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Lettitor

‘Sad Nipple Syndrome’ Jessica Berget Editor-in-Chief

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he human body is so strange. It’s interesting to think about all the things we still don’t know about the science of our flesh vessels. For instance, there is a condition that still confuses and vexes many people—known unofficially as “Sad Nipple Syndrome.” Anyone who experiences it says that when their nipples are aroused or touched, they have an overwhelming sense of dread, anxiety, depression, nausea, and even rage. I know this because I am one of those people. Yes, it’s true. Sometimes when

my chest is touched or stimulated, I experience an overwhelming depression and dread that I can’t explain… and then it just goes away. This is not just something I experience in a sexual context either, sometimes all I need to do is have something brush against my chest and I feel the dread in the pit of my stomach. I always thought it was just me experiencing this until I looked it up. Doing an internet search of the term brings up many forums from Reddit, Women’s Health, and baby community boards of people discussing their experiences. What’s interesting is that this isn’t just reported in women. Both men and women have said they also sometimes

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become incredibly sad or uncomfortable when their nipples are touched. Yet, there is little to no scientific or medical data, studies, or reports about this pectoral phenomenon. Many people might think you are referring to a similar ailment known as Dysphoric milk ejection reflex—a condition that often happens to mothers who are breastfeeding. They experience brief dysphoria before milk ejection. But this condition is generally reported in lactating mothers and there are still many people who are not lactating or have ever been pregnant who experience dread or overwhelming negative emotions when their teats are touched.

Brittney MacDonald Business Manager Athena Little Illustrator

Jessica Berget Editor-in-Chief  editor@theotherpress.ca

Janis McMath Assistant Editor  assistant@theotherpress.ca

Position Open News Editor  news@theotherpress.ca

Sonam Kaloti Arts Editor  arts@theotherpress.ca

Craig Allan Tania Arora EG Manilag Staff Writers

Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor  lifeandstyle@theotherpress.ca

Matthew Fraser Opinions Editor  opinions@theotherpress.ca

Billy Bui Staff Photographer

Position Open Entertainment Editor  humour@theotherpress.ca

Caroline Ho Web Editor  webeditor@theotherpress.ca

Christine Weenk Layout Manager  layout@theotherpress.ca

Nhi 'Jenny' Vo Production Assistant

Lauren Kelly Graphics Manager  graphics@theotherpress.ca

Jacey Gibb Distribution Manager

Atiba Nelson Staff Reporter

Jerrison Oracion Erin Meyers Senior Columnists Victoria Belway James Wetmore Contributors Cover layout by Lauren Kelly and Janis McMath Feature layout by Christine Weenk

In my research, many people cite this condition as the nerves in the chest releasing a fast dose of endorphins which then causes the dysphoria. Or just an irregular case of extra sensitive nipples. But there’s no definitive cause or answer to why this happens, but hopefully awareness will lead to research on the topic and the forming of communities. Limes,

Jessica Berget Jessica Berget

The Other Press has been Douglas College’s student newspaper since 1976. Since 1978 we have been an autonomous publication, independent of the student union. We are a registered society under the Society Act of British Columbia, governed by an eight-person board of directors appointed by our staff. Our head office is located in the New Westminster campus. The Other Press is published weekly during the fall and winter semesters, and monthly during the summer. We receive our funding from a student levy collected through tuition fees every semester at registration, and from local and national advertising revenue. The Other Press is a member of the Canadian University Press (CUP), a syndicate of student newspapers that includes papers from all across Canada. The Other Press reserves the right to choose what we will publish, and we will not publish material that is hateful, obscene, or condones or promotes illegal activities. Submissions may be edited for clarity and brevity if necessary. All images used are copyright to their respective owners.


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News

news // no. 3 • The chaos surrounding fake driving laws • College surprised by legal action • The long goodbye ...and more

New driving laws busted ››The chaos surrounding fake driving laws

Tania Arora Staff Writer

Illustration by Athena Little

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acebook posts from January about new driving laws went viral due to their incredibly strict and unbelievable guidelines. Contrary to the post, there are no new additions to the driving laws effective in February. The fake post that circulated around the internet said that drivers could be ticketed over multiple acts which may lead to distracted driving. Some of them include texting, reading (e.g. books, maps), programming a GPS, watching videos, eating or drinking, smoking or vaping, grooming, adjusting the radio, listening to extremely loud music, and talking to passengers. People who saw these fake laws expressed their frustration in the post’s comments with the government, ICBC, and Alberta ministry of transportation for even coming up with the laws at the first place. What angered them further was the imposing of a penalty of $500 or more in BC and $3000 and up in Alberta with demerits and suspension on repetitive mistakes.

But don’t worry, the RCMP is not actually ticketing people for any of these things. A post from the RCMP website was taken out of context. The webpage talks about things that contribute to distracted driving. The RCMP website reads, “When a driver is distracted or fatigued (mentally and/or physically), they may not be fully focused on the road. Distractions and fatigue can compromise your judgment and affect your ability to drive safely.” It then listed the above-mentioned acts. Although cell phones are a big no-no while driving, the Motor Vehicles Act does not list using a GPS as unlawful. In a 2010 RoadSafeBC document, it even mentions that GPS systems are acceptable under the conditions that it is programmed before the person is driving, it is voice activated, it must not be held in the hand, and it is out of the drivers view and safely secured. Most accidents happen due to distracted driving which can be avoided by planning ahead of time. Cell phones can be avoided by keeping them out of sight or off ringer mode. While these driving laws are fake, it is still important to address the danger of distracted driving.

­Will Douglas offer free menstrual products? ››Faculty member says College is receptive Atiba Nelson Staff Reporter he deadline has come and gone for all public schools in British Columbia to install dispensers that provide free menstrual products to students in school washrooms across the province. Under the power of the School Act, the Ministry of Education required all school boards under their jurisdiction to have policies in place to provide menstrual products to all students who require them by the start of 2020. The policy aims to create positive and inclusive learning environment for all students, as a lack of menstrual products may lead to decreased school attendance when students are menstruating. During the press conference announcing the new education policy, Education Minster Rob Fleming noted “students should never have to miss school, extracurricular, sports or social activities because they can’t afford or don’t have access to menstrual products.” Citing that one in seven Canadian girls has missed school due to lack of menstrual product access—a statistic generated by a study funded by a manufacturer of menstrual hygiene products. Other research from America negates the claims that lack of menstrual products

Photo by Billy Bui

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affects school attendance. Regardless of the research, menstrual product access is seen by many as a right—

as necessary as toilet paper. After advocating for the provision of menstrual products in her child’s school

and pushing the province to include tampons and pads free of charge to public school students, Douglas College professor Selina Tribe and Lisa Smith are pushing Douglas to do the same. Douglas College administration has been receptive to provide free tampons and pads, claimed Tribe in a CBC interview. Although the college features coin dispensers in some washrooms, there is currently no central location where students can regularly receive free menstrual products. Although the Douglas Students Union sometimes may have them in their office. University students across Canada face varying landscapes with regards to the provision of free menstrual products. In the Lower Mainland, University of the Fraser Valley faculty, staff, and students are petitioning the institution to provide products free of charge—while at Thompson Rivers University students can access free menstrual products in several washrooms in the main campus library. The University of Victoria currently offers free menstrual products in select locations across campus; however, only until the end of the 2019 to 2020 school year, as the pilot program seeks student feedback regarding whether the provision of free menstrual products is wanted, needed, or sustainable.


