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COMMUNITY NEWS BELOW 14TH STREET • JANUARY 30, 2014

P.17

That Doggie In the Window New Yorkers See Pay Dirt for Super Bowl Weekend With out-of-towners converging on NYC, renters are looking to sublet to tourists -- sometimes at exorbitant prices By Alissa Fleck Real estate broker Ralph Auerbach owns a number of residences he’s been renting out for a few years through the website AirBnB, including one on the Upper West Side that is going for $5,000 for Super Bowl week. The rate for a normal week in January? $1,500. “I tend to be very selective and usually pass up more leads than I bring to fruition,” explains Auerbach of his vetting process. “These are people coming into my home.” With only days remaining before the Super Bowl, New Yorkers -- many of whom seem largely ambivalent to the big game -- nevertheless are hoping to cash in on the influx of visitors, offering up their apartments at prices that can triple or quadruple the usual rate. So far, though, game-goers aren’t biting. (Super Bowl ticket prices also, apparently, are off, with scalpers worried that cold weather may be keeping traveling fans at home.) For the Super Bowl, Auerbach was hoping to rent his Upper West Side studio out to a single professional who might come to town for the game, not a gaggle of inebriated frat boys. “The Super Bowl does not draw a sophisticated crowd,” he explains, “maybe not the crowd you want in your house.” Auerbach hasn’t yet had a single bite on this

property. Auerbach blames his lack of success with AirBnB, in part, on the website itself -and, curiously, not on the price tag he has put on his property. “I don’t have a high success rate,” he says. “I think because they filter communications, it’s hard to do business. A lot is lost in feeling out the renter - you lose human contact so you can’t judge a person’s caliber. One thing I look for is level of education and you can’t feel [a person] out using all your senses.” Auerbach said he has no intention of lowering the price to draw hits and is still hoping for a bite for this upcoming weekend. Gordon (not his real name), who frequently rents out his four-bedroom apartment in SoHo, has been using AirBnB successfully since November of last year to rent his apartment in a prime Manhattan location. He receives many requests from couples as well as the occasional girls’ weekend trip. Typically Gordon will price his property at $600 a night for weekends and $500 a night for weeknights. When seeking out Super Bowl pricing, he saw a similar four bedroom apartment in Union Square asking for $25,000 for Super Bowl week. “That seemed high to me,” explains Gordon, “but I figured I’d start there.” He raised the price to $5,300 a night for the Super Bowl. Like Auerbach, Gordon wasn’t getting any bites at his asking price. He ended up lowering the price to $11,000 for a full week. “I think that’s a pretty reasonable price, if you break it down per person,” he says, adding he’d lower the price again but hopes he won’t need to. Gordon also inflates his prices around Christmas and New Year’s. Continued on page 5

A state ban on puppy mills makes life uncomfortable for Manhattan pet stores By Joanna Fantozzi Every Thursday night, the protestors line up in front of CitiPups in Chelsea, handing out fliers to passersby, their chants of “Stop Puppy Mills” drowning out the faint barks of the puppies romping in the window. This small band of protestors has been Photo by Mary Newman demonstrating, pretty much every The battle in Chelsea – pitting store week, in front of CitiPups for almost owners who claim they are doing the right two years, claiming it has evidence that the thing against protestors convinced they store gets its dogs from puppy mills. CitiPups, in turn, has sued the protestors, aren’t – could soon multiply across the city, thanks to legislation recently passed claiming defamation and slander, saying in Albany. The puppy mill bill, signed by the weekly vigil hurts business. “They Gov. Andrew Cuomo and co-sponsored by thought I was just going to roll over and Assembly Member Linda Rosenthal, would dance for them, but I will not sit back and allow local municipalities to regulate pet let these people lie about us,” said David Jacoby, the manager of CitiPups. “Look, we hate puppy mills, too.”

Continued on page 4

ALSO INSIDE THE BEST MANHATTAN SUPER BOWL BARS P.5

SHRUGGING OFF THE POLICE’S JAYWALKING CLAMPDOWN P.8


NEIGHBORHOOD CHATTER Johnson named to health committee Freshman councilman Corey Johnson has been selected to chair the City Council’s Committee on Health. The committee oversees the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Health and Hospitals Corporation and

9/11 museum to charge $24 entrance fee The 9/11 Memorial Museum will charge $24 for a general admission ticket, according to an announcement made by museum president Joe Daniels. Daniels said the decision was made by the museum’s board and the funds generated will go towards ensuring the museum’s financial health and necessary operational costs. “The 9/11 Memorial does not yet receive government support for ongoing operations as many other important museums of our national history do,” said Daniels. “9/11 family members are free and there will be discounts for various groups, including seniors, youth and NYC schools. Each week there will also be hours set aside for the general public to enter for free.” A spokesperson said the museum will be free to the public from 5-8 p.m. every Tuesday evening. The fee will go into effect when the museum opens in May, but they hope to begin selling tickets by March. Daniels said the fee, “will help fulfill our obligation to commemorate and preserve the history of 9/11. It will also enable educational programming that will teach

the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. Johnson, who represents the West Side from SoHo to Central Park, succeeded former councilwoman and onetime mayoral front-runner Christine Quinn. Johnson is an LGBT activist and former chair of Community Board 4.

the nature of and responsibility for the special freedoms we have.” The 9/11 Memorial has had more than 11.5 million visitors since opening two years ago.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Re: the January 23 article, “Solving a Deadly Traffic Puzzle”: Bicycle lanes don’t necessarily cut down on pedestrian accidents. Just observe the lane now running along First Avenue and you will see that about 50 percent of all bike riders do not follow the traffic rules. They prefer to go through red lights if they see no side vehicular traffic and weave through any pedestrians that are crossing. Some also ride the wrong direction in the bike lane. Now pedestrians on First Avenue have to watch out for cars and for bikes and I perceive no slowing in car traffic because of the bikes, just a speed up in bike traffic. Why doesn’t the city really enforce the law against driving with cell phones in hand and turning without making a signal? Many drivers flaunt these rules. The danger of driving and turning while on a cell phone (or grabbing for one) is obvious. Turning without a signal completely throws off pedestrians crossing with the light and also surprises any car behind the one turning. This suggestion does not require any new law, any special permissions, any new studies: just have a few traffic agents stand on the corners of any major avenue and start handing out tickets. By the way. don’t preannounce this policy as a special crackdown day as has been done a few times in the past, just make it standard policy. The city will garner the revenue for as long as it takes the drivers to lose their money, potentially their licenses, and get the message. Bob Raber, Upper East Side resident

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CRIME WATCH Garbage Men Part Two One of two men posing as sanitation workers was arrested for robbing a bar. Replaying an incident from two weeks before, two men posed as sanitation workers on Friday, January 17, at 8AM. While one of the men distracted an employee of a bar on Murray Street, threatening to ticket the establishment for garbage left on the street, the other went inside and removed $710 from the cash register. This time, however, one of the thieves – a 52-yearold – was identiďŹ ed and arrested the following weekend.

By Jerry Danzig

Fulton Street Assault An elderly man was attacked by a disturbed individual. At 2 PM on Wednesday, January 15, a 74-year-old man was walking on Fulton Street when a 24-year-old man attacked him without warning. The attacker punched the elderly man in the face, causing a laceration on the bridge of his nose, as well as a broken ankle when the old man fell from the force of the punch. The victim was taken to New York Downtown Hospital, while the attacker was chased by witnesses and arrested by police in the subway.

Crossrobber A man walked off with $4,200 of women’s clothing from a boutique on Prince Street. At 6 PM on Saturday, January 18, a man walked into the store, picked up a number of garments off a couch, and walked out of the store without paying. The stolen merchandise included four sweaters, four tabby shirts, five olive pants, and 15 pairs of gray jeans. A video camera inside the store caught the incident.

Lingerie Larceny Four women stole $4,000 worth of underwear. At 12 noon on Sunday, January 19, the women walked out with 300 pairs of underwear from a popular chain lingerie store on Broadway.

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The robbery was discovered when employees were reviewing security video later. The video showed one of the four women distracting a store employee while the other three grabbed the underwear and put it in a bag.

Too Many Bags Someone stole a man’s bag on the street. At 11 PM on Saturday, January 18, a man arrived outside his apartment building on Prince Street and unloaded seven or eight pieces of luggage onto the sidewalk. He could only manage to bring two of the bags into his building at a time, and when he was done, he discovered that one of the bags had been taken. Its contents included an iPad valued at $300, an unknown amount of cash, various credit cards, and $200 in antique postcards.

Teen Terror Four teenaged girls attacked a woman in the subway. At 3:30 PM on Thursday, January 16, four girls approached a 33-year-old woman on a northbound 4 or 5 train. One of the girls had words with the woman and pushed her. She pushed back, and then one of the girls punched her in the face and kicked her while trying to take her pocketbook. The attackers fled at the Wall Street station, while the woman was taken to the hospital to treat swelling to her head. She did manage to retain possession of her pocketbook.

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Puppy Mills Continued from page 1

.com STRAUS MEDIA  MANHATTAN PRESIDENT Jeanne Straus EDITOR IN CHIEF Kyle Pope EDITOR Megan Bungeroth • editor.otdt@strausnews.com CITYARTS EDITOR Armond White • editor.cityarts@strausnews.com STAFF REPORTERS Joanna Fantozzi, Daniel Fitzsimmons FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS Alan S. Chartock, Bette Dewing, Jeanne Martinet, Malachy McCourt, Angela Barbuti, Casey Ward BLOCK MAYORS  Ann Morris, Upper West Side Jennifer Peterson, Upper East Side Gail Dubov, Upper West Side Edith Marks, Upper West Side PUBLISHER Gerry Gavin • advertising@strausnews.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHERS Seth L. Miller, Ceil Ainsworth, Kate Walsh ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Eliza Appleton CLASSIFIED ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Susan Wynn

dealers, meaning that New York would have more teeth to crack down on pet stores. First, though, both sides need to agree on what constitutes a puppy mill – a definition that isn’t entirely clear-cut. According to the ASPCA, the definition of a puppy mill is “a large-scale commercial dog breeding operation that places profit over the well-being of its dogs—who are often severely neglected—and acts without regard to responsible breeding practices.” Photos circulating on the Internet, playing on Humane Society commercials and plastered on protestors’ poster boards show dogs’ legs with flesh rotted to the bone and sickly puppies recently freed from shut-down facilities. But what about a breeder like Donna Dailey who supplies dogs to New York pet stores like CitiPups, and according to USDA inspections (the agency overseeing pet farms), has had zero violations in the past three years, despite having over 100 dogs and puppies at her facility in Missouri? She may have passed the tests of the inspectors, but her facilities are unquestionably large-scale. Jacoby at CitiPups says he is in touch

Regulating the Puppy Business ■ USDA-licensed animal

breeding facilities are inspected at least once a year by the USDA Animal Care Program ■ After a 2010 audit report, which showed negative reviews of the inspections, the USDA closed a loophole that was allowing “Internet breeders” to slip through the cracks ■ Pet stores are not inspected by the USDA ■ The USDA inspections are not with other pet stores in the city about their breeders, and claims to know where at least 75% of the puppies are coming from. “And it’s not puppy mills, these are reputable breeders,” he said. Dana Derraugh, who owns the Chelsea Kennel Club and used to be co-owner of Le Petit Puppy on Christopher Street, echoed that view, claiming that most pet stores in New

