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for his pattern. It is, moreover, a trait completely in keeping with the Augustan emphasis on control and restraint, of the fear of an emotional involvement which blinds the reason. Goldsmith does not in The Traveller offer any explanation of why the exile chose his particular path, though the question quoted above indicates that the choice was a deliberate, if not fclly understood, one. When he speaks in his preface of his brother’s ’’wisdom” in remaining at home, he points up the focus in this poem on the despair wrought by the choice of the wandering course. Yet he also makes, clear that no return is contemplated, and in fact he indicates by the mountain-top view that no return is possible. An examination of the pattern of his subject matter leads to the realization of its similarity to the structure of his earlier Enquiry into the Present State of Polite Learning in Europe, which in turn points up a major theme in the two works. Gold­ smith seems strongly impressed by the dissimilarity in the various societies of Europe, the differences in taste in polite learning, in governmental forms, indeed in national character. At the same time he is very much aware of the fact that the citizens of each country can and do adjust themselves to local circum­ stances and manage to achieve rather similar states of happi­ ness. In every government, though terrors reign. Though tyrant kings, or tyrant laws restrain. How small, of all that human hearts endure. That part which laws or kings can cause or cure. (11. 424-27) This observation leads him to the conclusion that happiness is not the product of government but rather ’’centres only in the mind.” (1. 421) As he concludes that there is not one system which seems more productive of happiness than another, he comes to the realization that the ’’bliss” he seeks comes in finding a “spot of all the world my own.” (1. 30) Thus it is not rural Ireland he here apostrophizes, but rather “home,” a place where one belongs, where he finds his family circle, where he need not struggle. This is essentially the conclusion reached in the Enquiry when he noted: “The man who in this age is enamoured of the tranquil joys of study and retirement, may in the next, should learning be fashionable no longer, feel an ambition of being foremost at a horse course; or, if^such be the absurdity of the times, of being himself a jockey.” Enquiry, Chapter XIV, H'or^s, III, 527.

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Otterbein Miscellany May 1965 combined  
Otterbein Miscellany May 1965 combined