news // no. 4

theotherpress.ca

Faculty association sues college over term limits

Photo by Billy Bui

››College surprised by legal action

Atiba Nelson Staff Reporter

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disagreement between the Douglas College Faculty Association (DCFA) and Douglas College—regarding limiting the number of years a member can serve on an important committee—has found its way to the British Columbia court system for resolution. On this January 21, the DCFA—the union that represents all Douglas College Faculty (including instructors, counselors, and librarians)—filed a claim with the Supreme Court of British Columbia stating that Douglas College did not have the power to limit faculty members to two full consecutive terms of service (or four years) on the Douglas College Education Council,

according to the ‘Petition to the Court’ document obtained by the Other Press. Case file number VLC-S-S-200709 – Douglas College Faculty Association v. Douglas College alleges that the Registrar of Douglas College overstepped its powers (which are outlined in the College and Institutes Act) by amending the Douglas College election rules and procedures. “The DCFA is defending the integrity of the Colleges and Institutes Act and the structures of Education Council,” wrote Jasmine Nicholsfigueiredo, President of the Douglas College Faculty Association when asked for comment by email. The Douglas College Education Council (EdCo) is charged with a number of duties—as laid out in the College and Institutes Act—specifically setting

Douglas College class curriculum content, educational policy, and managing the business affairs of the College. Members sit on the council for two-year terms. Currently, there are 20 voting members on the 2019 to 2020 Educational Council—10 DCFA members (elected by the DCFA) with a mix of Douglas College students, staff, and administrators. Douglas College President Kathy Denton, and Registrar Rella Ng, sit on the council as well—but as non-voting members. The crux of the matter is whether the Douglas College Registrar unilaterally changed the election rules. The Registrar’s alleged rule change affected DCFA President Nicholsfigueiredo, as the English faculty member was barred from running in the election for

membership to the 2019 to 2020 Education Council, as she already served two twoyear terms when the Registrar ruling was instituted—despite being elected President of the DCFA earlier that year. Douglas disagrees with the DCFA and has 21 days from receiving the DCFA petition to respond to the court. “This application came as a surprise to Douglas College, as this issue was discussed with the DCFA last year, and an agreed process was put into place for Education Council to resolve it. The college remains committed to the agreed-upon Education Council bylaw review process, which is expected to be completed in Fall 2020,” commented Sarah Dench, Associate Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs when reached for comment.

The crux of the matter is whether the Douglas College Registrar unilaterally changed the election rules.


news // no. 5

issue 18// vol 46

The long goodbye

››The UK is finally out of the European Union Craig Allan Staff Writer

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n January 31 at 11 am London time, the United Kingdom officially said goodbye to the EU after years of struggling to do so. There were celebrations in the UK, including a display of Big Ben on the Prime Minister’s residence (10 Downing Street) to ring in an independent UK. This was due to the actual Big Ben being under renovation. The UK joined the EU in 1973, back when it was called the European Economic Community. But, as the assembly of countries grew from a trade union to political and economic union, Britain began to feel like its grasp on its independence was being lost. This would lead the UK down the path that would end with them making one of the biggest political decisions of the 2010s. In 2016, Conservative British Prime Minister David Cameron decided to put to bed the question of whether Britain should be in the EU once and for all with a referendum. Cameron would prove to be too confident of the outcome, as Britain voted 52 percent to 48 percent in favour of leaving the EU. After such, the Brexit car was in motion. There were many supposed reasons that led to the UK leaving the EU— including nationalism and populism—but the point was that Britain made its choice and would leave the EU under the guide of a new PM, seeing how Cameron resigned immediately after the final results were read.

With Cameron gone, it would be Theresa May that would get the keys to the Kingdom. Looking to consolidate power, May decided to hold an election to get a majority under her regime (she was appointed PM and not elected). This would backfire on her though, as May would win the election—but with a minority government. This lead her to needing to align with other parties, relying on them to get her Brexit vote through. May would eventually craft a deal with the EU, but the deal was so reviled that even her own party members wouldn’t vote for it. May’s

government was now stuck in a quagmire. They were determined to see Brexit through, but they could not get parliament to vote on the bill. As the date to leave kept being moved back again and again, May saw no way out. On May 24, 2019 almost two years after gaining the position, May was forced to resign. With British politics in shambles, it was clear that Britain was going to need a determined leader to push through the nation’s Brexit dreams. That leader would be Boris Johnson. Johnson was mayor of London from

2008 to 2016, leaving the office a month before the Brexit vote. He was educated in one of the best boarding schools in the country. Like May before him, appointed Johnson decided to call an election to consolidate power too—but, unlike May, he would be incredibly successful. The British public, growing tired of the constant delays of Brexit, voted Johnson’s Conservatives in with a strong majority. This included many ridings that had voted for the opposition Labour Party for decades. After the election, Johnson said to the first time Conservative voters “You may only have lent us your vote, you may not think of yourself as a natural Tory… Your hand may have quivered over the ballot paper before you put your cross in the Conservative box, and you may intend to return to Labour next time round, and if that’s the case, I am humbled that you put your trust in me.” There is still so much work to be done though, because even though Britain has left the EU, it will still abide by EU customs laws until new deals can be crafted and voted on. Many other links will need to be severed and negotiated to reflect the new relationship between Britain and the EU. The end of the year is when the transition period expires. Johnson is hoping that Britain can get the same kind of trade deal that the EU has with Canada. It is not likely due to the fact of Canada and the EU do not have a large trading relationship in general. In the end, leaving the Union is just the beginning of Britain’s EU uncoupling.

Sugar students

››Due to higher tuition costs, luxury dating in Canada rises in popularity Jessica Berget Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Billy Bui

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ecoming a “sugar baby”—someone who exchanges their company for money or gifts—has become increasingly popular for students in Canada as of late. With the financial pressure of school and tuition costs, many students are opting for this path to secure their financial futures and to avoid debt after graduation. One such website for people to find more out about “luxury dating” is SeekingArrangement, a sugar daddy dating website. Website CEO Brandon Wade states in an article for the Vancouver Sun that a 40 percent increase in tuition costs may be reason for the site’s popularity among college students. According to SeekingArrangement, the largest “sugar daddy dating site,” the number of Canadian university student who seek out sugar relationships rose 44 percent from last year. They also released a list of the fastest growing sugar baby universities in Canada for 2019. Douglas College did not make the list, but some of its sister schools did. Placing at number one for the 2018 list was the University of Toronto—with an estimated 1,158 total number of students who are engaged in a sugar relationship. Closer to home, the University of British

Columbia had 359 total students; The University of Fraser Valley had 175 students; Simon Fraser University had 486. The list for most members in 2019 did not have as much local representation as previous years, seeing how SFU had 270 and no other local universities made the list, but many new schools joined the list. According to the previously mentioned article in the Vancouver Sun, the average age for a sugar baby is 26 years old. The average sugar daddy age is 41 years, and “daddies” usually have an annual income of around $250,000. A 2015 CBC article says that over 40 percent of sugar babies are students or graduates and that 34 percent of sugar daddies are married. The most common job for sugar daddies are tech entrepreneurs, CEO’s, developers, lawyers, financiers, and physicians, according to Radio Canada International. The most common occupations for sugar babies are students, actors, models, teachers, cosmologists, nurses, and flight attendants. SeekingArrangement averages that Canadian sugar babies receive a monthly allowance of almost $3000, along with other benefits. Similarly, according to a 2010 Statistics Canada report, the average Canadian university student accrues more than $26,000 in student debt.


