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CENTRAL EDITION: Serving The Glebe, Alta Vista, Elmvale Acres, Mooney’s Bay and surrounding communities Year 1, Issue 4

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November 18, 2010 | 40 Pages

LANSDOWNE PLANS City council will vote on the site plan for Lansdowne – including whether to give the city’s planner delegated authority – on Nov. 19 5

CYCLOCROSS BAN The city has pulled park permits for an Ottawa-based cyclocross series, leaving organizers scrambling. 14

Photo by Dan Plouffe

FALCONS FALL IN FINAL Alvan Julien (left) and the Franco-Cité Falcons came up just one step short of the city title in a 24-16 defeat in the national capital Tier 2 city final on Saturday, Nov. 13 at Minto Field. See page 17 for the story.

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The city could trim down problems on Bronson Avenue by putting it on a “road diet,” a coalition of community groups says. But first, the city needs to be open to trying something new on the street, which was once a green residential corridor, but has become a bleak, unattractive thoroughfare for much of the city’s north-south traffic. The street is scheduled to be rebuilt starting next year, but so far the city isn’t open to

changing the street’s configuration. Rescue Bronson, composed of the Centretown Citizens Community Association, Centretown Citizens Ottawa Corporation, Dalhousie Community Association and the office of Coun. Diane Holmes, says the city just wants to rebuild the street the same way it looks right now, with only slight changes. “We feel the city must take more time to examine the options and not to repeat 1950s-era mistakes,” said Eric Darwin, president of the Dalhousie Com-

munity Association. “We need to be willing to experiment.” Planning and consultations with the groups have been ongoing for the past year, but Holmes is hoping to delay construction by another year to spend more time consulting with the community and hopefully experiment with different line-painting configurations on the street to test which works best in reallife situations. Holmes said she is hopeful the construction will be delayed because last year’s infrastructure projects drained the city’s

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Winterlude needs help from businesses to survive Annual festival not sustainable, NCC tells Ottawa Chamber of Commerce LAURA MUELLER

capital plan never included before, she said. The NCC is also looking at engaging all 13 municipalities that fall within its territory, including Beckwith, Carleton Place and Mississippi Mills. In the past, consultations have focused on the two main cities – Ottawa and Gatineau, but there have already been three meetings with all 13 municipalities, Lemay said. If the plan was approved by the federal government, it would give the plan more strength, Lemay said, and she asked business owners in attendance to consider helping push that campaign.

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National Capital Commission CEO Marie Lemay spoke to a packed crowd of businesspeople about changes at the NCC and a new focus for Winterlude that will invite participation from private businesses. vironment is changing; we have no choice.” Part of that change will include inviting private companies to stage events during the festival and use the NCC’s Winterlude marketing material to make it part of the festival. “It’s very evident that we can’t do it all,” Lemay said. “We have to share this brand.” Shifting to that strategy would also encourage Winterlude events to expand across the city, she said. “It could be in every community. You should be in Ottawa and Gatineau at that time and everywhere you go you should feel the Winterlude buzz; not just on the weekends and not just downtown, but everywhere. The only way to do that is to get everyone involved.” Winterlude will take place from Feb. 4 to 21, 2011. Last year, more than 600,000 attended the festival. Another opportunity to expand programming is to make Canada Day festivities into a three- or seven-day event, Lemay suggested. HORIZON 2067 The NCC is “just embarking” on a review of the plan for Canada’s capital, a process dubbed Horizon 2067, Lemay said. “I think we’re going to be touching on another dimension of the capital,” she said. “Not

just the physical, but the vibrancy of the capital … and making it a people place.” The commission wants to engage all Canadians in that process, so it hired a firm to develop an “engagement strategy” to tell people about the NCC and encourage them to participate and visit the capital region. The winning slogan? “Canada, just like you.” Lemay told the audience to expect to see a lot of that campaign starting in January 2011. She said the winning slogan captures an inspirational message Canadians told the commission they weren’t seeing in the NCC right now. Rejected slogans included “Where Canadian stories live” and “The capital of being Canadian.” That campaign will centre on four key reasons why people should care about the National Capital Region and it’s planning, Lemay said. All Canadians should feel that the capital region is their “second home,” a place imbued with culture and heritage, a place that should be a window to the character of the entire country, and a region that represents Canada to the rest of the world. It should commemorate our past and our future, Lemay said. The Horizon 2067 review will include a high-level transportation framework – something the

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The future of Winterlude could rest in the hands of private businesses. National Capital Commission CEO Marie Lemay said the annual festival is not sustainable unless businesses begin to play a role. The future of Winterlude should also include the entire City of Ottawa, Lemay said during a speech to a sold-out crowd of business owners at the Ottawa Chamber of Commerce Eggs N’ Icons breakfast lecture series at the Sheraton Hotel on Friday, Nov. 12. Businesses have approached the NCC about partnerships in the past, Lemay said, but collaborating with them was often not possible due to the NCC’s strict regulatory framework. That will change next year, Lemay said. Business partnerships won’t just be considered, they will be needed, she told the crowd of approximately 200 people. She said the “next level” of discussions will begin following her announcement at the breakfast. “We’re in the middle of continuing and making more changes, and I think again, for this part of the changes, we will need the business community to make it happen.” Next year will be a test to see how the private sector can fit into Winterlude, Lemay said. Each strategic plan for Winterlude covers five years (the new plan covers 2011-15), so transitioning to business partnerships would be rolled out over a couple of years, she said. “This time around, we learned some things that maybe we weren’t expecting. “The bottom line is, the model that we have now is not sustainable.” Winterlude isn’t sustainable financially, or environmentally – climate change is taking a toll on the festival, and the NCC will be hard-pressed to be able to guarantee winter weather sufficient to support activities such as skating on the Rideau Canal for the duration of the festival each year, Lemay said. The NCC has been planning Winterlude for 32 years, developing and producing all the events on its own. Lemay said the commission needs to “rethink” how it does things to ensure the festival can continue in the future. “I don’t want to get used to the idea of doing things just because this is the way we’ve been doing them,” she said. “Our whole en-

Ottawa residents might also be seeing a bike-sharing program as early as next year, a possibility that is still under negotiation, she said. Also coming up, Lemay said the NCC will be planning to position the capital as the hub of festivities for the 150th anniversary of confederation in 2017. The NCC owns 10 per cent of the land in the National Capital Region and is responsible for Gatineau Park, the Greenbelt, urban parks, nine parkways, 200 kilometres of pathways and hundreds of buildings, including 63 heritage buildings.

November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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4 OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

News

PC leader primes for next provincial election Tim Hudak discusses low profile, high costs and the Tory alternative DEREK DUNN derek.dunn@metroland.com

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Two gentlemen in a Byward Market coffee shop discuss next fall’s provincial election, admonishing PC leader Tim Hudak for keeping a low profile among voters. They said it is time for change in Ontario and time for Hudak to step forward. In walked the opposition leader a few minutes later – for an exclusive interview with Ottawa This Week – saying it’s always a challenge for a party not in power to attract attention, but that he is raising issues in Question Period, travelling the province for town halls, and reaching out to media. “People are saying it’s time for a change,” Hudak said. “McGuinty and the Liberals are taking voters for granted in Ottawa and Eastern Ontario, and they’ll be in for a surprise on election day.” If it is true that Hudak – known by the moniker ‘Who dat?’ – is a

word rarely uttered in this part of the province, the same is often said about Ontario’s second largest city among politicos at Queen’s Park. He called the neglect felt by Eastern Ontario voters “legitimate” and longstanding, even though Premier Dalton McGuinty hails from the region. He said he would end the notion that Toronto can count on the federal government to support Eastern Ontario. A first step toward that end, he said, is to build on the “team of strong MPPs” already in the region. SOCIAL ISSUES On the social side, Hudak, 43, shies away from using the term “progressive” to describe his Progressive Conservative party, instead repeating a mantra of “standing up for working families.” But he won’t be swayed by social conservative movements in Alberta and the U.S. that play to a

Photo by Derek Dunn

PC leader Tim Hudak says he will run a campaign on lower taxes for working families, cutting government waste and creating jobs. white, often aging base of angry voters. He insists that Ontario could have in him, the grandson of Slovak immigrants, its first non-British Isles premier. “New Canadians are increasingly turning to our party. They want to stand up for a more prosperous province and a good future for their grandkids.”

He talks about “mainstream conservative principles” of lower taxes and small government under the banner of a PC name that has been around for 60 years. He also insists the party’s federal counterparts are within the same “family.” Despite a theory that blames the world economic meltdown

on 30 years of trickledown economics – low corporate taxes and few regulations – Hudak said voters are tired of the Liberals raising taxes and growing government. “There is an increasing appetite for change. People are tired of higher taxes and energy rates,” he said. “That manifested itself in recent municipal campaigns.” The PCs plan to run on: • Giving families a break; • Targeting government waste and high taxes; • Creating more jobs. Momentum and poll results are growing in Hudak’s direction, but he said he won’t be happy with winning an election by default. A tired, arrogant two-term Liberal government isn’t enough, he said. The PCs have Ontario’s largest survey in haveyoursayontario.ca en route to mailboxes throughout the province. As for the weight of the Mike Harris years, the strife endured during the 1990s, Hudak doesn’t even mention the name. “I think people are going to be talking about the future of the province, not 1995.”


5 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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Council set to vote on Lansdowne tomorrow LAURA MUELLER laura.mueller@metroland.com

The city’s planner would have authority to make changes to the Lansdowne site plan if council approves a report on the project at a special council meeting tomorrow. The report, released by the city last Friday, recommends that John Smit, the city’s general manager of planning and growth management, be given the authority to finalize the site plan, with some conditions. Smit would have to consider advice from the panel appointed to review the design for Lansdowne. He would also be required to advise the planning and environment committee if the plan is changed based on recommendations from the design review panel, and the planning committee would have to approve “any plans that reflect substantial changes” from the site plan to be approved by council. The site plan council will vote on tomorrow sets out the “big picture” framework for how Lansdowne will be designed, including the layout of the main features, such as the location of buildings (such as the contentious move of the heritage Horticulture Building), streets and paths for pedestrians and cyclists, conceptual landscaping, and on-site servicing (including stormwater management). City staff would work out the details for the plan by spring, if council votes to give Smit that authority.

The proposal for Lansdowne includes a new stadium, a mixed-use residential (condo) and retail section, 1,350 underground parking spaces, as well as an “urban park” with gardens, a pavilion square for events such as the farmers’ market, and a large open field. While some critics have suggested the city’s current “lame duck” council does not have the authority to make decisions on Lansdowne because it is restricted from voting on matters that would cost the city more than $50,000, the report states that there would be no change to the city’s financial implications for the project. “That report indicated that the capital cost to the City would be $129.3 million for the stadium renovation and parking, $35 million for the Urban Park and $8.5 million for the Trade Show and Exposition Hall. These costs have not changed,” the reports states. Lansdowne would also be named the preferred location for the Ottawa Art Gallery (OAG), which is currently housed at Arts Court downtown. The OAG board unanimously approved the move last week. Two locations are being considered: Building D adjacent to the relocated Horticulture Building and Building K adjacent to the new south side stands at the foot of the Bank Street Bridge. Although the city’s heritage advisory committee recommended that the city leave the Horticulture Building where it is, the report going to council on Nov. 19 recommends that the city approve moving

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ket,” the city report states, adding that the two groups decided that a memorandum of understanding was required in order to accomplish that. The report recommends exempting Lansdowne from the city’s sign bylaw because it will have its own comprehensive plan. The city will also investigate whether hydro lines along Bank Street could be buried as part of a Bank Street rehabilitation in the Glebe; construction on that project is set go ahead next year.

