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COMMUNITY NEWS BELOW 14TH STREET • OCTOBER 24, 2013 P.13

A school under strain on the Lower East Side A proposal to co-locate at University Neighborhood, despite parent complaints By Daniel Fitzsimmons

A

s it is, the building that houses the University Neighborhood High School on the Lower East Side is far from ideal. The basement of the school - at 200 Monroe Street - floods whenever it rains. The electrical

BUILDING WORKER AWARDS Hurley Jones

system is so out of date it can’t support new air conditioners, which now sit unused. A space on the first floor of the building is used as a combination auditorium, cafeteria, gymnasium and lobby. UNHS only has two sets of bathrooms and one science lab. Because it was originally designed as an elementary school, its hallways are narrow and its classrooms small. Given all of this, the Department of Education’s proposal, recently approved by the Panel for Educational Policy, to coContinued on page 4

Ghost Tours & Pumpkins

Photo by Mary Newman

Doorman of the Year Downtown, meet your doorman of the year. Hurley Jones, a doorman at 270 Broadway as well as 80 Chambers, is among the honorees in this year’s Building Service Workers awards, presented by 32BJ SEIU,the country’s largest property services workers union, and Straus Media Manhattan, the publisher of Our Town Downtown To learn more about Hurley, and to see the complete list of this year’s winners, go to our special coverage, which begins after page 12.

Downtown is full of family-friendly local Halloween events this week By Helaina Hovitz

The Big Quiz Thing Halloween Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street www.bigquizthing.com Oct. 29, 6:30pm From the NYC Media hit game show, the Big Quiz Thing brings its multimedia trivia spectacular back to Le Poisson Rouge (158 Bleecker Street). Quizmaster Noah Tarnow and DJ EdP, present five rounds of NYC’s most beloved live quiz action, with Halloween-themed video and audio puzzles, the Lightning Round, the Text Message Challenge, the Buzzertastic Three Way Finale, and the best trivia questions anywhere. Plus, there’s hope for the non-geeky, since you get points for funny answers. There will also be a live magic performance, short films.

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NEIGHBORHOOD CHATTER were evacuated a few days before the Prison for Sale in storm to upstate prisons and never Chelsea came back. The flooding destroyed By Tom Hays On a recent morning on the west side of Manhattan, Wendy Featherstone showed off a prime piece of real estate that many New Yorkers don’t know exists. The eight-story brick building in Chelsea’s gallery district has three terraces, one with views of the Statue of Liberty and cruise ships docking along the Hudson River. There’s an indoor pool, basketball court and even a private chapel with stained-glass windows. Featherstone isn’t a pushy real estate agent - she’s a prison superintendent. The property once was a mediumsecurity women’s lockup called Bayview Correctional Facility. And those terraces? They’re really caged-in recreation areas. The superintendent ran Bayview until Superstorm Sandy made the Hudson surge and sent a wall of water into a facility as she and her workers helplessly looked on. The 153 women - serving time for robberies, assaults and lesser crimes -

boilers and damaged electrical equipment, causing $600,000 in damage. The state’s current budget called for the facility to close by the end of the fiscal year as a cost-saving measure, leaving the building in limbo. The Empire State Development agency is still assessing the best use for Bayview, but its location alone suggests it has more potential than the typical redevelopment stepchild. Bayview abuts a condominium highrise designed by French architect Jean Nouvel and topped by a penthouse unit that sold for nearly $20 million. In such a hot neighborhood, potential buyers would swarm if they knew the building could be torn down and replaced with more high-end residential development, said Jonathan Miller, president of real estate appraiser Miller Samuel Inc. “The value there is in the land, or `the dirt’ as developers call it,” he said. “It’s all about the dirt.” Miller said it’s too soon to estimate the value of the Bayview site, but he cited the recent sale of a nearby lot that once had a gas station for a reported $23.5 million.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR To the editor: Regarding the October 17 story “The Congregation Versus the Community”: I want to make you aware of one important fact which you may have overlooked in this piece, and might consider as you continue to write on this subject. Enshrined in the landmarks law is a “hardship provision,” which has been expanded over time by the courts. It ensures that no for-profit owner of a landmarked property is unable to make a “reasonable return” on their property as a result of landmarks requirements, and no non-profit or religious institution is ever unable to “fulfill its mission” as a result of landmarks requirements. If an owner feels this is the case, they can file a hardship application, and if they demonstrate their case as required by law, they must be relieved of the landmarks requirements (which can mean allowing them to demolish the building or build something that the Landmarks Preservation Commission had said they could not, for example). The hardship provision has been used successfully over the years by religious institutions and non-profits, as well as private developers, to ensure that the landmarks law is fair and never deprives anyone of their basic rights. There have been relatively few such applications over the years, however, because the truth is it’s rare, though not impossible, that landmark requirements do actu-

ally prevent a “reasonable return,” or interfere with a non-profit or religious institution from being able to “fulfill its mission.” Like the landmarks law, we recognize that the need for preservation must be balanced with consideration of real world economic realities and the need for non-profits and religious institutions to do the work they were founded to do. The good news is that experience has shown the two are rarely in conflict, much less mutually exclusive. Andrew Berman Executive Director Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation PAGE 18

