

1105 0.77 11291131 0.74 0.70 0907 0.87 09550910 0.74 1020 0.830.76 1036 0.72 1146 0.74 1210 0.75 1053 0.73 0.85 0.71 1033 1105 0.70 1640 1.63 1637 0238 1.42 MO1.08 1725 1.47 1508 1.95 1.90 1600 1.69 FR0116 1803 1.45 1.60 TU0156 TH 0321 SA 1.15 0228 0.99WE 1855 0416 1.05 1.16WE 1524 1.01 SU1.49 1.46 TU 1.79 1.73 1606 1710 SU0.21 TU 2245 0.34MO 1639 2341 0.59 23151754 0.57 1.57 2115 TH 0.60 16002116 0.26 2206 0.391.47 2232 0926 1.33 08462326 1.360.72 1046 1.61 0739 1.68 2135 0.45 0622 1.44 0630 1.722035 0.31 0603 2258 1.40 0.40 0910 1.31 2045 0.67 2150 0.16 2231 0.41 2208 0.28 0354 2.01 0501 1.95 0300 1.83 0304 2.01 1.60 0131 1.60 0546 1.92 0553 1.75 0652 1.75 0608 1.83 0007 0.92 0423 2.09

6

0.65 0754 0948 0.54 0.70 1439 2.12 1348 2.06 SA 1452 2.06 0122SU 1.09 0051 2.000.861.13 TU 1447 WE 1534 2050 1.99 0.80 2027 0.57 1937

21

6

21

21

6

21

6

1536 0.55 0.70 0.70 0649 1355 0.50 0.48 0951 13280.350.75 0849 0.41 1140 FR 0.78 SA 1457 TU 1631 TU 0.75 1230 0.82MO 1444 0941 0.90 1051 0.82FR 1330 0841 0.65 TH 1414 0.42 MO 0715 1116 0.74 0.80 1208 0.74 1.82 0318 2.032.111.65SU 0336 2.06 0607 0501 2.08 0515 0532 1.87 WE 1911 1.44 1530 1.87 1623 1.591.85 1520 2.17 2.07 1515 0427 2.10 1722 1.52 1713 2248 1.39 TU1.55 18240615 1.50 0.80 1.78 2327 FR1.62 2211 1.621.88 2141MO 1.78 2232 1.58 2114 1.49MO1.82 WE TH 1445 2.08 FR 1427 SA2134 TH 1251 2302 TH 1601 2145 0.55 2237 0.35 2123 0.77 2106 0.49 2038 0.85 2017 0.79 2315 0.31 2326 0.46 2006 1.63 2157 0.26 0907 0.87 0910 0.74 1020 0.83 1146 0.74 1210 0.75 1036 0.72 1105 0.77 1129 0.74

9

24

8

9

24

23

8

9

24

23

24

8

9

23

24

9

8

23

24

1.10 1.71

1508 0221 1.951.701.24 1.69 1803 16400511 1.63 1637 1725 1.47 0354 0231 1.19 0316 1.17 0600 SU 1.10 0.901.60 0144 1.06 1.45 0342 1.90 1.88 0353 2.05 0028 0.81 0052 0504 1.12 0431 FR 1.94 1.95 0538 1.821.420221 0635 0633 0502 1.67TU 1.09 00021855 0.76 TU1.64 WE 1524 TH 1600 MO1.77 WE 10 0230 25 102116 25 1.55 10 2522 0645 1.78 0823 0.52 0927 0.26 0.85 0925 2206 0.75 7 0743 1.69 0726 1144 1.74 1014 0.92 1031 0.83 1122 0.830.34 1159 0.80 1220 1039 0.84 251.32 22 7101030 7 0804 7250652 2341 0.59 2115 0.600.441.60 0.39 2232 0.21 2245 2315 0.57 0840 0700 1.31 1050101.29 1.542522 0643 1.291022 FR 1520 2.08 2116 0.83

SA 1504 2.13 MO 1545 2.05 TU 1550 2.04 1500 0.50 14150.730.71 2155 2145 0.43 WE 0.74 TU 2056

0.99 1.79 1.10 2346 1.77 1.28

TH 1549 1.75 FR 1640 1.64 SA 1645 1.49 SU 1812 1.43 TU 1803 1.37 WE 1322 0.90 TH 1255 0.74 FR 1336 0.83 0.43 2239 1704 0.57 0.74 WE 1943 1.55 2035 1.49 TU 1610 2118 1733 1.68 2215 0.50 2311 0.36SA 1439 0.45 FR 1522 SA 0.31 SU 1642 0.78