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it to another location on the Lansdowne site. The city would use a memorandum of understanding it is in the process of developing with the Ottawa Farmers’ Market as the framework for determining design details, but city staff would have the final say. “There have been ongoing discussions with the Ottawa Farmers’ Market to determine how best to design this space to accommodate its use for a farmers’ mar-

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7 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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School board seeks data on religion, family makeup in new student survey JENNIFER MCINTOSH jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

A proposed survey for students of the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board (OCDSB) is receiving mixed reviews from parents. The board will survey the parents of students from junior kindergarten to Grade 6, while students in Grades 7 to 12 will be asked to complete the survey on their own. Both surveys touch on a wide range of issues, including academic abilities, bullying, extracurricular activities, cultural backgrounds and language, and religious affiliation. The board says it’s an effort to better serve its diverse student population, but some fear the questions go too far, especially for students in Grade 7. Some parents have questioned the ability of students as young as 12 being asked questions about their sexual orientation and family’s religious background. “I remember getting the survey last spring for teachers,” Lisa Nash, a parent and teacher at Merivale High School, said. “And a lot of adults had trouble answering that (sexual orientation) question and being able to tell the difference between ‘gay and queer’

or know what terms like ‘two-spirited’ means. If we had trouble understanding, then my feeling is kids are too.” Nash said she is also concerned about the possibility of kids skewing the survey results by putting joke answers. “We used to have a reading and writing survey-type test for Grade 9 students and they would goof around and skew the results,” she said. Nash, whose middle daughter is in Grade 12, said she is in favour of finding the right places to put board programming, but doesn’t see how the survey will accomplish that. Anne Teutsch, chair of the Merivale High School parent council says she is glad the survey is coming to school. Tuestch, as a member of the Ottawa Carleton Assembly of School Councils (OCASC) has been aware of the survey for awhile. “I know some people are concerned, but frankly, I don’t see how it’s a big deal,” she said. “The board needs the information to better serve the schools. Teutsch dismissed the question about students’ sexuality – saying that in this day and age, people should be ready for open and frank discussions. “Really, if that is the most contro-

versial question on the survey, then where are we today?” she said. “I know at Merivale we have a club for students that serves the gay, bi-sexual, lesbian and transgender students.” The board is ready to move on the survey despite the controversy. Zone 5 - College trustee Pam Fitzgerald said that the survey is great news for the board. “Gone are the days where the board can fund the same programs at all the schools, so we need to target where we have programming,” she said. Fitzgerald said the survey will help staff know which areas to target for anti-bullying programming, or in the case of high immigrant populations, English as a Second Language courses. “The schools should know their own populations though,” Nash said, saying getting the information from staff would serve the board better than the survey might. Donna Blackburn, trustee-elect for Zone 3 – Barrhaven/Knoxdale-Merivale, said that she is in favour of the new survey. “I think the information asked in the survey is something the board needs to better serve the students,” she said. “That should be our goal.”

QUESTION SAMPLES An example of a question from the junior kindergarten to Grade 6 survey: •Who are the adult caregivers your child lives with most of the time? The answers include: • Mother and father • Mother only • Father only • Mother and step-father • Foster parents • Two mothers • Two fathers An example of a question from the Grades 7 to 12 survey • How do you identify your sexual orientation? The answers include: • Bi-sexual • Gay (male) • Heterosexual (straight) • Lesbian (female) • Transsexual

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EDITORIAL

It takes a village... The Ottawa-Carleton District School Board has announced plans to conduct a survey for all its students to help make better decisions about the programs offered. The board says this survey is a significant undertaking and a critical component of its commitment to better understanding the needs of students. The survey brings together the board’s commitments to student achievement, equity and inclusion and the need for data-informed decision making. In addition to addressing mandated requirements with respect to school climate and aboriginal self-identification surveys, this survey will provide data that will be useful in developing future board and school improvement plans. They say they want to understand the unique and diverse characteristics of the students and this in turn will

allow the board to provide better instruction, programs and services to meet the needs of the diverse groups of students in the board. A student’s sexual orientation or family make-up should not determine success or failure or board programming. What should, are the ways in which that child is nurtured from the moment of birth. Children need love, support and strength, not only from their parents, but from their siblings, their extended family and their friends. In a perfect world, children should be loved, welcomed and treasured. Unfortunately, this is not always the case, but as outsiders, do we have a right to look inside? Yes, if a child shows bruises or other signs of abuse, it is our responsibility. We all know that a majority of families are blended; that

many don’t have an exorbitant amount of funds, so what will this survey accomplish? Programs to help educate parents and guardians on the benefits of successful parenting, nutrition and healthy, active lifestyles could be money more wisely spent. This survey, some say, is way too personal. Many won’t tell the truth, or will skew the results and that will throw everything off kilter anyway. The board says that principals and school staff are very connected to their school communities. However, there is a difference between what they know informally or anecdotally and what they know based on data. “When we are data informed, we can make decisions based on needs rather than perceived needs,” says the board. Time will tell … the survey is available Nov. 22 to Dec. 10.

COLUMN

Eighteen years of an extra Saturday There was an interesting page in the Citizen recently, in which a number of religious leaders commented on the 18 years in which we have had Sunday shopping in the city. Was it bad? Was it OK? Did the sky fall? Understandably, those for whom Sunday was not a day of worship have had an easier time with Sunday shopping. Several made the point that the old Sunday closing laws had become less relevant in a society in which many non-Christian religions are now represented. Only the Roman Catholic priest was concerned about the effect of removing the Sunday closing laws: “For many,” he wrote, “Saturday and Sunday have become almost indistinguishable and so the idea of the latter being the day for going to church and spending time together as a family has been greatly diminished.” Good point, although there may be an even scarier thought, which is that families are indeed spending time together, but they are doing it by shopping. This leads to a point so obvious yet so ominous that no religious leader wants to state it: Shopping has become a religion. That is not apparent at first. There are no smells of incense in the shopping centre,

CHARLES GORDON Funny Town only the sickly aroma of scented candles wafting over the populace. There are no songs of praise, except at Christmas time — and actually, come to think of it, White Christmas isn’t a hymn, is it? No one is kneeling. No one seems to be praying, although something like that may be happening at the lottery counter. And in some of the department stores there can be detected a prayerful longing for a cashier station that is actually open, and in some big hardware stores parishioners search for any wise man who can explain about snowblowers. There is more eating than in your normal place of worship and more talking on the telephone. But there is also a sense of seeking salvation in a bargain, which you see in its most extreme form in the Boxing

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Day sales. This, of course, is exactly what the opponents of Sunday shopping were worried about. Not that people wouldn’t go to church, but that even church-goers wouldn’t be invulnerable to seven-day consumerism once church let out. That was one of the good arguments against Sunday shopping. At least, when the stores were closed, people would have to find something to do without using their money. And that might be good. It might just mean watching more TV, but it could also mean reading a book or going for a walk or talking to a parent or throwing a ball or going to a museum. Ottawans being a bit slow to react — when is that voter rage thing going to hit us, by the way? — Sunday shopping took a while to catch on. In the early years, you could find merchants in shopping centres who were annoyed at being forced to stay open when there no customers. Some storekeepers gave it up and closed their doors anyway. Others, fighting the trend refused to open (I always had a soft spot for independent merchants like Bleeker Stereo because of that). But gradually, the patterns shifted, until

Managing Editor Patricia Lonergan patricia.lonergan@metroland.com • 613-221-6261 Associate Editor Matthew Jay matthew.jay@metroland.com • 613-221-6175 Political Reporter Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com • 613-221-6162

we arrived at where we are now, with the shopping centres bustling and Sunday being Saturday. Some of that bustling is done by people who don’t have time to shop during the week, and more power to them. Some of it is done by people who have nothing better to do — but then, who are we to say what better for anyone to do? That’s why those laws were abolished in the first place. It’s worth mentioning that some of the people who are not in the shopping centres are at home sitting in front of their television sets worshipping the National Football League.

Editorial Policy Ottawa This Week welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-2242265 or mail to Ottawa This Week, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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9

Rescue Bronson wants the city to keep an open mind From STREAMLINE on page 1 from Laurier to Gladstone; and from Gladstone to the Queensway. The construction will not include anything south of the Queensway. The section between Laurier and Gladstone is of particular concern. As Darwin put it, the community is looking to work with the city to create an environment that “fixes a blighted street” the community was saddled with in the 1970s. What was once a vibrant residential street with green lawns and trees has been gobbled up by wider roads and unattractive storefronts that are often left vacant by high business turnover. While some reports have characterized Rescue Bronson as a campaign to reduce traffic on Bronson, Darwin said the point of changing from a four-lane to three-lane format is to handle the same number of vehicles in a more efficient and safer way. Darwin said there are cases where traffic volumes increase or decrease after a four-lane road is converted to three lanes, but some of that change could be due to people adopting different driving patterns and other factors, he said. “The purpose of going to three lanes is to handle the same amount of traffic in a better configuration. “We’re not married to any particular configuration,” he added. “We just want the city to look at other options.” Darwin said studies show that Bronson handles 18,000 vehicles per day between Somerset and Laurier. That figure jumps to 25,000 for the blocks between Somerset and Gladstone. At the Queensway, Bronson handles 30,000 vehicles each day. “You need different measures tailored to different blocks,” Darwin said. The “road diet” of three lanes would work best for the section with lower traffic volumes, he said. The road would have a dedicated southbound lane and a northbound lane, with a dual-direction left-turning lane in the centre. That would allow left-turning vehicles to move out of the flow of traffic and into the centre lane without causing the traffic to stop. Any extra space in the width of the street could be devoted to parking, wider sidewalks or bike lanes. When it comes to cyclists, however, the rescue Bronson group says they would probably be safer on another street entirely. The group is asking the city to consider improving a parallel street such as Percy to make it better suited to a dedicated cycling lane. Unfortunately, the city’s response is that adjacent streets “aren’t part of the boundaries of the study” for Bronson’s reconstruction, Darwin said.

Photo by Laura Mueller

Rescue Bronson supporters are hoping to work with the city to come up with innovative ideas for turning the city’s main north-south arterial road into a safer, more livable community. Bronson after vehicles exit the Queensway, and there are no traffic-calming measures in place on Gilmour, she said. “Please consider the residential areas.” “The city is sometimes guilty of doing things piece by piece,” said Sue Stranks, a resident of Old Ottawa South who uses Bronson to commute to work. She said the city needs to look at the big picture of how changes to Bronson will affect other areas. Dave Weatherall said Bronson Avenue divides the community into “good” and “bad” sides. He would like to see more beautification of the street and more cross-

ing opportunities to make the neighbourhood more cohesive again. GET INVOLVED More information about the Rescue Bronson campaign can be found at www.rescuebronson.ca. Communicate with the group by emailing rescuebronson@centretowncitizens.ca, checking out the Facebook page or following @RescueBronson on Twitter. The group advised residents to share their ideas and concerns with city staff and Holmes’ office.

RESIDENTS WANT CHANGE The people who came to the Nov. 10 Rescue Bronson meeting generally agreed that something needs to be done to make the street safer and more pedestrian friendly, and many demanded that interim improvements be made immediately. Pamela Connolly was one of several people who bemoaned the crooked crosswalk and lane lines at the Gladstone intersection. She asked if there was something that could be done even before the road reconstruction to make it safer for pedestrians. Greg Bak, who lives on Cambridge Street, prompted a round of applause when he asked why people are forced to press buttons to activate crosswalks on Bronson, therefore making it unfriendly to pedestrians. Holmes said she has been working to get rid of the buttons and encouraged people to send messages to her office complaining about them. “I was under the impression that they were all gone,” she said. Moya Crangle said she is already concerned about the traffic zooming down her street, Gilmour, and was worried the situation could worsen if the number of lanes on Bronson were reduced. The street is already one of the few right turns off 427255

November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

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11 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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Small business ‘vital’ to economy: McGuinty KRISTY WALLACE kristy.wallace@metroland.com

While Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty was recently in Ottawa visiting one of his government’s Small Business Enterprise Centres, the Wellington West BIA would like to see more connections with these centres – and, McGuinty to connect more with BIAs in general. “When I’m at city hall, I pass by there and I think we should have better connections with the Entrepreneurship Centre,” said Annie Hillis, executive director of the Wellington West BIA. “There are a whole bunch of initiatives that aren’t linked up.” The McGuinty government’s Small Business Enterprise Centres have helped 13,600 Ontarians find jobs in the past year. The premier of Ontario was at Ottawa’s entrepreneurship centre recently for a tour and to talk to people who are currently working there and using it. The centre is one of 57 Small Business Enterprise Centres in Southern Ontario and they help people start a business. “I want to thank everyone who’s in small business in Ontario,” said McGuinty. “They’re such an important contributor to the health and vitality of the economy.” He said that small businesses are the economic drivers that take risks, borrow money and make investments – helping

the Ontario economy get back in the game. Hillis agrees that it’s not easy for people to start their own business. “It’s risky and expensive and you need to have every skill set,” she said. But she also said it’s important to remember BIAs which represent and help improve thousands of locally-based businesses. “I think sometimes we’re seen as we’re our own local situations and because we’re locally-based, we’re not really seen as big economic drivers,” she said. She added that the BIA has been working with the city’s economic development committee members who are very connected to entrepreneurship, Ottawa Centre for Research and Innovation (OCRI) and Ottawa’s tourism sector. “The economic development people in the city are starting to get it, and see us as a resource,” Hillis said. “We also exist. We’re rooted here.” While she said BIAs don’t get visits from McGuinty, it’s good to see him recognizing that the economy is based on small business. And, she adds that the Entrepreneurship Centre is also important to local businesses and to people who want to start their own small business. “If the [centre] help provide support and expertise, that’s very helpful,” she said.

Photo by Kristy Wallace

Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty was recently in Ottawa on a tour of city hall’s Entrepreneurship Centre.