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Joe Bendik OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN is published weekly Copyright © 2013 by Straus Media - Manhattan, LLC 212-868-0190 • 333 Seventh Ave, New York, NY. Straus Media - Manhattan publishes Our Town • The West Side Spirit • Our Town Downtown Chelsea Clinton News • The Westsider To subscribe for 1 year, please send $75 to OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN, c/o Straus News 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918 PREVIOUS OWNERS HAVE INCLUDED: Tom Allon, Isis Ventures, Ed Kayatt, Russ Smith, Bob Trentlion, Jerry Finkelstein

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pass/fail but they do take note of whether the facilities are compliant with AWA (Animal Welfare Association) standards, and facilities with multiple violations can be investigated, and then fined or have their license suspended ■ Inspectors rate the cleanliness and sanitation of the facilities, as well as the state of the animals’ housing, food, water and protection against weather, and the overall health of the animals

York get their dogs from reputable and ethical breeders. “Just because I’m a pet shop doesn’t mean I’m a puppy mill,” said Derraugh, whose own yorkie was her bridesmaid for her second marriage. “After 30 years in the business, I can smell a puppy mill from a distance. Healthy puppies are happy, plump and bright-eyed. Pet stores are safe, and it’s actually usually people who buy from online breeders who are in trouble.” Michael Feldman, an organizer of the weekly protests at CitiPup, doesn’t buy it. “In New York City, I would say 100 percent (of the pet shops) get their dogs from puppy mills, and probably 99 percent nationwide,” said Feldman. “In puppy mills, dogs are forced to breed two or three times a year, and they don’t care whether the puppies are healthy or not because it’s a for-profit industry. Pet stores are in the business of selling puppies as products.” Despite pet-store contentions that their dogs come only from reputable breeders, there nevertheless are dozens of negative Yelp reviews online for pet shops across the city, including CitiPups and Chelsea Kennel Club. “They assured me the pups were not from puppy mills but now I am convinced I was LIED to!” says one CitiPups reviewer. A Chelsea Kennel Club reviewer said, “The vet cleared this dog for sale for the pet store owner, and now we are dealing with having a sick dog and a $4,000 surgery that we may have to pay for.” When asked about these negative reviews, Jacoby said puppies, like people, can get sick, no matter where they come from. Derraugh had a similar take on the negative reviews. “If the dog gets sick, it doesn’t make him a puppy mill. It’s a natural thing that they get sick, because puppies are fragile,” she said.

Photo by Mary Newman

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Bringing Denver and Seattle to New York Two Manhattan bars that cater to Broncos and Seahawks fans prep for the big game By Daniel Fitzsimmons We know - the Giants flopped this season and the Jets didn’t do much better. Eli Manning and Geno Smith were competing to see who could end the season with more interceptions. Manning beat all comers with 27 - a career high. And even though the Super Bowl is being held at the Meadowlands, it’s hard for New Yorkers to get pumped about it. But consider the story lines coming into the Seahawks-Broncos matchup. The Bronco’s Peyton Manning, the quarterback’s quarterback, who recovered from serious neck surgery for the right to play in February, is playing on little bro’s home turf - in what is possibly his last trip to the big game. And then there’s the Seahawks, the upstarts from the soggy, foggy city of Seattle. Their defensive corner, Richard Sherman, is now a household name after making a gamesealing play in the Seahawks’ 23-17 defeat of the San Francisco 49ers - and afterwards trashing a rival while ranting that he’s the best corner in the league. The play did secure the Seahawks’ trip to the Super Bowl and the post-game interview set the stage for a showdown with the Broncos on Feb. 2. But where to watch the game? Butterfield 8 at 38th Street and 5th Avenue is the only

Broncos bar in the city. Bartender Gavin Cunningham said he expects over a hundred people to pack into the front bar, in which • Seattle Seahawks case they’ll open up the back vs. Denver Broncos bar for the loyal dressed in • Feb. 2 orange. • 6:30 p.m. On most days, Butterfield’s is a classy - even refined • FOX - establishment, with shimmering chandeliers and white linen tablecloths. But on Sundays, Cunningham said, the Broncos schwag which they get directly from the team - goes up on the wall and all bets are off. “It gets pretty rowdy,â€? said Cunningham. “This past week we were fully packed.â€? Butterfield is doing a $50 unlimited Bud, Bud Light and wings special for the duration of the game - for $15 more you can get unlimited well drinks on top. For the Seahawks faithful, no bar in the city beats Carlow East on Lexington Avenue and 85th Street - if you can get in the door, that is. Owner Sean Spratt said they’re selling $100 tickets via PayPal for an all-you-caneat-and-drink-6 p.m.-to-midnight-bonanza, with the first tickets being offered to a core group of Seattle transplants that have been coming to to Carlow East every Sunday for years. Don’t despair though, the bar is teaming up with McSwiggan’s at 2nd Avenue and 23rd Street to handle the overflow. The two together are temporarily changing their names on Super Bowl Sunday to the Hawk’s Nest East and the Hawk’s Nest South.

Super Bowl Sunday

Spratt said about six years ago, a group of Seattle fans reached out to the bartenders at Carlow East looking for a place to call home. “We embraced them, and it’s been a Seattle-New York love affair ever since,� said Spratt. For Alan Murphy, a regular at Carlow East going back 15 years, the atmosphere is unbeatable. “Seahawks fans are great, they’ve really done Seattle proud,� said Murphy, who’s become a bit of a Seahawks fan himself in the past year, setting off a minor scandal among his peers. “It’s going to be hard for me to go back to Big Blue next year.� Another regular, Charlie Mournez, humorously lamented the avian invasion. “On regular season games we can’t get in here as regulars,� said Mournez. “The Super Bowl? Forget it. At the same time, it’s good for the bar.� Murphy, who owns Salon V on East 7th Street, is even offering a gameday $20 Seahawks coloring job for the hardcore fans who don’t have a job. So from our point of view, you can either cry into your beer at your usual hole on Super Bowl Sunday, or you can become a Broncos/Seahawks fan for a day and chalk it up as a win because there’s always next year.

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Kathleen Gaffney, also on the Upper West Side, listed her property on Craigslist and notes, “the most interesting thing is [she] hasn’t had a legitimate inquiry yet.� Gaffney rents her apartment, which sleeps five people, so she explains this is more like subletting. “I heard from friends and around the neighborhood that the city’s hotels were booked and visitors were paying top dollar to rent apartments during Super Bowl week/weekend,� says Gaffney. “I already had plans to go away so I thought I’d give it a try.� At press time, several Manhattan hotels still had rooms available for the weekend, but for steep prices. The Hilton Times Square is going for $619 a night, the Westin Times Square for $685, and the Marriott Marquis for $999 a night. In the past Gaffney has let friends and family borrow her place while she travels. Gaffney, who also listed her place on EventHomes.com, also already tried lowering her asking price. “Originally, I posted it for $1,000 a night based on other listings I viewed on Craigslist,� she says. “I thought it was absurd but gave it a try. I then reduced it to $500 a night. I’m

not sure if I’d think it was worth doing it for less than that. This was all really just on a lark.� While we were unable to find anyone on the Upper East Side willing to comment on the process, a search on both AirBnB and Craigslist reveals no shortage of listings in the area, many of which advertise the Super Bowl as a major draw. One three-bedroom apartment at 81st St. and 2nd Ave. (11 miles from MetLife Stadium in New Jersey) lists its asking price on Craigslist as $1,250 with a three-night minimum. It also lists a “party package,� which promises discounts and connections to NYC nightlife. Unlike AirBnB, Craigslist does not require pictures, something that might keep potential renters at bay. James, who is listing his 73rd. St. and 2nd Ave. apartment on AirBnB, calls it “the ideal SuperBowl weekend spot.� His Upper East Side apartment sleeps up to five people, and his thorough listing includes a full weekend itinerary for potential guests. James’s listing has received five out of five possible stars on AirBnB by past renters. He’s asking for $1,120 per week, though his apartment remains unclaimed for the Super Bowl weekend. Unless last-minute planners snap some of these properties up soon, it seems many property owners hoping to make a buck on this iconic weekend will be outdone by their competition.

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OUT & ABOUT

YOU READ IT HERE FIRST New York Post WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S UP WITH THAT?

Is the West Side Fairway Cheaper? A reader wrote asking why some groceries cost more at the Upper East Side location than the Upper West Side

A

can of Bumble Bee wild Alaskan salmon at the Fairway on East 86th Street is priced at $7.19 a can â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but the same exact product is only $5.49 at the Upper West Side Fairway on Broadway and 74th Street. J. Rubin, a local shopper, wrote to Fairway, and to us, to try to get to the bottom of this discrepancy. We decided to see for ourselves. We sent a reporter to compare prices for a host of products (see chart) at the West Side and East Side locations. Prices were checked on Thursday, May 23, and do not include any sales or specials. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we found: While a few prices were indeed higher on the East Side (Frosted Flakes and Twinning tea will set you

.com STRAUS MEDIA ď&#x161;ş MANHATTAN PRESIDENT Jeanne Straus ACTING EDITOR Megan Bungeroth â&#x20AC;˘ editor.wssp@strausnews.com CITYARTS EDITOR Armond White â&#x20AC;˘ editor.cityarts@strausnews.com STAFF REPORTER Joanna Fantozzi FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS Alan S. Chartock, Bette Dewing,Jeanne Martinet, Malachy McCourt, Angela Barbuti, Casey Ward, Laura Shanahan PUBLISHER Gerry Gavin â&#x20AC;˘ advertising@strausnews.com

West Side East Side

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CLASSIFIED ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Stephanie Patsiner DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Joe Bendik

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Filet Mignon, per pound

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Veal Cutlet, per pound

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Fairway Organic Dark Roast CoďŹ&#x20AC;ee

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Twinning English Breakfast Tea

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Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil

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Fairway Cheese Ravioli

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Naked Juice Green Machine

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Cost: $925

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Applegate Organic Beef Hot Dogs

$8.49

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Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tomato Soup

$1.69

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Simply Heinz Ketchup

$4.29

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Nutella

$3.99

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TOTAL

$155.91

$158.01

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back a couple extra dimes) there were also a few items more expensive on the West Side, like Chips Ahoy and Ghiradelli hot chocolate. Many prices, however, were the exact same. But what about that glaringly high mark-up on the salmon? Fairway did not respond to our email, but did respond to Rubinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s email, apologizing for what turns out to be a pricing error, which the store said they have since corrected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The retail for the Bumble Bee Wild Salmon should be $6.49 at our 86th Street location, and $5.99 at Broadway, and these retails were corrected,â&#x20AC;? said a customer service representative in an email. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The difference in these retails is due to promotional pricing we received from our vendor at our Broadway location. We are sincerely sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused you, and we thank you for bringing this matter to our attention.â&#x20AC;? It seems that Fairway is offering a fairly even grocery shopping experience for both the Upper East and West Sides.