0354 2221 2.01 1.690423 2.09 0501 2250 1.78 1.90 0443 1051 2.03 0.78 1007 0.85 0.95 1623 1.78 WE2.07 SU 1541 FR 1626 TH 2.13 1608 1.99 SA 1553 TU WE 0259 1.29 0412 1.21 1.94 2226 0.39 2152 0.82 2226 0.26 0.71 2145 2135 0.550.671.472157 0705 0955 1.43 2237

1.95 0546 1.92 2337 1.62

0553 1.752252 0652 0608 1.83 23120007 1.60 1.740.92 1.51 1.75 2358 0123 1.04 0147 0.62 00590649 0.95 1208 0.74 1.82 1.63 0730 1.73 0840 1.65 0812 1.64 1824 1.50 1251 0.80 1245 0.88 1314 0.88 1352 0.71 MO TU WE TH 1427 0.95 0.83 1607 SA 1.63 1726 1.51 1709 1.40 TH SA FR0458 SA SU MO WE FR 0628 1.02 1.10 0033 1.66 0405 1.05 0453 0.77 1428 0539 0.90 1930 1.38 21152006 1.65 1.63 2158 1.59 2224 1.75 2247 0.47 23152324 0.40 2348 0.410.46 1919 1.36 0.35 0.31 2326 1200 1.43 1015 1.20 0708 1.00 0936 1.23 1142 1.78 1228 1.96 0401 1.73 0702 1.66 0050 0.67 0116 0.81 0244 1.23 0213 1.11 0308 1.37 0559 1.69 0707 1.57 0403 1.86 0508 1.88 0535 1.96 1801 0.81 1513 1614 0.48 1636 0.37 SU 1207 1.33 0.48 0.81 0.75 0916 1.08 MO WE 0937 TH 1.95 WE 1716 TH 1821 1.77 0633 1.671607 0028 0002 0.76 0431 1.940.710.630511 1.82 0830 1.58 0823 1.61 08270052 1.68 1.12 1119 0.99 06351201 1234 0.92SU 1049 0538 0.93 SA 0945 0.79 0.96 0942 1.63 1.53 1037 1.03 2321 2357TH 1.80 1815 MO0.56 1.60 TH1.69 1347 0.97 1425 0.87 FR0645 0.64 1.74 1744 1.340.84 1702 1122 1.80 1.39 1540 0.95 1627 0.83 1.90 SU 1624 2.06 SU 1827 TU2359 SU 1527 0.79 SA 1623 1.50 1159 MO 1615 0.80 1220 0743 1.78 SA 1458 0726 1014 0.922.101.74WE 1031 0.83 2046 1.36 2128 1.49 2235 1.79 2324 0.46 2214 0.62 2257 0.67 2307 0.39 2228 0.82 2307 1.74 2323 1.82 1812 1.43 1803 1.37 WE 1322 0.90 1255 0.74 FR 1336 0.83 1.75 FR 1640 1.64 SU TH 1.70 TH 1549 0434 SA 1645 1.49 0603 1.13 0532 0.95 1.49 1.851.68 1.81 0034 1.70 0017 0.54 0126 TU 1.74 0430 1.30 0455 0023 1.34 0659 1.57 0035 0.51 0159 0.88 0245 0052 0.97 03442118 1.18 0451 1.76 0558 0.31 1.82 0632 2311 1.86 2035 1943 1.55 0003 2215 0457 0.501.891.252239 0.36

0424 91.690941 0312 24 0951 0.901.79 11 0315 0905 0.64 26 0851 0.57 11 1002 1530 1.87 1601