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The Ottawa Food Bank has been named one of the top outstanding charities of the year. The accolade comes from Charity Intelligence, a research company that offers support analysis to charities and helps donors make informed decisions. In its 5th-annual Top Picks Report, released on Nov. 10, the Ottawa Food Bank is named one of the top 36 charities of 320 organizations assessed for the report. Ottawa Food Bank’s communications representative Chris Cline said the food bank was honoured by the nod, but indicated it would not affect their main goal – putting food into people’s stomachs. “We put our goal to fighting hunger first in the community,” Cline said. The Ottawa Food Bank filled out an application to be considered. The criteria involved a painstakingly thorough process, where the charity is

examined in a number of different ways. The most important aspect identified is the amount of social return on donations given. Kate Bahen, managing director for Charity Intelligence, said the charities chosen are the best options for people looking to donate. “These outstanding charities have distinguished themselves through their operations, strong management and efficiency and, most importantly, their ‘bottom-line results’ in helping Canadians, making them national leaders in their work,” Bahen said in a statement. The Ottawa Food Bank is currently bulking up and trying to raise enough food to get ready for their toughest months – January to March. “This is an extremely great honour and we are going to continue to strive to fight hunger,” Cline said. For more information on the Ottawa Food Bank and its services, please visit www.theottawafoodbank.ca

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Perley to get 45 new units Eastern Ontario Christian Seniors Citizens Co-operative set to expand thanks to funding DANIEL NUGENT-BOWMAN daniel.bowman@metroland.com

The Perley and Rideau Veterans Health Centrewill be one of four beneficiaries of increased funding for low-income housing across the city. In an announcement at the Eastern Ontario Christian Seniors Citizens Cooperative on Nov. 12, the centre learned it will receive $5.4 million from the federal and provincial governments. A Nepean seniors housing centre, meanwhile, will receive the biggest portion of the pie, with $8.3 million for a new adjacent building which will contain 69 units, a dinning room and a kitchen.

With construction underway, the addition will be finished by next October and will eventually be connected to the third floor of the main building. “It’s not about the building, it’s about community and people living together and having purpose in their lives and not living in isolation and loneliness,” said the centre’s administrator Wilma Runia. More commonly known by their address, 220 Viewmount (Drive), the centre officially opened in 1982 and offers all sorts of recreational activities for independent living. While rental costs haven’t been released, the city’s program manager for affordable housing Saide Sayah said most units would be priced between 70 and 80 per cent of market value. He estimated that with grants and subsidies a one-bedroom home normally costing $1,200 might cost between $500 and $600. Stephen Arbuckle, city manager of social housing and shelter manage-

yourottawaregion.com

Remembering & regeneration the length of his life.

Nicolas Ruszkowski

Nicolas Ruszkowski VP, Communications Ottawa Hospital This week, we remember the veterans who served us in World War I, World War II, or more recently in places like Afghanistan. My thoughts go out to my maternal grandfather, Guy de Puineuf, a veteran of the French Resistance in World War II. I remember the kindness with which he shared his war stories. I remember the day I learned he had a heart attack. And I remember the look on his face – a combination of courage and fear for the journey ahead – when we said goodbye before his multiple bypass surgery. He survived his heart attack and lived another nine years. His operation was a success. Or was it? Half of heart attack survivors suffer permanent damage that can make it harder to run, walk, or do everyday activities. That’s because heart muscle that dies during a heart attack is replaced with scar tissue, which weakens the heart’s ability to pump blood through the body. The things my grandfather loved doing, like hunting or cycling, became far more difficult. It meant a reduction in the quality and, ultimately,

New research in the field of regenerative medicine may help change this. If it does, it could happen at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI). Dr. Duncan Stewart, CEO and Scientific Director at OHRI is leading research that asks “what if we can help the heart repair itself?” The question could be lifted right off a Star Trek script. Instead, it is the basis of a new therapy and an upcoming clinical trial developed by Dr. Stewart. The therapy involves harvesting “regenerative cells”, sometimes called adult stem cells, from the blood of patients a few days after their heart attack. Then, growing the cells in a lab, where they would be given genes that make them more powerful. Finally, cells would be injected back into the patient’s heart in order to get rid of scar tissue and regenerate healthy new tissue. Dr. Stewart’s clinical trial begins later in 2011. It will be the first in the world to test a combined cell and gene therapy in people with heart disease. It will include 100 patients in Ottawa and two other Canadian cities. To find out more, please visit www.ohri.ca/ centres/StemCellResearch/default.asp Nicolas Ruszkowski is VP, Communications and Outreach at The Ottawa Hospital. Each week, he will share behind-the-scenes insight from the hospital. E-mail him your questions or comments at nruszkowski@toh.on.ca

ment, added that the city currently has over 10,000 households on its waiting list for affordable housing. “It’s a tremendous opportunity that we’re happy to participate in,” he said. Outgoing Knoxdale-Merivale Coun. Gord Hunter said the announcement is “vital to our community’s long-term sustainability.” Hunter recited statistics from the United Way Ottawa indicating that 18 per cent of the city’s 90,000 seniors live on annual incomes of below $20,000 and 33 per cent live with less than $30,000. Hunter added that 1,000 seniors are on a waiting list for social housing and 2,000 are homeless or are at risk of becoming homeless. “This announcement ensures hundreds of our seniors are no longer a bleak future,” he said. The 69 units at the Eastern Ontario Christian Seniors Citizens Co-operative were the biggest portion of the $25.4 million funding for 223 total rooms, which include:

• $5.4 million for 45 low-income seniors units at the Bruyère Continuing Care Affordable Supportive Housing • $5.4 million for 45 low-income seniors units at the Perley and Rideau Veterans Health Centre • And $6.4 million for 64 units for lowincome families through the OCISO Non-Profit Housing Corporation. Ottawa West-Nepean MP John Baird said that since he became a federal minister in 2006, he’s wanted to ensure Ontario got its share of the funding pie in relation to population. He said the announcement does that. “We know that many seniors and families are facing very serious challenges in accessing safe and affordable housing,” he aid. Likewise, Ottawa West-Nepean MPP Bob Chiarelli was thrilled with the announcement. “This is an exceptional day in the City of Ottawa for affordable housing,” he said.

OPP introduces new program to help parents keep kids safe online

Visit us Online at

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ONTARIO PROVINCIAL POLICE As a follow up to Crime Prevention Week (Nov. 7 to 13), the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) has introduced an effective new Cyber Safety program designed to help parents keep their children safe while they are using the Internet. The OPP Crime Prevention Section developed the program in partnership with Cowan Insurance Group and the OPP Youth Foundation to raise awareness and educate parents about how to ensure that children are having safe online experiences. While the Internet provides learning opportunities for youth, it also opens the door to the potential exploitation of children, including cyber bullying and other online threats. The program was designed to address these threats and provides all the information parents need, in order to recognize what risks exist as their children learn and play in the online world. It also provides them the tools to be aware of what sites their children are accessing and how to monitor their Internet use. “The program focuses on parents and prevention, and while officers are active in schools educating our kids about safe Internet use, it’s important that parents also be engaged and educated about Internet safety, as they are instrumental in keeping their kids safe while online”, said OPP Insp. Mark Allan. The Cyber Safety program consists of a training kit and resource package that will be provided to OPP community services officers and school resource officers who will deliver presentations and make this material available to parents in communities throughout the province.

Metro Creative Graphics

Internet Safety Checklist for Parents Parents should discuss the potential dangers of the Internet with their children and educate them on how to handle situations that may arise. Here are some basic steps parents can take to protect their children: • Be involved and know your child's online activity. • Keep the computer in an open area of the home. • Remind children to protect their passwords; encourage them not to share passwords with friends. • Use caution with web cams, unplug web cams when they're not in use. • Be sure of who they're talking to before allowing them to turn on a web cam and enter your home. • Make sure children are cautious with what they post online. • Know their online friends the same way they know friends in real life. For more information about Internet Safety Tips for parents, go to: http:// www.opp.ca/ecms/files/250363925.pdf


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Lest we forget EDDIE RWEMA eddie.rwema@metroland.com

Tens of thousands of people converged on the National War Memorial in downtown Ottawa on Nov. 11 to honor the contributions of Canadian military service men and women. The event kicked off with O Canada, lowering the flag at half mast and observing two minutes of silence at exactly 11 a.m. The ceremony was the first presided over by newly appointed Gov. Gen. David Johnston. It is also marked the first year there were no First World War veterans in attendance following the death

of Canada’s last veteran, John Babcock, in February. Johnston placed a wreath at the memorial, as a 21 gun-salute rang out in the background. “As a nation, we gather here to honour their service. To express our gratitude, and to fulfill our promise to never forget them,� Johnston’s Remembrance Day message read. Prior to the ceremony, a parade of pipers and war veterans marched from Cartier Square Drill Hall towards the War Memorial. Brig.-Gen. Karl McLean, the chaplain general of the Canadian Forces, read a poem written by a girl whose father died

pared statement from Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who was attending the Group of 20 summit in South Korea. Veterans with medals from three wars watched in the crisp, bright sunlight as the rituals played out. Veterans in blazers adorned with medals from the Second World War and Korean War stood alongside young men and women in uniform wearing decorations earned while on duty in Afghanistan. Each year, Ottawa hosts the National Ceremony of Remembrance at the National War Memorial at the corner of Elgin and Wellington. The ceremony marks the anniversary of the end of the First World War, at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918.

in Afghanistan. “Today we face another war which no one understands. Why can’t we get along, why can’t we hold hands?� she wrote. For the large crowd gathered, some in tears, this was a moment to honour and express gratitude to the fallen heroes and a moment to say welcome back to those returning from tours of duty in Afghanistan. “We stand in silent reflection for those brave men and women throughout Canada’s history who, when called upon to defend the values we hold dear, did not waver. Instead, they left family and loved ones for far away battlefields from which many would never return,� read a pre-

Royal Canadian Legion Eastview Branch holds ceremonies bers of the Vanier community, members of the armed forces, cadets and navy as well as members of the Canadian government and the city of Ottawa. After the service, the parade made its way back to the legion where everyone was invited in for food and drinks. Photos by Michelle Nash

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The Royal Canadian Legion Eastview Branch 426 hosted the Vanier Remembrance Day parade. The Ottawa Police service pipe band and the navy league cadet Corps Vice Admiral Kingsmill band performed for the ceremony. The parade marched east on Montreal Street and up Hannah Street to the Vanier Cenotaph where the service was conducted. Wreathes were laid at the Cenotaph by mem-

November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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Cyclocross ‘ban’ puts Ottawa events in jeopardy LAURA MUELLER laura.mueller@metroland.com

The city has effectively put the brakes on a burgeoning 20-year-old cycling series, organizers say. The city yanked the three remaining permits for Eastern Ontario Cyclocross Series events in Ottawa parks after city staff observed damage to the ground at Walter Baker Park after an event last month. Now, cycling enthusiasts are worried that the move equates to a de facto ban on cyclocross in city parks, and cyclists are wondering what will happen to the series next year. The series has used the park – and other city parks, including Mooney’s Bay – for its events over the past five years. It also holds events outside the city, including Almonte, Renfrew, Perth and Kingston. The city had warned the Ottawa Bicycle Club that wet conditions had left the ground susceptible to damage after the grass was muddied at Britannia Park during an Oct. 3 event. The club continued with its next event in Kanata as scheduled. Shortly afterwards, Woods received a letter from the city that stated: “… You assured staff that in the future you would adjust the course to avoid sensitive areas, avoid repetitive use of specific areas and pay particular attention to avoid

wet areas. Unfortunately, none of these preventative measures were taken into account with your latest event at Walter Baker Park …” The move came as a surprise to Woods, who said he has never had any problems with the city over the course of the two decades he has organized the series. “This issue has been completely out of the blue,” said Woods, adding the group has always extended a standing offer to clean up the parks to the best of its ability after cyclocross events. Woods claims that the city just needs to have more patience. While the events do churn up some mud, especially when conditions are wet, he said the ground will go back to normal by spring. Parks are not heavily used in the late fall, so some lingering muddiness wouldn’t have much of an impact on people’s use of the park, he said. The city disallowed that appeal, he said. And as an environmental consultant, Woods said he is always conscious of the impact of the events he plans, and he is confident that cyclocross doesn’t cause any lasting damage. But Dan Chenier, the city’s general manager of parks, recreation and cultural services disagrees. Two weeks later, Walter Baker Park is still crisscrossed with muddy trails, conditions he said are unacceptable. “The damage is much more lasting and

Remembering & regeneration the length of his life.

Nicolas Ruszkowski

Nicolas Ruszkowski VP, Communications Ottawa Hospital This week, we remember the veterans who served us in World War I, World War II, or more recently in places like Afghanistan. My thoughts go out to my maternal grandfather, Guy de Puineuf, a veteran of the French Resistance in World War II. I remember the kindness with which he shared his war stories. I remember the day I learned he had a heart attack. And I remember the look on his face – a combination of courage and fear for the journey ahead – when we said goodbye before his multiple bypass surgery. He survived his heart attack and lived another nine years. His operation was a success. Or was it? Half of heart attack survivors suffer permanent damage that can make it harder to run, walk, or do everyday activities. That’s because heart muscle that dies during a heart attack is replaced with scar tissue, which weakens the heart’s ability to pump blood through the body. The things my grandfather loved doing, like hunting or cycling, became far more difficult. It meant a reduction in the quality and, ultimately,

New research in the field of regenerative medicine may help change this. If it does, it could happen at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI). Dr. Duncan Stewart, CEO and Scientific Director at OHRI is leading research that asks “what if we can help the heart repair itself?”