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Arts

• Review of ‘Clio a Giant Clitoris Puppet Learning to Love Herself’ • A Valentine’s Day photo story • ‘Sex Education’ season 2 review ...and more

Sexy songs for your Valentine ››Tracks about love and romance Sonam Kaloti Arts Editor

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“Ghostboy”— Robotaki EDM in nature, Robotaki’s 2016 hit is fun, upbeat, and features casual female vocals. The lyrics are playful, with Claire Ridgley singing, “I swear I fell in love with a ghost boy, I know cause I just see him when we under the sheet,” referring to only getting to be with the boy she loves when they’re hooking up. The song plays on the ghost sheet costume generally worn on Halloween. Via Robotaki’s SoundCloud, “Ghostboy is about needing someone you can never really have, which makes you want him/her even more. Some people will always be a ghost to most, even those they keep close.” “Got Your Love” — Dirtyphonics and RIOT Harder electronic music with an industrial and completely unexpected bass drop that literally knocked my socks off the first time I heard it. The straight-to-the-point lyrics

Still from 'Sex' music video by Eden

alentine’s Day or not, if there’s one thing couples love, it’s playlists dedicated to their significant other. Embellished with a pretty picture, a title in old Latin (see: “ab imo pectore” meaning “from the bottom of my heart,” or the Irish phrase, “a chuisle mo chroí” meaning “O, pulse of my heart”), and a cryptic playlist bio—now you’re set! Now for the music… I’ve got you covered.

describe the meaning of the song: “You got your love, your sweet love; And keep the fires burning baby, it keeps my fire burning […] We set the place on fire.” “Falling Autumn” — Alayna This slow and sensual R&B track features soft drums, bass, a vibey guitar, and reverb-drenched synths. The focus stays on Alayna Powley’s soft and airy, yet resonant voice—one which effortlessly dances over difficult runs. In an interview with The Line of Best Fit, Powley says that “ ‘Falling Autumn’ is about finding the stillness and comfort in someone else, it's about connecting with someone on a deeper level and being confident in what you want, crave and feel.” “Sex” — The 1975 This list wouldn’t be complete without this song. It was written by Matty Healy at only

19 years old and became one of the band’s staple tracks. During a Last.fm session, Healy said, “ ‘Sex’ is a love letter to every prudish 17-yearold girl. Everyone’s been there with that indecisive, flirty girl who just can’t make her mind up. It gets labeled as being quite brash, but it’s very romantic.” The track is rock, dance, pop, everything really. The best part is when you know the lyrics, because that’s when you and your partner can both sing “You say no!” at the top of your lungs during the chorus. “Sex” — EDEN Might be a little too on the nose to include not one, but two songs titled “Sex” in this article but fuck it—pun intended. It’s raw, soulful, and sad—yet, it is also a little hopeful. This song, unlike its predecessor, is much darker in it’s meaning, though

of course you can listen to it with any meaning you’d like. The chorus goes, “we're just having sex, no, I would never call it love. But love, oh no, I think I'm catching feelings,” which sounds positive, if it weren’t for the part where the speaker would like to move on from this girl but finds himself unable to. It’s pretty sad really, so here’s to all the broken hearts on V-Day. “Glue” — Somewhere Else featuring RAYE Possibly one of the most upbeat and dance-y songs I’ve ever heard. It begins with a brass section intro and skillfully introduces more percussion parts until it naturally moves into a heavy drum machine beat… but it continues alternating with the brass between verses and the chorus. RAYE’s vocals are infectiously joyous. The chorus contains the lyrics, “Lemme do, lemme do, what I want to you— lemme have my way with you. If I have my way, I'd be turning up your temperature. If I have my way, you'd be blowing up my cellular.” Straight-forward and to the point, this song screams confident young love. Oh, and a notable lyric: “Never really cared about what I look like: now I’m putting on my make-up, the fuck?” There are thousands of sex songs out there. Most are fun, some are sad, but hopefully this list inspires your Valentine’s Day playlist! Have fun lovebirds—and remember: don’t be silly, wrap your willy.

Unleash all your fears and desires Tania Arora Staff Writer

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etflix just raised the bar by creating a show that highlights all the issues we don’t talk about. Although the British series is titled Sex Education, it portrays all the fears, hidden desires, insecurities, and emotions that surround sex. The show is not simply a droll school education of sex. This great work was created by Laurie Nunn—a producer who has been successful in extracting the best out of the characters. The season begins with Otis (Asa Butterfield) who is a late bloomer in exploring his sexual urges. He is trying to get closer to his new girlfriend, Ola (Patricia Allison). He struggles through the entire season and finally has a realization at the end. Ola, while trying to fix her relationship with Otis, gets to explore her sexuality. She also spends the series trying keep Otis away from Maeve (Emma Mackey). The show gets spicier when Otis’ mother and well-known sex psychiatrist, Dr. Jean (Gillian Anderson), is appointed at

his school. The last series showed how Otis bagged a part-time job where he gives sex advice to students. His partnership with Maeve ended last time…but this time they are back again. Although, the two have competition this time.  After facing backlash, threats, and unwelcoming smiles, Eric (Ncuti Gatwa) finally accepts who he is and what he wants. While the new French guy is after him, he comes to realize who he is after.  In the series of new relationships, one more is added. Ever imagine dating someone whose parent is dating your parent? This season has lots of awkwardness in the changing of family dynamics—and it’s great to watch. Another important incident happens to Aimee (Aimee Lou Wood) that shakes her to her core. She keeps running away from her fears… until one day, she faces them. And

Promotional image for 'Sexual Education' via Netflix

››‘Sex Education’ season 2 review

when she takes that step ahead, her friends are there to support her. This show is for you if you want to see meaningful character development. The raunchy yet romantic series is blended with sex, emotions, romance, and

...a show which highlights every issue we don’t talk about.

confusion… but ensures to enlighten and brighten your mood when you sit down to watch it. The relationships are all tangled. Everyone is trying to explore what they like and what they don’t while learning to accept that it’s okay to not be okay, and everything is normal. We are just human beings with different bodies and different needs—we are intentionally created to be different from each other. There is no point trying to be someone else, and this show speaks that truth.


arts // no. 7

issue 18// vol 46

An analysis of the short films nominated for Academy Awards Jerrison Oracion Senior Columnist

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019 was an interesting year for cinema. Many of the films that were released last year could be categorized as “Trump cinema” because many made references to the US President. There were multiple jokes made about politics during the show additionally—the ceremony was very political in many ways. While the feature films discussed many of these hot partisan topics, the short films that were nominated this year did not reference such issues. The short films did talk about other important subjects though, even—surprisingly—the animated ones do. The Vancity Theatre offers the opportunity to watch the nominated short films, so here is my analysis of them. The movies that were nominated for Best Live Action Short Film this year are A Sister, Brotherhood, The Neighbors’ Window, Saria, and Nefta Football Club. A Sister involves a 911 dispatcher helping a woman who is held hostage by her husband after being raped. She even

must go undercover to make sure that her husband does not find her. Brotherhood shows a Tunisian family of sheep hunters in a dispute, while Saria is a social-issue short film based on the real story of the burning of a group of girls in a Guatemalan camp after they attempted to escape abuse. The short film that won Best Live Action Short Film this year is The Neighbors’ Window, and it fully deserved the win. It follows a married couple watching another couple who just moved in next door. The film masters the balance of comedy and drama. There is also Nefta Football Club, a movie featuring two cocaine dealers trying to find their (literal) drug mule, yet instead, two kids find the drugs instead. The film has many humorous scenes throughout; it is very much like the Danny Boyle film Millions, a film about a young boy who finds a bag with a lot of money in it. Usually, the animated short films are fun and heartwarming. This year’s nominated short films are not so. They talk about critical topics and feel like they were made for adults instead of children.

Promotional image for 'Sisters'

››Dark topics were discussed in this year’s shorts

The short films that were nominated for Best Animated Short Film this year are Hair Love, Daughter, Sister, Memorable, and Kitbull. Hair Love (which was shown before The Angry Birds Movie 2) involves a father trying to style his daughter’s hair while his wife is absent. Daughter and Memorable were like watching art-house stop-motion films. Especially Daughter— it looked like a Spike Jonze film, though it has smooth cinematography. Sister should have gotten the Best Animated Short Film this year because it offers a different debate on abortion— specifically, forced abortions. It is a

film where a man talks about what his childhood would have been like if he had a sister in China in the 1990s—a time when the country had the infamous one-child policy. The short film is a student film, impressively independently produced and directed by Siqi Song. Kitbull (which was shown before Toy Story 4) shows a cat and a dog having common ground as only Pixar can. The film tackles the issue of pet abuse in a meaningful way. While the short films that were nominated this year are all from different countries, they talk about issues that everyone can relate to.

