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Lettitor Self-esteem or self-compassion—which should we prioritize in education? S

elf-esteem has been accepted as the holy grail for Western education. Society is filled with self-help books to boost self-esteem, and the schooling system is similarly filled with lessons that have the goal of increasing students’ self-worth. And high self-esteem does bear many benefits: increased initiative, increased happiness, persistence in failure, girls are less likely to develop bulimia, and some studies have even found that stress hormone levels are lower in those who have high self esteem. It’s clear why this approach to education about the self was taken, but there are plenty negatives to be considered in this pedagogical approach. Narcissism is a growing problem—one that has been found to have strong correlations with the self-esteem education model. An oft-recited study, “Generational Differences in Young Adults’ Life Goals,” found that compared to Baby Boomers, Gen X’ers and Millennials in high-school and post-secondary considered values like money, image, and fame to be more important than self-acceptance, affiliation, and community. The study also found that self-esteem had grown significantly between generations. Another issue blamed on the self-esteem pedagogy is bullying; as cited in the paper “The role of self-compassion in development” by Kristin Neff—perhaps the biggest name in self-compassion theory—bullies are just as likely as others to have high-self esteem, and they often gain self-esteem through putting others down. In a different article by Neff, she argues that individuals allow their inflated self-image to antagonize those who threaten that image—constant comparisons are seen as a huge downside of self-esteem teachings. As mentioned before, self-compassion theory is seen as the solution to the problems of the self-esteem model. To clarify, self-compassion is “a way of relating to ourselves” according to Neff. This philosophy emphasizes that we must be kind with ourselves and accept that we are human and failures are a part of that; the ideology also emphasizes that we do not criticize ourselves or make selfevaluations of any kind. To be self-compassionate, we must intrinsically believe we are worthy of empathy instead of hinging it on valuations we and others make of us—unlike

self-esteem. It is argued, then, that self-compassion offers solutions to the problems the self-esteem doctrine causes—and research has shown that it is true in many cases. In a study of over 2000 participants called “Selfcompassion versus global self-esteem” researchers Neff and Vonk found that self-compassion predicted much more stable feelings of self-worth than self-esteem did. The same study also found that because self-esteem was contingent on favourable outcomes, it was very susceptible to fluctuation. A study called “Self-compassion protects against the negative effects of low self-esteem” surveyed over 2000 adolescents on how levels of self compassion and self esteem affected mental health. While low self esteem certainly predicted poor mental health, it was found that those who had low self esteem combined with high self compassion were much better off in terms of mental health. An essential result of this study to note though was that those with both high-self esteem and high-self compassion fared the best in terms of mental health improvements. Many proposing self-compassion as the new doctrine for education say that self-compassion should outright replace self-esteem—but should that really be the case? Researchers for a 2017 paper called “A worthy self is a caring self” found that high self-esteem reliably led to the development of self-compassion—but not vice-versa. The scientists proposed several reasons for such, but regardless of the reasons, it is important to consider that perhaps the two concepts are not as black and white as they have been treated. Seeing how the previously mentioned study showed that those with both high self-esteem and high self-compassion fared better than those with just high levels of self-compassion, perhaps the education system should be looking to teach both. There seems to be a complex relationship between the two concepts— seemingly self-compassion picks up the slack of selfesteem—and clearly self-compassion is lacking some of traits that self-esteem contains. Education is never a one-size-fits-all scenario. The schooling system needs to be as fluid as the needs of the students that enter it, so there should be space for multiple ideologies to be present. Different pupils mature

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at different rates; a wide array of pedagogical tools is ideal for educators. Teachers should not be looking to shun one method in favour of another. It’s time we acknowledge that essentially every educational tool will have some merit in some scenario for some student, so we should do our best to be open to gradual incremental change in the system instead of complete ideological overhauls. On to Cincinnati,

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The Other Press has been Douglas College’s student newspaper since 1976. Since 1978 we have been an autonomous publication, independent of the student union. We are a registered society under the Society Act of British Columbia, governed by an eight-person board of directors appointed by our staff. Our head office is located in the New Westminster campus. The Other Press is published weekly during the fall and winter semesters, and monthly during the summer. We receive our funding from a student levy collected through tuition fees every semester at registration, and from local and national advertising revenue. The Other Press is a member of the Canadian University Press (CUP), a syndicate of student newspapers that includes papers from all across Canada. The Other Press reserves the right to choose what we will publish, and we will not publish material that is hateful, obscene, or condones or promotes illegal activities. Submissions may be edited for clarity and brevity if necessary. All images used are copyright to their respective owners.


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News

news // no. 3 • USA election • COVID-19 update • New coronavirus restrictions in effect until early December ...and more

Mandatory masks indoors and other new COVID-19 guidelines Jessica Berget Assistant Editor

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n November 19, Bonnie Henry announced new rules and regulations in order to curb the current increase of reported COVID-19 cases in BC. These restrictions will be in place until December 7. Masks are now considered mandatory in all public indoor settings including retail stores, community centres, business buildings, restaurants, work-related spaces, and anywhere else physical distancing is not possible such as elevators. Henry has not made them mandatory in schools because she states: “Schools are not public spaces where we’re with a variety of different people we don’t know on a repeated basis,” she said in a press conference on November 23. “What schools have are individual COVID safety plans that meet certain criteria, so you’re with the same people everyday, you don’t have people walking in and out […] There are COVID safety plans that do include wearing masks in the schools.” All social gatherings of any size are

also banned, which means no inviting friends or family over, no backyard barbeques, and no playdates for children. This excludes anyone outside of your household or “core bubble”—which can include a maximum of two people. People who live on their own are allowed to make their own core bubble of two people to maintain their social interactions. All community gatherings and events, which include movie screenings, galas, performances, religious gatherings, conferences, or meetings are also banned. However, medical and support group meetings such as Alcoholics Anonymous are still free to operate as long as it’s under 50 people. Important gatherings like weddings, funerals, and baptisms have a limit of maximum 10 people only. Some indoor fitness centres such as hot yoga, spin classes, and high intensity training have also been ordered to shut down because those activities are regarded as more high risk. Other indoor fitness centres are suspended until new regulations are developed. Places that are considered “essential services” such as grocery stores, liquor

stores, hair salons, and spas remain open with mandatory mask guidelines. Henry also advises against any non-essential travel including vacations or visiting family and friends. Restaurants and bars are also permitted to stay open as Henry says there have been little transmissions in those industries. People of BC are still encouraged to dine with their core bubble or immediate households. WorkSafe BC says they will also be conducting inspections of restaurant and bar spaces to ensure regulations are being followed effectively. According to the BC government, under the Emergency Program Act (EPA), those who are caught not complying with certain COVID regulations can be issued fines ranging from $200 to $2000. For example, people not wearing a mask indoors (unless exempt) could be subject to a $230 violation ticket. People can also be fined for hosting an event with more than 50 people and not taking contacts of all participants for contact tracing ($2,000), encouraging people to attend a gathering that does not comply with mass gatherings order ($200), operating a party

Photo by Billy Bui

› New coronavirus restrictions in effect until early December

bus or limousine ($2,000), being an owner, organizer, or operator of a restaurant or bar whose music volumes exceeds the volume or normal conversation ($2,000), or if you do not vacate the restaurant or bar premises by the stated time of 11 pm ($200).

Adopted animals get bright side of pandemic › SPCA reports animal adoptions still at an all time high and return rates even lower Jessica Berget Assistant Editor

Illustration by Athena Little

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f anything good can be said about this pandemic, it’s that it has helped adopted animals. Back in March in the beginning of the lockdown, news outlets reported that SPCAs were being flooded with adoption applications. With more people staying home and not having to leave the house for work, many people had more time at home to care for pets. Nearly 10 months later, with some people coming back to work and others being laid off again because of the influx of cases, the Other Press finds out if the BC SPCA’s adoptions still have the same success rate. According to Lorie Chortyk, the general manager and community relations of the BC SPCA, as far as animal adoptions go, business is still booming. She says they have adopted out thousands of animals since the pandemic including cats and kittens, dogs and puppies, other small animals, and even horses. The only thing that has really changed is the way they carry out adoptions with online meet and greets so people can meet their potential new pets while still following COVID regulations. When asked if any animals are being returned due to people having to go back to work, Chortyk says they have not seen any returns, and

the already extremely low return rate for animals has also decreased, meaning less people are returning the animals they’ve adopted than before the pandemic. Dianne Stebner, branch manager of the SPCA tri-cities adoption centre, also corroborates the steady flow of animal adoptions. “We have times where we post one animal and get 70 applications. People are looking to bring new family members home and by doing so are helping the BC SCPA to free up space and direct resources to animals in most urgent need of care.” Stebner also says this pandemic is the perfect time to adopt a pet, “These days can be the perfect time to bring a pet home since we are all spending more time at home. Ensure you have a plan for when things return to normal and that you will still have the time it takes to care for a pet for life,” she said in an email interview with the Other Press. The Surrey SPCA also says adoptions have been steady at their branch since the beginning of the lockdown. “In just one week in March we adopted over 300 animals across all of our branches […] It is not uncommon for one animal to receive over 20 applications in just one short day.” They also say their branch has not seen one COVID related return all year, and the organization has seen 50 percent fewer returns than past years.


news // no. 4

theotherpress.ca

USA election

› A brief look at some of the unmentioned allegations

Timothy Easling Senior Columnist

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he USA election of 2020 has proved to be quite the source of controversy. The line from most publications is about how the 2020 election was the “most secure in American history.” But while most media seems to be happy to dismiss claims of fraud without even mentioning the specific allegations, there is simultaneously no rationale provided for why the election was so secure. This article is by no means a comprehensive look at the allegations made by various legal teams across the USA but is intended as a sample of some of the major issues that have gone unreported. Voting machines used to be widely reported on as having weaknesses that could leave them vulnerable to hacking and fraud; to illustrate this, here are examples from CBS, the New York Times, and the BBC. Yet this year, in an odd 180, almost no media sources have reported on even the possibility of fraud. Dominion voting machines Dominion voting machines (used in 28 States) appear to be one of the major sources of irregularities in the vote counts cited during the various hearings that have been taking place recently. There were several massive voting spikes that appear to be strange anomalies—not following any consistency with the rest of the data. Several of these spikes in Pennsylvania added up to more than 570,000 votes for Biden while Trump only received about 3,200. At a ratio of almost 200 to 1, the spikes are statistically impossible; if one were to convert the spikes to a percentage, it would be the approximate equivalent of a candidate receiving 99.5 percent of the vote. While one batch of votes coming in with such a ratio could possibly be a very strange one-off anomaly, it is highly unlikely that multiple batches of randomly unsorted votes achieved the same ratio— especially in such large numbers. The

spikes are also concerning because of the speed at which these spikes were processed (they exceed the measured capability of the machines). No election official has commented on the irregularities. The spike impossibility is best illustrated with an example. Mail-in ballots have been reported to be overwhelmingly requested by Democrats, and the reports seem to be correct. Unfortunately for the spike likelihood, the totals are nowhere near the ratio shown in the irregularities. California, which few would debate is a Democratic stronghold, saw early mail-in ballot totals as 6,157,827 for Democratic registered voters, 2,955,528 for Republican registered voters, and 2,977,358 for those with no party affiliation. Even if one were to assume that every single Democratic and non-party member voted for Biden (another statistical impossibility), that would mean 9,135,185 voters of the 12,090,534 votes were for Biden—or approximately 75.6 percent, almost an entire 20 percent off of the spike percentages. In order to extend this impossible ratio to a state level, 99.5 percent (12,030,081), 2,894,985 of the 2,955,528 Republican voters (98 percent) would have needed to vote for Biden. As an aside, even the strongest Biden county in one of the strongest Democratic states came nowhere near the ratio; the highest concentration of Biden votes in California was in San Francisco County with 85.3 percent of the vote (377,772 to 56,329). Also of major focus for the Dominion machines is the concern of the weighted vote feature, which supposedly exists for “their condo or land ownership customers who may want to tabulate votes based on the amount of land each participant may own.” Weighted votes is a common feature in voting software—some for the aforementioned reason—to allow some votes to count more than others (e.g., A vote for one side could count as 1.4 while a vote for the other could count as 0.7).