Photo by Katie Mulligan

A rider participates in an Eastern Ontario Cyclocross Series event in the Lanark County town of Almonte on Oct. 17.

The question could be lifted right off a Star Trek script. Instead, it is the basis of a new therapy and an upcoming clinical trial developed by Dr. Stewart.

significant,” Chenier said. “If we’ve done such a bad job, where is all the permanent damage?” Woods said.

The therapy involves harvesting “regenerative cells”, sometimes called adult stem cells, from the blood of patients a few days after their heart attack. Then, growing the cells in a lab, where they would be given genes that make them more powerful. Finally, cells would be injected back into the patient’s heart in order to get rid of scar tissue and regenerate healthy new tissue. Dr. Stewart’s clinical trial begins later in 2011. It will be the first in the world to test a combined cell and gene therapy in people with heart disease. It will include 100 patients in Ottawa and two other Canadian cities. To find out more, please visit www.ohri.ca/ centres/StemCellResearch/default.asp Nicolas Ruszkowski is VP, Communications and Outreach at The Ottawa Hospital. Each week, he will share behind-the-scenes insight from the hospital. E-mail him your questions or comments at nruszkowski@toh.on.ca

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A sport on the move Cyclocross has really picked up steam over the past couple of decades, with an average of 175 riders participating in each cyclocross series event. “There has been a lot of growth,” Woods said. That’s because the sport appeals to both recreational and competitive cyclists, and it’s something that parents and their kids can do together, Woods said. Imad El-Ghazal, an avid cyclist and general manager of the three Kunstadt Sports stores across the city, said the “de facto” ban will be very detrimental to the cycling community. Mounting biking was popular in the early 1990s, and then road cycling became popular. As cycling evolved, more and more people seemed to catch on to the idea of cyclocross as an off-season hybrid of those two forms of biking, ElGhazal said. Cyclocross is a family activity that actually brought people of all ages into

their community parks, making them more comfortable and likely to use the parks even when they weren’t participating in a cyclocross event, he said. The events also give cyclists an alternative to biking on the roads, providing a safe alternative for people on bikes, ElGhazal said. The city should be encouraging people to use its parks for a variety of recreational purposes, he said. Not only does it bring in revenue for the city and business for bike shops, it encourages people to get out and use the taxpayer-funded resource of public parks. “The message that the city is sending is questionable,” he said. But El-Ghazal was positive that cyclocross won’t go away, even if it’s not allowed back in city parks. He estimated that interest in the sport would drop off by five to 10 per cent initially based on people not wanting to travel outside the city for events. It could also lead to about 30 to 40 per cent less business for shops such as his, El-Ghazal See CYCLOCROSS on page 15


15 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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Photo by Katie Mulligan

Cyclists traverse the fields and hills at Gemmill Park in Almonte on Oct. 17 during the Eastern Ontario Cyclocross series. The ity staff pulled permits for similar events in Ottawa this fall due to damage to park grass, leaving organizers scrambling to find alternate locations for the three remaining 2010 races. 426393

Cyclocross events might be pushed outside Ottawa next season From CYCLOCROSS on page 14 also lead to about 30 to 40 per cent less business for shops such as his, El-Ghazal said. The next event in the series is set to take place on Nov. 21, but Woods has not yet secured a location. The Nov. 28 race has been relocated to Lake Ontario Park in Kingston.

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Options for 2011 The letter Woods received suggested planning the events in the Gatineau hills, which Woods said isn’t the right terrain for cyclocross, or holding the events in city parks during the summer when it is drier. Woods said that isn’t an option because cyclocross is an off-season series. Most cyclists participate in road racing or mountain biking during the summer, and switch to the cold-weather sport of cyclocross in the fall. If the city won’t issue permits for cyclocross in its parks, the series will go where it is welcomed – in rural areas outside the city’s boundaries. That will make it less accessible to Ottawa residents who aren’t able to travel, Woods said. The city’s businesses will also lose the resulting spinoff business, whether it is cycling shops, convenience stores or even gas stations, Woods said. “So far, everyone except Ottawa is interested in us for those reasons,” he said. Chenier said the city wants to discuss conditions with the cyclocross organizers before it considers issuing permits for next year. “What we’re looking to discuss is an understanding of the conditions under which these events can go on,” he said. Permits wouldn’t be issued

until late summer, but Woods would prefer to wrap up discussions before the snow flies in December. Other sport groups voluntarily cancel their events when the weather is damp and it’s clear that going ahead with the event would damage the field, Chenier said. His department had suggested Woods and the cyclocross organizers to do the same, but that didn’t happen, Chenier said. The city does have the ability to enforce a blanket cancellation of all permits issued on a certain day if the city determines the weather would have a negative impact on the park, Chenier said. That happens once or twice per season, but the city does not cancel individual permits due to weather, he said.

www.ChristineHauschild.com

Office: 613.592.6400 Toll Free: 1.888.757.7155 Fax: 613.592.4945

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

16

You know our health care system You’ve been toldfor you are goingaging to die. isn’t prepared our rapidly You’ve been told tolonger get your affairs population. You see wait times in order. You wonder when in emergency departments. Youdeath hear will about come. waits You’refor struggling and longer hospital physically beds. You read emotionally. You want to get the most about surgeries being delayed. Everyone of says the life have left.worse. aroundout you it’s you going to get You want something to be done.

Many people still think Bruyère is only a place where people come to die. More often we know it’s also where improving care for struggling seniors across our community is a daily focus. Bruyère Continuing Care is the champion of our aging population and those requiring continuing care.

Bruyère Continuing Care Is — Saint-Vincent Hospital – Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital – Élisabeth Bruyère Research Institute – Saint-Louis Residence – Élisabeth Bruyère Residence – Bruyère Family Medicine Centre – Primrose Family Medicine Centre – Bruyère Foundation.

Bruyère Is Continuing Care.

www.bruyere.org

426091

Bruyère Continuing Care is focused on delivering health care system solutions that will address the rapid growth of our aging population. Every day Bruyère provides innovative health care programs for seniors, conducts research to improve care of the elderly and, collaborates with health care partners across the region.


17 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

Sports

Photo by Dan Plouffe

Jamahll Charles (15) and the Franco-Cité Falcons celebrated the first touchdown scored against St. Joseph’s defence this year, but it wasn’t quite enough to win a city title as they fell 24-16 in the national capital Tier 2 city final on Saturday, Nov. 13 at Minto Field.

Falcons grounded in Tier 2 football final DAN PLOUFFE dplouffe@metroland.com

It was a shame either had to lose as both teams played like champions in the national capital Tier 2 high school senior football final, but it was the St. Joseph Jaguars that emerged victorious in a 2416 win over the Franco-Cité Falcons on Saturday, Nov. 13 at Minto Field. The Falcons came within one play of having the chance to tie the game with 16 seconds left but wound up with a narrow defeat at the hands of the league champions for the second year in a row. “That’s all we ask of the players,” said Franco-Cité coach Serge Boisvert, who couldn’t feel at all displeased with the way his team battled throughout the contest to the very end. “They gave us a great game.” The final didn’t show the makings of a classic in the early stages as penalty flags flew on most plays and each team had a touchdown called back due to infractions. The score remained 3-3 shortly before halftime until Franco-Cité’s Jamahll Charles danced through for a punt return touchdown to give the Falcons a 10-3 lead. The St. Joseph offence came alive to start the second half with a pair of majors. First, quarterback Jordan Maxwell hit a wide-open Emmett Choi for an end zone score, and then runningback Ryan Robillard finished off the next drive, set up by a 58-yard catch-and-run play by Corey Wright to go ahead 17-10. Charles responded for Franco-Cité with a 45-yard TD catch, but Tyler Bertin and several Jaguars teammates busted through to block the extra point attempt and maintain a crucial one-point advantage. It was an entertaining finish to the ball game as both defences battled back and forth down to the wire. Eventually it was Wright who again provided the key play

en route to the end zone with a 31-yard catch near the goal line to set up Maxwell’s short plunge for the major and a 2416 lead with under two minutes to play. Thanks to a couple clutch receptions by Charles, Franco-Cité threatened to tie the score on their final drive. It came down to a third-down play, and Alvan Julien very nearly tracked down a deep pass from Sébastien Legros-Poitras in the end zone, but he ended up one step short, along with his Falcons. “That was a good team we played against – very athletic, really well coached,” Jaguars winning coach Mario Panetta commented. “They were a great team. It was a big challenge for us.” Boisvert noted that it was a game where every play counted, and he certainly couldn’t be upset with his players’ efforts against a strong opponent whose defence hadn’t allowed a single point against it leading up to the final. “It was an amazing season,” smiled the coach of the second-year Falcons, who carry an all-time record of 12-5. “We took those guys and I think they’re a much better team, and better people too. We went to the final and they gave it their best. I’m happy with that.” The Franco-Cité football program, which currently allows students from other French Catholic board schools to visit for the first semester at Franco-Cité, recently got approval to continue in the second semester. That paves the road for the Falcons to train together year-round and also makes the team eligible to compete in OFSAA provincial competition and the national capital Tier 1 league since all players will be full-time students at Franco-Cité. “That’s going to be good for us,” added Boisvert, whose school likely had the largest number of fans attend the championship game out of the six participating teams. “We’ll go play with the big boys next year.”


OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

18

Community

Margaret’s Table goes on air EDDIE RWEMA eddie.rwema@metroland.com

Margaret Dickenson, dubbed Ottawa’s master of home entertainment, last week launched her latest television series on Rogers Cable TV. This time around viewers of her new series, Margaret’s Table, will not only be entertained, but will be exposed to many unique ideas that can be incorporated into their own family dining and entertaining. Insisting that “not everything needs to be a dinner party,” Dickenson will share alternative ways of entertaining. She is determined to inspire viewers, but insists they find what suits them. “Absolutely everything we do has to be fun, relaxed and playful. I don’t like to make things a struggle or an effort.” Each episode will feature three of Dickenson’s own kitchen creations, along with one basic recipe, a home decoration tip as well as one of her own signature suggestions. Episodes will finish up in the Dickenson dining room, where she marries her exquisite table arrangements with plated recipes from the show.

As a professional home economist, Dickenson’s passion is to develop new recipes where ordinary ingredients are used to make extraordinary creations. She says her dishes have become her art. With a great inherited respect for food, she says clever presentation is essential – be it playful, elegant, unique or all of the above. She regards presentation as bonus points, which she always takes full advantage. A recipe is never complete until the food styling is done. “Remember, we first eat with our eyes,” she adds. Dickenson has shared 45 years of culinary knowledge and experience with others through her international award winning recipes, menus, food styling, cookbooks, TV shows and writes regular columns for various Ottawa-based magazines. And with 20 years of living and entertaining abroad in eight countries, many refer to her as “Canada’s Julia Child,” while some make a comparison with Martha Stewart. The new series marks Dickenson’s return to television after her first award-winning show aired in 2009.

“Ever since my first TV series, Margaret’s Sense of Occasion, I keep getting comments on a daily basis from strangers at the bank, in the grocery store and on the street (even far beyond Ottawa) such as ‘We love your show – when are you coming back to TV?’ ” She says it is most reassuring to have such loyal and supportive fans. “Thus, I am thrilled to reach them through the medium of TV.” Dickenson insists that cooking and entertaining are very personal and how one goes about it is up to them. The important point is that they make family dining and entertaining more of an occasion. The themes of Margaret’s Table are divided into six episodes: Cocktail Favorites, The Ultimate Stacked Dinner, An All Seasons’ Menu, Creating a WOW Breakfast, Crêpes Go Exotic and A Relaxed Chic Dinner. Margaret’s Table is available to Rogers’ cable TV customers on channel 22 in Ottawa. It is also available across Canada to all Rogers’ cable, wireless and high-speed Internet customers on Rogers on Demand Online. By the end of November, airings will be daily.

Photo by:

While at grocery stores or at the bank Margret always got compliments about her program. People would always ask, “When are you going back on air?” Well their question has been answered.


19 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

Community

LIGHTING CEREMONY & SILENT AUCTION PRESENTED BY

In support of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario

Monday, November 29, 2010 Ballroom, Fairmont Château Laurier | 6:15 pm – 8 pm

Fairmont Château Laurier and CHEO invite you to celebrate the gift of giving by attending the annual Trees of Hope event. Feel the magic of the holidays come alive through the twinkle of the lights, the sweet smell of plum pudding and the beautiful voices of the children’s choir. Start your Christmas shopping by bidding on luxurious getaways to Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, beautiful works of art, spa packages, jewelry, restaurants and so much more.