Playing with the puppet

Photo via VancouverPresents.com

››Review of ‘Clio a Giant Clitoris Puppet Learning to Love Herself’

Craig Allan Staff Writer

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n the beds of numerous Canadians resides a mysterious figure. Some have said it does not exist, some have said it inspires madness, but overall it is something that many are unsure about. This enigma is the female pleasure spot known as the clitoris. Just saying the word may inspire laughter or awkwardness—but why? Why does this piece of the female anatomy make people so uncomfortable, and why do we undermine it to the point of questioning its existence? These are the

questions that the people of Puppets Not Patriarchy, a physical theatre troupe, will answer in the most logical way possible: with a big puppet clitoris named Clio, in the play “CLIO—A Giant Puppet Clitoris Who Learns to Love Herself.” Clio is the brainchildof puppeteers Julia Muncs and Hannah Pearson. They created the puppet to teach people about the clitoris. The play came out of their own desire to feature this too seldom talked about organ in a light-hearted way. The show itself is one of comedic and thoughtful musings about the female anatomy. Whether it’s a poor date with

a too-rough gentleman, or the discovery of a vibrator, Clio takes you on a journey through her world. Her goal is to feel less alienated and invisible, and to be understood to the same degree that her penis counterpart is. The show is funny, fresh, and thoroughly enjoyable. Actors and puppeteers Muncs, Pearson, and Stephanie Wong deliver their show with a wonderfully high-spirited and playful vibe—yet they still find time to fit in some serious moments into the production. A monologue from Pearson, where which she talks about her struggles with pleasing men

whole also not fully understanding how to please herself, was a particularly strong highlight. Her struggles and experiences felt raw and honest. This can also be appreciated during the transitions, where audio from the women in production discuss their experience with sexual education in school and other moments of discovery in unraveling the mystery behind the clitoris. Other highlights of the show include a tour of the clitoris from a woman with a thick Australian accent—played by stage manager and actual Australian Maddi Silvia—and an entertaining ukulele song from Wong. The show takes itself seriously (as serious as you can with a giant puppet clitoris)…yet not too seriously. It hits the right balance between informative and funny. Muncs, Pearson, and Wong hope that the show will really take off, and even have visions of teaching it in schools. One can see from attending the show that there is an educational value to it. I definitely learned more than I thought I would going into the show—especially from the segment where they talk of the historical myths about the clitoris that were seen as fact by many throughout the ages. The only fault with “CLIO” is that the play itself is too short. The show never drags and keeps you wholly engaged—so much so that I was sad to see it end after only 40 minutes. The show will leave you pulsating for more. “CLIO—A Giant Puppet Clitoris Who Learns to Love Herself” will be running at The Art of Love Sex Shop on 369 W Broadway on February 11 and 14. Tickets can be bought at artofloving.ca


arts // no. 8

theotherpress.ca

Love, lust, and desire ››A Valentine’s Day photo story

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(1) Tattoo by Charline Bataille via charlinnebataille on Instagram (2) “Lovers” by John Kenn Mortensen via johnkennmortensen on Instagram (3) “Civilization has only changed our way of life, But barbarism has changed the world.” by Xue Jiye (4) 2010 watercolor pencil by Xue Jiye via xue.jiye on Instagram (5) “Are You Here,” “Bad Habits,” “Every Inch of You,” and “Bittersweet” by Alyssa D. Silos via alythuh on Instagram

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• Amazing vegan dessert recipes • Sex without dating—the new trend • What's happening? ...and more

Photo by Morgan Hannah

Life & Style

life & style // no. 9

Amazing vegan dessert recipes ››Nourish your appetite and your curiosity about veganism! Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor

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ometimes when riding the SkyTrain, I notice ads about going vegan— something I’ve seriously considered recently. These ads broadcast that going vegan will help save the planet. While I can agree to some of the facts of that statement, seeing how a lot of farmland could be saved and repurposed if we all didn’t eat meat and dairy, the diet change is still a big commitment that I just haven’t taken on yet. Why though? It’s not like I’d be missing out on my favourite meal of the day (dessert) or anything… maybe it’s time to nourish my curiosity, my body, and hopefully help my planet. Here are some vegan dessert recipes, inspired by the idea of change without making much of a change: Mini Raw Vegan Matcha Cheesecakes These are the perfect dessert to help ease your way into the vegan lifestyle. I’ve always been a fan of cheesecake and matcha, so why not combine the two and make it vegan! It will blow your mind that something so decadent could also be vegan… and kinda healthy, too! The base is sweet and crunchy—the filling is smooth and rich. This no-bake recipe requires only eight ingredients and a blender or food processor.

Ingredients: Base: 1 cup walnuts 1 cup medjool dates (pitted) Filling: 1 and 1/2 cups raw cashews 1 lemon (juiced) 1/4 cup coconut oil (melted) 2/3 cup full fat coconut milk 1/2 cup maple syrup 1 tbsp matcha power Method: In a high-speed blender (or food processor), pulse walnuts and dates together until a crumbly dough is formed. Press about 1 to 1 1/2 tbsp of the base mixture into a non-stick muffin pan. Blend the remaining ingredients for cheesecake filling until completely smooth and pour into each muffin tin. Freeze for at least two to three hours. Let it sit at room temperature for 10 minutes before serving. Vegan and Gluten-Free Sweet Potato Brownies The best way to get your serving of veggies in is with this recipe by Detoxinista! Moist, gooey, and fudge-y brownies made with sweet potato!!! They’re scrumptious, vegan, and gluten-free. Who would’ve thought veggies could taste soo good—it doesn’t get better than this, does it? Oh wait, it does! Turns out sweet potatoes are an excellent

replacement for eggs in baking, so now y’all have something new to experiment with in the kitchen. Ingredients: 3/4 cup mashed sweet potato (steamed, then mashed) 1/2 cup creamy almond butter (use raw almond butter for best flavour) 1/2 cup cacao powder , or cocoa powder (unsweetened) 1 cup coconut sugar 1/3 cup gluten-free flour mix 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips (use a dairy-free brand to keep the recipe strictly vegan!) Method: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a nine-inch square pan with parchment paper. In an adequately sized bowl, put together sweet potato, almond butter, cacao powder, coconut sugar, flour, baking powder, vanilla extract, and salt. Stir until the batter has a relatively smooth consistency. Carefully fold in the chocolate chips. Put batter in the nine-inch pan and use a spatula to smooth. Bake until edges are dry and the brownies have expanded in the centre—this will take 35 to 40 minutes. Brownies must completely cool before you cut them!

Vegan Hazel Nut and Chocolate Energy Balls Probably about the easiest dessert or snack item one can make, with only five ingredients needed! No recipe required… really! But in case you need one, here is one from Cupful of Kale. Also, for the record, they’re dairy-free, gluten-free— and if that’s not enough, they’re also free of refined sugar! Ingredients: 200g (about 10) fresh medjool dates (dates are amazing!) 1/2 cup hazelnuts 2 big tbsp of nut butter 1.5 tbsp cocoa powder, good quality 2 tbsp maple syrup Method: As usual, preheat the oven—this time to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the hazelnuts on a baking tray and pop them into the oven for 10 minutes; flip them five minutes in. Once 10 minutes have passed, remove them from the oven and let them cool. Then rub them with paper towels to remove their skins. Pour the hazelnuts into food processor, and finely chop them up. Put in remaining ingredients; pulse until the dates are blended and the mixture is sticky. Roll into balls. Eat! They last in the fridge for a week at maximum.