26

1.62 0.47 2.08 0.79

12

12

04 45 39 36

1.66 0.62 2.06 0.76

13 1023

13 24

00 31 16 18

1.71 0.79 2.02 0.74

1.78 1.90 0655 1726 1607 1.631.00 SA14 14 0546 29 0556 1101FR 1.08 1106 1152

05 1.76 20 0.97 56 1.96

99

Local Time DECEMBER

0126 0737 TU 1258 OCTOBER SEPTEMBER 1.66 1853 0.74Time 1827 0.32NOVEMBER 1841 2215 AUGUST 1.37 m 2344 m m Time Time Time m Time m m Time Time m m Time m Time m Time m Time Time m Time m m Time Time m 0452 0016 0.590.831.980405 0.84 00180244 1.76 0147 2.22 0201 0151 0.58 0446 0.80 0059 0055 0542 0.58 0125 0.57 0.51 0337 0.58 0446 0.812.100424 0115 0451 1.97 0005 0.71 0425 2.06 0515 2.00 1.92 0430 0456 1.99 1.94 1144 1.68 0910 1.63 0914 1.84 0717 1.82 1035 1.59 0632 0754 1.79 1102 1.68 1129 1.69 0712 1.06 1200 1030 1.761.320.701128 1.72 1212 1.79 05531609 0.79 0725 0811 0750 1.02 1727 0.77 1016SU 0.57 1112 TH0.37 0.63 0.54 SU0.87 1350 1.22 1.00 1240 1718 1.04 1734 0.93 FR1034 1305 1045 1.75 MO0.27 WE WE 1216 1.14 TH 1230 SA 1416 1.25 TU1109 1805 1748 0.951.731.57 1704 1807 0.86 12342215 1.79 1329 1.73 1334 1337 WE1.88 TH FR TU MO 1.37 1747 1.38 2012 0.88 1.55 1840 1827 2238 SA 1.41 2344 1.661.751710 1853 1750 0.74WE 2.06 1634 1.70 1810 1.95 1624 1732 1.79 1.95 SA TH 1.57 WE 1.53 SU MO 1913 1915 2345 18150405 0.61 1923 SU 0.622255 2213 0.44 2330 0.80 0.79 22160.800.532326 2313 0.85 0.84 0.20 0236 0.50 0159 0.54 0147 0100 0.67 0100 0452 0.59 0.57 0542 0.84 0018 1.76 0151 2315 2.10

0337 ONG 143° 41ʼ E 1102 gh and Low Waters 1718 TU JULY 2238

me

Tides 2020

APOLLO BAY – VICTORIA

8

10

9

051224 1.82 11160603 1.80 0014 240.471230 0.82 9061911401.690.80 0000 0.82 0.74 11 1045 0.95 26 1114 0.88 11 1155 0.86 26 0729 1.65 11 0722 1.59 1722 1.52 1713 1.39 1911 1.44

926

27

12

27

12

28

913

28

913

23

27

25

28 9

10

23

8

25

23

8

27

12

10

27

2824

13

928

25

12

24 11

23

27

25

10

1324

26

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2824

1041 1.61 1.44 1200 1.03 0811 1.50 0937 1.57 1.62 0940 1.62 0.94 1021 1.10 1133 1.01 1111 1.37 09500.861.34 1114 1137 1.34 0936 0543 0.63 1026 0611 0612 0.98 0809 1.57 0741 0.91 0702 0.95 1330 0.97 WE 1524 1.02 1544 0.79 SA 1642 0.89 SU 1647 1.40 MO 1310 1.04 SU 1605 0.52 MO 1624 0.70 MO 1652 2.02 TU 1651 2.03 TH 1642 1.77 FR 1745 1.66 1724 0.44 1615 0.47 FR1.04 2.011.28FR 1305 1153 1.26 1310 TU1.44 1.59 0123 00001950 0.47 0014 0.621727 0059 0.95 0512 1.820.570.520603 1.69 FR 1.80 TH 2254 TH 1240 MO TU 1301 1.33 1854 1.29MO 2216 1.46 2258 1.69 23430147 1.94 2302 0.83 2330 0.64 2354 0619 0.42 SU

11 1045

0.95

26 1114

11 1155

0.88

260.300729 1744 0.86

191011 0.57 1.65 0722

1.63 26 0840

11 0.83 1.65 1857 0730

0134 0.69 0345 1.03 0420 1.03 0003 0010 0.49 0140 0.65 1.74 0734 1.75 1427 0.95 1.51 0.88 1314 1.40 1.55 1046 1.66FR 1352 0600 0814 MO 1.50 12450921 1.500.88 1044 1.16 1226 1.08 TH1.60 WE0930 SU 1709 1.06 1656 0.99 1647 0133 0.65 SU1.79 1133 1300 1.08 1459 0.991.38 1654 0.40 1.64 1840 2348 1.51 0015 0056SA 1.83 0123 1.80 0206 WE1.82 1.73 SA1.59 TU 1520 TH0053 MO TU 1716 1.95 WE 1728 2158 2324 1919 1.36 1930 2115 2247 0.471.931.81FR 0.41 2119 1.36 2333 1.62 1728 1733 1.30 2126 1.33 2338 0.84 2337 0.54

14

29

14

29

29

14

1.73

0.80 2.10 1900 1.05 1.87

1.88 0508 1.14 0014 0.71 SA 1.27 10551428 1.58 0.83 0638 1.23 1.60 17052224 0.38 1.37 0048 1.931.75 TU 1126 0055 1.65 MO 0.79 1715 0.57