CAT FANCIERS

Photo by LJ Matheson

To purchase a tree and for more information, please contact deneen.perrin@fairmont.com | 613-562-7001

Cat lovers with felines of all stripes and sizes descended on Ottawa over the weekend to showcase the grace and style of their furry companions. The Ottawa Valley Cat Club held a cat show Nov. 13-14 at the Nepean Sportsplex. The purpose of the club is not only to organize and promote shows sanctioned by the Canadian Cat Association, but to also promote the interest and welfare of all domestic and purebred cats and to raise awareness of cat-related issues.

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Community

Capital ward councillor-elect launches new film EDDIE RWEMA eddie.rwema@metroland.com

ohoto by

David Chernushenko’s new film focuses on sustainable and renewable forms of energy that are also eco friendly. ly done a thorough job of becoming more energy efficient,” said Chernushenko. “At some point all the sources of energy will either run out or become so expensive and we can’t afford using them, or their environmental and social cost

Since the premiere of his second documentary film at the Mayfair Theatre on Nov. 2, Chernushenko says the feedback has been very positive given it is difficult to sell a film, especially a documentary film. “I am thrilled that the feedback has been all good.” LANSDOWNE PARK In addition to his sustainable living project, Chernushenko is the councillorelect for Capital Ward. He is taking over the seat from outgoing councillor Clive Doucet amid the contentious planning stages for the redevelopment of Lansdowne Park. Council will hold a special meeting tomorrow to discuss the site plan for Lansdowne Park, with a vote expected on Nov. 24. Chernushenko thinks this is not a good deal financially and it sets a bad precedent. “It is giving final approval to a project with a huge spending and huge implications for the tax payer. It is incurring large amounts of debt which all the city of Ottawa taxpayers will have to be paying over decades.” He adds that the current council is unlikely to change the vote. “I am not expecting any significant change in the voting, and there is nothing I can do about it.” 426759

Fresh off an election victory, David Chernushenko has launched his second film exploring the enormous potential for clean, renewable energy as an alternative to the growing demand for fossil fuels. In his new documentary film Powerful: Energy for Everyone, the Capital Ward councillor-elect visits locations in Europe where renewable energy provides power, creates local jobs and gets people active in building stronger communities. It also attempts to uncover what’s stopping North American’s from doing the same. “The film is about exploring what other direction we could be moving in, is anybody else doing it and what can we learn from them,” said Chernushenko. It looks at how everyone can get the energy they need from a chain of sustainable and renewable forms of energy. Chernushenko’s impetus for the film was the Ontario government’s 2008 decision to “build more nuclear plants because we are going to run out of energy.” However, he says the plan has not turned out as expected and the government still doesn’t have a plan to deal with nuclear waste and the resulting costs associated with its disposal. “That triggered a thought – have we really explored what other options are, have we really looked at not just where else we can get our energy from, but have we real-

will be deemed to high to keep going that route”. Chernushenko’s film explored possibilities ranging from generating wind energy in Denmark to underground waste collection in Sweden. He created the Living Lightly Project to provide a way “to live lightly, to inspire others to live more lightly, and to share with others what they are doing, how they are doing it and why. “The Living Lightly Project is unique not just in its philosophy, but also in its format. The project is about sharing a vision through words as well as visual means, including videos, photos and other illustrations that depict both the utopian and the practical.” In addition, he found that the story of sustainable living was not only personally fulfilling, but it brought him into regular contact with inspiring people. They shared their vision of a better way of living, and showed a determination to prove what was possible, rather than give up their dream in the face of challenges. He also learned that when you bring such optimists together, they can accomplish even more, and inspire each other to even greater accomplishments. The Living Lightly Project aims to provide a way for these dreamers to do just that — to live lightly, to inspire others to live more lightly, and to share with others what they are doing, how they are doing it and why.

It’s my world...

2010097110S

OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

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Former Carleton fundraiser to head Watson’s staff Serge Arpin also held positions at La Cité Collégiale, Queens’ Park Serge Arpin, a former Carleton University fundraiser and vice-president of the Public Policy Forum, will lead mayor-elect Jim Watson’s staff. He will head up the new mayor’s office as chief of staff starting Dec. 1. “Serge is proud of his lifelong career in public service and deeply cares about our city and its future,” Watson stated in a press release sent out last week. “Serge brings senior public service experience to the position, and I know he will contribute a tremendous work ethic, a high level of professionalism and the ability to work collaboratively with diverse groups from across the City of Ottawa.” Aprin’s most recent position was a vice-president of the Public Policy Forum, a role he took on in July. The Public Policy Forum is an

School of Public Policy and Administration. Arpin declined to be interviewed before he officially takes on his role in Watson’s office on Dec. 1, when the new council is sworn in.

Swearing-in to be held Dec. 1 at Shenkman Arts Centre OTTAWA THIS WEEK STAFF The swearing-in of Ottawa’s new council will take place away from city hall in an effort to show that Ottawa does not just revolve around city hall. The Dec. 1 event will be located at the Shenkman Arts Centre (245 Centrum Blvd., Orleans) at 7 p.m. In a note to councillors and councillors-elect, mayor-elect Jim Watson stated the location was chosen to emphasize that city business does not always revolve around city hall. “…We recognize and value the many distinct communities that make up Ottawa,” Watson stated. The arts centre also has more seating, which will allow council members to invite more guests (each council member will receive 12 invitations to share with family and friends). In another twist, the event will be sponsored by Tim Hortons. Watson said the move is meant to cut down on costs to the city to “reflect the times.”

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laura.mueller@metroland.com

independent, not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of government in Canada by improving dialogue between the public, private and voluntary sectors. Arpin has a long history in educational institutions. For seven years, he was the chief advancement officer for Carleton, where he was in charge of donor relations and the university’s alumni outreach and marketing efforts in Canada and around the world. He also held senior positions at La Cité Collégiale (Ontario College of Applied Arts and Technology) in Ottawa for eight years. Although his resume doesn’t list any municipal experience, Arpin has a history of working closely with the Province of Ontario. He was the manager of communications in the cabinet office of Francophone Affairs at Queens’ Park during the imple-

in Lowertown. He holds an undergraduate degree in political science and public management from the University of Ottawa, as well as a master’s degree in public administration from Carleton’s

...don’t let it go to waste

Be green. Fill your bin

2010097110S

LAURA MUELLER

mentation of the 1986 French Language Services Act. He worked as manager of a provincially funded youth employment centre at Niagara College. He also served on several provincial committees, including the colleges and universities restructuring taskforce and the college funding review committee. He was a fundraiser for Ketchum Canada, the country’s largest private-sector fundraising firm, where he directed a campaign on behalf of Bruyère Continuing Care. His volunteer affiliations include the Christie Lake Boys Camp, where he worked as a youth counsellor. He also served on the board and executive of the Ottawa Carleton Learning Foundation (now called the Ottawa Centre for Research and Innovation). In his free time, Arpin is an avid windsurfer. Arpin lives in the rural village of Navan in the east end of Ottawa and is a native of eastern Ontario. He is fluently bilingual and attended De LaSalle High School

November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

News


OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

22

Community

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Ottawa Public Library Vanier branch re-opens STAFF

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The Ottawa Public Library’s Vanier branch will be improved and more accessible when it re-opens Nov. 20 at 10 a.m. The library was temporarily closed to allow for extensive renovations includNo charge tire rotation! ing a new elevator to allow access to the second floor, a renovated entranceway, an No charge premounted winter tire installation! improved borrower services counter and (Special covers most light duty vehicles, uses 5w30 oil and winter tires must be already mounted on rims.) (Can not be combined with any other promotion. Taxes not included.) accessible washrooms. Parts & Services Guaranteed 1 Year or 20,000 km The branch will have a modified sched-

ule for the first few weeks. From Monday to Wednesday, it will be open from 1 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Thursday to Friday from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All levels of government shared the costs but the federal government’s infrastructure stimulus fund was a key contributor. Visit: www.BiblioOttawaLibrary.ca or call InfoService at 613-580-2940 for more information and branch locations.

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25

Christmas Exchange, 211 Ottawa team up for holidays EDDIE RWEMA eddie.rwema@metroland.com

STARTERS + SHARES

of duplicate applications. “The feedback we have received regarding the 211 service from families we helped last year was very positive. They were able to receive all the information they needed to apply for assistance with food and toys over the holidays, and were able to follow-up on the status of their application by again calling 211.” In addition to providing direct food assistance, The Christmas Exchange also manages the centralized database to cross-reference the names of applicants. The database is also used to process the names of children receiving assistance from the Salvation Army toy centre. This year, The Christmas Exchange is looking at being able to help as many as 10,000 households representing 25,000 to 27,000 people. For information contact www. christmas-exchange.com.

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The Christmas Exchange is teaming up with 211 Ottawa this holiday season for a campaign designed to provide meals and toys for low income families. The two local charities will be working together to make it easier for Santa to visit local families by streamlining the application process for those in need, providing a holiday meal and gifts for their kids. For those who have never faced the challenge of living on a fixed income, it is difficult to appreciate how tough the holiday season can be for thousands of families who find themselves in a time of need after a sudden work lay-off, illness, the death of the family breadwinner, or as a result of spousal abandonment. “We need the public’s help, now more than ever,” stressed

Marilyn Matheson, executive director of The Christmas Exchange. “These are people just like you and me who have for whatever reason been hit by hard financial times.” By calling 211, families and individuals in need are provided with an easier way to apply for help acquiring both food and toys this Christmas, as well as information on how to apply to other services. “The partnership with 211 allows our volunteers to redirect their energy towards other activities other than phone enquiries,” said Matheson. “Also, since 211 has the list of all the social service agencies in the area, they may be able to provide the families with information on how to access other resources.” Through this partnership, the two charities last year redirected more than $700,000 in assistance through the elimination

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November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

26 424195

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27

Old Ottawa South women petition against over packaging in grocery stores DANIEL NUGENT-BOWMAN daniel.bowman@metroland.com

Two Ottawa women are the driving force behind a petition sent to the Ontario Tender Fruit Board and Loblaw Companies Ltd. over what they feel is wasteful new packaging for fruits such as peaches, plums, and pears. Old Ottawa South residents Melissa MacLean and her sister-in-law Colette Stoeber decided to voice their concerns about a month ago when they noticed how some of the province’s fruits were being wrapped. MacLean said, that over the summer months, local fruits started to be covered in a one-time-use clam-shell container, which is not recyclable in Ottawa. “We were quite sad to see this for local fruit,” she said. “Now you’re faced with the situation where, do you buy local or do you think of the environmental impact of your purchase? It seemed kind of crazy.” MacLean is hoping to see more of the traditional cardboard baskets. While MacLean recognizes this type of packaging is commonplace for items like baked goods, she is not sure why there was an appetite for change in the produce section – especially since she feels the contain-

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er dries the fruit. “Then when it comes to something like local fruit it just seems so egregious and unnecessary,” she said. “If you have a lot of money, you can do all your shopping at the organic farmers’ market. But most of us with families have to go to the grocery store and do the best we can with a grocery budget. We really need the producers and the retailers to do their bit.” That’s exactly what Adrian Huisman, manager of the Ontario Tender Fruit Board, feels is being done. Huisman confirmed that the board did receive the petition, but doesn’t see the issue as a problem. Huisman added that the board decided to come up with the packaging because of retailer demand – namely Loblaw – because of costumers hand-picking their food and placing them in different baskets. “They were concerned about the losses they experience in their stores,” he said. Huisman said 12 million bins have been sold across the province and only 39 comments have been filed, with about half being positive because customers enjoy the fruits being preserved well. “Our sales actually went up,” he said. “They didn’t go down because of the plas-

tic.” The bins have a lid, which Huisman said keeps the food fresh and allows people to see the product.

“Do you buy local or do you think of the environment impact of your purchase ” Melissa MacLean As long as the retailer continues to demand the claim-shell product, that’s that they get. If people don’t like the new containers, Huisman recommended that they pick out individual fruit by the pound and put them in plastic bags. “Anybody that’s deadly opposed to plastic, we suggest you don’t buy,” he said. Ken Ross, co-owner of Barrhaven’s Ross’ Your Independent Grocer – an offshoot of Loblaw – said he hasn’t heard any complaints. He said his store sells lots of local fruits

and even recycles any of the claim-shell containers it can. While Ross generally likes the product because his fruits don’t get bruised or picked at, he is cognizant of the potential for waste and the desire people have to touch the food they’re going to eat. “It’s still early, but there’s more and more of this style being shipped,” he said. While MacLean tries to stop the spread of the packaging, she and her family have started a No-Plastic Project against the Stoebers. The project consists of the two households attempting to create as little garbage and recycling as possible over a month’s time. “It was quite an eye-opener,” she said of the results. “We were trying super hard and we still ended up with quite a bit of plastic.” Meanwhile, the open petition continues to grow and can be seen on the Riverside South Community Association’s website message board. There are nearly 600 names on it. “We’re trying to raise awareness on the effects of plastic pollution on the environment and our health,” MacLean said. For more information about the petition, visit www.maclmax.typetad.com.