Dominion, in their full-page defence on their website of allegations made against them, avoids transparency and makes no mention of it. Dominion also curiously dropped out of several public hearings they were slated to appear in. Other statistical irregularities The New York Times had a live dataset for the election and it revealed some more irregularities. In more than one instance, there were multiple negative vote entries. One instance in Virginia had two massive negative entries (-330,153.34 from Biden and -37,510.39 for Trump—and -308,341.59 for Biden and -80,357.05 for Trump) less than 20 minutes apart. Stranger still is the fact that these numbers are not whole numbers—despite every vote supposedly only ever counting as one whole vote. The data seems to indicate votes were weighted differently at some point. Those with any accounting training are wellaware negative entries tend to indicate adjusting/fraud. Unless several hundred thousand US citizens decided to rescind their votes near-simultaneously, the data indicates some very strange occurrences. No election officials have commented on the irregularities. Fake voter addresses The public hearings held in Pennsylvania and several other battleground states have produced many allegations based on more than just logic and statistics. There are multiple instances of voters’ residential addresses not being residential addresses, despite efforts to make them appear so. An example of this alleged voter fraud lists a host of addresses such as 4339 Hartley Bridge Road APT 167 in Georgia. A quick internet search reveals the address as a UPS store. Likewise, 724 Charlie Smith SR HWY APT 5402 and UNIT 5734 are both the same USPS. In fact, all of the addresses are registered businesses, PO boxes, or post offices, that have tried to claim they are residential addresses. If true, the registered addresses are clearly attempts at fraud

because they claim to be apartments, units, or suites—rather than simply having the main address be a mistake. Registering with a fake (non-residential) address is illegal under US Law. There are thousands of these claims. No election official has commented on these claims. Watcher restrictions A handful of other allegations made in the hearings were that some ballots were sent out and returned the day-of; some were sent out and returned the day after; and some were somehow recorded as being returned the day before they were mailed out. Watchers were also barred from observing many votes—in some cases only being allowed in a room for five minutes every hour; many watchers were also restricted to a specific area of each voting room, often resulting in many votes being counted as far as 25 feet away. Votes were often brought in from entirely separate rooms that watchers were not allowed any access to. Watchers were also not allowed to view individual ballots or challenge any of the processes, even if they saw direct violations of US law. Watchers also observed ballots being completely separated from their envelopes and the envelopes sent to the far side of a room, or a separate room entirely, making any forensic audit near-impossible to verify. The question has been asked of what the resistance to watchers is; if there is nothing to hide, why was access restricted? Many votes had no signature and yet were still counted, and thousands of votes arriving were observed to be perfectly filled-in—as if by machine. As noted in the Arizona hearing, technology to determine whether a machine has filled-out a ballot exists but has not been used. No election official has defended the various allegations. Links to two of the massive lawsuits can be found on the Other Press’ online article: Sidney Powell’s in Georgia and Trump’s in Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania hearing can be found here and the Arizona hearing can be found here.


issue 13// vol 47

news // no. 5

COVID-19 update

› Government refuses to specifically protect at-risk populations Timothy Easling Senior Columnist

Photo by Billy Bui

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OVID-19 total deaths remain relatively low, though most media and lockdowns seem to suggest otherwise. It is important to keep in mind that the government data shows COVID still predominantly affects those of advanced age and weakened states, not those of average age or really even those who are over 60 but healthy. British Columbia has suffered 93 deaths from 5,831 cases (1.5 percent fatality rate) since November 24 as Provincial Health Officer Bonnie Henry’s extended two-week health order continues towards the supposed end date of December 7. The population of the province is 5,147,712. On November 30, Henry drew attention to the fact that the majority of deaths (approximately 80 percent or 74 of BC’s 93) were in long-term care. While the knowledge that deaths are primarily in LTCs is not new, the confirmation from an official draws several questions. Despite the obvious need to protect the older population, there have been no government motions to specifically protect them. Many have questioned why the vulnerable have not been afforded extra protection—such as complete isolation—rather than massive lockdowns that have little-to-no effect on these populations. Government relief funds are broadly based instead of focused on healthcare workers who could remain 24/7 in these closed systems to care for and protect Canada’s at-risk citizens. Unless stated otherwise, all statistics in this piece are from available government data with age demographics (99.9 percent of cases). From November 24 to 30 there have been 519 deaths, and 96.9 percent of those (503) are from those 60-and-up—often in long term care homes (LTCs), acute care, or assisted living, and with multiple comorbidities; the risk of dying for Canadians who are neither of advanced age nor weakened states continues to remain low. Canada has suffered 11,759 deaths from COVID-19—and saw 8,511 deaths in 2018 from Influenza and pneumonia. The population of Canada is 38,005,238. Countrywide from November 24 to 30, the 0-39 age bracket suffered 1 more death, the 40-49 age bracket, 2, and the 50-59 age bracket, 13. The massive case numbers indicate the low fatality rate of the disease for those not of ill health; the 0-39 age bracket saw 15,976 more cases, the 40-49 age bracket had 4,264 more, the 50-59 age bracket observed 3,914 more, and the 60+ age bracket recorded 6,231 more. Just from the last week of cases, the fatality rate for each bracket in relation to its case numbers was 0.006 percent (0-39), 0.04 percent (40-49), 0.33 percent (50-59), and 8.07 percent (60+). Further emphasizing the low risk of death to many Canadians, there were 24,154 cases from 0-59 and 16 deaths— which works out to a fatality rate of 0.06 percent.   Hospitalization increases remained relatively steady with previous weeks—and with almost none of them (again, for those not of weakened states) resulting in death. The vast majority (74.2 percent) of hospitalizations were from the 60-and-up age bracket (1,709 more) with the lower age brackets registering small totals: 0-39—191 more, 40-49—141 more, 50-59—279 more. ICU admittances remained much the same with only 315 more. Of those 315, 75.9 percent (239) were from the 60+ age bracket. The remaining 76 cases were divided among the lower age brackets: 0-39—20, 40-49—22, and 50-59—34. Influenza (responsible for 8,511 deaths in 2018— approximately half of what COVID is on pace for) has been drastically down this year—with only four total cases reported in week 47 (November 15-21). The average from week 3547 over the last six years has been 1,527, but this year has seen only 23. Based on the data, there is a likelihood that COVID-19 numbers have been merged with Influenza figures. With Influenza numbers almost non-existent, Canada’s total death figures are relatively even with recent years. Canada’s largest fatality increase since 2014 was in 2017 when there were 9,476 more deaths than the previous year. Since 2014, four of the six years (data not yet out for 2020) have seen at least 5,512 additional deaths. With the current figures and the zero deaths from Influenza, it could be loosely calculated that Canada will record 4,000 to 5,000 additional deaths— well within the country’s normal death totals (current COVID deaths [11,759]—Influenza and pneumonia deaths [8,511] + rough estimation of COVID deaths for December [1,0002,000]).


Sports

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sports // no. 6 • The top five highest paid athletes • Pat Quinn Classic 2020 canceled • Cano is among an infamous list of MLB players caught using banned substances ...and more!

A deeper dive into the game seven of the 2011 Stanley Cup Finals › A night embedded in Vancouver’s history

Mo Hussain Sports Reporter

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he day was June 15, 2011. The Vancouver Canucks were set to play the Boston Bruins in game seven of the Stanley cup finals on their home ice and the city was buzzing. “I was watching the game from the suite with family and friends. There was an energy in the arena I’d never felt or seen before. The tension in the air, the expectation. The Stanley Cup was in the building. Somebody was going to lift that trophy,” said Canucks owner Franceso Aquilini. The Canucks came into the Stanley Cup Finals coming off the best regular season record in the league; they had defeated the reigning Stanley Cup champion and bitter rival Chicago Blackhawks in the first round, brought an entire city together, and were the favoured to win it all. “If the Canucks are willing to pay the price, and nothing suggests they aren’t, Vancouver will win the Stanley Cup,” said sports media personality Jason Borough.

The Game The Canucks started off the first period with a couple of good chances from stars Henrik and Daniel Sedin, however, it was the Bruins who opened the scoring with a goal from Patrice Bergeron—a goal that would end up being very crucial. "We got the first goal, and we knew that would be important coming here," said Bruins forward Mark Recchi. The Bruins would then take that momentum into the second period, with a goal from forward Brad Marchand and another goal from Bergeron. The Canucks would go on to outshoot the Bruins, but the combination of the Bruins stellar defence and another empty net goal from Marchand in the third period would shut out the Canucks’ chances at winning their first Stanley cup as the Bruins won the game 4-0. The Riot Once it looked like the Canucks did not have a chance at winning the cup, chaos ensued. Cars were vandalised, fires were started, stores were being looted, and the entire city

Illustration by Jeanie Mao

A funny feeling about the game In the meantime, there were some people who felt that the crowd that gathered to watch the game in public was not going to be just any ordinary hockey crowd. “And I was watching the crowd that was around me, they were a little bit different than the crowd that you’d normally see on a firework night,” said Stephanie Smith, who witnessed the crown at its epicentre. “I had heard some kids on the train talking about how either way, whether we lost or whether we won, they were going to start a riot in the city.” Sgt. Ian Morrison who was then a constable with the Port Moody Police Department also had a funny feeling about what was about to take place. “Right from the time that the game was on I actually knew we were going to get called. I don’t know how, I just knew it.”

Cars were vandalised, fires were started, stores were being looted, and the entire city went into madness. went into madness. “I was at home watching the game when my dispatcher called me about 8 o’clock to say he was starting to get calls. He had 10 calls for jobs already, so I came up to the office and took calls. The phone was ringing off the hook,” said Mike Miller who is the co-owner of Burnaby glass-repair shop Action Auto Glass. Downtown Vancouver had gone into chaos, as total damages incurred were at least $3.7 million. Fifty-two assaults were also reported against civilians, police, and emergency personnel. At the end of the whole process, 912 charges were laid out on 300 alleged rioters.