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THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013

June 2, 2013

May 30, 2013

NY Times Hunter, The Saddest Smartest School Around Elite East side high school ranks last in happiness study By Adam Janos

H

unter College High School, at 71st East 94th Street, is a school of superlatives. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regularly recognized as one of (if not the) most successful public schools in the city and nationwide, and is an ivy feeder, putting its graduates on the fast track to a life amongst the intellectual elite. Now, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been saddled with a less-stellar distinction: saddest spot in New York. A new study by the New England Complex Systems Institute

.com STRAUS MEDIA ď&#x161;ş MANHATTAN PRESIDENT Jeanne Straus

released August 20 took a measure of mood in the city using geo-tagged tweets. Twitter users are known for their informal, concise language, and tweets are frequently accented by the use of emoticons like â&#x20AC;&#x153;:)â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;:(â&#x20AC;&#x153;). After researchers established a correlation between the emoticons and the words that would accompany them, they divided all the chosen tweets by location and mapped the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mood. Yaneer Bar-Yam, the studyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s principal investigator, notes that high-density traffic spots like the midtown tunnel are associated with more negative emotions, while Central Park and Fort Tyron Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the peaceful, green lungs of Manhattan â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are associated with positive sentiment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We looked at the locations with strong positive or negative sentiment, and the results are intuitive, which is strong confirmation that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing the right thing,â&#x20AC;? he said. And, according to the study, in all of New York City, the most negative place to be is Hunter College High School. Several Hunter grads rushed to defend the institution. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a really great time there,â&#x20AC;? Mynette Louie, an independent film producer from the class of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;93 says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happy about commuting over an hour to get to schoolâ&#x20AC;Ś but I had a good time, because I was surrounded by all these smart peopleâ&#x20AC;Ś it was pretty nerdy, but it was also just fun.â&#x20AC;? Caroline Friedman, class of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;06, thinks the atmosphere was

EDITOR IN CHIEF ,ZMF1PQFtFEJUPSPU!TUSBVTOFXTDPN EDITOR .FHBO#VOHFSPUItFEJUPSPUEU!TUSBVTOFXTDPN CITYARTS EDITOR "SNPOE8IJUFtFEJUPSDJUZBSUT!TUSBVTOFXTDPN STAFF REPORTERS +PBOOB'BOUP[[J %BOJFM'JU[TJNNPOT FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS "MBO4$IBSUPDL #FUUF%FXJOH +FBOOF.BSUJOFU  .BMBDIZ.D$PVSU "OHFMB#BSCVUJ  $BTFZ8BSE -BVSB4IBOBIBO PUBLISHER (FSSZ(BWJOtBEWFSUJTJOH!TUSBVTOFXTDPN ASSOCIATE PUBLISHERS 4FUI-.JMMFS $FJM"JOTXPSUI ,BUF8BMTI ADVERTISING MANAGER .BUU%JOFSTUFJO CLASSIFIED ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 4UFQIBOJF1BUTJOFS DISTRIBUTION MANAGER +PF#FOEJL 063508/JTQVCMJTIFEXFFLMZ $PQZSJHIUÂŞCZ4USBVT.FEJB.BOIBUUBO --$ t4FWFOUI"WF /FX:PSL /: 4USBVT.FEJB.BOIBUUBOQVCMJTIFT 0VS5PXOt5IF8FTU4JEF4QJSJUt0VS5PXO%PXOUPXO $IFMTFB$MJOUPO/FXTt5IF8FTUTJEFS To subscribe for 1 year, please send $75 to 063508/ DP4USBVT/FXT 8FTU"WF $IFTUFS /: 13&7*06408/&34)"7&*/$-6%&% 5PN"MMPO *TJT7FOUVSFT &E,BZBUU 3VTT4NJUI  #PC5SFOUMJPO +FSSZ'JOLFMTUFJO

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intense, but never cutthroat competitive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in law school now, and when I was applying Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d hear stories that at some law schools, people will rip out the relevant pages from the library books so other people couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read it. It was nothing like that,â&#x20AC;? Friedman says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At Hunter, there was a lot of cooperation: people were sharing notes, people were copying homework.â&#x20AC;? Still, Friedman notes that there was limited sunlight in the classrooms (the students refer to the building itself as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the brick prisonâ&#x20AC;?), and advises current Hunter College High School students to, â&#x20AC;&#x153;go to the park during lunch. spend some time in the courtyard.â&#x20AC;? Other alumni are less glowing in their reviews of the Hunter community; Sachi Ezura, class of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;04, remembers high school as one of the most difficult times in her life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One thing I remember, is that everyone would go home and write in their Xanga or their Livejournal [online blogs]. And this one kid, all the popular kids used to pass around his blogâ&#x20AC;Ś people reveled in each othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sadness.â&#x20AC;? Ezura herself spent considerable time in the nurseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office when she would get upset, and she notes that in her classâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yearbook, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a drawing of her crying on a page entitled, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Day in the Life of the Senior Class at Hunterâ&#x20AC;?. Michelle Kang, class of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;02, thinks a large part of the stress was related to the high pressure of the school combined with the inherent stress of living in New York. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I mean, you think all the typical things American kids get to do in high school: driving around, going to football gamesâ&#x20AC;Ś I was in the middle of this dense, dirty place, trying to catch a train.â&#x20AC;? Kang has since moved to Seattle, and is getting her masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in architecture. Still, all Hunter alumni seem to agree that the experience, however painful or enjoyable, was indispensible. And when asked, all maintain that their closest friends in adulthood are people they met while at Hunter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think if people can step away from [the academic pressure] and appreciate that this is the time in your life when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re surrounded by the most intelligent, special people, that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot to be gained by that,â&#x20AC;? Benjamin Axelrod, class of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;02 says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really good group.â&#x20AC;?

Friday, January 31 Catch & Release South Street Seaport, Pier 17 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7 p.m., Free A participatory design project that aims to capture and celebrate the extraordinary efforts of a community in a time of crisis. South Street Seaport is a waterfront neighborhood with a strong maritime tradition that has historically subsisted on its proximity to water, and was one of the areas hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy. Catch & Release hopes to recognize, and make public and visible the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resilient spirit. Aigany.org

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

September 25, 2013

September 5, 2013

NY Times cityArts

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PAGE 18

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Village Halloween Parade Faces Obstacles in Comeback The Town & Village Synagogue

Churches and synagogues throughout Manhattan are ďŹ nding their ďŹ nancial plans thwarted by preservation eďŹ&#x20AC;orts By Megan Bungeroth

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to argue against preserving the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic, soaring monuments to God. Churches and synagogues throughout Manhattan have been targeted by preservation enthusiasts since the city first created the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1965. They have good reason: without landmark status protection, surely many of these places, which give religious congregations a home and neighborhoods an inimitable character and sense of history, would have been torn down

long ago. The side not often heard above the rallying cries of well-meaning preservationists, however, is that of the actual church or synagogue members. The landmark process, meant to protect and preserve historical assets that theoretically belong to everyone, can sometimes end up displacing the very people who hold the actual deeds to these properties and destroying the community that resides within the building in order to preserve its facade. On the Lower East Side, a well-known synagogue is hoping to avoid a landmark designation that some in the community are eager to obtain. The Town & Village Synagogue on East 14th Street has occupied a building for decades that has been technically calendared (meaning that a vote was already taken to schedule a hearing) by the Landmarks Preservation Commission since 1966, though a hearing was never Continued on page 8

ALSO INSIDE WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HAPPENING IN HELL SQUARE? P.4

RESTAURANT HEALTH GRADES P.13

After its ďŹ rst cancellation in a three-decade history last year, the parade is struggling to ďŹ nd enough money to raise itself from the dead By Omar Crespo

T

he Village Halloween Parade has had quite the rough year. Last year, hurricane Sandy left the costumes, floats, and music inoperable. This year, organizers have been forced to turn to Internet crowd funding in hopes of keeping the event going. Sandy left the parade in dire need of donations and funding, which left its organizers in a state of limbo. Jeanne Fleming, the paradeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head coordinator for the past 33 years, is optimistic the event will come together for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Halloween. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope so,â&#x20AC;? she said. Because of the unintended shutdown of the parade last year, the event coordinators have had to try and recoup the losses suffered. The parade committee turned to the popular crowd-sourcing website

Kickstarter, which helps artists fund their creative pursuits through public monetary pledges. The Kickstarter campaign, which began on September 16, has been slowly making its way to the $50,000 green-light goal. If the full amount isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pledged by a October 21 deadline, the parade wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any of the funds. Fleming said that compared to the hundreds of thousands of people who have attended and enthusiastically supported the parade over the decades, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Kickstarter response has been lukewarm.â&#x20AC;? As of press time, the campaign had raised $41,975 from 732 backers, and five days left. The $50,000 collected this year will go to investment insurance for the businesses and individuals who donated last year but did not get a parade. Before this new digital venture, support for the parade came in the form of sponsorship from companies, businesses and TV licenses, as well as from grassroots-level funding such as children selling cookies or restaurants donating food. Recently, the Greenwich VillageChelsea Chamber of Commerce, which represents small businesses in the downtown area, announced that the Rudin Family Foundations and the Association for a Better New York will give a $15,000 matching fund if the parade Continued on page 8

Conehead Buddha

October 29, 2013

October 17, 2013

FIRST IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD ourtownny.com

westsidespirit.com

otdowntown.com

19 Fulton Street Suite 201 7-11 p.m., Free Front/Row Stage presents FREE tix with an RSVP to see Conehead Buddha at the South Street Seaportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brand new pop-up venue! Located on Fulton Street between Water &

South streets next to the ice skating rink. This fully enclosed heated cube features live music, a full bar and hot food. Free w/ RSVP. ymlp.com/xgejuhewgmgjw

Saturday, February 1 Mike Albo: The Junket Dixon Place, 161A Chrustie Street 10 p.m., $20 The author of the column recounts his misadventures as as style columnist, New York scenester, blog target and luxury victim. Dixonplace.org

Animation Celebration Smithsonianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green 1st Floor 10:30 a.m., Free Features tales of the Anishnaabe trickster Wesakechak in the lively series Stories of the Seventh Fire, and celebrates the artistic style of Anishnaabe artist Norval Morrisseau, whose work is featured in the current exhibition Before and After the Horizon. americanindian.si.edu

(212) 868-0190 PAGE 6

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


OUT & ABOUT

Sunday, February 2

OPPORTUNITY Motivated and talented low-income public high school students are eager to go to college but can’t afford SAT prep.

The Schneider Concerts presents the Attacca Quartet 66 West 12th Street 2 p.m., $17.50 First Prize winner of the 7th Osaka International Chamber Music Competition in 2011, top prizewinner and Listeners’ Choice Award recipient in the 2011 Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition, and winner of the Alice Coleman Grand Prize at the 60th annual Coleman Chamber Ensemble Competition in 2006, the internationally acclaimed Attacca Quartet has become one of America’s premier young performing ensembles since forming at Juilliard in 2003. events.newschool.edu

Stand Up and Take Your Clothes Off Kraine Theater, 85 E 4th Street btwn Bowery and Second Ave. 9 p.m., $8 A monthly get together hosted by burlesque performer Kitten Kent, Kerryn Feehan, is a meeting of comedic and ecdysiastic arts. Horsetrade.info

Monday, February 3 Annual Hot Chocolate Festival Citi Bakery, 3 W. 18th Street, btwn Fifth & Sixth avenues 7:30 a.m. - 7 p.m., $3-$6 Different flavors of hot chocolate will be served everyday for the month of February. thecitibakery.com

Tuesday, February 4 New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium: Keren Katz 2 West 13th Street 7 p.m., Free NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium is a weekly series for artist/writers working in various text-image forms: comics, picturestories, animation, etc. at which to present and critique current work. The symposium will examine new ideas for the distribution of print

and electronic work that move beyond the existing models of publishing and advertising. events.newschool.edu

Moons Over My Hammy Otto’s Shrunken Head, 538 E. 14th Street 7 p.m., Free This weekly showcase, hosted by Maribeth Mooney, presents both stand-ups and storytellers. ottosshrunkenhead.com

IMPACT Every year, New York Cares brings its Kaplan SAT Prep program to public schools throughout the city. In 2012, volunteers worked in 40 schools and helped 1,000 students get into the colleges of their choice, including several admissions to Cornell and New York University.