Sex Work in Canada An interview with Emele Devine on the current industry BY ANONYMOUS

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ex work is known by many names. Escorting, companionship, and service providers just to name a few. However you say it, the meaning is clear. The Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act (PCEPA) has been in place for 5 years now. The law was adopted after the Canadian Supreme Court of Canada shot down Canada’s prostitution laws in the case of Bedford v. Canada. How is this law affecting the community of sex workers? To answer this question and many more is Emele Devine. A sex worker herself, Devine has worked tirelessly for the rights of sex workers in the Vancouver area. A few of her many accomplishments include frequently volunteering for local nonprofits that assist people in the Vancouver sex trade and giving speeches advocating for the decriminalization of sex work at many events. The Other Press: How did you get involved in sex work? Emele Devine: “Sometimes I feel that any time I have exchanged emotional labour for a perk, I have participated in sex work. Relationships where I benefitted from something my partner had—I can see that as sex work. Formally though, I answered a recruiting ad on Backpage in 2015. I got set up with a professional persona, ad, and photos. I answered email inquiries and booked my first clients." OP: Why do you like doing sex work? ED: "It allows me to utilize the best of my skills and knowledge to help make a real difference in someone's life. I work to my energy and interest levels, while still making enough to pay off debt, make monthly donations, and save for my future. I feel like I'm living my best life, on my terms, and in a place that I can explore and celebrate myself."

OP: What is a cost associated with sex work that people may not realize? ED: “Sex work is a combination of physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual tiredness. It's holding space and validating another human being; the cost of such work is difficult to comprehend without actually experiencing how laborious it is. In this profession you also spend an absurd amount of time doing maintenance since you're self-employed and selling the brand of you and your life." OP: People may think that sex work is as simple as having sex for money. What is a point that people may not expect? ED: “BDSM and cuddling are as therapeutic as conventional therapy. Just as everyone learns differently, everyone heals differently. The stigma and prejudice against sexuality keeps a lot of people from getting help.” OP: There is a perception that the women who do sex work are uneducated. Is this accurate? ED: “A lot of sex workers are incredibly formally educated but are underemployed in the workforce. […] Many forms of continuing/higher education “don't count” in the eyes of many if there isn't a certificate at the end, or if it wasn't taught at a traditional institution.” OP: Are terms like “prostitute” and “hooker” considered derogatory? ED: "Language in every community has its share of controversy, and sex work is no exception. Some choose to reclaim historically hateful words, while others would prefer that the terms are taken out of regular use. I prefer to use a wide range of terms for my work that I can tailor to my audience. Where "escort" may be ambiguous to some, "hooker" is definitive in meaning, but also demeaning in use. “Sex worker” is the most neutral and current term."


OP: What’s the most important thing people should know about sex work and sex workers? ED: “Everyone can be a sex worker, but it doesn't mean that everyone should be one. It's difficult work to do well while maintaining your health. The work should not be taken lightly. It's accessible… but is best done from a place of choice. Penalizing sex work itself is not helpful; systemic changes are more effective at reducing ‘desperation sex work.’” OP: Though the Nordic Law is in place as a deterrent to sex work, there still seem to be a lot of active sex workers for a job with no legal clients. Are the police actually arresting people who take part in the purchasing of sex? ED: “In Vancouver, the VPD are instructed that in lieu of any other crime in the city, to leave sex workers to their work. Unless there's damage being done to people or property, there is no need for them to intervene in our affairs. If the sex being purchased is between consenting adults, there's not much reason to arrest. However, in instances of minors and trafficked people, there is more than adequate basis to conduct arrests.” OP: Outside of decriminalization, what are some of the main issues facing sex workers in 2020? ED: “Advertising is a big one. The ability to

affordably advertise and work in groups would go a long way in ensuring our security. Not having our content filtered or blocked on social media platforms, as well as having our profiles not removed from dating sites would also normalize sex for everyone. When it comes to housing and employment, I’d say that many sex workers fear being evicted as a result of their work. Additionally, they fear being fired from their civilian jobs. Stigma unfairly casts us as unreliable and undesirable.” OP: If people want to educate themselves on sex work in Canada, where should they go? ED: “PACE Society, Wish Society, SWAN, and Living in Community are all local organizations that work with sex workers of varying backgrounds and have a wealth of information. Advice blogs such as Lola Davina's are amazing sources of information that often link to other groups and more specific knowledge. Unfortunately for non-profits, we tend to have unstable funding which puts our members at risk for further danger on all fronts. It is crucial that we are funded adequately because every cent we spend now is dollars saved in the future. If the systems are not able to change rapidly enough, then organizations picking up the slack need more consistent resources to be effective."

“Everyone can be a sex worker, but it doesn't mean that everyone should be one. It's difficult work to do well while maintaining your health. The work should not be taken lightly.”


life & style // no. 12

theotherpress.ca

Sex without dating—the new trend Tania Arora Staff Writer Gone are the days of old-school romance. The current generation of young adults often want to satisfy their physical and emotional needs whenever they want and wherever they want, without having to commit. No matter how long they have been going on with their “arrangements,” they are not interested in commitment. And by “arrangement,” I mean that special type of relationship where one is dating and not dating at the same time. Many want a five-course meal served to them when they too lazy to even pour themselves a glass of water. They would go to a restaurant, order what they like, get done with it and leave. No effort and no obligation to get what they desire. My really close friend has been involved with a guy for two years. I asked her during their first few months together about what they “were,” i.e. were they just seeing each other, or have they started dating? At the beginning, she just said that they were friends with benefits (FWB). Two years down the line, this is still the term they use—but they act exactly like every other couple. They hang out

together very often, do day-to-day stuff as a duo, and are all mushy-mushy in public. There are examples of relationships like this everywhere nowadays; I wouldn’t be discussing this if it was just one instance. Sex before dating used to be the norm for relationships, now the current popular trend is sex without dating. People want companionship without having to carry the emotional baggage of others. But where does this lead to? Are we just trying to fulfil our physical needs, unwilling to invest time building a relationship? Does this make this generation self-centred? When I asked my friend if she and her FWB have ever discussed the scope of their relationship, and she said that they don’t want to ruin what they have so they never asked each other about it. This makes me think, is this generation too scared to talk about relationships? Is it the fear of rejection or heartbreak so great that we don’t want to even risk anything? It seems that in most of the cases, it’s not just one, but both people who are facing these insecurities. But what are the boundaries? Does it mean we can see someone else or not? Can we be involved with someone else or not? Should we act like we are okay if we see the

Illustration by Brittney MacDonald

››We want everything but drama

other person with someone else? I mean, why is this so complicated? I wonder where this current trend will lead many people in

relationships, and how positive or negative an effect this new culture of sex will have in the future.

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life & style // no. 13

issue 18// vol 46

What’s Happening ››February 11 to 17 Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor

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ebruary is the month of love, apparently, but not everyone is down for that. Though I love love, I’m not really a fan of the mushy, gushy commercial season. So, here’s a week of events—not related to love or Valentine’s—to attend to your heart’s content. UBC Journalism's Asper Public Lecture with Farah Nosh • Date: February 11 • Location: UBC Robson Square, HSBC Hall, 800 Robson Street • Time: 6:30 to 8:30 pm • Price: Free! Take advantage of the opportunity to hear an award-winning photojournalist talk about her perspective on how she approaches the business, and her ideas on what the definition of ethical work is. Some light refreshments will be provided as well! Justin Willman: Magic in Real Life Tour • Date: February 13 • Location: Vogue Theatre, 918 Granville Street, Vancouver • Time: 7 pm • Price: $32.50 per ticket on eventbrite Part of the Just for Laughs festival, Willman is so funny he’ll knock your socks off—or magically blow them off your feet! Maybe you’ve heard of his Netflix original, Magic for Humans? He’s been on Ellen and several other big shows. He’s making people interested in magic with his unique blend of comedy and magic tricks.