Why did the riot happen? Although the answer to this question may seem straightforward, some believe there is more to the story. A piece written by the Daily Hive News, points out how the riot was not started by Vancouverites but was rather planned by a small group of young “kids” who grew in numbers as more people in the crowd began taking notice and giving them attention. The piece also points out how some people in the crowds were craving to be part of history one way or another. All in all, the unfortunate actions of a few led to a very chaotic night and hopefully, the next time Vancouver makes it to the Stanley Cup, law enforcement will be better prepared to handle any situation.


issue 13// vol 47

sports // no. 7

The top five highest paid athletes › They only make a few bucks more than the average Canadian…

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et’s face it, for a lot of people being a superstar professional athlete is a dream job. You get to play the game you love, always stay in shape, be just as famous as the biggest celebrities, get free athletic gear from the brands you love, and you also get paid an enormous amount of money. The average professional athlete in a major sports league makes approximately $2.3 million, almost 44 times the average salary for Canadian employees. And if you were to look at the average salary of the top five highest paid players relative to the average salary for Canadian employees, they make over 1900 times more. I think we could probably say these guys are in a good place financially. Here are the top five highest paid athletes according to Forbes magazine: 1. Roger Federer Although he’s getting closer to the end of his career, the tennis superstar managed to rack in a total of $106.3 million,

making him the first tennis player ever to be number one on Forbes highest paid athletes list. Most of the 39-year old’s earnings came from his endorsements, as he only made approximately $6.3 million related to his performances on the court. His most notable deal was when he signed a 10-year $300 million deal with Japanese apparel brand Uniqlo. 2. Cristiano Ronaldo The Portuguese soccer star continues his streak as one of the top athletes on the Forbes list, making approximately $105 million dollars. He earned approximately $64 million through his ongoing fouryear deal with his current club Juventus, and over $45 million in endorsements. The 35-year old is also the most followed person on Instagram with almost 250 million followers. 3. Lionel Messi Falling not so far behind from his colleague is Argentinian soccer star Lionel Messi, as he made approximately $104 million. Although there were rumours of his departure from

Illustration by Udeshi Seneviratne

Mo Hussain Sports Reporter

FC Barcelona earlier this year, Messi still earned approximately $72 million from his play on the pitch and $32 million in endorsements. His most notable deal is his lifelong sponsorship with Adidas. 4. Neymar The soccer stars continue to roll through this top five list, with Brazilian star Neymar racking in approximately $95.5 million. Most of his earnings came through his ongoing $350 million deal with French soccer giant Paris Saint-Germain. The transfer from his former club remains the most expensive in the world.

5. LeBron James Coming in as the only basketball player in the top five list is basketball star LeBron James—with approximately $88.2 million. Most of the soon-to-be 36-year old’s earnings came from his endorsements which are worth $60 million. His earnings on the court came to about $28.2 million from his ongoing four-year, $153 million contract with the Los Angeles Lakers.

Pat Quinn Classic 2020 canceled › Annual tournament in honour of Quinn will focus on virtual initiatives

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he Pat Quinn Classic (PQC), one of the biggest Peewee and Bantam hockey tournaments during the Christmas holidays, has been canceled due to COVID-19. Despite no hockey, there will be off-ice activities occurring in its place.   A statement on the official tournament website states: “After thorough consultation with local health authorities and tournament partners, we made the difficult decision to cancel this year’s Pat Quinn Classic.” They are planning to continue Pat Quinn’s legacy by “planning some exciting community and virtual

initiatives. Details will be shared on social media and this website in the coming weeks.” There have also been changes to the scholarships. To make more players eligible, the tournament’s Twitter account posted on November 21: “Since we are not able to host a tournament this year, we are expanding our eligibility criteria so more players are able to apply. In previous years, you had to participate in the tournament...” Furthermore, the PQC announced on Twitter on November 25 they are holding a virtual food drive in support of the Vancouver Food Bank—with their goal to raise $2,500. The PQC is managed by Sport Burnaby and is run by Inside Edge Hockey. Jennifer Scott, Event Director for the PQC, says despite no hockey, there are important off-ice initiatives that need to continue. “We also know there is a significant need in our community and many families will need some help to have a bright holiday season,” Scott said in an email interview with the Other Press. “We have teamed up with Burnaby Minor Hockey Association to run a toy drive to support the Burnaby Christmas Bureau and a Virtual Food Drive to support the Greater Photo by Arnaldo Fragozo

Brandon Yip Senior Columnist

Vancouver Food Bank. We have some terrific prizes including a Nintendo Switch and an autographed Canucks jersey. Again, anyone interested should check out patquinnclassic.com for more details.” The Pat Quinn Classic tournament is held in Burnaby at several local arenas: Burnaby Lake, Kensington, Burnaby Winter Club, Scotiabarn (formerly Burnaby 8 Rinks), Bill Copeland—where the championship games are held, and Planet Ice in Coquitlam. Burnaby is also home to the Burnaby Minor Hockey Association and Burnaby Winter Club. Burnaby has the highest ratio of rink per capita in the world. The city of Burnaby has produced many exceptional hockey players such as Cliff Ronning, Joe Sakic, Paul Kariya, Chris Joseph, Darren McCarty, Glenn Anderson, the late Jack McIIhargey, Greg Zanon, Karl Alzner, Tyler McNeely, Byron Ritchie, Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, Matt Barzal, and Dante Fabbro—all played their minor hockey in Burnaby and later moved on to the NHL and/or Team Canada. The PQC has brought in dozens of teams from all over Canada and the US. The tournament has been held since 2015 in honour of the late Pat Quinn. He was a former NHL player and later coach, general manager, and president with the Vancouver Canucks. He also coached the Toronto Maple Leafs. Quinn also coached Canada to a gold medal at the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City in 2002. In 2004, he coached Canada when they won the World Cup of Hockey tournament. And in 2009, he was the bench boss for Canada’s gold medal victory at the World Junior Championships. Quinn was also a co-owner of the Vancouver Giants of the

WHL. He passed away in November 2014 at age 71 after a lengthy illness and was survived by his wife Sandra, and daughters Kalli and Val. The Pat Quinn Classic has been a success in its first five years—more than 3,100 players have played in the tournament. Burnaby also has a long history of hosting an annual Bantam hockey tournament during Christmas for 58 years going back to 1962. In terms of numbers, the PQC has raised $55,000 for the Pat Quinn Scholarship Fund, 170 players have been drafted to the WHL, and the Vancouver Canuck Alumni Association has given $6,000 in scholarships to worthy PQC players. Tournament organizers are hopeful there will be a PQC in 2021, but for now, it will be virtual activities and updates while not deviating from its mission and goals. Continuing to honour Pat Quinn’s legacy is something Jennifer Scott says is very important: “It’s a tremendous responsibility and honour to play a small role in carrying forward Pat’s legacy. We hold ourselves to the highest standards on how we conduct ourselves, how we deliver the tournament and how we represent the Quinn name. We are fortunate to have the guidance of [former NHL player and Vancouver Canuck] Cliff Ronning and Kalli Quinn who ensure we remain true to the vision and objectives. Pat was passionate about developing athletes to be successful and leaders off the ice, and this tournament is true to his spirit and legacy. Pat was a giant of a man, and this tournament allows people to share their experiences and stories of Pat as a man, father, coach, husband, and leader.”  


sports// no. 8

theotherpress.ca

Mets’ Robinson Cano goes two for two in testing positive for PEDs

› Cano is among an infamous Illustration by Athena Little

list of MLB players caught using banned substances

Brandon Yip Senior Columnist

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obinson Cano of the New York Mets has been suspended for the entire 2021 MLB season. The second baseman tested positive for stanozolol, a performance enhancing drug (PED), and the same drug Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson was caught using during the 1988 Olympics. This is Cano’s second violation and will forfeit his salary of $24 million. Cano, as a member of the Seattle Mariners in 2018—missed 80 games after testing positive for a diuretic. ESPN reported in an online article published in November 2020, Cano stated the diuretic had been given to him “…by a licensed doctor in the Dominican Republic to treat a medical ailment.” Cano claimed that he did not realize the drug was banned by MLB. When the suspension was announced, Cano issued a statement in an attempt to defend his dignity and integrity: “I would never do anything to cheat the rules of the game that I love.” But Cano is not the only baseball player caught using banned substances. Cano is just one of numerous players whose names and reputation are now tarnished using PEDs. It also raises suspicion of who else may also be cheating and using PEDs to prolong their baseball careers. In the case of Cano, there is probable reason why he was caught again for using PEDs: he is an aging ball player at 38 making a huge salary. Perhaps Cano felt pressure to live up to his big contract (Cano signed

a 10-year deal totaling $240 million with the Seattle Mariners in 2013). He used PEDs to help him stay competitive in the Mets lineup. However, it is very difficult to feel any sympathy for Cano—since this is the second time he has been caught. His reputation has been tainted and his chances of getting into the Baseball Hall of Fame are in doubt. Here is a look back at other MLB players who decided that doing it the “clean” way was just too difficult. Alex Rodriguez Alex Rodriguez, “A-Rod,” was not immune to scandal and links to steroid use during his baseball career. He has always denied ever using steroids. However, while playing for the New York Yankees, he was involved in the Biogenesis scandal in 2013. Rodriguez and 12 other players had purchased PEDs from the now-defunct clinic, Biogenesis of America. Each player involved received heavy suspensions of 50 or more games (nearly a third of a season). In August 2013, a few weeks after the news broke that A-Rod was connected to the Biogenesis scandal, the Yankees played the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park. Red Sox pitcher, Ryan Dempster (from Gibsons, BC), made his feelings known about how he felt about Rodriguez—intentionally hitting him in the left arm. Rodriguez would later be suspended for the entire 2014 season after violating the league’s antidoping rules. The New York Post bestowed him with honourable headline names “A-Hole” and “A-Rat.” Don’t think J-Lo would appreciate those names.

Jose Canseco The slugger, then of the Oakland Athletics, became the first MLB player to reach the 40/40 plateau, hitting 40 home runs while stealing 40 bases in 1988. Canseco was known for hitting long bombs including a famous home run during the 1989 ALCS playoffs against the Toronto Blue Jays—where Canseco hit a monster home run high into the left upper deck at the Skydome (now called Rogers Centre). Maybe there was a reason why he was hitting so many bombs as Canseco later admitted that he had been using steroids during his baseball career. Canseco wrote a tell-all book called Juiced in 2005 where he named other ball players who were also using PEDs. Canseco severed many friendships in baseball after the book was published. In 2012, Canseco posted on Twitter, his regrets writing the book: “I am truly sorry for hurting my [teammates] and friends when I wrote Juiced.” Mark McGwire McGwire of the St. Louis Cardinals was part of the 1998 home run chase along with Sammy Sosa of the Chicago Cubs. Both hitters were trying to break Roger Maris’ long standing record of 61 home runs in a season. McGwire would break Maris’ record on September 8 against the Cubs and finish with 70 home runs. Sosa would finish the season with 66 home runs. In March 2005, McGwire testified during the congressional hearings into steroid use in baseball. But he was evasive and uncooperative and refused to discuss

anything—let alone whether he took PEDs. Five years later, McGwire would come clean and admit that he had been using PEDs during his pro baseball career. However, McGwire denied that steroids helped him hit home runs, telling Bob Costas in an interview on the MLB Network in January 2010: “I believe I was given this gift [to hit home runs]. The only reason I took steroids was for health purposes.” Sammy Sosa He was the counterpart to Mark McGwire during the 1998 home run chase. While McGwire took a long time to finally admit he had used steroids during his baseball career, Sosa has always denied that he used PEDs. There has always been a cloud of suspicious surrounding Sosa and this doubt about him being a “clean” hitter came to the forefront in 2003 when he was caught using a corked bat. In addition, Sosa was named as part of the anonymous list of players that were connected to steroids in 2003. Also, he was one of 11 players and executives that were subpoenaed to speak in front of congress in 2005 pertaining to steroid use. “I never had a test positive in this country,” Sosa said to Jeremy Schaap of ESPN. However, The New York Times reported in 2009 that Sosa did have a positive test during MLB’s anonymous survey testing six years earlier. “No, I never missed any test at the major league level,” he said in response to a follow-up question. Mr. Sosa, meet Mr. Cano. Mr. Cano, meet Mr. Sosa.