29

14

1.82 0.88 0.68 0213 0115 0.54 0323 0.78 0315 0.76 0524 1.08 0050 0.48 0004 1348 1.91 0047 2.00 0040 2.05 1.92 1.79 11191.89 1.30 0008 1220 1.37 1300 1.39 1400151.57 1250 1.5415 WE 1.76 1330 2.18 0058 2.18 FR SA 0.61 MO TU 1.60 TU FR15 SA 1340 15 30 30 30 0659 0930 1.51 0830 1031 1044 1.571.61 1142 1.66 1156 1.12 15 0801 0.96 1.67 30 0843 1234 1.67 0533 1.01 300827 0657 1.19 06150916 1.04 30 0727 1.10 1.22 0942 1.63 1.53 1119 0.99 1201 0.92 1.58 0823 1.68 17131.810.38SA 1240 1.21 1824SU 0.40 0.27WE 1653 1.00 1955 TH0.60 0.47 SU 1146 1941 1906 0.76WE 1217 1938 0.99 1439 1.08 1628 0.91 FR1830 1746 0.92 1340 1.14 1.70 MO0.84 1218 1.58 1201 1.56 1.34 1.85 TH 1810 TU1843 TU

15 0648 1143 12 WE 1736

29

26 18140812 0.761.64

10 0553 0559 1.69

1.14 25 0712 0702 1.66

27

1.01 10 0704 0707 1.57

0.85 25 0810 0050 0.67

27

12

0.84 10 0630 0116 0.81

12

27

0.82 25 0731 0244 1.23

12

10 062903080.491.3725 0641 1.11 27

1.34 0.97 1425 0.64 SU FR 1540 0.95 SA 1623 1.50 SU 1827 MO 1744 TH2309 2018 TU 1.25 13472240 1.48 1.510.87 1713 1.39 1.50 1956 1.40 1739 0.48SA 1458 1805 0.66 18001527 0.25 0.79 1801 0.43 2046 1.36 2128 1.490140 2235 1.79 01302323 2307 2324 0027 0.460.521.87 1.971.82 1.80 0102 0145 1.87 0207 1.91 0240 1.90 1.87 1.74 0206 1.87 0030 1.81 0206 0.55 0138 0126 1.95

31 0649 11

0805 1.861.01 FR 1256 1.21 1902 1.67

26 075631 0.90 11 0750 0954 1.65 MO 1546 1.13 2119 1.37

0.74

26 0839

0.78

11310717

0627 1.09 0.69 SA 1228 1.72 1822 0.84

0430 1.57 0017 0.54 0035 0.51 0159 0.88 0245 0.97 1.310809 1318 13 1.41 0811TU1.50 1358 1.55 144213 1.71 1.76 SA 1222 SU 1.57 28 13 0659 28 1041 1200 1.03 28 0937WE 1.57 0936 WE 1.621350 1805 0.26 1916 0.39 1938 0.28 2035 0.65 1928 0.50 SU 1647 1.40

reau of Meteorology

MO 1310 1.04

26 0800 1.30

0.81

0344 TH 1427 1.92 1.61 0940 2020 0.86 TU 1330 0.97 WE 1524 1.02 FR 1544 0.79 SA 1642 0.89 SU 1605 © Copyright 2216 Commonwealth of Australia 1854 1.29 1.46 2258 2019, 1.69Bureau of Meteorology 2343

13

11 0713

26

0.97 0.3831 0758 0713 0.56

0455 1.34 1.18 1.34 TH 1303 1415 2.271.44 2.21 SA 14161026 SU 0.32 1845 1.62 0.770.70 2013 0.93 1624 0.52 1954 MO 1.94

28

1.33 0211 0157 1.91 0247of Predictions 2.00 1.96 0221 1.98 0235Caution: 1.91 Predictions 0145 1.931950 Caution: Predictions are of 0228 secondary quality Datum is 0309 Lowest Astronomical Tide are of 1.95 secondary quality 0.301.87 0745 0831 0.82 0140 0.65 0832are0.63 0908 0.56 0829 0735 0.88 0003 1.88 0014 0010 +11:00) 0.49 when in 0134 1.03 0420 1.030801 0508 1.14 daylight savings time (UTC effect 0.69 Times in0345 local standard time0.72 (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC 0.72 +11:00) when in0756 effect 2.28 1408 1.48 0930WE1.50 1450 1.71 1520 New 1.83 1.95Quarter 1316 1.370921 SU 15010638 MO 1449 MO 1.55 TH TH 1443 First FR 1502 2.03 SU Full 0600 1.27 1.23 0814 1.50 1044 1.60 1046 1055 1.58 Moon Moon Phase Symbols Full Moon First Quarter Last Quarter Moon 1.66 Last Quarter 0.771.37 2046 2003 0.41 2030 TH 0.34 2113 SA 0.70 0.55 1.60 2057 1.08 0.18 1656 0.99 1647 0.652020 1705 0.38 2039 SU 1133 TU 1126 MO 1300 1857 TU 1520 1.06 MO 0.86 WE 1459 0.99