The Congregation Versus the Community

The Town & Village Synagogue

Churches and synagogues throughout Manhattan are finding their financial plans thwarted by preservation efforts

long ago. The side not often heard above the rallying cries of well-meaning preservationists, however, is that of the actual church or synagogue members. The landmark process, meant to protect and preserve historical assets that theoretically belong to everyone, can sometimes end up displacing the very people who h ld th t l d d t th ti d

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CRIME WATCH Getaway Stroller Three people abandoned a child after attempting to shoplift items from a store using a baby stroller. At 2:30 PM on Monday, October 7, a 20-year-old man, a 28-year-old man, and a 23-year-old woman entered a chain drug store on Broadway and concealed merchandise in a stroller holding a one-year-old child. The three shoplifters then tried to leave the store without paying. A 44-year-old male store employee attempted to recover the merchandise, but he was assaulted by the thieves, sustaining cuts to his chin and throat. The three shoplifters then fled the scene, abandoning the stroller with the child still in it. The three were apprehended, arrested, and charged with robbery. The items stolen included three cartons of Hall’s, three cartons of Wrigley’s, three cartons of Dentynes, and one carton of Tic Tacs totaling $296.

by Jerry Danzig

No Trace in Park Place

Ex Kawasaki Someone stole a man’s motorcycle. At 11 PM on Tuesday, October 1, a 28-year-old man parked his motorcycle on the southwest corner of Nassau Street and John Street. When he returned to the parking spot later, his bike was gone. A computer check and a canvass of the area both proved negative, and the theft was not captured on video. The stolen motorcycle was a green 2008 Kawasaki EX 2503 valued at $2,500.

A woman’s cell phone was snatched on the subway. At 10:55 AM on Thursday, October 10, a 34-year-old woman was studying on a southbound 2 train, when a 19-year-old man grabbed her cell phone from her hand as the subway doors were closing at the Park Place Station. Police searched the area but were unable to find the thief. There was no tracking software on the phone. The stolen phone was a Samsung S3 valued at $700.

Two-Wheeled Thief

Another Bike Gone A man’s bicycle was stolen on North End Avenue. At 11:30 AM on Sunday, October 13, a 32-year-old man parked and locked his bicycle on North End Avenue. When he returned at 3:45 PM, he found the bike and lock missing. There were no witnesses to the incident, but video may have captured the theft. The stolen bike was a Rocky Mountain Altitude 70 with a Lezyne pump attached, a total value of $3,000.

A man on a bicycle stole a visitor’s cell phone. At 11:59 PM on Wednesday, October 9, a woman in New York City for two days from Narraburdan, Australia was dropped off by a taxi at the corner of Spring Street and Greenwich Street. She walked eastbound on Spring toward Thompson and stopped, possibly at Sixth Avenue, to check her phone for directions. Just then, an unknown man on a bicycle came from behind on her left side on the sidewalk, snatched her phone from her left hand, and fled eastbound on Spring Street. Police searched the area but could not locate the thief. The stolen phone was an iPhone 4S costing $600.

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NEWS School Under Strain Continued from page 1

.com STRAUS MEDIA  MANHATTAN PRESIDENT Jeanne Straus EDITOR IN CHIEF Kyle Pope EDITOR Megan Bungeroth • editor.otdt@strausnews.com CITYARTS EDITOR Armond White • editor.cityarts@strausnews.com STAFF REPORTERS Joanna Fantozzi, Daniel Fitzsimmons FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS Alan S. Chartock, Bette Dewing, Jeanne Martinet, Malachy McCourt, Angela Barbuti, Casey Ward BLOCK MAYORS  Ann Morris, Upper West Side Jennifer Peterson, Upper East Side PUBLISHER Gerry Gavin • advertising@strausnews.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHERS Seth L. Miller, Ceil Ainsworth, Kate Walsh ADVERTISING MANAGER Matt Dinerstein CLASSIFIED ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Stephanie Patsiner DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Joe Bendik OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN is published weekly Copyright © 2013 by Straus Media - Manhattan, LLC 212-868-0190 • 333 Seventh Ave, New York, NY. Straus Media - Manhattan publishes Our Town • The West Side Spirit • Our Town Downtown Chelsea Clinton News • The Westsider To subscribe for 1 year, please send $75 to OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN, c/o Straus News 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918 PREVIOUS OWNERS HAVE INCLUDED: Tom Allon, Isis Ventures, Ed Kayatt, Russ Smith, Bob Trentlion, Jerry Finkelstein