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Arts

arts // no. 9 • Why so many celebrities are damaging their voice • No box office mojo • Beautiful winter and Christmas paintings ...and more

The modern human condition is disguised in old country timbre › An album review and interview with city cowboy Dougie Poole CJ Sommerfeld Staff Writer

     ynth-country artist Dougie Poole released a new album earlier this summer. Its title—The Freelancer’s Blues— is comically relevant to many writers and other artists who try to make a fiscal living via their art. This record begs the listener to recognize how modern-day themes have been added to those traditional ones in old country tunes. The Other Press had the chance to ask Poole some questions about his new album, giving perspective to its twenty-first-century themes. Poole is a synth-cowboy based in Brooklyn, New York. His previous works include single Olneyville System Special and full-length album Wideass Highway. While these personal works are both derivatives of country, his sounds were not always restricted to their current honkey-tonk perimeters. Prior to finalizing his sound, he toured with synth-pop artist Jerry Paper. Perhaps this is what the interjections of synth in his current country projects were influenced by. Generating a hybrid genre such as synth-country is salient in inaugurating something undiscovered and unheard; Poole’s mash of genres is genius. The Freelancer’s Blues album cover arrays this mash of ideas. Poole explains how the cover’s art came to be in an email interview with the Other Press, “[It] is a collaboration with an artist named Maren Jensen, […] an old friend of mine. She makes beautiful, highly detailed colored pencil drawings. I made her a mood board when I was trying to capture the vibe of what I wanted on the cover. I can’t remember everything that was on it, but it definitely included lot of blue china plates, and the cover for The Byrds’ ‘Sweetheart of the Rodeo.’” Just as country songs often do, the tracks heard on The Freelancer’s Blues tell stories. These narratives—perhaps fictional, perhaps not, are relatable to the multifaceted, modern human condition. The album’s first track, “Vaping on the Job” may be alluding to something other than it directly references—being consumed in a less than favorable workforce. Poole says otherwise, noting how the song relates to his own work situation. “Like the majority of other musicians, and other artists, I spend a lot of my time working other jobs to support myself.” The song’s lyrics describe this well-known narrative: “Michelle turned in her BFA for a CDL/And now she drives that box truck fifty hours a week/She don’t paint anymore; she misses it for sure/But who’s got the time?” The album’s second track, “Los Angeles” outlines a similar modern-day

Illustration by CJ Sommerfeld

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predicament: the uncertainty that option brings. The melody’s chord progressions hinder to Dolly Parton’s “Jolene,” injecting familiarity to the cosmic tune. Instead of begging a red-headed bank teller to not steal the protagonist’s lover, however, the listener is trailed along with their transforming thoughts while driving cross-country. When asked if Parton’s “Jolene” was inspiration for the tune, Poole replied “‘Los Angeles’ used to sound very different—originally it was slower, and in a major key. It always felt like it was missing something, […] when I sat down to change it I must have been thinking of the ‘Jolene’ riff […] the similarity is undeniable. But at the time, Dolly didn’t occur to me. I was listening a lot to Fleetwood Mac’s “Big Love” and Glen Campbell’s ‘If This Is Love.’” A good trip that has dulled with use and time is described in “These Drugs

Aren’t Working.” When asked if drugs were a metaphor, Poole replied “I don’t think about metaphors too much when I’m writing. […] I don’t have that poetic skill really, to let my mind run wild like that. I get very hung up on things making sense.” He elaborates on metaphors by saying “A lot of folks call my work ‘cosmic country,’ which is funny to me because I think most of my work is pretty firmly grounded on earth, in real experiences. I wish I could get cosmic with my metaphors, my associations, but I can’t really. I don’t do a ton of drugs, but I’ve done enough for them to have stopped working, […] ‘These drugs aren't working anymore’ is just a real thought I’ve had about a real feeling. In that sense, I don’t think of it as a metaphor, but it did occur to me that the arc of that feeling, the way excitement fades with time and repetition, bears some similarity to the arc that a

romance can often take.” The last track, the tune which the album is named after, “The Freelancer’s Blues,” opens with reverberate and baritone vocals reminiscent of Canadian city cowboy Daniel Romano. “I chose it for the title of the record because I think the concept of ‘freelancing’ reverberates through a lot of the other tunes,” Poole tells the Other Press. “Freelancing is a common occupational practice, obviously, but I think that we can also freelance romantically, or spiritually, or socially.” The tune uncovers a not-so-classic country theme, similar to the album’s first track: the suffocation and toxicity of comfortabilities in life. And while woozy pedal steel punctures the melody, reviving the paragon country timbre, one must ask themselves if such plights are modern, or simply a new version of life in comparison to when the genre first came about.


arts // no. 10

theotherpress.ca

The importance of vocal placement › Why so many celebrities are damaging their voice Sonam Kaloti Arts Editor ocal placement is a huge deal. It’s one of the easiest ways to tell a casual singer from someone who actually knows what they’re doing. With that, it’s a great way to determine who knows how to play the instrument they’re using, which can prove itself very important in the realm of music. There are many placements for sound in and around the body. Various tracks for sound exist—some bad, some good. Some of this may ring untrue since every person’s body is different. I am a high soprano and a petite figure, and this is where the sound usually exists for me. Though, most of this information is universal enough. Generally, sound should begin at the diaphragm, hooking under your sternum for support. This grounds the sound for wherever you’re going to take it next. It should then go through your chest to behind you. This is already a place where most people do not go. The absolute worst way to sing is forward and from your throat. Pushing the sound out is dangerous and can permanently damage your vocal cords—which is also the reason most voice instructors don’t recommend belting. It’s generally believed that there is no fully safe way to belt (though, there are some safer ways than others).

Photo by Arnaldo Fragozo

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To go into head voice (high pitch going beyond your break), the sound generally should go behind your head and slightly above, where it circles and resonates best (since it is a track, depending on the note, the placement may be slightly above or below on said track). At the same time though, regardless of what pitch you’re singing, the sound should go behind you

(this is where chest voice goes). With high notes, it should go behind and above, but still behind and down to keep the sound grounded and not pushed forward. The sound can also circle above and be thrown forward from above your head, but this isn’t a good move for beginners who may lose control of the sound from here. Mix voice is head voice connected

with chest voice and it eliminates the break between the head and chest registers. It is also a way to “fake belt”—creating a strong resonant high sound without damaging your vocal cords by putting too much breath and throat tension on them. It is worth noting that it is a careful practice and should be worked on mindfully. Tons of extremely talented and well-trained vocalists have practiced some sort of poor vocal technique—resulting in damaged vocal cords. One example is Adele, who had to undergo a high-risk surgery in hopes of repairing her damaged vocal cords. Sam Smith, Megan Trainor, and Michael Bublé are just some of the countless vocalists who have damaged their voices. Voice is a much more dangerous instrument than it is given credit for— especially by those assuming that vocalists are simply “divas” with little genuine skill as opposed to their visible-instrument bearing musician counterparts. However, it is a dance, and an exercise requiring extreme awareness and connection to your entire body and the space around it. It is difficult, dangerous, and deeply misunderstood by everyday folk, musicians, vocalists, and professionals alike. Although vocal placement is important in the art of singing, if you’re interested in learning the instrument, the first step is learning how to breathe, but that’s a whole ‘nother anatomy lesson.

No box office mojo › The 2020 movie box office will definitely Craig Allan Staff Writer

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hen this year began, if bets were being taken for what the top films of the year 2020 were going to be, anyone who bet on films like James Bond, Marvel’s Black Widow, or Jordan Peele’s Candyman, would not have received a high return on their bet. However, in a year in which theatres have been ravaged by COVID and those films disappeared off the schedule, films with little-to-no expectations were able to rise to the top and become artificial kings of the box office. Here are some of the unexpected champions and anomalies of the abnormal 2020 box office. Note that this list will only include the domestic box office results. First is the number one film of this year. As of November 26, the highest grossing film of 2020 is Bad Boys for Life. The film so far has grossed $206,305,244 and is the only film in 2020 to gross over $200 million. To make a comparison, last year’s highest grossing film, Avengers: Endgame, grossed $858,373,000 and was one of 11 films to make over $200 million. If Bad Boys for Life is placed in that year, it would only finish in 12th place. Bad Boys for Life was released by Sony Pictures Entertainment. If they are able to hold the top of the box office, this will be the first time in almost 30 years that Sony has reached the top of the box office. The

last movie to do this was Terminator 2: Judgement Day, which was the number one film in the year of 1991. The title of number one film at the box office normally belongs to Disney, who has won the title every year since 2015 and eight of the last 10 years. This year that will not be the case, as not only does Disney not have the number one spot at the box office… they don’t even have a film in the top five. The highest grossing film they have this year is Call of the Wild— which is currently holding sixth place and was a holdover film from the studio’s 20th Century Fox acquisition. If judging the year by the calendar gross, the herd thins out even more, with four films in the top 10 that were actually released last year, like 1917 (second) and Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker (fifth). The calendar year also shows that none of the films in the top 10 debuted after March, with Tenet being the closest post March release at number 14. Some of the biggest films in the last 20 years have been comic book superhero films, with many of them frequenting the top 10. This year will be vastly different, as it will be the first year since 2009 that the Marvel Cinematic Universe does not release a film in its long running series. The only film Marvel was able to release this year was The New Mutants, which, like Call of the Wild, was a holdover from the 20th Century Fox acquisition and had been sitting on the shelf for almost three years.

Illustration by CJ Sommerfeld

be a departure from previous years

Instead, the highest grossing comic book movie of the year will be Warner Bros DC Extended Universe film Birds of Prey. Though, this year will be a shining light for one film genre that has often been ridiculed: the video game movie adaptation. After years of futility at the box office, and incremental climbs over the last decade, this year will see the speedy Sonic the Hedgehog breakthrough on the charts for the video game movies. The movie is claiming the title of highest grossing video game movie and highest ranking video game movie of all time, finishing second at the calendar year box office with

$146,066,470. A successful, yet slightly hollow win for the genre. Despite this odd year, we could see the box office go in the opposite direction next year due to so many films being moved. Next year could see a huge boost due to two years of tent-pole movies being released in one year. If anything, the 2020 box office is a snapshot of this time, as anyone looking at the box office for this year in the future will likely not understand that sudden drop in money if they are not aware of the damages of COVID.


arts // no. 11

Winter warmth captured in fleeting moments

› Beautiful winter and Christmas paintings

Claude Monet’s The Road to Giverny in Winter has a magical quality to it. Whether it is the notes of pink in the sunset, or the reflection of it on the snow, the painting beautifully contrasts the dreary atmosphere of the dull winter with the hidden warmth of the season peeking out behind the ever-grey clouds. Floating Ice Near Vetheuil came about soon after artists had access to paint tubes, and you can tell. The water scene is dazzled with warm tones reminiscent of a sunrise bouncing off of every element in the painting. Monet is known to have done many paintings of the River Seine.