Wednesday, February 5 Gandhi, Is That You? Lucky Jack’s, 129 Orchard Street 9 p.m., Free Brendan Fitzgibbons and Lance Weiss invite comedy fans into the bar’s basement each week for this friendly stand-up show. Luckyjacksnyc.com

Thursday, February 6 Everyone Wants to Be Me or Do Me Barnes & Noble, 97 Warren Street 6 p.m., Free Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez as they discuss their book, Everyone Wants to Be Me or Do Me: Tom and Lorenzo’s Fabulous and Opinionated Guide to Life and Style. Barnesandnoble.com

Volunteer or Donate at newyorkcares.org.

Karaoke for Adults Chatham Square Library, 33 East Broadway 3 p.m., Free Belt out to your favorite classics. Nypl.org

New York Cares is New York City’s leading volunteer organization.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

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Photo credit: Lauren Farmer

PAGE 7


Despite Traffic Deaths,New Yorkers Shrug Off Jaywalking Crackdown Amid a rash of pedestrian deaths in the city, the police are upping their enforcement of jaywalking laws By Mary Newman Most New Yorkers ponder the consequences of jaywalking about as often as they contemplate the advanced physics of movement – in other words, they don’t think about it, they just do it. But errant street-dashers may need to reconsider their technically Photo by Mary Newman illegal crossings. Caroline Durham So far in January 2014, the number of jaywalking citations issued by the New York Police Department is already five times higher than the number issued in January of 2013. The increase is likely due to the recent spate of pedestrian deaths in the city, four of which were on the Upper West Side in the past two weeks. Three of those fatal accidents occurred at the busy intersection of 96th Street and Broadway. Traffic police flooded this location last weekend, issuing 18 jaywalking citations and only 5 traffic tickets, according to The Wall Street Journal. Among those ticketed was the 84-year-old Chinese immigrant Kang Wong, who recently made the cover of the New York Post after being aggressively restrained by the NYPD when he did not understand why he was being ticketed. Mayor de Blasio has faced recent criticism over the jaywalking crackdown. The mayor has addressed the issue of pedestrian safety recently, stating, “There is no larger policy in terms of jaywalking and ticketing and jaywalking – that’s not part of our plan. But it is something a local prescient commander can act on if they perceive there to be a real danger.” One busy Saturday afternoon we staked out

intersections on the Upper West Side to talk to New Yorkers about their jaywalking habits. The increase in citations has made city residents more aware of their jaywalking tendencies, although most admit that it will not change their habits of ignoring traffic lights. Upper West Side resident Caroline Durham said, “It is very easy to get into your own zone, you’re not looking around, and become very unaware of what is around you. I’ve made that mistake, so that’s why I know.” Although many New Yorker’s admit to jaywalking, they don’t believe that ticketing pedestrians so aggressively is the answer to increasing safety. “It’s not just a matter of jaywalking, it’s also a matter of drivers who don’t observe [the speed limit],” said car owner John Hutchinson. “Most people don’t know that it is a 30 mph limit in New York. I see people going 50-60 mph on

the streets, so it would be a real investment of resources to both change the behavior of pedestrians and drivers.” The sudden spike in jaywalking tickets has caught many New Yorkers off guard, and some are even unsure of what it means to jaywalk. “I think people are unsure of what jaywalking actually is, if it’s crossing the street with out the light, or walking in the middle of the street,” said Upper East Side resident Eva Ramos. Most New Yorkers, from residents to politicians to cops, seem to be unified in the goal of bolstering the safety of pedestrians. The debate lies in what will be most successful without disrupting people’s daily routines. An effective compromise might mean sharing the blame equally between drivers and pedestrians. It also means educating everyone on safety practices. “I was surprised to learn that because of the rarity of jaywalking enforcement, some younger New Yorkers were mistaken in their belief of what actually constituted jaywalking,” said attorney Gerard McCloskey. “An educational campaign could remedy that and alert pedestrians that police will be enforcing the jaywalking restriction.” Scott Gastel, a spokesperson for the Department of Transportation, said that their department does not have control over what citations the NYPD gives out, but said that the

Photo by Mary Newman

John Hutchinson DOT will be employing new safety measures. “We are developing a proposal with pedestrian safety enhancements for the intersection of West 96th St. and Broadway, and will present it to Community Board 7 on Thursday [January 30th],” Gastel said.

Photo by Mary Newman

PAGE 8

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


The Essential Guide to

Camps and Summer Programs 2014 .com

.com

.com


Photo courtesy of American Camp Association

The Great News About Homesickness The affliction of many firsttime campers has benefits By Christopher A. Thurber, Ph.D. That’s right - there’s great news about

PAGE 10

homesickness! For starters, you should know that: • Homesickness (or “missing home”) is normal. In study after study, researchers found that 95 percent of boys and girls who were spending at least two weeks at overnight

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

camp felt some degree of homesickness. Children at day camp may also feel pangs of homesickness, but less frequently. • Homesickness is typically mild. Nearly everyone misses something about home when they’re away. Some campers most miss their parents; others most miss home cooking, a sibling, or the family pet. Whatever they miss, the vast majority of children have a great time at camp and are not bothered by mild homesickness. • Homesickness is something everyone can learn to cope with. In fact, research has uncovered multiple strategies that work for kids. Most kids use more than one strategy to help them deal with homesickness. • Homesickness builds confidence. Overcoming a bout of homesickness and enjoying time away from home nurtures children’s independence and prepares them for the future. The fact that second-year campers are usually less homesick than first-year campers is evidence of this powerful growth. • Homesickness has a silver lining. If there’s something about home children miss, that means there’s something about home they love — and that’s a wonderful thing. Sometimes just knowing that what they feel is a reflection of love makes campers feel much better. So if nearly everyone feels some homesickness, what can be done to prevent a really strong case of homesickness? Here’s a recipe for positive camp preparation: • Make camp decisions together.

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• Arrange lots of practice time away from home. • Share your optimism, not your anxiety. • Never ever make a pick-up deal. OK, then, what are the most effective ways of coping with homesickness at camp? What advice can you write in a letter or e-mail to your son or daughter if you get a homesick letter?

Anti-Homesickness Strategies • Stay busy. Doing a fun, physical activity nearly always reduces homesickness intensity. • Stay positive. Remembering all the cool stuff you can do at camp keeps the focus on fun, not on home. • Stay in touch. Writing letters, looking at a photo from home, or holding a memento from home can be very comforting. • Stay social. Making new friends is a perfect antidote to bothersome homesickness. Talking to the staff at camp is also reassuring. • Stay focused. Remember that you’re not at camp forever, just a few weeks. Bringing a calendar to camp helps you be clear about the length of your stay. • Stay confident. Anti-homesickness strategies take some time to work. Kids who stick with their strategies for five or six days almost always feel better. Originally printed in CAMP Magazine, reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


the best summer of my life! Register today!

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

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PAGE 11


Your Child’s Health at Camp How to ensure your little one stays healthy this summer By Linda Ebner Erceg, R.N., M.S., P.H.N. Letting go means different things to families. Growth. Independence. Opportunities. No arena is more challenging for parents than entrusting their child’s wellbeing to others. We have our medicine cabinets brimming with bright Band-Aids® and children’s cold medicines, not to mention the ready hug and kiss when the need arises. So, what’s a camp to do? A look at what camp health professionals are talking about helps parents prepare for a child’s camp experience.

Zip

The Camp Health Form — What Happens After You “Stick Out Your Tongue” The camp health form provides the perfect opportunity to assess the overall state of your child’s health and growth. Preparation should include parents reflecting on some of the following: • Growth and development (physical, intellectual, emotional) • Eating and sleeping habits (changes are important, too) • Recent illnesses or injuries • Immunizations (also note travel, especially outside the U.S.) • Fitness • Behavior • Family life adjustment or challenges • Puberty and other developmental issues A thorough exam by a pediatrician or family practitioner prior to a camp session allows you to take the necessary steps to

mer into sum

Something is Making Me Sneeze — Allergies and Asthma Children’s health profiles are best described as moving targets. Allergies, both mild and severe, can exhibit themselves for the first time at camp or be exacerbated because exposures at camp vary from those experiences while at home. Parents need to get the assurance from camp staff that they are prepared to address these symptoms if they occur, as well as the procedures they follow. Camps offer a rich profile of activities

for children, and given various health concerns, parents are advised to carefully select a camp for their child with this in mind. Children who have asthma, for example, aren’t necessarily a good match for a camp emphasizing scuba diving or rock climbing, while a strong pioneer or crafts program at another camp may be a perfect fit for their child. Parents will want to learn what accommodations camps can make for health issues while at the same time presenting a range of activities appropriate for their camper.

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Choose from two, four, or eight-week sessions Point-to-point bus service t School vacation mini-camps available Register today at GZLJKWVXPPHUFDPSRUJ or contact our Director of Camps at director@dwightsummercamp.org or 917.551.6430

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PAGE 12

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


communicate fully with the camp’s health-care staff. The physical is also a chance to update that very important health history.

Communication is a Two-Way Street

Camp Pemigewassett, Wentworth, NH

Camp directors and health-care staff are eager to discuss the health concerns and needs of campers. Armed with your own observations and information from your child’s health-care provider, you can ask the right questions and provide the information that creates the most positive experience for your child. Families with children experiencing chronic health problems may occasionally forget to share some of the routine care instructions — second nature to them, but unfamiliar to camp nurses and staff. This also is a major step in assuring that your child will not be marginalized because the staff is unprepared to smoothly integrate medicines or treatments into the camp routine. Have a management plan in place before your child begins camp and determine how the camp will communicate that plan to its staff. Another area of concern for camp professionals is a child’s exposure to health risks from traveling, particularly outside the U.S. Again, sharing this information about travel previous to camp will lead to a more

Happy Hollow Children’s Camp, Nashville, Indiana complete picture of your child’s health and will strengthen the partnership.

Emotional and Psychological Wellness For campers with diagnosed psychological challenges or in cases where parents are unsure about a child’s behavior, parents need to talk with the child’s professional care provider and assess whether the child is a good risk for camp at this stage. Just as a pediatrician needs information about the camp under consideration, so, too, does the child’s mental health practitioner. A shorter-stay camp, for example, offering a two-week stay, has a very different skill set profile for campers than one offering a longer-term stay. Day camps offer another option for parents to consider — maintaining a familiar routine at home to balance the challenges of a program filled with new faces and new activities.

Stress Happens — Even at Camp! Sometimes in our rush for community and togetherness, we forget that contemporary children are often used to solitude, and, may, in fact, need quiet time and space to reflect on their day. Providing a child with a clock radio with headphones or a CD player tucked under a pillow may allow your son or daughter to

decompress. Ask the camp director or camp health-care provider about opportunities for private time. Maybe the camp library is the perfect place — or a sheltered outdoor spot away from the fray of games will provide the quiet and restful area that your camper may seek. Talking with your child ahead of time reassures both of you that camp can and does accommodate many different personalities and needs while offering a wealth of activities to share.