November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

Community


OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

28

y t i n u m m o c r u Yo ! p e t s r o o d r u o y at

We’ll keep you connected...

Ottawa This Week is your Thursday connection to local businesses, community events, family activities and neighbourhood news. Hooray for Thursdays!

If you keep us connected Send us your local sports scores, community calendar items, special birthdays and anniversaries, and letters to the editor. We may print them!

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.com

n o i t c e n n o c y t i n u m m o c Your 28, 2010 October

Issue 1

Our featured columnists like Charles Gordon share their (sometimes humorous) take on local news, events and culture.

www.yourottawaregion.com 422742


29

School board collects ideas for new strategic plan EDDIE RWEMA

learning through a solid foundation in literacy and numeracy and committed to using new information to find solutions. From the discussions, Giroux said, they are starting to see some common trends emerge, mainly focusing on the school district’s role in the community, encouraging academic excellence among stronger students, parental engagement and creating a school environment that is a welcoming place for everybody. “It is important for me to contribute to the future of our schools and education. This shows that the board cares about what the parents feel about education,” said Nimet Mawji, one of the parents at the meeting. From each session, participants get from the facilitator a report that summarizes the result of that session. The board is also planning to host a moderated online discussion forum as part of the consultations.

eddie.rwema@metroland.com

The Ottawa-Carleton District School Board is hosting a series of public forums to gather community input that will help guide the development of its 2011-2015 Strategic Plan. “We are trying to approach as many members of the community as possible to find out what they think about education and how best the future of our schools can be improved,” said Michele Giroux, the board’s executive officer. Importance of information technology, tailoring instruction to meeting the needs of individual learners, positioning schools as an integral hub of the community and curriculum review were some of the major themes that came up during the public forum held at the Confederation Education Centre on Woodroffe Avenue last week. Giroux said the board is also reaching out to a wide range of stakeholders, including other school boards, colleges and universities, the city, community partners such as the United Way and Youth Services Bureau as well as the local business community. The board is using a document called 21st-Century Learner: Schools for the Future, written by the board’s former

ROB CAMPBELL OCDSB ZONE 9 TRUSTEE director of education Lyall Thomson, as the launching pad for conversations about educational issues and the role area residents think the public school

KATIE HOLTZHAUER OCDSB ZONE 12 TRUSTEE board should play. The document underscores the importance of developing critical thinkers by having classrooms that inspire

PUBLIC CONSULTATIONS: •Nov. 18, 7 p.m., OCDSB Administration Building (133 Greenbank Rd.) •Nov. 30, 1 p.m., Tudor Hall (3750 North Bowesville Rd.) •Nov. 30, 7 p.m., Earl of March Secondary School (4 Parkway, Kanata)

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November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

Community


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425689


Events

Community calendar We welcome your submisions of upcoming community, non-profit events. Please email events to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com by 4:30 p.m. on Friday.

• NOV. 19 AND 20 Come out to the Eastview Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion, 294 Cyr Ave. Entertainment includes Fran and the Rebels playing from 7 to 11 p.m., and on Saturday, Nov.20 from 7 to 11 p.m., and Simon Clarke on Sunday, Nov. 21 from 4 to 8 p.m. Free Admission – all are welcome. For more information, contact the Branch at 613-741-9539. www.rcl462.ca

our local vendors. St. Ignatius Parish at 518 Donald St. will host a bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Crafts/Gift Tables/ Books/Raffles/Baked Goods. Lunch Room. Plenty of free parking. Food Bazaar - 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Presbyterian Church, 579 Parkdale Ave. (corner of Sherwood Drive). Deli, frozen foods, candy, baking, gift baskets, German food table and coffee shop

• NOV. 20 AND 21

• NOV. 20 Welcome Winter with Dylan Thomas and music. Rob Clipperton reads A Child’s Christmas in Wales, in harmony with voices of The Canterbury Alumnae Trebles and Canterbury High School’s Vocum, The Savoy Society and Maria Woyiwada. 4:30 p.m., Glebe-St. James United Church, Lyon at First Avenue. Tickets from the Church, Compact Music Stores, Kaleidoscope Kids Books on Bank at Lansdowne Park or at the door ($15 adults; great for children 10 and over, who enter free.) Net proceeds benefit The Ottawa Food Bank. Further information: 613 235 4144. Christmas Craft Sale, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Trend Arlington Community Center, 50 Bellman Dr. Free admission and parking. Refreshments and hot dogs available. Nature games, handmade jewlry, pure natural skin care products, wood crafts, baked goods, sewing, pottery, lace cupcakes and more. Please come and support

The 2010 Ottawa Independent Writers fair and will take place at a new location, Dominican University College, at 96 Empress Ave. near Somerset and Bronson in Ottawa on Saturday, Nov. 20 and Sunday Nov. 21 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. More than 45 local authors will display and sell their books. New this year will be a workshop for writers on the Saturday; tables for local artisans and public tours of Dominican University College, which is quite historic. For more information about the fair, please contact OIW President George Laidlaw: (613) 831-2505 or laidlaw@iosphere.net. Information can also be seen at: www.olw.ca

• NOV. 27 Irish Social Dance, St Margaret Mary Church, 7 Fairbairn ave, 8-11 p.m. For singles and couples of all ages, no dance experience required, all dances are easy to learn, free Irish dance lessons, free munchies/desserts and tea, live Celtic music by the Ottawa Ceili Band, entertain-

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

32

ARNPRIOR

Chronicle Guide

Barrhaven•Ottawa South

THIS WEEK

Mercury The Renfrew

Serving the community since 1879

ment by local Irish/Scottish dance schools. We welcome all ethnic groups to experience a bit of Irish Culture. Donation. 613-523-9702, bmjarmstrong@hotmail.com The Ching Hua Chinese Language School is a non-profit organization, hosting an open house from 11 a.m. to noon. Our Saturday morning Chinese language school is part of the Ministry of Education’s International Languages Program, and is heartily supported by a volunteer organization (Parent Association Council). Classes range from kindergarten to Grade 8. We are co-located and affiliated with the St. Anthony School in Ottawa at 391 Booth St., and our Saturday morning program is open to students of all backgrounds. For our history, mission, and particulars please visit us at: www.chinghua.ca

• NOV. 28 Ottawa Brahms Choir Christmas Concert will be held at 4 p.m., St. Thomas the Apostle, 2345 Alta Vista Dr. The Ottawa Brahms Choir, in its 30th Anniversary Season, presents Christmas Favourites under the direction of Kurt AlaKantti, with the Polished Brass Quintet and accompanying pianist Ioulia Blinova. Tickets are $18 in advance at Leading Note on Elgin, and European Delicatessen on Merivale Road; $20 at the door. For more information, contact Leo Heistek 613 749-2391; www.OttawaBrahmsChoir.ca Carleton University Library of Friends and the Institute of African Studies present a panel

discussion entitled The early days of Tanzania’s independence from 2 to 4 p.m. at Room 2017, Dunton Tower. The five panellists include the director of the African Studies Institute, and Tom Torrance author of Dar es Salaam 1963, a memoir of 36 vignettes for his first three months on a temporary job as a junior economist for the Government of Tanganyika.

• DEC. 4 Christmas: more than toys and tinsel. Riverside Churches, 3191 Riverside Dr. invite you to an interactive “Messy Church” event with crafts, music, story, worship and celebration for the whole family. Followed by supper. 4:30-6:30 p.m. For info, call: 613 733-7735.

• DEC. 5 Christmas bazaar: Annunciation of the Lord Church, 2414 Ogilvie Rd., Ottawa. 613-7457774 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Crafts, white elephant, bake sale and tea room. A Christmas Fair with Eastern European Flair: Christmas Bazaar at Annunciation Orthodox Cathedral, 15 LeBreton St. North (off Somerset between Booth and Bronson), 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Russian Tea Room with sweet and savoury goodies. Sale tables include home baking, preserves, crafts, attic treasures. Other attractions include roast chestnuts, face painting for kids of all ages, raffles, and an icon painting demonstration. Join one of the short explanatory tours which will be offered throughout the day. Part of the Bazaar proceeds will go to support the Dalhousie Food Cupboard .


33 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL


LOOK ONLINE @ yourottawaregion.com

Call Email

1.877.298.8288 classifieds@yourottawaregion.com

DEADLINE: MONDAY AT 11AM. MORTGAGES & LOANS

HOUSES FOR SALE

FREE YOURSELF FROM DEBT, MONEY FOR ANY PURPOSE! DEBT CONSOLIDATION. 1st, 2nd, and 3rd mortgages, credit lines and loans up to 90% LTV. Self employed, mortgage or tax arrears. DON’T PAY FOR 1YR PROGRAM! #10171 ONTARIO-WIDE FINANSHARED ACCOMMODATIONS CIAL CORP. CALL 1888-307-7799. www.ontario-widefinanSHARED ACCOM- cial.com MODATIONS For rent. Heat, hydro, use of laundry and SERVICES kitchen included. Located near Ikea Mall, $550.00 per month. aamilne2671@rog J.C. ers.com for more info

PRIVATE HOME-CARE (17years experience) by qualified R.P.N, specializing in Elderly Alzheimer’s and Palliative Care. Day or evening shift, plenty of TLC, credentials and references. For more info call 819684-8834

ARTICLES 4 SALE

*HOT TUB (SPA) Covers-Best Price. Best quality. All shapes and colours. Call 1-866585-0056. www.thecoverguy.ca

LANDSCAPING & INTERLOCKING STONE Interlocking Stone Tree Removal & Pruning Mini Roll-Off Bin Rentals (6½ x 12 x 3 ft.) Dry mixed hardwood Discount on bulk orders

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

PUBLIC NOTICE

**PLEASE BE ADVISED** There are NO refunds on Classified Advertising, however we are happy to offer a credit for future Classified Ads, valid for 1 year, under certain circumstances.

Jason Carty 613-229-9695 COMING EVENTS

THE ANNUAL SEASONS Greeting Craft Fair and Sale. Nov. 27& 28, 10am to 4pm Stittsville Arena Warner-Copitts Lane Fundraiser for Ottawa Humane Society. Contact Gord 613-592-4376

CAREERS

**WORD AD COPY TAKEN BY PHONE IS NOT GUARANTEED FOR ACCURACY. For guaranteed wording please fax your word ad or email it to us.

OPEN AND LEAD A BUSINESS Become a State Farm agent in Ottawa insurance background not required. CRAIG JOHNSTONE, HUMAN RESOURCES 1-877-910-6222 x CARS 4404 FOR SALE Craig.john stone.csom@statef 2000 TOYOTA CAM- arm.com RY, 215,000 km, dealer maintained, good HOUSE condition, extra set of CLEANING tires and rims $4500, as is. 613-433-9475 AN EXPERIENCED HOUSE CLEANER Available. Will leave MORTGAGES & LOANS your home sparkling clean. Insured & bonded. 613-832-2581. $$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages MATURE to 95% No income, RELIABLE, Bad credit OK! Better CLEANING LADY will Option Mortgage clean your home for a #10969 1-800-282- very reasonable price. 1169 www.mortgage- References available. 613-599-8985 ontario.com

416 MINI STORAGE on Hwy 43, various unit sizes. Security fenced (24hr key pad access).

613-258-1146 HUNTING

HUNTER SAFETY Canadian Firearms Course. Courses and INSURANCE exams held throughout the year. Free course if you organize a group, SAVE UP TO $400 exams available. WenON YOUR CAR INSU- da Cochran, 613-256RANCE. Good driving 2409. record? Call Grey Power today at 1-866-424- PAUL SEVIGNY & 0675 for a no-obliga- SONS TAXIDERMY tion quote. Additional 613-624-5787 Discounts Available. Complete Taxidermy, Open Weekends Big Game shoulder mounts, rugs, turkeys, fish, birds, full body, exCAREER otics, replicas and antTRAINING lers, over 25 years experience. SUPERKIDS TUTORS: in-home, all subjects, SERVICES references. 613-2824848, superkidstutors@rogers.com BASEMENT RENOVATIONS, upgrades, ceramic, laminate, wood LOTS & LAND flooring, repairs. Please contact Ric at ric@SmartRenos.com or ARIZONA BUILDING 613-831-5555. Better LOTS! Full acres & Business Bureau. Senmore! Guaranteed Fi- iors discount nancing! NO CREDIT CHECK! $0 Down, $0 CARPENTRY, REPAIRS, Interest. Starting @ just Rec Rooms, Decks, etc. $89/month USD! Reasonable rates, 25 Close to Tucson Int’l Air- years experience. 613port. FREE Recording 832-2540 at 1-800-631-8164 code 4040 or www.SunsitesLandRush. CERTIFIED MASON com Offer ends 10yrs exp., Chimney Repair & Restoration, 11/23/2010 cultured stone, parging, repointing. Brick, block & stone. Small/big job PETS specialist. Free estimates. Work guaranteed. 613-250-0290. DOG SITTING, Experienced Retired Breeder providing lots of TLC. My Home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17$20 daily. Marg 613-721-1530.