A Montreal painter, Richard Savoie, takes us into the still, cold beauty of winter. The people who live in the paintings turn away from us, making it feel as though we are paused in a moment. The peaceful solitude and warmth emitting from Savoie’s oil and pastel paintings demonstrate the best aspects of winter. Through the freezing cold darkness radiates pure orange warmth, light, and with it, love.

'Blessings of Christmas' by Thomas Kinkade

Paintings by Richard Savoie

'Holiday Gathering' by Thomas Kinkade

'Floating Ice Near Vetheuil' by Claude Monet

Sonam Kaloti Arts Editor

'The Road to Giverny in Winter' by Claude Monet

issue 13// vol 47

Thomas Kinkade’s specialty is Christmas and winter paintings—and they are all gorgeous. The emotion captured in Holiday Gathering presents nostalgia for the good ole pre-COVID days. The sense of coziness and community is at the heart of this scene. Blessings of Christmas shows the meaning of family. The love, warmth, and cheer are represented by the cottage’s glow, and the gleeful stature of the snowman. The tree outside is topped with a star, and the marble walkway is inviting. You can almost smell the hot chocolate and freshly baked cookies.


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Life & Style

life & style // no. 12 • COVID-19 has caused a pandemic in many people’s love lives • Holiday take out • Lavender syrup recipes ...and more

Masks make consumers change focus › COVID-19 transforms beauty industry Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor n times of crisis, despite trying to save up financially for the unknown, we’re all known to indulge in simple comforts— some of us turn to baked goods, some to crafting, and others to makeup. Now that we are a long way from the beginning of the pandemic, most people have accepted that new standards of living life include wearing masks, eating on the go, and doing it yourself. Which means there’s a lot more reliance on the online community, and a lot more YouTube (cue DIY videos and homemade muffins, please). Entertainment has shifted gears and it seems everyone and their dog is posting reaction videos and makeup tutorials these days, but the funniest new thing is seeing a commercial or Instagram clip that takes COVID-19 regulations to heart, including masked makeup tutorials! So, what must this mean for the lipstick industry if no one is lining the perfect lip anymore? According to Fortune Magazine, the makeup industry has seen steady profit

Photo by Billy Bui

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margins since at least 2005, including during the global financial crisis. However, this pandemic promises to change the industry fundamentally with the consumer’s new focus on skincare creams and homemade beauty treatments rather

than rosy cheeks and luscious lips. With little to no reason to leave the house, the make-up industry has taken a hit—with lipstick sales falling 15 percent and prices falling 28 percent. The humble face mask covers half the face, so who has the

time bother? And those who do have to deal with smudging. The pandemic has, however, led to an increase in hair product and colouring sales at 172 percent, and nail polish sales at 218 percent. Even eye makeup sales are up! Does this mean it’s time to contemplate another sorrowful consequence of coronavirus? Do we dash away the daring colours we once placed on our lips? Not necessarily, as face mask wearing consumers are learning more about smudge-resistant and transferresistant lipstick options that they’ll still apply for FaceTime meetings and dates. Some brands worth looking into are Stila Stay All Day Liquid Lipstick, Lorac PRO Matte Lip Color, or N.Y.C. New York Color Expert Last Lip Lacquer. One way to look at things is that the coronavirus invites us to embrace change and to try on new looks! It’s time to take a leap and freshen up that hair with colours never thought of before, or some fun new nails and sharp eyes to stand out even with a mask!

A virus of breakups › COVID-19 has caused a pandemic Brandon Yip Senior Columnist

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ince March, many people have been staying at home. And this prolonged time with couples at home under stressful circumstances has put an emotional strain on some marriages. The irony appears to be that couples spending more time together at home should solidify and strengthen a relationship and marriage. However, that is not the case; since the emergence of COVID-19, there has been a rise in the divorce rate with married couples.   In Canada, the divorce rate has increased since the start of the pandemic. Marcus Sixta, a Vancouver lawyer in an interview with the CBC, states that the sudden increase in couples divorcing is alarming: “We’re seeing an increase in inquiries regarding divorces and separation [...] the areas of domestic violence as well,” he said. “It seems that what happened in China [...] we’re actually seeing the same thing happening here. There is this ‘COVID bump’ in the divorce rate that we’re seeing now.” In addition to the divorce rate increasing, there has also been an increase in demand for private investigators to spy on unfaithful spouses. Adrianne Fekete, who owns Star Quality Private Investigations in Toronto, said she saw a 30 percent increase in clientele in April.

She states that COVID-19 has not deterred cheating spouses. “It just makes it more tricky and exciting for them,” Fekete told CTV News in November 2020. Trevor Haywood, president and CEO of a private investigation company in Toronto called Haywood Hunt and Associates Inc., has also noticed an increase in their services. “They see the telltale signs,” Haywood said to CTV News. “They’re hiding their phones a lot more. And the partner is asking, ‘If that call is work-related, why aren’t you picking up the phone?’” Divorce mediator Edit Farun has also seen a significant increase in the number of people seeking to legally dissolve relationships. Farun says that the pandemic has caused a lot of stress with many couples who do not want to stay together to work out their issues. “Typically, it’s natural for a lot of couples to have friends and to go out to socialize. And now with COVID, the pandemic has created a lockdown for many families, so people are either not going to work outside of the home, or they’ve been working at home. They’re actually in each other’s spaces 24/7. So, it’s been that much more difficult and that much more complicated for families." On the other hand, some experts, such as Toronto-based family lawyer Ron Shulman, say that marriages end because

Illustration by Sonam Kaloti

in many people’s love lives

they are put in a terrible environment like COVID. “Whenever we deal with separations and divorces, there are always underlying issues. It’s rarely triggered by one specific event that comes out of the blue. It’s usually a process couples go through until they get to the point where one of them realizes separation is inevitable,” he said in an interview with Global News. “With the COVID-19 crisis and everything that followed, everything got significantly amplified… that’s what we see from the increase of clients calling in.” Nevertheless, Dr. Theresa E. DiDonato, a social psychologist, states the pandemic has been stressful for many people. But she notes that people need to be aware that divorce, itself, is already a stressful event. DiDonato writes in an article published in Psychology

Today that “many people are not only managing the common stressors produced by the pandemic (e.g., isolation, work changes, health concerns), but they are also enduring one of the hardest life transitions, divorce. Divorce is extraordinarily stressful even in a calm world.” Finally, Dr. Sara Schwarzbaum, a counsellor with the Couples Counseling Association in Chicago, has advice for couples who are looking to divorce during the pandemic. “So, one piece of advice I’d have is don’t make decisions in the middle of a pandemic. You might change your mind,” she said in an interview with ABC 7 Chicago. “The best way right now is to communicate, communicate, communicate. Ask kindly what you need. Ask for help. Manage expectations.” 


issue 13// vol 47

life & style // no. 13

Lavender syrup recipes › Sweet and soothing methods

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little trip to the neighbouring gulf island, Mayne Island, last week ended with my coming home with jars of locally made jam and something a little different: lavender syrup! I wasn’t sure just exactly what lavender syrup was, so I asked the merchant and she said it’s basically maple syrup minus the maple. She recommended putting the lavender syrup on pancakes and in coffee or tea. And while I am sure those suggested options would be quite delicious, they wouldn’t be my go-to. Nevertheless, I bought a bottle with the intention of inventing some sweet and soothing recipes back at home. But first, how do you make lavender syrup? Using a saucepan, heat up one cup of water, three tablespoons of lavender flowers (fresh or dried), and two cups of granulated sugar. Let everything simmer, then steep until cooled— and pour into a glass bottle. This same recipe can also be used to make simple herbal syrups that are blended. Lavender Lime Gin and Tonic As simple as it sounds, mix together two shots of pink gin, tonic water on ice, a squeeze of lime, and a dash of lavender syrup, and voila! A refreshing and floral spin on the classic gin and tonic using lavender syrup! Lavender French 75 A subtle lavender flavour with the bubbly and herbal hints known to accompany a French 75. Mix one-part gin, one-part champagne, a squeeze of lemon, and of course, the lavender syrup into a cocktail tumbler full of ice.

Lavender Hot Chocolate and Whipped Cream Because what sounds better than a dollop of lavender-flavoured whipped cream on top of a lavender-flavoured hot chocolate? How about curling up to an excellent book with a delicious cup of lavender-flavoured hot chocolate and whipped cream? For the whipped cream: combine one cup of heavy whipping cream and one tablespoon of dried lavender flowers in a small pot and heat to a boil. Stir often, then remove from heat. Let steep until room temperature, then strain out the lavender and refrigerate cream for several hours until chilled. Next mix cream, two tablespoons of powdered sugar, and half a teaspoon of vanilla extract with a mixer or whisk. Whip for several minutes until soft peaks form. For the hot chocolate: mix milk, cocoa powder, and lavender syrup into a saucepan and heat over medium heat, whisking frequently until warm. Add some chocolate chips and whisk constantly until the chips melt and are combined into the milk. Illustration by Athena Little

Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor

Lavender Rhubarb Cobbler This one is a favourite of mine! Cobblers are easy to make and an excellent way to use up fruit that’s just about to go bad. Cut up some strawberries and rhubarb into a casserole dish and drizzle with lavender syrup. Next, eyeball one-part flour (gluten-free or otherwise), to two-parts oats, add in some cinnamon, sugar, and a small pinch of baking powder. Whisk together and cut in half a cup or so of margarine or room temperature butter. Combine until a crumbly mix is formed. Top the chopped fruit with the crumbly mix and bake at 400 degrees for around 35 minutes, or until the fruit is soft and aromatic. Who needs measurements?


ROGERS ARENA TU

› The multi-purpose arena h

Brandon Yip Senior Columnist

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his year marks 25 years since Rogers Arena opened. This state-of-the-art building, like fine wine, has aged very well. The arena has been the home of the Vancouver Canucks since 1995. Located at 800 Griffiths Way, the venue has seen a plethora of sporting events, concerts, award shows, film shoots, conventions, speeches, high school events, etc. According to Rogers Arena, they have welcomed 33-million people. Here is a look back at some of the highlights of Rogers Arena’s first quarter century.