14

12

27

29

1733 1.30

14

2119 1.36

12

27

29

2126 1.33

12

14

27

29

14

12

29

1728 0.79

2333 1.62

27

1715 0.57

1.75 0.45 2.18 0.88

0327 2.06 0335 1.99 0302 1.92 0249 1.89 0227 0228 1.99 0303 1.94 0300 2.04 28 13 13 28 13 052428 1.08 0.54 0.770323 0.78 0.76 0004 13 1.910845 0047 2.00 0858 0.63 0040 2.05 0914 0.54 0937 0.66 08370058 0.251.92 0819 0816 0904 0.76 0315 0.46 28 15 1407 301.841142 FR1.661557151.920533 1.01 30 0657 15 2.10 1.51 30 0615 1.04 1540 15450727 2.221.10TU 1525 1.451031 1452 15 1.56 1044TH1.57 2.09 1.19 SA 1537 MO 30 TU 1.60 FR 1531 1746 0.92 1.08 1653 1.00 1628 0.91 1146 1.70 1218 1.58 1201 1.56 1217 1.34 0115 0930 MO TU 1439 2018

WE 1947 0.16 1.25

TH 2046 0.46

2240 1.48

0308 0858 TU 1456 2037

2.03 0.68 1.54 0.20

0335 0936 WE 1532 2126

29

1.98 0.72 1.65 0.54

15 0346

2.05

30 0404

2.00

14

2119 FR 0.44

2309 1.51

2148 SU 0.75

0403 2.09 0400 0030 1.81 0954 0.46 1006 0627 1.09 1633 FR 1630 1.93 SA 1228 1.72 2205 SA 0.56 2222 1822 0.84

14 31 29 15 0440

2.07

MO 0.61 2108

1739 0.48

1.99 0.60 1.96 0.80

0339 0926 SA 1618 2153

14

15 0415

1805 0.66

TU 0.85 2131

1800 0.25

WE 0.77 2121

1801 0.43

2.05 0.37 2.15 0.67

0329 0927 SU 1612 2204

29

1.89 0.53 2.11 0.84

0328 1.80 09180138 0.251.95 0758 2.100.97 TU 16291303 WE TH 0.781.34 2200 1845 0.32

14 31

2.01

30 0355

1.83

15 0406

1.69 0.36 2.11 2118 0.84

29 0257 0854

1.69

1.61 0.31 1601 2.01 2149 0.83

30 0327

1.54

1008 of 0.68 0957 0.44 0930 0.31 0937 Commonwealth 0.62 0959 0.30 © Copyright Australia1032 2019,0.40 Bureau of Meteorology 1006 0.30 SA 1718 1.97 SU 1704 2.14 MO 1646 2.06 WE 1545 1.62 TH 1612 1.72 WE 1713 1.95 TH 1639 1.90 Datum of Predictions is 2203 Lowest Astronomical Caution: are of secondary quality 2222 0.83 0.64 2248 Tide 0.68 2235 0.73 Predictions 2236 0.83 2126 0.30 2239 0.81 Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect 0431 2.01 0419 1.73 Moon Phase Symbols 1039 0.65 Full Moon1027 0.37 New Moon First Quarter Last Quarter

31

31

FR 1651 1.77 TU 1722 1.96 2239 2306 0.83 The Bureau of Meteorology gives0.74 no warranty of any kind whether express, implied, statutory or otherwise in respect to the availability,

accuracy, currency, completeness, quality or reliability of the information or that the information will be fit for any particular purpose or © infringe Copyright of Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteorology will not any Commonwealth third party Intellectual Property rights.

Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide Caution: Predictions are of secondary quality Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect Moon Phase Symbols Full Moon New Moon First Quarter Last Quarter

The Bureau's liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.


Profile for Otway Life Magazine

Otway Life Almanac 2020  

Art + Ecology + Culture + Spirit Trees are our inspiration and one of the many reasons we choose to live the Otway Life

Otway Life Almanac 2020  

Art + Ecology + Culture + Spirit Trees are our inspiration and one of the many reasons we choose to live the Otway Life

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