Camp — Designed for Healthy Living When we think about it, camp practices what parents and health professionals are always preaching: be active, get up off the couch, turn off the TV, stop snacking before meals, listen to others, cooperate, eat a variety of foods, sleep well. It’s a nearly invisible set of rules that makes a world of difference. At camp, we believe that enthusiasm for a healthy life is, in the best sense, contagious! Linda Ebner Erceg, R.N., M.S., P.H.N., is executive director of The Association of Camp Nurses, as well as health and safety coordinator of Concordia Language Villages in Bemidji, Minnesota. Reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association.

Photos courtesy of American Camp Association

Camp Howe, Goshen, MA

Preparing for Group Living Be consistent. That’s one of the most important maxims of parenting. But wait! At camp, we ask children to turn some rules upside down: share bunk beds,

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

equipment, bathrooms, and even talk to strangers. The good news is camp creates the perfect setting to learn these new skills in a supportive environment.

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PAGE 13


Gadgets, Great Outdoors Can Co-Exist

Ideas for combining technology with the outdoors

Your kid doesn’t necessarily need to leave her iPad at home when she heads off to camp

1. Rely on technology to plan or inspire outdoor adventures. This can include anything – from finding great nearby hiking trails to interactive, outdoor treasure hunts. 2. Keep a record of outdoor experiences with the help of electronic photos, videos or an electronic journal. They’ll love the ability to share their experiences with family and friends. 3. When safe and practical, take hand-held devices outdoors to combine the best of both worlds (just remember to plan for some fully unplugged time outside, too).

4. Use tools such as Ubooly, an appbased learning toy that can turn a walk in the park into an interactive experience with activities such as scavenger hunts, nature hikes, mindfulness games and plenty of exercise.

The Importance of Outside Play

A Special Camp for the

A new National Wildlife Federation (NWF) report shows that kids’ media habits can both positively and negatively impact health, and provides real-world advice to help parents serve as positive role models and teach children to use technology in moderation. “Kids need to be outside all year long, especially in the winter when days are short and we’re all a little more cooped up than usual,” said Maureen Smith, chief marketing officer for National Wildlife Federation. “In addition to developing a deeper appreciation for the outdoors and the wildlife around them no matter where they live, it helps them burn off energy, stay fit, and be mentally focused for school, homework and all activities in their busy day.”

Special Child Our Victory Day Camp Dobbs Ferry, New York Learning and/or Attention Difficulty Boys and Girls - Ages 5 to 13 Fred and Iris Tunick, Directors t1SPGFTTJPOBM4UBGGt4NBMM(SPVQT NBYJNVN

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Screen Time Plus Green Time Technology can be a valuable tool to help families balance the lure of screen time with the importance of green time for kids. Today’s connected world enables children to experience nature in ways never before imagined.

Transportation Available From Most Areas

7 Weeks

June 30 - August 15, 2014

For other helpful resources and to learn more about NWF’s goal to get 10 million more kids spending regular time in the great outdoors visit www.BeOutThere.org.

On Site Interview In Dobbs Ferry Required For Enrollment

For Further Information: Call: (203) 329-3394 www.ourvictory.com E-MAIL: OurVictory@aol.com PAGE 14

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Advancements in technology over the last decade have children spending more time with gadgets and gizmos, and less time enjoying the great outdoors. In fact, kids are now indoors up to 10 hours a day, according to the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. But kids’ increasing use of technology and opportunities to appreciate Mother Nature do not have to be mutually exclusive. You don’t have to take away the electronics to lure your little ones into some greenery. There are dozens of games and apps designed for phones and tablets that are designed to get your kid outside and immersed in nature. Apps like the Audubon Society’s North American bird fieldguide, and one called Leafsnap, which helps catalogue different leaves kids find, encourage users to glance at the screen but also go hunting through the woods for things to collect and learn about. There are apps and programs with star gazing charts, hiking trails, animal identifiers and lots of games for all ages. Children can also easily record photos and videos of what they find outside, and will hopefully get inspired to step in front of the camera to exlore while they’re out shooting.

Photo courtesy of American Camp Association

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


The Bottom Line About Camp Costs Ask the right questions to understand the true price of camp Parents know that camp is an experience that will last a lifetime. However, they may worry about the cost, especially if there is more than one camp-aged child in the house. The good news for parents is that there is a camp for just about every budget. While fees to attend camp vary, they can range from $75 to over $650 per week for American Camp Association-accredited resident and day camps. Parents may also reduce the costs by asking the right questions. When talking with the camp director, parents should ask the following:

• What is the refund policy? Refund policies vary greatly from camp to camp. Some refund for illness only, some will give a total refund prior to certain date, and some don not refund at all. Most camps will ask for a small non-refundable deposit at the time of application, which may or may not go toward the cost of tuition. It is important to know the refund policy before you send any money.

• Is there financial assistance available? Many camps offer camperships, which is a partial or total subsidy of the tuition costs, but parents need to ask if they are available. Although they are usually awarded based on need, don not assume that you make too much to qualify. It is important to apply early.

• What is included in the tuition?

• Are special discounts available?

Day camps will typically include transportation as part of their tuition. Resident camps may offer limited transportation, such as a van ride from a major local train station. Other amenities to ask about are fees for special programs and trips, laundry service, camp canteen, special equipment that is required and service organization membership. Also, ask the camp director if it is appropriate to send spending money with your child.

Often, camps will offer special discounts for such things as early registration, full-season enrollment, and enrollment of multiple family members. If more than one special discount applies, parents may only be able to take advantage of one. The ACA camp database provides parents with many ways to find the ideal ACA-accredited camp. For more information, visit ACA’s family-dedicated Web site, www. CampParents.org. Reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association.

VALLEY FORGE SUMMER CAMP Valley Forge Summer Camps are as special as the school itself. Located on the campus of Valley Forge Military Academy & College, campers grow, discover new abilities, and develop friendships that will last a lifetime. Filled with exceptional, exhilarating, and exciting experiences like horsemanship, marksmanship, mixed martial arts, sailing and SCUBA training, our camps have become the talk of the town! We offer a fun and safe environment where 9-17 year olds can build self-confidence and leadership while trying new and exciting challenges and skills with counselors and campers from around the block – and around the world. Our fitness program will challenge your camper like they have never before been challenged. When they complete our camp successfully, their self-image will improve and their confidence will begin to grow so that they can face the challenge of their high school years positively and successfully.

DWIGHT SCHOOL SUMMER CAMP With customized programs for children ages 4-13, we offer an extensive range of sports, and visual and performing arts activities to “ignite the spark of genius in every camper!” Swimming, basketball, fencing, martial arts, soccer, tennis, video game design, 2-D and 3-D art, music, dance, yoga, circus arts, and much more will make it the best summer ever! Based on age and preference, campers can customize their day. We have day trips for younger campers and overnight trips for older campers. With color wars, theme days, and all the challenges and fun that camp brings, Dwight offers you the choice of two, four, and eightweek sessions to match your family’s summer plans. Headquartered on the Upper East Side, we provide chaperoned stop-to-stop bus transportation throughout Manhattan, as well as pre-camp and after-camp activities, for additional fees, to meet the needs of busy parents and extend the day for your child. 917.551.6430 www.dwightsummercamp.org

Come see what a difference one summer can make at Valley Forge Summer Camps. Phone: 610-989-1262 www.vfmac.edu/camp-home

THOMAS SCHOOL OF HORSEMANSHIP For the first time ever children from Manhattan can experience Thomas School of Horsemanship Summer Day Camp in Melville. Thomas School is located on 33 beautiful acres in the heart of Long Island. This year there will be central pick up locations in Manhattan for transportation to camp. Give your children the total camp experience plus an extensive horseback riding program. Campers enjoy Red Cross Swimming twice daily, a full gamut of sports including soccer, lacrosse, basketball, volleyball, tennis, gymnastics, TaeKwonDo, Yoga and a full arts program with Zumba, acting and art. In addition, campers have daily riding lesson, horse care an older campers get to take their “own” horse. All these activities are adapted for boys and girls ages 3-15. For 70 years Thomas School has been connecting children with horses. The life skills that horses teach children about respect, compassion, communication, trust, confidence are so powerful. Today, Thomas School is serving a second generation of campers as alumni are now sending their children. Let your children enjoy the open spaces that both children and horses thrive in.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

OUR VICTORY DAY CAMP When he started Our Victory Fred Tunick wanted a camp where each child could grow, by “creating value” in their lives. A place where acceptance and nurturing, would encourage the growth of ego and self esteem. Calling upon his experience in Special Education (1963-1997), as a Speech Pathologist, Child Study Team Chairman and Special Education administrator, he developed a program where “Each Child Could Achieve Success, Regardless of Ability.” Where traditional day camp activities, could be geared to the needs of each summers population. This is accomplished by: 1 Utilizing mature staff working in or currently studying special education and/or related fields. (Occupational Therapy, Speech and Language, Social Work, Counseling etc.) 2 In addition to the group staff, five Specialists, with knowledge of our population, provide Art, Sports, Music, Drama and Movement. All activities are geared to the needs of each season’s population 3 Small groups of nine with three staff members per group and a maximum enrollment of 63 campers. 4 All prospective campers have an intake interview to determine if the program is the right one for them. 5 In May, Parents submit a detailed “needs” history, including school, psychological and social information and a photograph. Pertinent information about each child is then shared with the entire staff prior to the first day of camp. With this approach, the staff is familiar with each campers needs on the first day and allows for the start of a successful summer experience. Parent: “Thank you, a million times, for the amazing, wonderful, happy, place that OVDC is. I have never seen him so happy and eager to explore each day, with so many friends and adults that can see his special qualities. He has already informed me that he will be returning until he is 13. Thank you for being special people with a very special staff.”

For Further Information: Call: (203) 329-3394 www.ourvictory.com E-MAIL: OurVictory@aol.com

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CAMP RAMAQUOIS Camp Ramaquois, “A day camp as complete as sleep-away camp”, situated on 44 acres in nearby Rockland County. Only 30 minutes from the George Washington Bridge, via the Palisades Parkway. From adventurous activities to creative arts to athletic activities, boys & girls, ages 3-15 experience a traditional day camp program filled with a variety of stimulating activities. Facilities include group bunks, a 5-acre crystalline lake, 8 heated swimming pools, a splash park, tennis, basketball & volleyball courts, hockey rinks, ball fields, soccer fields, a petting zoo, horseback riding, special events & much more. Optional Adventure Trip Program for grades 4-10. 10th Grade Leadership Program Mini Day for 3 & 4 year olds (Pre-K). Many air-conditioned buildings. Visit us at www.ramaquois. com or call 845-354-1600 for a personal tour. PAGE 15


It’s Not Easy Being Green How camps help children care for the earth Daily life in the city can make getting “back to nature” hard for any family. Yet experiencing the outdoors helps children gain enhanced abilities to learn, lead, and experience contentment, as well as gain a lifelong interest in caring for planet earth.