THE HISTORY

The man responsible for building Rogers Arena was businessman Arthur Griffiths. The Griffiths family has a long history with the Vancouver Canucks, owning the team from 1974 to 1997—for over 20 years. Construction began in 1993 and was completed two years later. Griffiths secured five acres of land located at the old Expo 86 site. Over $160 million in private funding was used to build the new arena. The Canucks played their home games at the Pacific Coliseum, which was owned by the city (1970 to 1995). Griffiths, in an interview with CBC Vancouver, said the impetus for building a new arena was for the Canucks to have autonomy: “I recognized in the time and place and the history of sport that the Canucks required their own home.” The building was known as GM Place when it opened on September 21, 1995. Canadian rocker, Bryan Adams, performed a concert two days before to inaugurate the arena. In 2010, General Motors declined to renew the naming rights. Rogers Communications then purchased the naming rights under a 10-year deal—and the building was renamed Rogers Arena in July 2010.

MEMORABLE SPORTS MOMENTS

The Vancouver Grizzlies of the NBA played six seasons in the building between 1995 and 2001. Although the Grizzlies did not win a lot, the NBA experience was a great one for diehard basketball fans. Notably, the most unforgettable moment in the building’s history occurred on February 28, 2010. Sidney Crosby would score the “Golden Goal” against the US to clinch the gold medal for Canada at the 2010 Winter Olympics. Rogers Arena had been converted to “Canada Hockey Place” as the prime venue for the men’s ice hockey event.

VANCOUVER CANUCK MOMENTS

In the early 2000s, the West Coast Express line of Brendan Morrison, Markus Naslund, and Todd Bertuzzi was one of the most dominant lines in the NHL. In April 2011, Alex Burrows’ “slay the dragon” overtime goal in game seven against Chicago still resonates with Canuck fans. Kevin Bieksa’s famous “stanchion” winning goal in overtime during game five of the western conference final against the San Jose Sharks is also a immensely memorable moment—advancing the Canucks to the cup final against Boston. Rogers Arena would be the place where Canuck fans would marvel at the skill and evolution of the Sedin twins—Henrik and Daniel. The twins played their entire career with the Vancouver Canucks (17 seasons), retiring at the end of the 2018 season. The Canucks have also had several “Ring of Honour” ceremonies while retiring the jerseys of Pavel Bure, Trevor Linden, Markus Naslund, and the Sedins. There have also been many somber moments. The Canucks have honoured the memory of those who had passed away: Luc Bourdon, Barry Wilkins, Pavol Demitra, Rick Rypien, Pat Quinn, and John Ashbridge.

OTHER KEY MOMENTS

In October 2002, Queen Elizabeth II visited the building to take part in a ceremonial pre-game faceoff—during an exhibition game between the Vancouver Canucks and San Jose Sharks. In addition, a surfeit of performers and notable figures have paid a visit: The Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney, Elton John, U2, The Police, Madonna, Lady Gaga, Bill and Hillary Clinton, the Dalai Lama, and Michelle Obama. Furthermore, the building has hosted the WWE, and UFC. And if fighting doesn’t entertain you, perhaps the multiple Juno Awards (1998, 2009, and 2018) that were hosted in the arena will. Also of note is that in August 2018, Rogers Arena hosted The International 2018 Dota 2 eSports tournament. From Queen Elizabeth II to Dota, there’s nothing this arena can’t host!

INTERVIEWS WITH JIM ROBSON, AL MURDOCH, AND IAIN MACINTYRE Jim Robson, retired Hall of Fame Vancouver Canuck play-by-play announcer, witnessed the early years of the Canucks in their new building. Robson remembers the first time he walked into Rogers Arena. “I remember having a tour of the new arena before the first hockey game and being very impressed, especially with the broadcast location and facilities,” Robson said in an email interview with the Other Press. “I always felt the broadcast booth should be opposite the player’s benches, unlike the poor TV location at the Pacific Coliseum. And the height was good, [very] high, but not too high— offering an excellent view of the ice.” Al Murdoch, current Canuck PA announcer, was also the PA announcer for the NBA Vancouver

Grizzlies from 1995 until 2001. Murdoch remembers the first time he walked into Rogers Arena. “I was in awe of its size and design,” Murdoch said in an email interview with the Other Press. “You have to remember, the Pacific Coliseum was the only reference we had in terms of a pro hockey/basketball arena in Vancouver, so to walk into then GM Place was jaw-dropping. And to have it built right in the [centre] of the city, it was fantastic. I had never been inside an arena like that in my life and to know I was going to be working there for the Vancouver Grizzlies as their PA announcer, I felt like a kid at Christmas.” Iain MacIntyre, Senior Writer for Sportsnet, was a longtime writer for the Vancouver Sun—covering the Canucks from 1991 until 2017. MacIntyre was

impressed when he first walked into the building. “Honestly, my first impression of being inside Rogers Arena, besides how sparklingly new and shiny it seemed, was how intimate it felt,” MacIntyre said in an email interview with the Other Press. “It’s actually a small arena by modern standards. The Dunsmuir and Georgia viaducts limited the architects and squeezed the building’s footprint. But this was a blessing for fans because all the seats, even the back row of the upper bowl, feel close to the ice. It’s a pain sometimes to move through the concourses when the arena is full, but it’s one of the best places in the National Hockey League to watch a game.”


URNS TWENTY-FIVE!

has had an intriguing legacy

DARK MOMENTS IN ROGERS ARENA HISTORY

Clearly Rogers Arena has hosted many notable events. Unfortunately, however, the building has been the site for some very dark moments. Brashear and McSorley On February 21, 2000, Marty McSorley of the Boston Bruins hit Canuck enforcer Donald Brashear in the side of the head with his stick. Brashear fell backwards, hitting his head on the ice—suffering a concussion. McSorley would be suspended and it led to his eventual retirement from the NHL. In addition, McSorley was later charged with assault and appeared in the Provincial Court of BC. He was found guilty but served no jail time, being sentenced to 18-month probation.

Bertuzzi and Moore Todd Bertuzzi of the Vancouver Canucks was involved in one of the ugliest incidents in the building’s history. The Canucks were trying to exact revenge on Colorado forward, Steve Moore—who injured Canuck star winger, Markus Naslund, with a borderline late hit that was not penalized in a game on February 16, 2004. Naslund suffered a concussion with cuts to his face. There is an unwritten rule in hockey: overly aggressive hits on star players are off limits. Hence, the purpose of an enforcer is to provide protection for star players (Wayne Gretzky having Dave Semenko and Steve Yzerman having Bob Probert).

Illustration by Sonam Kaloti

Guns N’ No Axl Rose In November 2002, fans waiting to see Guns N’ Roses began to riot outside the arena when news broke that lead singer, Axl Rose, was a no-show. Entertainment journalist Kurt Loder stated on MTV that “groups of ticked-off kids converged at the gates of GM Place. Fuelled, in some cases, by strong drink and marijuana, they hoisted the long metal security barriers outside and rammed them through the glass entry doors. They threw bottles and rocks. […] After about 20 minutes of all this, a phalanx of cops waded in with attack dogs, and things got really ugly.”

Both teams would play each other again two weeks later in Colorado with no incident. The teams would meet again in Vancouver five days later on March 8, 2004. In the game, Colorado was leading the Canucks by a score of 8 to 2 (final score was 9 to 2). In the third period, Bertuzzi would seek retribution on Steve Moore, resulting in more violence. Moore suffered three fractured neck vertebrae, a concussion,

and facial cuts. He never played hockey again and all of this resulted in criminal charges against Bertuzzi— and a civil lawsuit against Bertuzzi and the Canucks. In August 2014, the CBC reported the lawsuit ended with all parties involved agreeing to a confidential settlement.

MARKING 25 YEARS AND MOVING FORWARD

Arthur Griffiths, with NBA expansion fees along with high cost overruns on the construction of Rogers Arena, had no choice but to sell his interests of the Canucks and Grizzlies (Orca Bay Sports and Entertainment), gradually, to cellular phone mogul, John McCaw. McCaw would take over full ownership in November 1996. In November 2006, McCaw would sell his shares to the current owners, the Aquilinis (Aqulinis had originally purchased 50 percent of the arena and Canucks in November 2004). Since March, Rogers Arena has remained closed due to the pandemic. The hiatus will give people the opportunity to reflect on the impact the building has had on the millions of people who have passed through its doors over the last 25 years. In the same September 2020 interview with the CBC Vancouver, Arthur Griffiths reflected on Rogers Arena’s legacy. “Well, I remember sitting in the arena in the morning of, sitting in the bowl, and kind of taking it all in,” Griffiths said as he paused while holding back tears. “And realizing what had been accomplished.”

ROGERS ARENA INTERESTING FACTS • Date opened: September 21, 1995 • Cost to build: $160 million ($249 million in 2018 dollars) • Architect: Brisbin, Brook, and Beynon Owner: Canucks Sports & Entertainment • People visited venue: 33-million people • Current tenants: Vancouver Canucks (NHL) (1995 to present) and Vancouver Warriors (NLL) (2018 to present) • First concert: Bryan Adams on September 19, 1995 • First NHL game: Vancouver Canucks hosting Detroit Red Wings on October 9, 1995 • First NHL goal: Steve Yzerman, Detroit Red Wings (October 9, 1995) • First Vancouver Canuck goal: Mike Ridley (October 9, 1995)

• First NHL playoff game: Vancouver Canucks hosting Colorado Avalanche on April 20, 1996 • First NHL playoff goal: Peter Forsberg, Colorado Avalanche (April 20, 1996) • First Vancouver Canuck playoff goal: Esa Tikkanen (April 22, 1996) • 961 regular-season NHL games and 59 playoff games • 246 regular-season NBA games (and no playoff games) • 28 men’s hockey games during the 2010 Olympics (Rogers Arena was renamed Canada Hockey Place) • NHL All-Star game in 1998 • NBA Draft in 1998 • NHL Draft in 2006, and 2019 • 2019 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships


life & style // no. 16

theotherpress.ca

Holiday take-out Jerrison Oracion Senior Columnist

A

s British Columbia started reopening businesses (including restaurants) the number of reported Coronavirus cases went up again. It might have been caused by the increase of seating for dine-in options in restaurants, despite safety precautions put in place. While major holiday parties, including the newspaper’s Christmas party, will not happen in person this year, we can still do them virtually and get some food offerings from a variety of places this holiday season. Recently, various fast-food places are offering 2-for-1 deals, some of them include Burger King’s two chicken sandwiches for $6, Dairy Queen two for $4 Super Snack, and one of my favourite offers: two egg McMuffins for $5 at McDonald’s. If you like to eat quality food, there is Wendy’s Quality Choices Value Menu where they have some of their famous burgers made with fresh and never frozen beef and their chicken nuggets beginning at $4. One of the interesting food finds during the holiday season this year is at Harvey’s where they have a new burger called the Stuffed Cheeseburger. The

burger is their signature beef patty only filled with cheese and topped with any toppings and sauces that you like! A suggestion that I would make when preparing the burger is the basic toppings with Harvey’s sauce, add a few hot sauces, and other toppings that you like— making the burger a beautiful thing. Many restaurants today are still offering take out discounts and depending on the amount of cases in the Lower Mainland, you can dine-in to eat special meals as long as you follow the rules in the restaurant and still support local restaurants like White Spot, Ricky’s AllDay Grill, Oz Chicken, and C-Lovers Fish and Chips—which might still have their all-you-can-eat fish and chips available but with limited seating. Next door to Harvey’s is Swiss Chalet where they are offering their holiday dish which is the Festive Special. It is a quarter chicken with all the holiday