Fatale Fridays • Date: February 14 • Location: Keto Caveman Cafe, 605 West Pender Street, Basement • Time: Doors 6:30 pm and show at 7:30 pm • Price: $14.99 per ticket on eventbrite • 19+ A stand-up set comprised only of nonbinary people and femmes, if that’s what you’re looking for! Black History Month Family Day • Date: February 15 • Location: Coquitlam Heritage, 1116 Brunette Avenue, Coquitlam • Time: 12 to 4 pm • Price: Free! The best way to celebrate culture is to participate in all the cool things it has

to offer! Come eat African food, see performances, participate in a musical circle of drums, and craft some cultural art! Sound Bath in New Westminster • Date: February 16, but there are also multiple dates • Location: Dancing Cat Yoga Center, #4—704 6th Street, New Westminster • Time: 7 to 8:30 pm • Price: $35 per ticket on eventbrite An experience of sounds to wash away your stress, this event promises to be an interesting one! “Vibrational healing”will be offered through several instruments: gongs, different types of singing bowls, drums, and many more! Don’t be late as they cannot let you in past 7 pm—there are no refunds for those who are late. Bring

stuff that will allow you to comfortably lay on the floor for this experience! CONSCIOUS CUDDLE PARTY • Date: February 17 and 20 • Location: Conscious Living Network, 1643 Venables St, Vancouver • Time: 7 to 10 pm • Price: $20 on Feb 17 and $35 on Feb 20 A cuddle party—no, really! An innovative idea that offers people the opportunity to experience cuddling in a large setting like they never have before. The intent behind it is to allow many to learn about the ins and outs of touch, consent, and nonsexual contact. Also, if you want to be in a documentary, one will be filmed there on the 17—which also explains the reduced ticket price on that day.

Vibe on

››Masturbation myths about vibrators Jessica Berget Editor-in-Chief

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ontrary to popular belief, diamonds are not a girl’s best friend—the BFF spot is held by vibrators. Vibrators are probably the most popular sex toy on the market. In a 2017 study in The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality about sex toys, it was found that vibrators were the most commonly used toy—with nearly 55 percent of their participants saying they have used a vibrator. But many have speculated on the dangers and harm of these popular sex toys and the dependence that people can form. A popular myth circulating around is that overuse of one’s vibrator can cause one’s clitoris to become numb or lose sensitivity leading to “Dead Vagina Syndrome,” a terrifying yet ridiculous name. This is a major concern for many women who own and use vibrators for their personal sexual pleasure. But all you chronic masturbators don’t have to worry—your clitoris will be fine. An article from Psychology Today illustrates how vibrators are not addictive. “Do Carpenters become addicted to power tools? No, power tools just get the job

done faster.” Furthermore, in a Vice article, sex therapist Sarah Berry explains that using your vibrator often may lead to a loss of sensitivity temporarily, but you can just wait for your body to reset. “You can’t

harm your vagina by using a vibrator, but you can desensitize it, particularly if you’re having a bit of a session […] If your clitoris is feeling numb you might want to wait and have a cup of tea and then start again.” So, there it is, just take a vibrator break

for a while, and then resume when you’re feeling ready again. Although you can’t become addicted to your vibrator, or lose sensitivity in your clitoris, there is a possibility of becoming too reliant on it for orgasming. If the first thing you do is grab your vibrator when you’re in the mood or when you’re with a partner, that may not be a good sign. It’s also important to note to make sure you’re not always using your vibrator immediately on the highest setting. Start with the lowest setting—or even just using your hands is a great way to get yourself warmed up. If you’re with a sexual partner, maybe keep it in the drawer for awhile before immediately breaking it out. Berry echoes this advice in the same Vice article. “Just slow down a little bit and take time to touch around your vagina. There are lots of different parts of the vagina that feel happy to the touch […] You may find the orgasm, and the journey to it a more relaxing enjoyable experience.” Keep calm and vibe on, but it’s also good to experiment without your sex toys occasionally. It’s good to be aware of what brings you pleasure without the use of an electronic device that can make your orgasm instantly.


Opinions

Have an idea for a story?  opinions@theotherpress.ca

• How to be original on Valentine’s • Africa is at risk • Should sex work be legal? ...and that's everything!

How to be original on Valentine’s ››Why I don’t like Valentine's Day anymore Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor

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ver since I started working at Purdy’s Chocolates, I’ve decided I don’t like Valentine's Day anymore. It all started with the piles and piles of red velvet boxes, teddy bears, chocolate lips, and cartoon hearts with big, bright bows. Then came the stream of various people all buying chocolates for their significant others for the special day. Don’t get me wrong, I love the feeling, I just don’t love the holiday of love. The idea of feeling forced to buy your significant other something just because a Hallmark holiday demands it feels kinda slimy. That’s basically buying their love because you already know that if you’re the only one who doesn’t present “bae” with a box of chocolates or a dozen roses, you’ll be hearing about it for a long, long time. Trust me when I say that the whole “let’s not get anything for each other this year” thing

does not work—it’s a trap! Furthermore, how do you stand out from all the BFs, GFs, hubbys, and wifeys by just buying the standard chocolates and flowers anyways? How unoriginal is that? Especially if you can’t afford to spring for fancy cufflinks or a diamond necklace. Besides, why is it the same crap every year? Why do we let big corporations decide what we buy for our main squeezes? Moreover, why do we let them decide when we buy gifts; every day is a great day to tell your sweetie you love them. My solution to the “what should I do for Valentine’s to be original” dilemma? Don’t wait until Valentine’s to present your other half with appreciation and love. You will stand out right away if you show your gratitude all year round—and at random points! Secondly, write a love letter. Better yet, just a letter that shows you care. Leave the love out of it. It’ personal, free, and a fun thing to make that your SO can hang onto long after the cheesy red

and pink Hallmark holiday is over. Plus, it’ll last far longer than a bouquet of flowers or a bunch of chocolates. As a bonus, you could start a cute new way of communication between you and your sweetheart by asking that they reply to you at the end of your letter. And if that feels weird, leave your letter off on a cliff-hanger that has them begging you for what’s next. Oh, and do stop in at a chocolatier for every other occasion. Chocolate is great.

Nakate and the forgotten continent ››Africa is at risk, yet glamourous climate change activists refuse vital inclusivity

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s of the last count, there are 7.7 billion people on this planet. They squabble over religion. They fight over imaginary lines in the dirt. They kill each other over words in decaying books that glorify a mystical man in the sky. Some of them lack education, and many of them are poor—but every single one of them will be affected by climate change. When there is no water, education won’t matter, and everyone will be poor. The preceding statement is nothing new in part due to the work of climate change activists spreading their word, but the statement is known also due to the efforts of one small Swedish girl: Greta Thunberg. She has been a keynote speaker at almost every climate major climate gathering of the past three years, she's spoken to UN conferences, and most recently, she has been suggested for the Nobel prize. One big problem, one big spotlight, one little girl. One small girl that has created a veritable vacuum that consumed all the light that many other more useful opponents of man-made climate change also deserve. Granted, she has not done so of her own choice—when she started sitting in front of her local parliament building, how could she know that millions of people around the globe were waiting on a messiah? How could she know that she would soon outshine even the scientists she claims to read? Thunberg became the face of a movement and the voice of resistance—in no time, all eyes were on her. On January 26 a youth climate event

was held at the World Economic Forum in Davos; in attendance of course, was Greta Thunberg. After the event a number of notable youths congregated for the photo above—the only difference between the two versions as posted by the Associated

Press is the inclusion of Vanessa Nakate on the far left. Ms. Nakate found herself cropped out of this picture apparently because: “the building behind her was distracting.” The sole person of color. One of the few voices representing Africa lost

Illustration by Athena Little

Matthew Fraser Opinions Editor

her place in the world’s conscious because of a building behind her. At least Greta Thunberg was front and centre. According to current UN estimates there are 1.3 billion people on the continent of Africa. And they lost their place due to a building in the background. Africa has been ravaged by floods, then droughts, then switching back to floods again. Twelve million people spread through Somalia, Kenya, and Ethiopia are experiencing dire food shortage due to the region’s “worse drought in decades.” But, here we are with our bamboo toothbrushes and handmade Thunberg posters blocking traffic in downtown Vancouver. Certainly, the protests need to happen—and outrage must be shown—but the commodity of anger and star power have quickly consumed the real need for solidarity. Everybody wants to tag themselves present, everybody wants to wave their flags, few really care about the suffering in the cradle of humanity. Vanessa Nakate said it herself when remarking on the news feature: “It showed how we are valued. It hurt me a lot. It is the worst thing I have ever seen in my life [...] Now I know the definition of racism.” The world has not forgotten to see Africa as a source for its own wealth and dustbin for its problems. The continent is a curiosity at the bottom of the map to be looted from and used as a scare tactic to berate children into eating broccoli. Ultimately forgettable beside climate change’s new favorite star—and to be ignored with the rest of the background noise.


opinions humour // no. 15 17

17// vol 46 issue 18//

Should sex work Marx for marks be legal? bring up Karl Marx in every class › How to The Other Press is hiring!