A Toad or a Frog? Parents who want to be sure their kids know a toad from a frog and a catfish from a crawfish don’t need to go it alone. Camp programs are among the best ways for children to get to know first-hand a very important family member — Mother Nature. Take James, for example. Despite being included in many family travels, James and the natural world had only a passing acquaintance, and his parents were wise enough to send him into the woods for camp. “We have a little potato patch down by the river, and the kids can catch a trout in the river and dig up potatoes and bring them back to camp, learning what it’s like to live off the land,” explains Sandy Schenk, owner and director of Green River Preserve camp

Photo via Flickr/ThreelByBike

of Cedar Mountain, North Carolina. “When James’s parents came to pick him up at week’s end, he dragged his duffle bag across the parking lot, gave his mom and dad a big hug, and fished out his prize from camp,

In Your Own Backyard

a huge potato, and gave it to his father. He was so proud. This was a first — he made a connection between the earth and food, and you could just see the light bulbs turn on.” Almost all camps incorporate hikes and nature activities, and some go an extra mile to immerse kids in nature and the environment. Green River Preserve is one such camp. It specializes in helping gifted children better understand the earth through daily activities with professional naturalists on a 3,400-acre nature preserve. “We find that getting kids into the natural world is transformational,” says Schenk. “Nature’s a magnificent teacher because everyone is treated the same. Pushing yourself is something that happens naturally in the out of doors. And when you see kids helping each other over a slippery rock wall, it’s amazing. We see each child come out of the program with a greater understanding of nature and better sense of self.” Eagles’ Nest Camp of Pisgah Forest, North Carolina, has been teaching kids to take care of their natural world for decades. “In our Explorer’s Club class, kids are out in the woods, streams, and bushes, really getting a feel for the amazing biodiversity of the Northern Appalachians,” explains Noni WaiteKucera, executive director of Eagle’s Nest Foundation. Eagle’s Nest also sponsors camp craft classes, helping children learn to read a map, build a fire, and leave no trace. Even an earth art class uses items found in the forest for woodland sculptures, which campers then leave behind to biodegrade and contribute to the health of the forest ecosystem.

You Are What You Eat

PUSH.YOUr.LIMITS. SUMMER SUMMER OVERNIGHTOVERNIGHT FITNESS DAY DAY CAMPCAMPADVENTUREADVENTURE CAMP AGES 6-17 BOYS AND GIRLS

AGES 9 TO BOYS 17

AGES 14 TO 17

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FITNESS CAMP BOYS AND GIRLS AGES 14-17 Challenge your camper like they have never been challenged before. Campers self-image will improve so that they can face their high school years with confidence.

Environmental programs don’t always take place exclusively in the outdoors. Enter the kitchen! The Whole Kitchen program uses holistic ingredients, fresh foods, whole grains, and local produce. “We grind our flour from wheat berries, and the kids make the bread,” Waite-Kucera says. “It’s all a way to show how nature provides for us, and why we need to return the favor.” Sometimes, a camp’s location can provide built-in environmental lessons. At Windsor Mountain (formerly Interlocken), camp life centers around a small farm and camp garden nestled in the foothills of New Hampshire on the edge of a 4,000-acre nature preserve. “We offer kids a chance to get their feet wet in the morning dew, to feel the grass under their feet, to lie down in the field and look up at the stars. Our activities help them understand how Mother Nature is delicate and why we care about helping to protect her,” says Sarah Herman, director of the camp.

LEARN MORE: www.vfmac.edu (610) 989-1262 LEARN MORE www.vfmac.edu | (610) 989-1262 PAGE 16

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Five Planet-Friendly Ideas • Start a recycling program at home. Call 311 to find out what what can be recycled, and then research what happens to the recyclables. • Save 3-5 gallons of water when you brush your teeth — no need to keep the water running. • At the store, consider the packaging — is it disposable or reusable/recyclable? • When cleaning, choose rags that can be reused after washing. • Plant a tree in your backyard or neighborhood — help keep the air clean. Many block associations sponsor tree pits and kids can sign up to keep them free of weeds and litter.

Art and Nature Campers harvest vegetables from the garden for the salad bar and help take care of the farm animals. Children with a special interest in nature also can go directly into the marsh to learn about its animal habitats, into the woods to create natural art, or on a bog-wading ecological adventure. For older youth, off-campus trips can take campers backpacking, mountain climbing, rafting, and more — all with an eye to building awareness in the natural surroundings. Some campers even take environmental skills into their own communities. “One of our campers who enjoyed our garden wrote to tell us that he’s volunteering his time to a community garden project,” Herman says. It’s that kind of love for nature that camps of all types can foster. “We feel like we’re opening a door for many of our campers, so they can enjoy natural parks and wildlife preserves for the rest of their lives,” says Schenk.

Doing What Comes Nature-ly According to Camping Specialist Gary Forster of YMCA USA, camps are an ideal setting for creating environmental awareness in our children. “Children seeing animals in a natural setting for more than just a day and understanding how their choices have an impact on all systems of life is just the beginning. From awareness grows an appreciation, and from that standpoint, we see children who are ready to act.” Reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


cityArts

Edited by Armond White

New York’s Review of Culture . CityArtsNYC.com

Chelsea Church-Going and Theater-Hopping Atlantic Theater Company’s season of newness By Phyllis Workman

G

reek theater grew out of a religious festival so it’s fitting that the Atlantic Theater Company’s home in Chelsea uses that former neighborhood church as the locus of plays concerned with, in a classic theater company’s motto, the deepest questions about morality and performances that show the relationship between mortals, the gods and fate. As Shakespeare wrote, quoting the Greeks, “The Play’s the Thing,” and Cheseaites know it well. The Atlantic Theater Company’s current season turns its neighborhood-friendly space into a cosmopolitan theater temple with five new premieres. Ethan Coen’s first fulllength play Women or Nothing has already premiered. Next up is Stephen Adly Guirgis’s new play Between Riverside and Crazy about New York apartment renting--a perfect topic for Chelsea. Another premiere, Nancy Harris’ Our New Girl is scheduled, this “psychological thriller” promises to address “the darker side of parenthood.” Two special events are also upcoming: choreographer-director Martha Clarke’s visionary interpretation of Brecht and Weill’s The Threepenny Opera, addressing age-old and urgent moral and musical questions for a new century. There’s also urgency in The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, a new production of the Alan Sillitoe book and play, this time adapted by Britain’s new breakthrough playwright Roy Williams, whose colloquial dialogue that The London Times has called “Crisp and bespoke: motives are mixed, nobody is a hero, nothing is black and white.” Now in its 28th year, The Atlantic Theater, founded by playwright David Mamet along with William H. Macy and 30 New York

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Atlantic Theater Company at St. Peter's Episcopal Church University acting students in 1985 works out of two Chelsea locations. There’s a 99-seat Stage 2 space known as a black-box theater at 330 West 16th Street (Sigourney Weaver walked through its doors the day CityArts visited). It’s where the Company’s new plays are developed. But the Company’s main stage for performance and public entertainment is the Linda Gross Theater, a 165-seat space at 336 West 29th street. The Gross occupies the parish hall of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church which was built in 1854 then was Desanctified and renovated. Since then, what began as the Atlantic Acting school in1987, operates as both a private conservatory and an undergraduate program in conjunction with the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. It’s a local venue but its goal is worldwide.

ATC's Theater 2

ATC's upcoming production Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

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PAGE 17


CITYARTS GALLERIES

FILM CITYARTS

Lively Still Lifes Daniele Marin’s various techniques combine at Noho Gallery in Chelsea By Joe Bendik 

A

t NOHO gallery, Daniele M. Marin is showing her new series of still-lifes entitled “Interaction”.  Marin examines her association with this medium and explores various eras Marin's "Interaction" at Noho Gallery of art history. Indeed, to have “conversations” with each other and there appears to be the viewer.   references to James Ensor and traditional Through Marin’s use of a variety of still-life along with more contemporary art.  techniques, the viewer’s eye travels among Re-contextualizing the form by juxtaposing the canvases as different shapes begin to images gives a fresh approach to the works.  transform in their narratives. A bottle can Marin calls these works “Still Life Painting lead to a lampshade. An opaque vase is fleshed Installation” as she considers the gallery walls out to almost blur into the background.  themselves to be part of her art.  Instead of Some of these pieces border on Abstract traditional hanging, the paintings are grouped Expressionism   together as “Interactions”, where they appear These paintings are deceptively complex and CHARENEE WADE layered.  There is no way to Vocalist receive all of the information at first look. There is a depth to these works that is spellbinding.  Images one might pass by at first glance become dominant upon further viewing.   Born in Paris, but living in America, Marin studied at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn (where she received her MFA).  One can sense the European roots meet American sensibilities.  Utilizing a universal form such as the still-life, Marin creates her own unique language. Within that structure her works swing by tonight jalc.org / dizzys contain elements of both 7:30pm & 9:30pm sets 212-258-9595 balance and mystery.   Jazz at Lincoln Center Broadway at 60th Street, 5th Floor, NYC Daniele Marin’s “Interaction” at Noho Gallery Photo by Marylene Mey and Whit Lane 530 West 25th Street through February 1.

live nightly.

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Roberts and Streep in August: Osage County

Over-acting-Out August: Osage County bashes red states and Chekhov By Armond White

A

s the film version of August: Osage County finally, mechanically winds down, it reveals playwright Tracy Letts’ goal: His unoriginal view of domestic squabbling goes from warmedover Edward Albee to room-temperature Chekhov in a scene where three adult sisters Barbara, Karen, Ivy (Julia Roberts, Julianne Nicholson, Juliette Lewis) discuss frustrations regarding their gorgon, pill-popping mother Violet (Meryl Streep). It’s staged as a classic three sisters confab like in Cries and Whisper but Ingmar Bergman knocked your eyes out, here director John Wells fixates on drab ordinariness as if revealing shattering truth. Wells’ pretense is the most laughable thing about this unfunny movie which the Weinstein Company is trying to sell as an edgy comedy. Letts’ superficial drama toys with death, suicide, incest, greed, jealousy no differently than a sitcom but heavy-handedly. (This damn thing even begins with a T.S. Eliot quote, the same one Morrissey wittily turned into a threnody in The Smiths’ “The Queen Is Dead.”) At first I enjoyed watching the actors say theatrical dialog (Streep’s voice has never been deeper, harsher, sharper but she’s still over-acting up a storm and Julia Roberts’s anger hold interest then stays the same). But Letts’ theatrical conceit--a profane version of Chekhov no better than corn pone Beth

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Henley--becomes offensively shallow. “This madhouse is my home” Barbara snaps then complains “I can’t perpetuate this myth of family.” Letts and Wells must think this cynicism is new. It not even up-to-date. Todd Solondz’s ingenious examinations of Jewish American self-reproach (Storytelling, Palindromes, Life During Wartime, Dark Horse) go into ethnicity and then deeper. Letts is stuck at the sophomoric level of his semi-educated characters who speak of “Gordian knots” and a teenage druggie-savant describing life as “A random selection of cells” but lacking Solondz’s understanding that such nihilism is redundant and risible; Letts intends pathos. And then there’s crazily sentimental music-indie mush, sub-Philip Glass piano arpeggios-and even an Indian-ex-machina played by Missy Upham whose here just to contrast the loopy racist white folk. At least when William Friedkin directed Letts’ Bug and Killer Joe he kept things moving; this film is weighed down by its theatrical dialogue--the only thing going for it. Letts and Wells congratulate their own crabbiness by alluding to “the spiritual affliction of the blues.” August: Osage County is titled ridiculously as if documenting some phase of sociological history (another Red State denigration) but this story of selfdevouring Okies has nothing in common with the soulful laments of the blues--or even authentic Country & Western songs. Letts’ b.s. would make Merle Haggard vomit without drinking. Follow Armond White on Twitter at 3xchair

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


CITYARTS FILM

Have you tried naturally healthy, fresh, organic walnuts? Home grown, hand picked shelled or in shell.