Illustration by Udeshi Seneviratne

› Food products during the second wave

trimmings, including stuffing, cranberry sauce, bread, and a side dish of the famous Chalet Sauce, and five Lindor truffles. It is also available as a meal combo and you can get it for take-out so that you can have a festive holiday dinner at home and virtually. With all meals, it includes $10 Chalet Cash that can be used towards a future purchase. If you are on the go and like to have a big meal, IHOP has their IHOPPY Hour menu which has their breakfast dishes combined with their

dinner dishes including chicken strips and pancakes, burger and pancakes, omelettes, and Italian Cannoli Pancakes all for the low cost of $5. You can also get sides for $3 including mozzarella sticks, onion rings, and French toast. Like most of this year, the holiday season is not going to be the same as every year before, but the food offered during the holiday season will still create memories even through the internet.

salad ingredients into a rice maker and steam them for around 30 to 40 minutes, then get ‘em in a sauce pan with a generous amount of your favourite kind of oil, seasoning, stir it all around until everything has marinated (but not wilted), and BAM, you’ve got a hot salad! It’s fucking delicious, easy to make, and tastes better because of the oil and choice seasonings acting as yummy dressing! My recommendation is to go with kale, spinach, or quinoa as a base

rather than romaine or green leaf lettuce for more structure to your overall salad. Fact: eating hot salads can be healthier than eating cold salads (especially if you’re one to douse your salad with heavy cream and sugar-based dressings that you buy at the store) because cooked veggies supply more antioxidants, such as carotenoids, lycopene, and ferulic acid for the body than they do when raw. But it does matter how you cook those veggies! Deep frying, for example, is not okay—the oil used when deep frying veggies is continuously oxidizing as it heats up, causing free radicals, which in turn can increase the risk of cancer and other health problems. A report published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry said that boiling and steaming the veggies better preserves their nutrients and antioxidants. However, not all vegetables benefit from being cooked, like tomatoes and other high in vitamin C veggies—vitamin C is unstable and easily degrades through oxidation, exposure to heat when cooking, and boiling. So, for the sake of the hot salad, try sun-dried tomatoes or thin slices of raw tomatoes instead! That way you don’t compromise on taste or nutritional value! Weighing the pros and cons of all your food cooked versus raw can be challenging and time consuming. Instead, why not just ensure you always eat your fruits and veggies however they are prepared and remember to enjoy them by mixing things up a little. Just because a grapefruit is usually cold doesn’t mean you can’t put it in the toaster oven with some caramelized sugar—and just because salads are traditionally served cold doesn’t mean yours has to be!

Hot salad recipe Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor

D

o you remember that silly little jingle, “you don’t make friends with salad, you don’t make friends with salad”? Well, whoever came up with that line obviously never had a kickass salad. I’m about to change your definition of the word salad with this article. And hey, for those of you who are already “in the know”

with what I am about to say, good for you— you’re living life outside the lines; you’ve taken conventional and turned it upside down. Alright, ready? Hot. Salad. That’s right. Hot salad is the most delicious and nutritious way to eat salad. And it’s trendy! And as a bonus, you will want to eat more salad, like, actually want to eat more salad! What is a hot salad, you ask? It’s literally a salad that you steam and then pan fry. Just throw together your favourite

Illustration by Sonam Kaloti

› Cook your veggies for a healthier and tastier meal!


Opinions

Have an idea for a story?  opinions@theotherpress.ca

opinions // no. 17 • MOVID 2025 • Men are victims of domestic violence too • A culture of nonsensical bits of offence ...and more

Pulled by the stars

Illustration by Udeshi Seneviratne

› The politics of fame

Matthew Fraser Opinions Editor

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elebrity has become a preferred tool for sales. Daniel Craig will sell you a watch, Matthew McConaughey will sell you a car, and Michael Jordan will sell you some shoes. The idea of plastering famous faces on sellable products is so pervasive that Pepsi tried to use Kylie Jenner to sell its products while head faking its “wokeness.” It makes sense then that celebrities (or at least their star power) would be used to sell politics; what else explains rappers like Lil Wayne and Lil Pump being held up front and center at Trump rallies or on Trump’s Twitter feed? Answer: simply the need to sell the illusion of acceptability and diversity to the cameras. It’s not like either of those men are respected politicians or devout Christian fundamentalists—they have no pull for the majority of Trumps core audience and yet they were elevated to such heights. The goal was to capitalize on the fan bases of these two artists and show critics that with POCs on his side, Trump couldn’t be a racist. On the other hand, Cardi B interviewing both Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders served a similar

function: connect to the youth and present the democratic party as acceptable. In a rant following the Lil Wayne and Trump photo op, syndicated radio show host Charlamagne tha God said ­­that he does not care what celebrities think about politicians, but what is the true value of star power in politics? Why should any of us care about how these people vote or which politicians they pose with? On one hand, some would argue that we don’t follow these people—athletes or musicians—for their political opinion but for their entertainment value. Some who make this argument say the thoughts and concerns of the famous are incidental to their ability to provide the service of distraction. Political commentator Laura Ingraham went so far as to tell Lebron James to “shut up and dribble.” However, history has shown that it is important for the famous to stand up for the voiceless and forgotten masses. When Muhammad Ali said “My enemies are white people, not Chinese or Japanese or Viet Cong. You’re my opposer when I want freedom,” he forced those members of white America who were willing to listen to contend with the hatred that was perpetuated on black

Americans while they were being called upon to defend America. Unfortunately, Cardi B and Lil Wayne make no such critiques but still seem to have the ear of both the masses and presidents incoming or outgoing. With millions of fans between them, the majority of whom are in the highly coveted young voter bracket, the worth of these stars is in their influence and that influence alone. Since neither are positioning or representing themselves as critical thinkers, it should be fair to see them as conduits to voters and media coverage. Malcolm X predicted this type of behaviour in the ’60s when he said that entertainers are not leaders, but often puppets of the political class. Indeed, these stars are being used as both placation and diversion for the political masses. Though he was speaking at a time when the black entertainer was given little to no respect by the white audience, in today’s day and age, star power transcends race and has become a culture all its own. Now, the brainwashing coercion of a famously pretty face is applied not just to black people but to all people. And for what? To curry a few votes and distract from the real problems that plague

the working class? To throw a veneer of diversity over old and unjust policies? To pretend as if those in the suits and offices really care about the poor? The clever usage of star power by politicians is an effort in pulling two things: more votes and the wool over your eyes. But as time has gone on, the career turns of Ronald Reagan and Arnold Schwarzenegger seem less an aberration and more an early symbol of today’s world. We are in a new era, an era blazed by charismatic and media savvy politicians like Justin Trudeau and Barack Obama; two politicians who could turn their campaign fame into loyal voters and international power. We are in an era where politicians must lean on stars to stay on top or be threatened by the star-turned politicians like Donald Trump and Kanye West. If Donald Trump took the white house, why can’t Selena Gomez become a senator? But do we really want to blur the lines between star and politician? Is the cult of personality that sells movie and concert tickets what we want to motivate our politics? It is in treacherous and choppy water that the political and entertainment elite blend.

The clever usage of star power by politicians is an effort in pulling two things: more votes and the wool over your eyes.


opinions // no. 18

theotherpress.ca

A culture of nonsensical bits of offence Matthew Fraser Opinions Editor

O

ver the past week or so a few things have made me wonder how it is that someone could be so out of touch that they would be offended or even be wounded by these events. In a way I have been wondering these things for years as I followed news and culture. There were always times that I would read of some angry people screaming or crying over some slight or impropriety and wonder: “is that all it takes these days?” I had wanted to write about this topic for awhile and when I had decided to do it, these events immediately occurred. I find it so unfortunately apropos that as I was turning this topic over in my head such obvious examples would organically emerge. Enter Shannon Sharpe and the hapless watermelon. For those who don’t know him, Sharpe is a legendary football player turned football commentator. Sharpe was informed that Dallas Cowboys head coach Mike McCarthy had organized a team motivational activity of smashing watermelons. Sharpe took offense to this, stating that the white America has historically used watermelons as a racial

insult towards black Americans. He then spent a large chunk of his segment admonishing both Coach McCarthy and the black players on the team for engaging in this “racist” behaviour; but one must ask oneself, if this behaviour was so obviously racist, why weren’t the numerous black players also offended? Could it be that destroying a cheap and plentiful inanimate object is fun and not racist because of what the inanimate object is? Could it be that it’s wholly unhealthy to go through every moment of one’s life looking for offense in the behaviours of others? Sharpe exposes himself not only as one who is obsessed with the interplays of race, but also as one who sees the lack of this obsession in others as a failing. Why should any of these players have to look at their coach’s efforts at team bonding and motivation as anything but that? What makes Sharpe so omniscient that he can precisely determine the level of outrage that others must have in the situations that involve them? What makes him so special as to be offended? But the overzealously hurt feelings are not constrained to the sports arenas and commentators—these hurt feelings extend into fields as far away as publishing. Indeed, reports from New York Post

Photo by Arnaldo Fragozo

› How do people live with such thin skin?

describe Penguin publishing employees distraught to the point of tears at the news of a new Jordan Peterson book. To be honest, I have no idea why. As someone who has watched a few Jordan Peterson interviews and a couple of his solo lectures, I can say with certainty that Peterson is not the “gateway to neofascism” that many easily bruised progressives believe him to be. He is little more than your standard old Canadian man, who having read all the books he owns two times or more, thinks he has the totality of knowledge necessary to steer young people in the right direction. Peterson has synthesized old good ideas and applied them to new problems. He proposes to have answers for others but is human in his failings—nothing more and nothing less. I say firmly that Peterson does not deserve either the idolization or

the vitriol that he gets; he is just another thinker amongst many who have come, written, and gone. But the illogical ire and rage that he insights fascinates me, because it tells me so clearly that the people he “triggers” could never protect or serve as allies to the people they claim to care about. If the very thought of a Jordan Peterson book causes such reactions, you will be of no use should the real hatreds rear their ugly heads. So here I am, wondering again how it is that some people are so easily offended and always over nothing. Some smashed watermelons enraged a 300-pound man, and a self-help book has caused tears. It’s a wonder that anything gets done these days.

Johnny Depp: a role model for men experiencing domestic violence › Men are victims of domestic violence too

W

e know Johnny Depp as many characters; Jack Sparrow from Pirates of the Caribbean, Grindelwald from

Fantastic Beasts, or even Mad Hatter from Alice in Wonderland; little did we know he was also a survivor of domestic violence. The past few years have been a roller coaster of emotions for Depp and Amber Heard. While women from Depp’s past relationships have said he is no abusive monster or “wife beater,” Heard claimed otherwise. But just how legitimate was her statement? Or were they both abusive towards each other? After the two finalized their divorce in 2017, Heard accused Depp of physically abusing her, and Depp would then sue his ex-wife for defamation in 2019. Earlier this year, phone recordings were released in which Heard admitted to being abusive to Depp. Heard is caught saying: “I’m sorry that I didn’t [...] hit you across the face in a proper slap, Illustration by CJ Sommerfeld

Shivani Jeet Contributor

but I was hitting you, it was not punching you. Babe, you’re not punched.” Though the case was taken to trial this past summer, unfortunately for millionaire Johnny Depp even with the best lawyers, multiple recordings of Heard assaulting him, and photographic evidence of the abuse, he could not get his case taken seriously by the judge; and yes, I believe this has everything to do with him being a man. There are multiple barriers men face if they fall out of the heteronormative script, even if they are of status. So, what hope do other male survivors have for justice? Who do men reach out too for help when they need someone to count on? This issue is highly embedded in feminist theory and is explained as the patriarchy oppressing men who do not conform to traditionalist masculine gender norms and patterns. He lost his case and even called for an appeal, however, his libel case was turned down, which by no means was a surprise. But will his case and act of bravery affect other males who have been sexually, emotionally, mentally, or physically abused? If this horrible ruling does not set an example as to why male victims of domestic violence don’t come forward, I don’t know what will.