DRYWALL-INSTALLER TAPING & REPAIRS. Framing, electrical, full custom basement renovations. Installation & stippled ceiling repairs. 25 years experience. Workmanship guaranteed. Chris, 613-8395571 or 613-7247376

MARRIAGES

WEDDINGS, BAPTISMS & Funerals, location of your choice. Also available Small weddings, my home, weekdays. The Rev. Alan Gallichan. 613726-0400.

BIRTHDAYS

HAPPY 90TH Tom Brock November 13th and HAPPY 87th to Bubs Brock November 14th. Love the whole family!

ARTICLES 4 SALE

MELVIN’S INTERIOR PAINTING Professional Work. Reasonable Rates. Honest . Clean. Free Estimates. References. 613-831-2569 Home 613-3557938 Cell. NO JOB TOO SMALL

SERVICES

R. FLYNN LANDSCAPING Owner operated company. Quality work: References available. Interlocking stone, Garden walls, and all your landscaping needs. 13 years experience. Free Estimates. Call 613-828-6400

WOMAN PAINTER

Quality paint, interior/ exterior. Wallpapering. Specializing in preparing houses for sale/rent. 14 years experience. Free estimates,

Reasonable, References.

Donna 613-489-0615

Handyman

Complete Bathroom Renovations

Jobs large or small. Ceramic, Hardwood. Drywall, Painting & more Call Gord 613-726-6944 CL15115

ARTICLES 4 SALE

FREE CATALOGUE HALFORD’S LEATHER, Beads, Tanned Furs, Craft Kits, Butcher Supplies & Equipment, Animal Control Products, Free Shipping (some restrictions) www.halfordsmailorder.com/ 800353-7864/ order@halfordsmailorder.com

HOT TUB (Spa) Covers. Best Price, Best Quality. All Shapes & Colours Available. Call WILL PICK UP & RE- 1 - 8 6 6 - 6 5 2 - 6 8 3 7 MOVE any unwanted www.thecoverguy.ca cars, trucks, boats, snowmobiles, lawn- SCOOTER SPECIAL tractors, snowblowers, 25% Off Select Models etc. Cash paid for Buy/sell Stair lifts, some. Peter, All Pur- Porch lifts, Scooters, pose Towing. 613- Bath lifts, Hospital beds 797-2315, etc. Call SILVER 613-560-9042 CROSS www.allpurpose.4-you.ca 613-231-3549

ARTICLES 4 SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE

WHITE CEDAR LUM- DEBT CONSOLIDABER, Decking, fencing, TION PROGRAM all dimensions, rough We help Canadians reor dressed. Timbers pay debts, reduce or and V-joints also eliminate interest, reavailable. Call Tom at gardless of your credit. McCann’s Forest Prod- Steady income? You ucts 613-628-6199 or may qualify for instant 613-633-3911 help. Considering bankruptcy? Call us first 1877-220-3328 Free PUBLIC NOTICE consultation. Goverment approved pro#1 IN PARDONS regram, BBB member move your criminal record. Express Par- Walter Baker Christmas dons offers the FAST- Craft Show. Saturday Please call 613-221- EST pardons, LOWEST November 20th and prices, and it’s GUAR- 27th. 10am – 4pm. 6225 or email dan ANTEED. BBB Accred- Free admission. Over ny.boisclair@metro FREE Consulta- 50 local crafter’s and land.com (days) call ited. 6 1 3 - 2 8 4 - 1 0 3 1 tion Toll-free: 1-866- artisans. Info 416-6772 www. (nights) www.goldenopp.ca or ExpressPardons.com 613-823-4049 TREADMILL Weslo Cadence 400CS - 2hp motor (between 0-10 miles/hour. Power incline, comfort Cell cushioning. Heart rate Sensor. 3 window console - time, pulse, distance, and speed in miles/hour. Calorie burning display also showing. Safety clip. Space Saver fold up design. Asking $200 O.B.O.

HELP WANTED

$$$ SECURITY GUARDS $$$ No Experience Needed. Full Training Offered 613-228-2813

SEND A LOAD to the dump, cheap. Clean up clutter, garage sale leftovers or leaf and yard waste. 613-2564613

CL13904

Wholesale Jewellery Gold,Platinum & Silver Precious & semi-precious stones. Custom orders call 613-2901695 and ask for Mary.

TIMESHARE CANCEL. Were you misled when you purchased a Timeshare? Get out NOW with contract cancellation! Stop paying Mortgage and Maintenance 100% Money back Guaranteed. 1-888816--7128, x-6868 or 702-527-6868

GARAGE & STORAGE SPACE

www.ironhorsegroup.com

HELP WANTED

CURVES Curves Barrhaven We are currently looking for Circuit Coaches to work in a fast paced environment mornings, evenings and weekends - approx 25 hrs. Must be energetic, have an interest in health, nutrition & fitness, be people orientated and have computer skills. Flexibility to work various shifts is a MUST. Apply ASAP to: c u r v e s n e peans@bellnet.ca

HELP WANTED

NEEDED NOW-AZ DRIVERS & OWNER OPS-. We seek profes sional safety-minded drivers to join a leading int’l carrier with finan cial stability; competi tive pay and benefits; great lanes; quality freight; on dry vans on ly. Brand new trucks available. Lease pro gram Available. Cal Celadon Canada, Kitchener. 1-800-332 0518 www.celado ncanada.com MECHANIC NEEDED IN OTTAWA Great Pay / Benefits! Diesel / Bus Exp 310-T license APPLY ONLINE www.stocktransporta tion.com PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1000 Weekly Brochures from home 100% Legit! Income is guaranteed! No experi ence required. Enrol Today! www.national-work.com

VACATION PROPERTIES

PLANNING A TRIP TO FLORIDA? Search from 100s of Florida’s top vacation rentals. All Regions of Florida from 2- to 8-bdrm homes. Condos, Villas, Pool Homes - we have them all!

Rates starting as low as $89/night On your next Florida Vacation do not be satisfied with a hotel room when you can rent your own private Vacation home! U S IIT US IIS T V S T V OW A AT N NOW

The best place to start planning your Florida Get-Away!

CL13935

HEALTH & HOMECARE

CL22162

OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

34


35 CAREERS

CAREERS

MOTHERS.... IF YOU ARE EXPECTING OR HAVE A NEW BABY

Job Title: Number of Positions: Department: Location:

Place Your Birth Announcement in your Community Newspaper (includes photo & 100 words) and recieve your Welcome Wagon FREE information and GIFTS from local businesses. ded) lu c in Please register on line at (tax www.havingababy.ca or call 1-866-283-7583

$20.00

Redeem this coupon at the Kanata Kourier-Standard Office Attention: Classified Department 80 Colonnade Rd N. Nepean, ON K2E7L2 Ph:(613) 224-3330 Fax: (613) 224-2265

Official Sponsor to Welcome Wagon Ottawa Region

BABY PROGRAM

Rope in

your clientele Our wide variety of advertising can help you find the right type of advertisement for your business. Whether it’s an ad, coupon, feature, flyer, or whatever your needs are, we are happy to help find what best suits your business. For More Information Call 1.877.298.8288 or Visit yourottawaregion.com

Metroland Media - Ottawa Region has got you covered.

JOB POSTING

JOB POSTING

CL18011

REGIONAL SALES MANAGER Direct Target Promotions (www.dtarget.com) Established in 1989 Is the largest Canadian Publisher of Direct Mail Publications with over 35 million copies printed annually in the greater Toronto, Hamilton, Montreal and Ottawa areas. We require an ambitious, self-motivated, team player with outstanding communication & interpersonal skills to head up the growth and expansion into the Ottawa region’s market. The ideal candidate would have more than 3 years experience in advertising sales or similar. Strong skills at developing new accounts and maintaining existing accounts with proven professional sales techniques are essential. The successful candidate will enjoy a rewarding career & excellent compensation package of salary, expenses and incentives. Car is a must. Email resume to tg@dtarget.com

BIRTHS

Full-Time – Reporter/Photographer 1 Editorial Department Kemptville

Are you looking for a fast-paced, creative and challenging work environment? Is working with energetic, passionate people the right place for you? Do you have a flair for writing? Do you enjoy contributing to a team? Do you have a passion for news and features and capturing the essence of every story? Do you have an eye for design and a willingness to learn? Are you detail-oriented, with superior written and verbal communication skills? Are you web-savvy? Job Summary: We are currently seeking a Reporter/ Photographer for The Advance, located in Kemptville. Primary duties will include interviewing, writing stories, shooting photos and videos and uploading content to the web. Copy editing, layout of pages and proofreading will also be required. The successful candidate will be a confident, motivated, flexible self-starter with extensive news experience and strong news judgment. Proficiency in Adobe InDesign and Photoshop will be considered assets. Qualifications • College or University degree/diploma in journalism or relevant experience • At least two years experience in a busy newsroom • Detail-oriented with superior writing, editing, page layout and English-language skills • A commitment to quality and the ability to manage a multitude of tasks • Willingness to embrace change and advance the corporate vision • Proven results driver • Must be able to work well independently • Ability to be creative and have vision for a strong newspaper layout • Ability to adhere to daily deadlines a necessity Reporting to the Managing Editor - Urban Ottawa Group, the successful applicant for this union position will have news reporting experience as well as the creativity and drive necessary to produce a superior product in constantly changing times. Interested and qualified candidates should submit their resumes by November 26, 2010. Suzanne Landis Managing Editor Email: suzanne.landis@metroland.com

Time to Get Your Own Place? Find your answer in the Classifieds – in print & online! Go to yourclassifieds.ca or call 1.877.298.8288

Job Title:

Full-Time - Advertising Sales Representatives

Department: Advertising Department Location: Ottawa Are you looking for a fast-paced, creative and challenging work environment? Is working with energetic, passionate people focused on winning the right place for you? Metroland Media – Ottawa Region office has excellent opportunities for individual’s that are committed to building a career in sales; this is an entry level position with huge growth potential. You will be asked to produce results and devote time and effort required to consistently improve results. The candidate we seek will demonstrate exceptional abilities in... • Prospecting and closing customers with advertising sales opportunities. • Cold-calling new or non-serviced businesses in Ottawa and surrounding area. • Creative thinking style and an ability to problem-solve • Self-starter with loads of initiative who needs minimal direction • High energy and a positive attitude • Excellent verbal and written skills • Literate in computer skills including Microsoft Word, Excel • Driven for success • Excellent organizational skills This is a career position. You like to produce results and devote whatever time and effort is required to consistently produce improved results. Remuneration includes: Base Salary Car Allowance Commissions Bonus incentive plan Benefits package and group RSP plan Post Secondary Education an asset but not a pre-requisite. Interested candidates are asked to forward their resumes to: Nancy Gour Metroland Media – Ottawa Region ngour@metroland.com We appreciate the interest of all applicants; however only those selected for an interview will be contacted Job Category: Sales

CL22159

FOR RENT 1-BEDROO M APT. M ove in tomorrow. Affordable mon rent. Call No rma 555.321 thly 0

CL22191

November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

HELP WANTED


HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Door to door delivery once a week. Must have vehicle. Areas of delivery are - Ottawa east, - Ottawa Central - Vanier - Orleans areas Please contact by email only. Looking for people to start as soon as possible. No collections. Top dollar paid

Contact: paula.clarke@metroland.com HOUSES FOR RENT

Ottawa South/Barrhaven This Week One day per week delivery Please contact Lori Sommerdyk for further information about routes available in your area 613-221-6246

Email lori.sommerdyk@metroland.com

$300 MOVE-IN BON U S - K A N ATA - F O R RENT: Stunning Executive Townhouse, 4+1 bdrm, 2000sqft., finished basement, 3.5 baths, 5 appliances, garage. Contact Allan 613-831-6003; info1@ip-mex.com

3 bedroom townhouse, 1.5 baths, 2 appliances, unfinished basement, one parking spot. $1000 per month plus utilities.

Contract Administrator

Local, established company is looking for a Customer Service/Administration person to complete our team. Your duties Include but are not limited to: • Interoffice and Outgoing Mail Correspondence • Inventory Control • Shipping/Receiving • Processing Sales/Repair Orders • Processing and Tracking Rental Contracts • Telemarketing • General Office Duties Permanent Full Time with Company Benefits 8-5 Monday-Friday MUST HAVE: • Strong Organizational Skills • Ability to Multitask • Positive Attitude with a willingness to learn Nice to Have: • Sales Experience • Online Database Experience • Computer/Printer Repair Experience Salary TBD Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Please forward your resume and covering letter in confidence to bhobbs@geoshack.ca or fax at (613)-225-8111. Note resumes submitted without a covering letter will not be considered. CL22197

Tracking the movements of several projects simultaneously, and triggering action as necessary to ensure required schedule. Some electronics knowledge is an asset.

www.geoshack.ca

Don’t forget to ask about our signing bonus

FIREWOOD BINGO

CLEAN DRY SEASONED hardwood, mostly Maple, cut and split, 2 years old. Free delivery. Kindling available. Call today 613-489-3705.