Perry Creek

Franck and Henri in Stranger by the Lake

WA L N U T S

Touring the Gay Ghetto 530.503.9705 Stranger by the Lake is a pathological murder mystery By Armond White

T

he full-frontal male sexuality in Alain Guiraude’s Stranger by the Lake occurs at a gay nude beach in France. This location, surrounded by hilly woods and a parking lot, puts gay cruising rituals on display as well as explicit sexual acts--ejaculation, fellatio, copulation--shown with matter-of-fact frankness. Yet this film is anything but a realistic work. Despite the lavish, widescreen concentration on natural exteriors and woodsy, aquatic environmental sound effects, everything’s carefully arranged to accommodate a murder-mystery plot. Franck (Pierre Deladonchamps), a bland, boyish, middle-aged blond, focuses on the lithe, tanned, slim-hipped Michel (Christophe Paou), a dark-haired Tom Selleck-type, and becomes even more fixated when he witnesses Michel drown a lover in the waves at night. The mystery of Franck’s erotic attraction to death is Guiraude’s primary theme. His bluntness about gay male sex habits and desires are part of an audio- visual schematic; he unveils a subculture that has recently become more mainstream--or at least more widely acknowledged. The cruisey beach setting of assorted gay types suggests a behavioral grid--including bicurious divorce Henri (Patrick D’Assumcao), a burly Gerard Depardieu-type who cagily pursues Franck through casual conversation. The murder investigation by a local police inspector (Jerome Chappatte, who resembles Jean-Luc Godard) provides cursory suspense while analyzing that grid—it implies a critique of how social authority ineffectually responds to the mysterious, uncontrollable impulses of

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

gay male sex. Many critics have superficially likened Stranger by the Lake to Hitchcock and although the element of erotic threat resembles Hitchcock’s Suspicion and Rear Window, Guiraude’s beach is really Francois Ozon territory--the sexual obsessiveness that the ever-adventurous Ozon, student of Cocteau and Fassbinder, has lately surpassed. (Ozon’s In the House was a 21st century Rear Window and a more satisfying film than this.) Guiraude began as a student of Godard demonstrating an estheticized sense of humor in his 2001 medium-feature That Old Dream that Moves, where his prankish ellipses observed the private thoughts of laborers assessing their working conditions while contemplating a strike. Stranger by the Lake’s tour of gay sex habits is also full of ellipses, surveying psychological games within gay men’s amatory pursuits--various, private needs from physical release, love-ofdanger, to simple fraternization. Guiraude’s analytical style is not enhanced by the murder-mystery plot; if anything his bravura frankness, including the unnervingly quiet primal murder scene (like Leave Her to Heaven) drags gay film progress back to the pathological closet of Gregg Araki’s aberrant feature, the self-loathing Mysterious Skin. The Police Inspector’s investigation suggests the potential for social assimilation and regulation through solidarity and compassion. But then those hopes are cruelly, doubly dashed--a nihilistic turn that prevents Stranger by the Lake’s subculture from integrating into the moral universe. Integration is what Ozon learned from the example of Fassbinder’s films that argued for the stabilizing universality of queer emotion. In Fassbinder’s masterpiece Querelle, the interior (imaginary) gay world was seen with more rigor, passion and depth than Guiraude’s leisurely, outdoorsy, out-ofthe-closet tour of a spiritual ghetto.

15 1 4 7

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re-use

ways to your old newspaper

Use it as wrapping paper, or fold & glue pages into reusable gift bags.

2

Add shredded newspaper to your compost pile when you need a carbon addition or to keep flies at bay.

5

Use newspaper strips, water, and a bit of glue for newspaper mâché.

8

10

Crumple newspaper to use as packaging material the next time you need to ship something fragile.

13

Tightly roll up sheets of newspaper and tie with string to use as fire logs.

After your garden plants sprout, place newspaper sheets around them, then water & cover with grass clippings and leaves. This newspaper will keep weeds from growing.

Make origami creatures

11

14

6

Roll a twice-folded newspaper sheet around a jar, remove the jar, & you have a biodegradable seed-starting pot that can be planted directly into the soil.

9

Use shredded newspaper as animal bedding in lieu of sawdust or hay.

Make your own cat litter by shredding newspaper, soaking it in dish detergent & baking soda, and letting it dry.

3

Cut out letters & words to write anonymous letters to friends and family to let them know they are loved.

Make newspaper airplanes and have a contest in the backyard.

12

Wrap pieces of fruit in newspaper to speed up the ripening process.

15

Dry out wet shoes by loosening laces & sticking balled newspaper pages inside.

a public service announcement brought to you by dirt magazine. Let Us Tell You What to Do! Do you have a dispute with a neighbor? Need advice on how to navigate a sticky situation at your child’s school? Want to settle an argument about proper urban etiquette? Our Town Downtown is here to help, and dish out advice on living in your corner of the city. Please send your queries for our new advice column to editor.otdt@strausnews.com with the subject line “Ask Margaret.”

Follow Armond White on Twitter at 3xchair

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Stuff newspapers in boots or handbags to help the items keep their shape.

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PAGE 19


RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

January 15 - 21, 2014

Lebrini’s Pizzeria

31 Avenue C

Grade Pending (29) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation.Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Minca

536 East 5 Street

A

Akina Sushi

424 East 14 Street

A

Ninth Street Espresso

341 East 10 Street

A

Cafe Espanol

78 Carmine Street

Grade Pending (2)

The Path Cafe

131 Christopher St

Grade Pending (27) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or nonfood areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewageassociated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Karavas Place

162 West 4 Street

A

The Upper Crust

91 Horatio Street

A

Waverly Restaurant

385 6 Avenue

A

Louro

142 West 10 Street

A

Bell Book & Candle

141 West 10 Street

Grade Pending (29) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or nonfood areas. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Bill’s Bar & Burgers

22 9 Avenue

A

Pret A Manger

350 Hudson Street

A

Soho Park

62 Prince Street

A

Buskers

92 West Houston Street

Grade Pending (26) Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

The Wren

344 Bowery

Grade Pending (19) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Restaurant Grades The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website on December 13, 2013 and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Gyu-Kaku

Lillie’s Restaurant

Peels Restaurant

34 Cooper Square

13 East 17 Street

325 Bowery

Grade Pending (27) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Appropriately scaled metal stem-type thermometer or thermocouple not provided or used to evaluate temperatures of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, cooling, reheating and holding. Grade Pending (26) Food not cooked to required minimum temperature. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Grade Pending (18) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or nonfood areas. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Cosi

841 Broadway

A

Subway

120 4 Avenue

A

Ur Cup

287 Mercer Street

A

Liquiteria

170 2 Avenue

A

Bully’s Deli

759 Broadway

A

The Royal

127 4 Avenue

A

Louis 649

649 East 9 Street

Grade Pending (16) Food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Terroir

Kafana

PAGE 20

413 East 12 Street

116 Avenue C

Grade Pending (27) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. A

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SALES Reported January 20 - 26, 2014 Neighborhood Neighborhood Battery Park City

Chelsea

E Village

Address 200 Rector Place

Gramercy Park

Greenwich Villag

Lower E Side

#28B

Sale Price $1,050,000

3

2

Djk Residential

#5F

$470,000

1

1

Battery Park Realty

225 Rector Place

#2A

$589,994

0

1

Related Sales

30 W St.

#Ph3a

$2,750,000

3

3

Corcoran

319 W 18 St.

#1G

$479,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

77 7 Ave.

#14L

$705,000

1

1

Halstead Property

342 W 21 St.

#2E

$390,000

345 W 21 St.

#4A

$525,000

1

77 7 Ave.

#4K

$699,000

144 W 18 St.

#500E

$4,200,000

1

1 1

Douglas Elliman

#1B

$549,000

1

1

Citi Habitats

425 E 13 St.

#4N

$940,000

1

1

Nestseekers

205 E 10 St.

#3A

$875,000

2

1

Douglas Elliman

115 4 Ave.

#3J

$2,400,000

2

2

Brown Harris Stevens

#6F

$450,000

307 E 8 St.

#5Cd

$999,000

111 4 Ave.

#11Hi

$1,860,000

0

1

#6K

$1,280,000

1

2

Corcoran

125 E 12 St.

#1E

$2,550,000

2.5

2

Douglas Elliman

$1,323,725

15 Broad St.

#728

$855,000

15 Broad St.

#1022

$726,000

88 Greenwich St.

#726

$10

1

1

Corcoran

254 Park Ave. South #3P

$1,250,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

30 E 22 St.

#2D

$370,000

0

1

Douglas Elliman

22 W 15 St.

#3E

$1,240,000

1

1

Corcoran

10 W 15 St.

#206

$755,000

1

1

Corcoran

210 E 17 St.

#3A

$642,500

2

1

Sotheby’s International R

205 3 Ave.

#4A

$485,000

0

1

Citi Habitats

201 E 21 St.

#12N

$1,565,000

2

2

Brown Harris Stevens

1 Irving Place

#U10b

$1,325,000

242 E 19 St.

#10D

$885,000

1

1

Halstead Property

142 E 16 St.

#20B

$2,025,000

2

2

Halstead Property

200 E 16 St.

#9C

$435,000

0

1

Core

201 E 17 St.

#19H

$926,607

60 Gramercy Park

#17F

$895,000

1

1

Brown Harris Stevens

8 W 13 St.

#8Re

$445,000

0

1

Corcoran

77 Bleecker St.

#618

$650,000

0

1

Halstead Property

1

1

Town Residential

1

1

Corcoran

184 Thompson St.

#Lc

$999,000

211 Thompson St.

#6F

$740,000

60 E 9 St.

#343

$1,200,000

25 5 Ave.

#3E

$1,600,000

13 W 13 St.

#7Fs

$900,000

1

1

Corcoran

20 Clinton St.

#4E

$1,085,000

2

1

Corcoran

237 Eldridge St.

#9

$370,000

1

1

Keller Williams

210 E Broadway

#H1603 $531,000

1

1

Level Group

417 Grand St.

#A703

1

1

Halstead Property

$585,000

154 Attorney St.

#602+

$1,045,000

530 Grand St.

#G3e

$475,000

455 Fdr Drive

#C705

$570,000

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

417 Grand St.

#E1602

$360,000

BR BA Listing Brokerage

1 Bond St.

#2D

$1,925,000

1

2

Town Residential

Nolita

354 Broome St.

#6G

$1,950,000

1

2

Corcoran

Queens Soho

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

#1C+

$271,000

40 Mercer St.

#11

$6,174,000

3

3

Nestseekers

311 W Broadway

#6G

$3,030,000

2

2

Ostrov Realty Group

22 Renwick St.

#7B

$1,705,568

2

2

Brown Harris Stevens

22 Renwick St.

#6B

$1,575,000

2

2

Brown Harris Stevens

#602

$3,512,963

3

3

Core

2

2

Douglas Elliman

14 Wooster St. Tribeca

93 Worth St.

$4,625,000

93 Worth St.

#410

$1,694,368

25 Murray St.

#5C

$2,300,000

93 Worth St.

#705

$1,538,830

93 Worth St.

#605

$1,515,156

93 Worth St.

#902

$3,563,875

3

3

Core

145 Hudson St.

#11B

$10,000,000

4

3

Corcoran

W Chelsea

520 W 23 St.

#12B

$1,055,000

2

2

Mp Walsh Realty

400 W 23 St.

#6M

$835,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

W Village

634 Washington St.

#4A

$1,900,000

4

2

Corcoran

222 W 14 St.

#10E

$1,875,000

2

2

Warburg

421 Hudson St.

#507

$1,985,587

296 W 10 St.

#9N

$2,500,000

3

2

Corcoran

Brown Harris Stevens

425 E 13 St.

#45E

Sale Price

Noho

Core

99 Ave. B

333 E 14 St.

Apt.