Furthermore, the Warner Bros asked Depp to resign from the Fantastic Beasts franchise as Grindelwald after he lost his case, and the role has now been given to Mads Mikkelsen. This is not the only iconic role he lost; he will also no longer be playing Jack Sparrow. This is a truth I think so many deny and fail to acknowledge: feminism is not a “man vs woman” movement—it is a movement for those who are affected by patriarchal expectations, and yes, this includes men too. While feminism has focused more on women’s issues, this does not separate men from the movement, and if anything, feminists need to do a better job to raise awareness and be advocates for men’s issues too. Anyone can be a victim of abuse. It is our job to unlearn societal norms, take domestic abuse experiences from men seriously, and be an ally. Here are some resources to get in contact with: • Youthspace.ca (NEED2 Suicide Prevention, Education and Support) • Crisis Services Canada, Toll Free (24/7): 1 (833) 456-4566 • Canadian Crisis Hotline: 1 (888) 353-2273


issue 13// vol 47

opinions // no. 19

MOVID 2025

› Vancouver council proposal of mobility pricing is just another way of Vancouver trying to keep out the ‘normies’

W

hen I applied to become a staff writer at the Other Press I submitted a creative writing story called “Leaving Purgatory.” It was the story of someone moving to Winnipeg, who began to feel like Vancouver was her purgatory. The story was an allegory for my feelings regarding living near Vancouver. Always feeling like the city is trying to kick me out. With Vancouver council recently announcing that they will be developing a plan that they hope will lead to mobility pricing in 2025, I can’t help but get that feeling of rejection once again. Mobility pricing is a strategy which will involve Vancouver charging a fee to drivers for the pleasure of leaving and entering the city. How the pricing will be set up will be determined by this plan, but the goal is to reduce greenhouse gasses in the city in order to achieve its climate goals by 2030. However, anyone who knows this area can see through this façade. In truth, this is just another campaign in Vancouver’s “War on Cars” and their continued showing of contempt to the people south of the Frasier, and East of the Fairgrounds. I’m sure mobility pricing will get some people out of their cars, but I believe it won’t be enough to make a difference. British Columbia already has some of the highest car insurance rates in the country, and parking in downtown Vancouver is costly. For example, I have had a car for five years; in that whole time, I have maybe driven to

downtown Vancouver once or twice. As for driving into Vancouver, I have only done that about a dozen times in the last five years, and most of the time that was only to go to a late night showing at The Rio theatre. If people have already not been priced out of their cars, they certainly aren’t going to do it with the addition of mobility pricing. Vancouver also claims that they want to reduce greenhouse gasses by doing this, but car companies are already doing this by

them to introduce a mobility pricing model because they had the transit infrastructure already in place when they put it in. If Vancouver did it here, people would be charged a heavy fee to travel to areas greatly underserved by rapid transit, like the PNE Fairgrounds, Main Street, Commercial Avenue, and West Broadway. For Vancouver, this is an easy plan to get behind. Less of those suburban peasants clogging our streets with their ugly gas guzzlers. Also, Vancouver residents might get an exemption or a heavy discount on paying the charge like they have in London, so this is something that may not affect them in any way. Whenever I go to Vancouver, I always feel like I am a tourist, and this idea makes me feel that way even more so. The other problematic thing about this is the fact that the council approved this during the pandemic. It is widely believed that the pandemic will lead to more companies having people work from home as a permanent change in operation, as the pandemic has proven to be a good testing ground for the idea. If this is the case, then fewer people will be going downtown in general, meaning that the problem will solve itself. It’s a textbook manure problem. It’s obvious that Vancouver wants to keep its privilege bubble unsullied by the evils of the vehicle, but we must not let it happen. Vancouver cannot just implement something like this that is so blatantly antisuburb. Vancouver does not own the streets and should never be allowed to shakedown the suburbs. Not now, not ever. Illustration by CJ Sommerfeld

Craig Allan Staff Writer

introducing cheaper electric cars, and in some cases even phasing out combustion engine vehicles by the end of the decade. The city of Vancouver points to cities like London in the United Kingdom, and Stockholm in Sweden as places where this model has worked, but that is an incredibly flawed comparison. For one, they are comparing Vancouver, a city that is 134 years old, to cities that are over hundreds—and even thousands—of years old. Of course they need mobility pricing, London and Stockholm were heavily dense before the car was even invented. Also, it was easier for

Whenever I go to Vancouver, I always feel like I am a tourist, and this idea makes me feel that way even more so.


Humour

Have an idea for a story?  humour@theotherpress.ca

humour // no. 20 • How NOT to go batshit crazy • Comic: Heads or Tails • Comic: Finding the perfect room for Zoom ...and that's everything!

How NOT to go batshit crazy › Dealing with anger issues for dummies

Richard Dick Senior Columnist

I

t’s the end of the semester and the end of your rope. You’ve had it up to here. You just can’t take it anymore. How do you keep calm? How can you prevent yourself from ending up on the six o’clock news for screaming at the top of your lungs while streaking through a busy mall? I would not ask me, but I’ll be your guide anyways. Meditate Ohmmmmmmmmmm… Ohmmmmmmmmmmmm…… Channel

the energies of the universe through your physical being. Let all your thoughts flow like a branch guided by a lazy river. Look within yourself. Oh my god, is that really what I look like within myself?? Gross!!! Go for a hike Tread for several grueling hours through a bunch of animal shit and bugs in the mouth in hopes of finding your favourite peaceful spot. Then, when you finally arrive, find some asshole voyeurs filming themselves fucking in YOUR happy place. Promptly sucker punch an unsuspecting cougar in the head… and then even more

promptly get eaten by said cougar for your disrespectful lack of fighting etiquette.

relationships without the superfluous cost of a therapist.

Completely unload your problems on a rando Completely unload on the kindest and quietest person you can identify on transit. If they seem uninterested in the conversation, pull them into the conversation with extremely tragic personal details—this creates an obligation for them to be kind to you. “All 12 of my dogs died this year and I’ve got a new STD. I need a friend—give me your number?” A sure-fire way to create meaningful

Eat some tasty tasty carbs Weigh yourself down with calorie-heavy meals like pasta and potatoes. You’re not a threat to society once you’re couch locked. In fact, all good pacificists in history have maintained high-carb diets. Scream intermittently My own avant-garde approach to stress (copyright pending): scream whenever and wherever you feel the urge. Then leave the environment you were in very promptly.

How can you prevent yourself from ending up on the six o’clock news for screaming at the top of your lungs while streaking through a busy mall?


Comic by Morgan Hannah

Comics

Heads or Tails


Comics

Comic by CJ Sommerfeld

Finding the perfect room for Zoom


Creative Works Summers on the Deck Morgan Hannah Life & Style Editor I miss my deck sturdy and reliable She was a hazy glow, an evening of warm comfort Summer came and went her glass panes now grow milky with neglect my deck Body made of rough wood and yet so smooth to the touch against the soles of my feet saturation sizzling sensation saturation against the soles of my feet and yet so smooth to the touch Body make of rough wood my deck her glass panes now grow milky with neglect Summer came and went was a hazy glow, an evening of warm comfort She sturdy and reliable I miss my deck


Creative Works becoming silver Sonam Kaloti Arts Editor

Illustration by Sonam Kaloti

A break is nearly within reach, dancing on the skyline. But why push? Joining the dance and suddenly we’re intertwined. Every day can be one. Living like this living like this. Sensual salsa with a bender and bipolar. Hugging myself and swaying in the living room. Soft touch. Caressing, but not undressing— yet. Who knows where all these glitters will take me? To heaven, I hope. Not the one up there, silly. The one where I am waking up on the living room hardwood post-morning with all the lights on. My silk robe and the cig smoke like the silver line around clouds. Where I’m not talking to someone twenty-four seven, cramming for finals, holding myself back from full self-destruction. It’s just so fun! The thrill! the days I might kill doing nothing ‘til it’s boring and that’s it. Then I’m clean again. The cycle ends. Then someday, somewhere, I’ll do it all again. Joining the dance.


Crossword

Weekly Crossword: O Christmas Tree…

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Caroline Ho Contributor

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DOWN 1. CD-follower 2. Late singer-songwriter Cohen 3. Stars, en français 4. __ Disease 5. Those, en español 6. “The Bell of __” 7. Titular character of an upcoming 2021 Disney film 8. Coin 9. State strongly 10. Select group 11. Woos 12. Get rid of 15. Lougheed or 99, e.g. 18. Not against 21. Word before “book” or “watch” 22. Type of monitor connector 26. Feudal property 27. Pirate’s cry 28. “__ Stardust” 30. Egg layer

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32. 11th-century King of Denmark 33. Burn 34. Inventor Whitney 35. Eggs 36. Rights-granting document 38. Hidden away 39. Grape variety 40. Taste 41. Keyboard instrument 42. Brunch option 43. A standard deck has two 44. Blazing 46. Male relatives, briefly 47. US broadband regulator 49. Mine deposit 50. Finding __ (2016) 51. Sticks (out) 52. Eve’s partner 55. Sleeping state

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Previous solution

ACROSS 1. K-6 or K-7 in many dists. 5. All __ 9. Dull pain 13. Crumbly cheese 14. Common bacterial infection 16. __ dire 17. Beneficial for one? 19. Jazz singer James 20. One found on a Mediterranean capital? 22. Heroism (US sp.) 23. Prefix meaning “equal” 24. Fish eggs 25. Got bigger 26. Daunt 29. Part of the face 31. Pop-ups 32. Alexa competitor 33. __-Ball 34. Type of tree, and hint to all of the starred clues 36. Bass or C 37. Source of chèvre 38. FDR’s successor 41. Leg part 42. __ and terminer 42. Part of une semaine 44. Citation style 45. Ending for “Titan” or “Einstein” 47. Lack of common sense 48. One made into winter wear? 53. A fan of 54. One controlling the weather? 56. Marsh plant 57. Mattress company 58. Germanic character 59. To be, en français 60. “I really appreciate it,” briefly 61. It’s super popular in Hawaii

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EMERGENCY FOOD BANK The DSU Student Emergency Food Bank is a service to support students who are in need, in the form of grocery gift cards. Members can apply for the food bank until the last day of exam period - December 16th. Members are able to access the Food Bank twice per semester. To apply, head over to our website. (link in bio) Questions? foodbank@thedsu.ca

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The Other Press - Dec 1, 2020  

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