KANATA-HAZELDEAN LION’S CLUB BINGO. Dick Brule Community Centre, 170 Castlefrank Road, Kanata. Every Monday, 7:00pm.

FIREWOOD FOR SALE Dried, split hardwood firewood for sale. STITTSVILLE LEGION $140.00/cord taxes & HALL, Main St, every MUSIC, DANCE delivery included. Call: Wed, 6:45 p.m. INSTRUCTIONS 613-838-4066 or WORLD CLASS DRUM- email: harmonygard MER (of Five Man Elec- ens@sympatico.ca. trical Band) is now acFOR cepting students. Pri- FIREWOOD vate lessons, limited en- SALE. Early Bird rollment, free consulta- Special. All Hardtion. Call Steve, 613- wood. 613-836-6637 831-5029. w w w. s t eve h o l l i n g FIREWOOD, HARDworth.ca WOOD, Dried for 18 months. Suffolk Ram PERSONALS Lambs for breeding. 613-256-3258 cell 613 620-3258 Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? GERRY BLAIR We can help. & SON Al-Anon/Alateen FamiDry Firewood - ALL ly Groups 613-860-3431 HARDWOOD. Cut, Split & Delivered. 613-259-2723 LOVE! MONEY! LIFE! #1 Psychics! 1-877478-4410. CreditHARDC a r d s / D e p o s i t . MIXED $3.19/min 18+ 1-900- WOOD 8’ lengths, excellent quality, by 783-3800. www.mys the tandem load. ticalconnections.ca We also purchase standing timber and hard or soft pulp FIREWOOD wood, also outdoor furnace wood ALL CLEAN, DRY, available, call 613SPLIT HARDWOOD 432-2286 - READY TO BURN. $140/FACE CORD (tax incl.), (approx. BINGO 4’x8’x16”). reliable free delivery to NepeLEGION an, Kanata, Stittsville, KANATA Sundays, Richmond, Manotick. BINGO, 1/2 orders 1:00pm. 70 Hines Road. For info, 613available 592-5417. 223-7974.

Send responses to: ABSOPULSE Electronics Ltd. 110Walgreen Road, Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0 e-mail: marg@absopulse.com Fax: 613-836-7488 NO telephone calls please HELP WANTED

CARS FOR SALE kept. n. Garage Mint conditio e! Call at. Must-se Runs gre 555-3210

613-831-3445 613-257-8629

or

HOUSES FOR RENT

KANATA Available Immediately

Permanent Full Time

Find that car you’ve always wanted in the Classifieds. your classifieds ...your way Find your answer in the Classifieds – in print & online! Go to yourclassifieds.ca or call 1.877.298.8288

Capital Tickets is seeking part-

time Call Centre Operators and Supervisors at Scotiabank Place. These are front line positions, responsible for ensuring guests have a positive experience when purchasing tickets for all events sold by Capital Tickets. The successful candidates will have a minimum of one year customer service experience and be available to work flexible hours during weekdays. Bilingual in English and French is an asset. Please submit your resume in confidence no later than 12:00 Noon, Nov 26’10, to the People Department, Senators Sports & Entertainment: 1000 Palladium Drive, Ottawa, K2V 1A5; by facsimile at 613-599-4283; or email to employment@ottawasenators.com. CL22155

OZ Optics is currently seeking to fill the following positions:

Senior Production Scheduler He/She will be responsible for creating, managing, scheduling and maintaining production builds in the Master Schedule. Manage/Supervise the efforts of the Production Schedulers. Requirement: 7 years experience. Strong organizational and communication skills.

Accountant/Office Manager - China Operations This position will be based in JiaXing, China, after a few months of training in Ottawa, Canada. The successful candidate will handle all the accounting, bookkeeping and record-keeping functions of our China subsidiary. This will include various aspects of the Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable functions for the China Company. They will also be involved in financial statement preparation, preparing journal entries, completing account reconciliations, the preparation of payroll and various financial analysis. In addition, the successful candidate will fulfill the duties of Office Manager. In this capacity, they will handle day-to-day office matters, handle various administrative duties and other office tasks as they may arise. Must be a team player and possess a strong work ethic, have a strong attention to detail and be able to meet tight deadlines.

Order Desk Administrator Reporting to the Customer Order Management Manager Performs all administrative support functions required to service Sales Staff and meet customer/potential customer requirements in a timely and efficient manner Order processing and Customer Service, providing a link between customers and manufacturing procedure.

CL21738

local community newspapers.

CARRIERS NEEDED

HELP WANTED

CL22240

Looking for adult newspaper carriers to deliver

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Local Electronics Manufacturer seeks staff for the following position:

ADULT CARRIERS NEEDED

CL19054

OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

36

Interested candidates may submit their resumes to: OZ Optics 219 Westbrook Road, Ottawa, ON K0A 1L0 Attention: Human Resources or by fax to 613-831-2151 or by e-mail to hr@ozoptics.com For more information, visit www.ozoptics.com Or drop resume off at the OZ Optics Reception Desk

Go to: yourclassifieds.ca or call: 1.877.298.8288

PRINT & ONLINE

Classifieds made easy. Your way.


37 November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

LOOK ONLINE @ yourottawaregion.com 1.877.298.8288

Business & Service Directory Handyman Services

Home Maintenance, Repairs & Renovations

Rob 613.762.5577

Chris 613.276.2848

(Ottawa West)

• Tile and grout work • Caulking • Flooring • ... and more

TREE REMOVAL Bruce 613 880 9176

e-mail info@cutquick.com

• Free Estimates • Best Rates • Senior Discounts

Call 613-566-7077

(Ottawa East)

visit us at www.cutquick.com

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25 Years Experience “Revitalize with colour”

CL22153

599-4556

PAINTING

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CL21890

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WE recycle 99% of all waste materials... Call today for a free estimate

Call Steve at 613-298-3655 steve99@ steve99 @bell.net

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HOUSING

PAINTING

TITAN PAINTING

Helen’s Nail Care & Esthetics

1993 INC. “Your Residential Painters”

“Revitalize with colour”

CL22198

48

•20+ Years Experience •10% Seniors Discounts

25 Years Experience

00 per

Fully Insured • Independently Owned and Operated in Ottawa since 1998 * Electrical work performed by ECRA contractors CL22176

NAIL CARE CL22214

Electrical Contractors Division of Kulla Inc. E.S.A. Lic# 7006775

ABdec Painting

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$

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KULLA

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PAINTING TRILLIUM PAINTING & DECORATING

HANDY MAN

All your Drywall Needs! And More.

(call for Free estimate)

CL22216

PAINTING

WOW DRYWALL INC.

613-292-5544

Carmen DiNuzzo carman65@sympatico.ca CL21976 CL22217

HANDY MAN

DRYWALL

PAINTING

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www.cherrypick.ca

CL22210

Bus. 613.286.0684 Cell 613.617.1309

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CL22215

• Friendly & clean service • Stipple repairs/airless sprayingng • Written Guarantee • Same week service

CL21891

• Interior & Exterior • 18 years experience • Quality workmanship

• Carpentry • Painting • Drywall • Plumbing

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CL22109

m $$65 5 aaroro rom om frfo om

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MAINTENANCE

TREE SERVICE Hackett & Hill

Golden Years

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PAINTING

CL22220

classifieds@yourottawaregion.com

CL21896

Call Email

2401 Bank St. Unit #8 (Besides Southway Inn. Hotel) www.helennailcare.com ottawa@helennailcare.com

Bring ad in to get $5 off

Business & Service Directory

UNIVERSAL HOME IMPROVEMENT ADDITIONS - FINISHED BASEMENTS KITCHENS - BATHROOMS - PAINTING DOORS & WINDOWS - REPAIRS FLOORING - EAVESTROUGH - WINDOW CAPPING - INTERLOCK - DRYWALL

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CL22171

Whatever you’re looking for, these businesses ask you to consider them first.


OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

38

Th e

LYity OCoN mmun h this

Ask Us About .....

it a p er w Newsp d feature ad d e

CL13946

Network Classifieds:

Book your Recruitment ad today and receive 15 days on workopolis for only $130* *Placement in this publication is required.

Advertise Across Ontario or Across the Country!

For more information contact Your local newspaper

FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

PERSONALS

A-Z DRIVERS WANTED

BUSINESS SERVICES

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CLASSIFIEDS ... in print & online FOR ONE LOW PRICE! yourclassifieds.ca|PH: 1.877.298.8288|FAX: 613.224.2265 classifieds@yourottawaregion.com


November 18, 2010 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL

424416

39


Only Minutes Away!

Chevrolet Camaro SS Chevrolet Camaro SS 2 0 0 1 0 0 $272* Bi-weekly 2004 2 2

Chevrolet Cobalt LT 7 0 0 $93* Bi-weekly 2

Dodge Durango LTD

Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

$25,888**

$38,888**

35th anniversary vehicle, leather, convertible. P-3560A

Sunroof and Leather. 3,400 kms. PR 3364

2009

Chevrolet Aveo 5DR Hatch

$85* Bi-weekly Plus Taxes 7.35% for 84 Mths

2007

Saturn Sky $176* Bi-weekly Plus Taxes 7.79% for 72 Mths

Plus Taxes 7.35% for 60 Mths

$14,488**

$9,888**

AWD, leather, 5.7L, sunroof, with only 94,000 kms! US1601A

Loaded, auto, air, power windows and locks, with 55,000kms, P-3524a

Chevrolet Avalanche LT 6 0 1 0 $307* Bi-weekly 200 2

$21,888**

$43,888**

Sunroof, auto, air, pw, with 32,000km. 10-2196A

Auto, leather, chromes, convertible. P-3558A

4X4, 20” wheels, DVD and NAV with 20,229km US1604

Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

1@ $32,888** 1@$32,888** 4 available, heated leather with sunroof. US1634

Dodge Dakota Sport Crew 0 1 0 $166* Bi-weekly 2

Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

l ! a k i e c e p S We

Plus Taxes 7.79% for 60 Mths

Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

$11,888** Cadillac CTS RWD 0 1 $229* Bi-weekly 20

Pontiac EXT Montana $102* Bi-weekly

$10,888** V6, power group, with 93,000 10-2165a

Chevrolet Impala LT 0 1 0 $135* Bi-weekly 2

2009-2010

e h t of

GMC ACADIA

Plus Taxes 7.09% for 60 Mths

1@$18,888** 4 available all under 39,000kms! PR3353

2009

CHEVROLET TRAVERSE

Chevrolet Traverse LS AWD

$207* Bi-weekly Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

$23,488**

$28,888**

4X4 Power Group, 30,000 kms PR-3362

DVD, cloth, with 45,000 kms. 09-2861A.

GMC Acadia SLT AWD 0 1 $258* Bi-weekly 20

GMC Sierra Crew $229* Bi-weekly

$28,888**

$28,888** 4X4, leather with 58,000km P-3511A

2010

1@ $23,488**

Saturn Vue $161* Bi-weekly Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

2010

Buick Enclave $272* Bi-weekly Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

1@ $38,888**

8 Passenger, Leather, Remote Start, Only Fwd, V-6, Power Group, Low kms. 4 Available 16,000 kms. 2 Available

Myers HUGE

Tire Storage Available

Winter Tire Sale!

Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

$207* BI-WEEKLY

Plus taxes

6.99% FOR 84 MTHS 1@$36,888** Heated leather. Only 21,000 kms. 5 Available Chevrolet Tahoe LT 4X4 7 0 $241* Bi-weekly 0 2 2010

Cadillac Escalade

Plus Taxes 6.99% for 60 Mths

$469* Bi-weekly Plus Taxes 6.99% for 84 Mths

$26,888**

4@$66,888**

Sunroof, leather, with 72,000km. 11-6901A

Sunroof, Navigation, DVD, and much more. Only 20,000 kms. 5 Available

Tires from + $ 99

59

plus tax. see store for details. Installation and valve stems extra.

A dollar from every tire sold will be donated to the CHEO Foundation until December 31, 2010

Queensway (417)

613.225.CARS (2277) 1200 Baseline @ Merivale

www.myers.ca

*Payments include all fees only HST and license extra. Bi-weekly payments are for 72/84 months at 7.79/6.99%-7.35% O.A.C. Finance example, $10,000 financed at 7.79% for 72 months, monthly payment is $209.47 COB is $2568.72. **Purchase price includes all fees only HST and license extra.

426846

Merival e

Plus Taxes 6.99% for 72 Mths

Maitland

2008

(Experimental Farm)

Baseline Myers Cadillac Chevrolet

Clyde Me riva le

www.myerschevy.myers.ca

1200 BASELINE RD AT MERIVALE

www.myerschevy.myers.ca

OTTAWA THIS WEEK - CENTRAL - November 18, 2010

40

NEW SHOWROOM

Myers Used Car Centre

Ottawa This Week - Central  

November 18, 2010