››Legalizing prostitution could open the door to new problems

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payments and retirement plans. It may sound like a dream for pro-sex work legalization advocates, but unfortunately legalized prostitution also comes with the n Canada, we follow what is know as the dark presence of human sex trafficking. “Nordic Model” when it comes to sex According to the same report, in 2004, the work; selling sex is legal but purchasing or International Labour Office estimated the advertising it is illegal. Some might look to society’s stages of development from number of trafficking victims in Germany Caroline Ho of the county’s progressive to this as a sign hunter-gatherer to feudalism capitalism be 32,800. Another analysisto entitled “The ideas. Others, however, argue that this “end to Web Editor and so on. Now, just of wait for your GPA to Law and Economics International Sex demand” system to curbing the popularity metamorphose into its final form. Slavery: Prostitution Laws and Trafficking of sex pushes workerskid, farther s awork proud humanities I caninto tell the for Sexual Exploitation,” confirms that shadows and the intoone dangerous you that constantsituations. of my World Geography this is an issue that is “most prevalent in Many people have spoken out about this post-secondary education wasn’t stressing World capital? Bugger that, we hate capital! countries where prostitution is legalized.” and pushed for the legalization overhave exams or forgetting the name of of that Anyway, all sociopolitical divisions and Is this something we potentially want to prostitution both safety health person who’sciting been sitting next and to you for arbitrary national borders arise from bring to our country? reasons. weeks—no, the one recurring theme of economic circumstances and the political Personally, I was on the proareclass many calls for prostitution everyThere college is everyone’s favourite superstructures underlining the conversion legalization side—and I still do think that to be legalized, usually under the argument philosopher-economist-revolutionary, Karl of raw materials into labour, so once we legalization would carry a lot of benefits. that it’sDespite the oldest profession the world Marx. what one mightinassume, overthrow the bourgeoisie it’s all a wash In fact, according to Reuters, research has and people are always going to want to buy Marx’s relevance isn’t just limited to the anyway. shown that in countries where buying sex. Although these aretoboth valid points, humanities. The trick school is that you or selling prostitution is illegal, women Music Theory Ican think before into anyevery cause—no bring Marxbuying up in literally single are more likely to face violence, not use I mean, you could go the legit route and matter how beneficiary or progressive it class, for every single subject! Awe all of condoms, contract diseases—so there’s argue for aand critical analysis about Marx’s may looking into both your seem—it’s instructorsworth and show them you truly definitely some important good in being influence on early twentieth century sides. Namely, whatmaterial goes on by in countries understand course tying each pro-legalization. These arewith all essential expressionism, especially the atonality where sex work legalized? new concept youislearn back to Marx. Seize issues that need be addressed, yes of composers liketoSchoenberg as aand reaction A 2013of report by World the means producing the Development highest grades legalization could solve thesestructures… concerns. But against classical hierarchical titled “Does Prostitution with the helpLegalized of our beloved Father of going research of countries or justover writethe a catchy song about the where Increase Human Trafficking?” researches Communism! prostitution is legal andrevolution. decriminalized has impending communist 116 countries and the effects of legalized Philosophywith 101 human trafficking and made me rethink stance. Now, what rhymesmy with “dialectical prostitution This one’s really easy with because literally Legalizing prostitution may help materialism?” found that countries legalhe’s prostitution on the this class. Don’t be some issues that come with the territory saw an syllabus influx offor human trafficking, Marketing afraid to just keep bringing him up in of the job such as safety and well-being, especially with higher income countries. Oh boy, got arise Communist Manifesto every discussion, even though he was only but it canhave alsoIgive to other problems Germany for example has had prostitution to sell tocan’t you!and All for the lowignore. price of your relevant for that one reading you did three that we shouldn’t legalized since 2002 and is known to have individual property rights and thesolution shackles weeks ago. sex When yourmarket professor tries to Legalization may not be the best the largest worker in Europe of classist oppression. tell you “No, you can’t write your final essay for this cause—we should look to different with about 150,000 working as prostitutes. as a critical comparison ofenjoy Marxism and solutions. Not only that, prostitutes the same Business Management Confucianism because already benefits as a regular jobyou along with did tax your Normally doing group work sucks, but last two essays comparing Machiavelli and this time you can employ your Marxian Socrates to Marx,” just tell them they’re expertise to pawn off all work to your group too alienated from their own labour to members, take all the credit for the work, recognize your metaphysical genius. then explain to them that you’re simply illustrating the alienating effects of the legalized Invertebrate Biology Unfortunately, divide between labourer and capitalist. Invertebrate organisms and human prostitution also comes Now get back to that PowerPoint, prole. civilizations basically go through the same with a dark presence. evolutionary processes. Every time the Modern Languages: Basic Japanese professor discusses the life cycle stages of “Konnichiwa, watashi wa proletariat an insect, casually mention the parallels revolution.”

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Humour

• Sexy Valentine’s cooking • Coronavirus is only a political business scheme to upsell surplus face masks ...and that's everything!

Ultimate kitchen hacks: Sexy Valentine’s cooking ››How to make and appreciate a romantic homemade dinner

Caroline Ho Web Editor

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hat’s cheaper, fancier, and more intimate than a fancy restaurant dinner date? A fancy home-cooked dinner date! Perfect for when you refuse to give into yet another capitalistic, heteronormative holiday, when you or your partner want to provide a true labour-oflove gesture, and totally not just when

you forget to make that reservation your partner reminded you about at least five times over the past month. Being treated to a homemade meal by your partner this year? Fortunately we provide here tips for both the treater and the treatee because we at the Other Press strive represent all parties in all relationships (except, y’know, all the lonely suckers who don’t have Valentine’s dates).

As the chef: Make their favourite Listening to your partner and showing that you respect their tastes is such a turn-on. Demonstrate that you’ve been paying attention throughout this relationship by choosing one of their favourite dishes, like that spaghetti bolognaise they keep mentioning they used to love but had to stop eating because they’ve been vegetarian for three years. Sorry, sweetie, what did you say? Real neat? Yes, I know this dish is really neat. As the diner: Offer helpful culinary advice While your partner does the actual work of prepping and cooking, try standing over their shoulder watching critically and occasionally doling out helpful, non-judgmental comments such as, “The water’s boiling over, you should turn the stove off,” and “Is that really how you want to cut that carrot?” Don’t offer to actually help though—that will only undermine your partner’s confidence, and you need to support them by demonstrating that you have utmost faith in their cooking ability. Even if they clearly don’t know how to brown a roux properly, tsk tsk.