BR BA Listing Brokerage

2 South End Ave.

Financial District 123 Washington St.

Flatiron

Apt.

Address

StreetEasy.com is New York’s most accurate and comprehensive real estate website, providing consumers detailed sales and rental information and the tools to manage that information to make educated decisions. The site has become the reference site for consumers, real estate professionals and the media and has been widely credited with bringing transparency to one of the world’s most important real estate markets.

Do you have a news tip, story idea, nomination for “mayor of your block,” complaint or letter to the editor?

We want to hear from you!

Please go to nypress.com and select “Submit Stuff ” www.nypress.com

PAGE 21


CELEBRITY PROFILE

Bringing the Brilliance Back to Living in The Big Apple it was part of your home décor or it’s in good enough shape that you can actually use it? A lot of what I do involves coming in and asking clients the hard questions. It’s not me being judgmental as much as it’s offering a counterpoint and making them think about their decisions.

Upper East Sider Amelia Meena started Appleshine to help with the daunting task of organizing our belongings By Angela Barbuti When you’re trying to stuff that last pair of jeans into an overflowing drawer, don’t you ever want to stop and just declutter? That’s where personal organizer Amelia Meena comes to the rescue as your own cheerleader, teacher, motivator, therapist, and interior designer all rolled into one. The 32-year-old started Appleshine to help New Yorkers with the daunting task of organizing, decluttering, and, ultimately, loving their homes no matter how large or tiny they are. When she’s not rearranging kitchens, she’s bringing donations to family shelters, or putting shoe racks over the doors of studios. As a child in Kentucky, she would always eagerly volunteer to organize her friends’ rooms. “Now, here I am living in New York City. I get to do that every day with these tiny apartments,” she said.

What does someone’s apartment say about them? We tend to judge people based on their space, saying, “You must not have your stuff together if you literally don’t have your stuff together.” Everybody has a right to express themselves at home how they’d like to, but my clients come to me when they realize their home is not expressive in the way they’d like it to be. There’s an interesting book called Snoop, by Dr. Sam Gosling. Through his research, he discovered that everyone assumes you’re a nicer person if your space is more organized. Whether it’s right or not, that’s not the point. The point is society really tells us how to judge people based on their space.

You said your dad always told you to live within your means. How do you apply that to apartment living in New York City? He taught us to live within our means mostly financially, however I took that to a broader scale. Think about what you have and how your life’s going to fit into that. A lot of times I bring up the point of capacity limits with my clients. For instance, I had a client who was recovering pens from all across her apartment. She kept finding pens. And she would have a huge wad of them and she’s like,

PAGE 22

After you declutter, where’s the best place to donate in Manhattan?

“They all work. I don’t want to throw them away.” I said, “You probably have so many pens because you never designated a home for pens so you could not find them when you need them, then you have to buy more.” So if you can designate a home, that place becomes a capacity max. So say that it’s now a drawer in your kitchen. Those are where the pens live. But ultimately, if you go over capacity, then you have to scale back.

I’m sure you’ve been overwhelmed at times. What have been the most daunting places you’ve had to organize? I do my best work with people who want to work with Appleshine. The most daunting projects have been with people who aren’t ready to get organized. Someone put them up to it, or are in a circumstance, like a time crunch, or dealing with the loss of a loved one. They’re emotionally not ready, and it’s hard.

How do you help clients who are dealing with the loss of a loved one? A client’s mother had passed and she had a lot of her artwork. She was able to donate to a company called Art Start, which teaches art classes to homeless children in the city. It was very specific to her mother’s legacy.

Through your experience, what have you learned about why we hold onto things? I find that we hold onto them for a lot of emotional reasons. Memorabilia we’ll hold onto because our memory is attached to a physical item. We’ll hang onto it because of guilt - someone gave it to us or it reminds us of someone. And we don’t want to disrespect them by getting rid of it. A lot of people keep things for financial reasoning. They paid a lot of money for it at one point. And I use

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

the counterpoint. This is an item you agreed to purchase at a price for its service and that service has likely expired. Even though it’s still a good item, those jeans no longer fit you or that shirt is no longer in style.

I have so many books. How do you deal with those? Books are tough because they’re another one of those very sentimental things. I’m a very tangible person; I love holding a book and turning the page. However, we just don’t need them in our lives extensively because they take up precious space. The New York Public Library has a decent return policy in some of their facilities. Children’s books are pretty easy to give back. There are great organizations that help gain books for correctional facilities. It helps promote literacy, empowerment, and education.

How can one incorporate sentimental items into everyday living? I have a breadbox that I got from my grandfather. I’m sure it has no monetary value, the veneer is chipping, but it’s something I remember from going to his home as a young girl. I have it on display and I use it. That makes me really happy. I have some clients who have their grandparents’ stuff and they just keep it boxed up. What if

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My favorite place to donate is to a family shelter. You can do research and find one in your neighborhood. Because they house men, women, and children, they have a need for a large variety of products. They’ll take clothing, toys, electronics, household goods. It’s a onestop shop and you know the goods you give are getting used immediately. Sure, you can take things to Housing Works or Goodwill, but they have a processing procedure and it might take a little longer. I’ve never encountered a family shelter yet that said “no,” but I always call ahead.

Since it’s almost Valentine’s Day, let’s talk about the interview you did about the concept of dating your apartment. Yeah, we did that [interview] last year with Apartment Therapy. It was about accepting your space for what it is. Just like we always tell our girlfriends, “Just accept him for who he is and don’t try to change him.” The same goes with your space, especially in New York City. We are very limited with space, it’s not going to change, so we have to accept it and work with it instead of against it. Even aesthetically, if it has quirks or design flaws, how can you make them work for you? If you only have one closet and you’re visual and inspired by your clothes, put them on display in your room on an open rack and use the closet for things that are less attractive, like paperwork. To learn more about Appleshine, visit www. appleshinenyc.com Follow Amelia on Twitter: @appleshinenyc

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014


CLASSIFIEDS POLICY NOTICE: We make every effort to avoid mistakes in your classified ads. Check your ad the first week it runs. We will only accept responsibility for the first incorrect insertion. Manhattan Media Classifieds assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for copy changes. All classified ads are pre-paid.

Classified Advertising Department Information Telephone:]Fax:Email: classifi FE!TUSBVTOFXTDPN Hours: .POEBZ'SJEBZBNQN]Deadline: .POEBZOPPOGPSTBNFXFFLTJTTVF ACCOUNTING/FINANCIAL SERVICES Sara Winter C.P.A. Specializing in Business and Personal Taxes Phone (917)968-7407 Email sjwinter114@verizon.net ANIMALS & PETS

ATT DOG OWNERS: Never run out of poop bags again. Free Shipping! www.walkingdoggies.com HELP WANTED

Congestion Analyst position avail. with Windy Bay Power LLC in New York, NY. Will provide the ďŹ nancial analysis to assist the co. in two types of trading, Virtuals & Up-To-Congestion (Two-Settlements), in PJM, NYISO, California Independent System Operator (CAISO), & Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) for the Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s account. Candidates should possess Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deg. in Comp. Sci., Finance, or related ďŹ eld; 3 yrs exp as a Programmer, Financial Analyst or related ďŹ eld; 3 yrs exp developing & maintaining heuristic tools to optimize trade selection & execution using data mining & statistical analysis; 3 yrs exp building databases in Microsoft SQL Server for capturing pricing & other related data for various ISOs; 3 yrs exp programming in Java; 3 yrs exp communicating with traders & developers in team setting; & demonstrated knowledge of the PJM ISO along with knowledge of other ISOs such as ERCOT, CAISO, NYISO, MISO or NEEPOOL. Apply with resume by mail to Mr. Brian Agre, Windy Bay Power LLC, One North End Avenue, Suite 1133, NY, NY 10282 No recruiters

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Java Developerâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;ICE Link position avail. with IntercontinentalExchange, Inc. in New York, NY. Will be involved in analysis, design, implementation, & support of a series of apps. for the business. Candidates should possess Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deg. in Comp. Sci., Mgt. Info. Sys., or related ďŹ eld; 3 yrs exp as Product or Application Developer; 3 yrs exp in developing Java apps. in a high transaction environ.; 2 yrs exp in developing Java apps. against Oracle or another Enterprise RDMS; 1 yr exp in concurrent & distributed programming in Java; 1 yr exp in high throughput workďŹ&#x201A;ow systems; demonstrated knowledge of multitier systems development using Tomcat (or its equivalent), Hibernate (or its equivalent) & Spring Framework (or its equivalent); demonstrated knowledge of Client-Server, message-based middleware development, such as ESB, JMS or Reliable UDP messaging system; & demonstrated Java implementation & debugging skills to solve business & technical requirements. Alternative requirements for job: Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deg. in the abovestated ďŹ elds, 2 yrs exp as Product or Application Developer, 2 yrs exp in developing Java apps. in a high transaction environ. & the other stated special requirements described above or any suitable combination of education, training or experience. Apply with resume by mail to IntercontinentalExchange, Inc., Human Resources Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;TY, 2100 RiverEdge Parkway, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30328 No recruiters

VOLUNTEER REFERRAL CENTER & THE ALL STARS PROJECT PRESENT

VOLUNTEERING IN THE ARTS MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE ART CAPITAL OF THE WORLD! Tuesday, February 11, 2:00-4:00 pm The All Stars Project 543 W. 42nd St (Subways A,C & E to 42nd St) RSVP: 212-889-4805 FREE Drivers Wanted Looking to earn some extra money? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re reliable, have a valid drivers license/insurance and are available overnight Wednesdays we need your help delivering this newspapers. We pay $.85 per stop. Call (212)868-0190 and ask for Helen today. HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Expert on-site repair and restoration of antiques & new furniture in your home or ofďŹ ce Quality custom-made furniture & cabinetry FURNITURE MEDIC (212)470-3850 Visit us on Facebook FurnitureMedicBH Serving NYC

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Social Security Disability & SSI Court Representation Victor Ferrer, Legal Advocate Email: ssdrep@gmail.com No money up front Se habla Espanol Serving NY, NJ, CT 347-573-3882/347-692-6902

New York City Department of Transportation Notice of Public Hearing The New York City Department of Transportation will hold a public hearing on Wednesday February 12, 2014 at 2:00 P.M., at 55 Water St., 9th Floor Room 945, on the following petitions for revocable consent, all in the Borough of Manhattan: #1 920 Broadway Owner, LLC â&#x20AC;&#x201C;to construct, maintain and use sidewalk lights and to maintain and use an existing stair, on the south sidewalk of E 21st St., east of Broadway, and on the east sidewalk of Broadway, south of E 21st St. #2 A. Trenkmann Estate Inc. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;to construct, maintain and use a stair, on the west sidewalk of Centre St., south of Broome St. Interested parties can obtain copies of proposed agreements or request sign-language interpreters (with at least seven days prior notice) at 55 Water St., 9th Fl. SW New York, NY 10041, or by calling (212) 839-6550.

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ways to re-use

your

newspaper

#

Use shredded newspaper as animal bedding in lieu of sawdust or hay.

ways to re-use

your

#

9

Make newspaper airplanes and have a contest in the backyard.

REDUCE REUSE RECYCLE To advertise call (212)-868-0190 Classified2@strausnews.com

OfďŹ ce of National Drug Control Policy/Partnership for a Drug-Free AmericaÂŽ

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Our Town Downtown January 30th, 2014