Photo by Michelle Lim

As the chef: Just use chocolate When in doubt, add the most romantic, Valentine’s-appropriate flavouring: chocolate. Gravy’s a little too salty? Add a dash of chocolate syrup. Miso glaze turned out too sweet? A chunk or two of nice, bitter dark chocolate. Guaranteed to automatically make your meal more

authentically romantic! Alternately, use liberal amounts of the second most Valentine’s-themed consumable: red wine. If you can’t beat ’em, get ’em drunk enough not to notice that your AAA sirloin beef steak is actually just a hunk of fudge. As the diner: Eat in the nude Any activity instantly becomes a “sexy” activity if you do it minimally clothed. Be sure to make lots of eye contact with your partner’s roommates every time they pass by, too, just to let them know this is totally not awkward for anyone involved. As the chef: Cook in the nude Nothing says “sexy dinner” like grabbing trays out of the oven with your bare hands, or accidentally splashing hot oil all over your bare arms and torso. Now that’s hot. As the diner: Eat up! Regardless of how successful or not your partner’s meal turns out, remember to show your appreciation by digging in wholeheartedly. It’s fine if you sacrifice some optional niceties like pleasant conversation or table etiquette for the sake of shoveling food in your face at maximal speed. Make sure you consume as much as physically possible, including at least a third of their plate as well as the leftovers they specifically told you they set aside to feed themselves for the next week. Seems like a fair deal, right. You have to eat their questionable cooking, they have to starve—the couple that suffers together stays together.

US President Donald Trump will step down to honour Kobe’s death ››Save the date! EG Manilag Staff Writer

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o honour the recent unfortunate death of one of the greatest NBA players of all time, US president Donald J. Trump will voluntarily resign on February 24, 2020. Mr. Trump specifically chose the date because it symbolizes both the jersey numbers of Kobe (#24) and Gigi (#2). According to Mr. Trump in an interview with the Other Press, stepping down is a decision he will treasure his entire life because it will surely be executed with a greater purpose. “There is nothing more beautiful than

resigning your presidency knowing that it will not only honour Kobe Bryant, but also the Americans,” Mr. Trump said. This future resignation will automatically cancel his ongoing impeachment trial (before the acquittal eventually does). The democrats were left speechless as they heard the “unlikely to happen” ground-breaking news. “Wow! I have never thought that this would be happening. Only wish he would have resigned sooner due to a celebrity death” said Nancy Pelosi, speaker of the House of Representatives and Trump's current number one rival.


humour // no. 17

issue 18// vol 46

Coronavirus is only a political business scheme to upsell surplus face masks ››As the supposed virus spreads, so does their cash EG Manilag Staff Writer fter accidentally producing too much product, China’s government— cunningly and covertly—has decided to make compensations by propagating a fake epidemic that would definitely make people buy off their surplus in face masks. It was a grand success for China’s government. In just a span of just three days, they fully made their cost back for the excess, and they also made a whopping 3000 percent Return on Investment (ROI). Everything was going smooth for them until the fallacious news went international. Instead of backing down and calling it a day, the Chinese government still hustled

Illustration by Athena Little

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and continued their journey, bribing other countries to go with their grand scheme. But, as it turns out, the leaders in these countries gladly accepted the offer with no hints of hesitation. And as we know today, people around the world are buying off face masks like crazy. China’s plan did not as far as they would expect, however, because a lot of government-owned businesses have been largely undermined—particularly airline and hotel companies. Keeping the large piles of face masks and preserving them for future use was simply not an option for them to consider.

The 'Other' Other Press ››In the news this week...

Images edited by Janis McMath

Erin Meyers Contributor


Creative Works For July, from September Victoria Belway Contributor For July, from September You were my whole summer, although I never saw you, never even heard your voice you were in everything I touched; The burning of the metal car door, The gravel clutching the flesh on my knees, The one day it rained in august, You were heavy hitting my shoulders tapping each ripple in my spine. Your daylight just suffocates me And your nights slither around, silky one moment icy the next But I have learnt you to the point where I know nothing else I have learnt to fall asleep like goose bumps in a fire.

a fairy-tale about the wolf in love Sonam Kaloti Arts Editor like a watermelon slice glistens, seen through two acid screens, my pupils dilate to the clock ticks, fast, like my heart rate. Unlike the start, this now feels like a dream as my classic commitment issue doubts begin to fade, replaced by wonder at the light you shine. I am your copycat trying to sprout but I'm withering out, unworthy. perhaps it's you that I'd been afraid of. far more radiant, with fate protecting you from me. from my claws' scout for soft skin. I'm digging in. we will last.

Space Geographer Part 4 Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor

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rasping at the slick glass and insulating fabric, I release the pressure and tear off my helmet. Holding my breath—a fruitless effort, but one I pursue nonetheless—for a moment, then another. I can’t anymore—I’m forced to exhale only to find myself still alive. Mental note: red, sandy alien planet sustains human life. So far. A small smile creeps across my damp face, the surprisingly cool air fanning at my skin in small whiffs as an almost sulphuric breeze surrounds me. I’m not dead yet, so I don’t believe I will be any time soon. Overriding my fear of the unknown and stuffing it down below my excitement for discovery, I strip off the heavy material covering my body. Once free from my protective suit, I take a tentative step out of the mouth of the ship and into the soft sand. It embraces my shoes with a familiarity akin to that of stepping into a pile of playdough. Quick side glances let me know I am in fact alone. Whatever it was I saw moments before is now gone. Perhaps the species that inhabit this foreign planet are shy, timid creatures. Perhaps I will be corrupting them with my boisterous human nature. “The question is… what do I do now?” My voice is wicked away like a bead of sweat on a runner’s brow, lost in a terrestrial atmosphere. I walk a couple of steps forwards, creating footprints in the extra fine sand as I take in my surroundings more closely. The bloody red mountains are further away than at first glance, their peaks are swamped in wispy orange and pink clouds. There seems to be no obvious vegetation or water in sight and the entire landscape is made up of shades of red, orange, and rose. The air is thick, warm, and stinky; dense particles feel like they are resting on my skin for a long stay, much like a cat burrowing into a blanket. Suddenly, a soft clicking noise echoes from behind me and every hair stands up on my skin. My body is a field of grass in a storm. Continuation of this exciting adventure next week!


Comics & Puzzles Weekly crossword: ♥ By Caroline Ho, Web Editor

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ACROSS 1. Pub potable 4. Sugar suffix 7. What one 12. Knight’s title 13. Relative 14. Assembled, with “together” 15. The role of that actress (2 wds.) 17. Late 18. Large chimp 19. Faced a challenge 20. Holistic medicine, perhaps (2 wds.) 24. Disagreement 28. Hearing organ 29. Diving bird 30. Videogame pioneer 31. To a great extent 33. US nine-digit identifier 34. Step with a spring 35. What a growing child might be measured against (2 wds.) 38. White meat part of chicken 40. Brit’s toilet 41. Drop of sadness 44. Bend 45. Dowel 46. __ de Janeiro 47. Online DIY marketplace 48. “What an intelligent fellow!” (3 wds.) 52. Casual conversations 54. US espionage org. 55. Where the devil is, idiomatically 58. German philosopher Johann Friedrich 62. Oppositional 63. Dubai’s country, for short 64. Large, non-venomous serpent 65. Irish poet W.B. 66. Finale 67. The theme of this newspaper issue

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Caroline Ho Web Editor

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DOWN 1. Volcanic output 2. Untruth 3. Slip up 4. Forest giraffe 5. Alarm 6. Treebeard’s race 7. Cunning 8. Advantage (2 wds.) 9. Frigid 10. Average letter grade 11. Alt. to SSD 14. Impudent 16. Buddy 17. Shadowy 19. Resolute 20. Clothes edge 21. __ de cologne 22. Bowmen 23. Deep cut 25. “Cowboys From Hell” band 26. Rainbow’s shape 27. Its colour dictates an event’s level of formality 30. Altar constellation 32. What a bulk shopper might be pushing (2 wds.) 33. Rank above cpl. 34. Vietnamese noodle soup 36. UK verb ending 37. Gears 38. Abbr. for pre-0 years 39. Furrow 42. Breathable stuff 43. Decay 45. Cats and dogs 48. Healthy 49. Arctic or Indian, e.g. 50. Begat 51. Shakespearean fairy queen 53. Snake’s warning sound 55. Week component 56. Night before 57. Steeped drink 58. Shade 59. Sit-up muscles 60. Caviar 61. Levy

Weekly crossword: Let there be... By Caroline Ho, Web Editor

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