Do you have a news tip, story idea, nomination for “mayor of your block,” complaint or letter to the editor? We want to hear from you! Please contact us at News@strausnews.com. PAGE 4

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locate an early college program in the UNHS building has not gone down well with school parents and local leaders, who say the building is too small and beleaguered to accommodate another program. “The way they did all this was a disaster,” said Haydee Felix, president of the parents association at University Neighborhood High School on the Lower East Side. In New York’s cash-strapped school system, co-locations -in which two and sometimes more schools are combined in the same building -- are becoming more common. But they also are straining the system, as UNHS shows. The DOE said the school was targeted as a co-location site because, according to department standards, it could fit more students. It currently has a little over 300 enrolled while the department’s target capacity for the building is 700 students. The early-college program would add 75 to 85 students beginning next school year, continuing until the 2019-20 school year, by which time it will have added approximately 500 new students to the building. The department said programs like these are in high demand across the city and the one at UNHS offers students interested in advertising careers a chance to earn an associate’s degree at no cost to them or their families. City Councilwoman Margaret Chin came out against the proposal at a rally with parents in August and gave testimony condemning the plan at a recent PEP hearing. After the co-location vote, Chin said she’s disappointed the panel decided to ignore the concerns and needs of the UNHS community. “Together, students, parents, teachers and staff proved time and time again that UNHS has neither the space nor resources to support a co-location without sacrificing the quality of education that our students deserve,” said Chin. “Although the vote on October 15 was a setback, we will continue to fight this misguided proposal through every platform possible.” Opponents believe the co-location at UNHS will lead to increased class size and overcrowding in the school, which will negatively affect the quality of education students receive. Felix said her daughter is a senior this year, and so won’t be affected by the co-location at UNHS, but that she’s continuing to oppose the proposal for the other students and parents. “Because [the students] are very concerned about this,” said Felix. “They know they’re not going to get the same quality time with the teachers in order to improve.” Felix said the DOE hasn’t communicated to UNHS principal Elizabeth Collins which floors and classrooms they’ll need for their new students. Collins could not be reached for comment. “I’m in the dark as well,” said Felix. “They haven’t presented

anything at all to us.” Of the extra classrooms that do exist at UNHS, Community Education Council acting chairwoman Lisa Donlan said they’re used for one-on-one counseling with special needs students and that’s there’s not enough of them to accommodate another high school. The lack of space, according to Donlan, Felix and others who oppose the plan, along with the building’s infrastructure issues, make the DOE’s choice seem unwise in their eyes. She said despite these concerns, she’s not surprised the PEP voted to co-locate at UNHS. “The PEP, everyone knows, is a rubber stamp. Although that’s not fair to rubber stamps because even rubber stamps leave an impression,” said Donlan. “The PEP doesn’t even acknowledge really that there’s any problems… these things get handed down and they get passed without any scratching below the surface.” Donlan said UNHS is really starting to take off, referring to their most recent DOE grade of a B, up from a D rating in 2011. UNHS anticipates scoring an A for the 2013-14 school year. “They’ve been able to really wrap their arms around what they need to do in order to get more and more students to achieve,” said Donlan. “So this is a school that’s really doing more with less, and you wonder then how are they going to continue with even less, and that’s really the concern. And that’s what the DOE hasn’t been able to make clear to us.” The unanimous vote to co-locate at UNHS, along with the approval of 22 other co-location proposals, came at an Oct. 15 PEP meeting at Prospect Heights Campus in Brooklyn. At the meeting, Democratic nominee for Public Advocate Letitia James promised to take legal action against the panel - which has never rejected a city proposal over their decisions once in office. “I urge all of you in anticipation of litigation to save your emails,” said James, addressing the panel amid raucous applause from other attendees. “This is a legal notice to all of you that there will be litigation, I can promise you that as the next Public Advocate.” Mayoral hopeful Bill De Blasio has also indicated he’d consider overturning or re-examining decisions made by the PEP under the Bloomberg administration. Email requests to tour UNHS were not returned by the DOE. The PEP did not return a request for comment. “We don’t see room for 500 more students,” said Donlan. “Basically, the UNHS building is inadequate for the needs of the students who are there now. How are you going to go from just over 300 to almost 800 students? What is that going to look like? How is that space going to get used? And [the DOE] hasn’t really said anything, and that’s where our concerns are.”

Lower East Side school co-location: What’s at stake

• New program to add 75-85 new students/year through 2019-20, 500 total • 800 students total in building by 2019 • Parents, community leaders say the building is beleaguered and small, originally designed as an elementary school.

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OUT & ABOUT

Friday October 25th

Spooky Stories to Frightfully Delight!

Candlelight Ghost Tours

Battery Park City Parks Conservancy Between Warren Street and Murray Street, east of River Terrace 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free Entering Teardrop Park through winding paths and sitting on the green hilltop, listeners are transported to the far corners of the earth as storyteller LuAnn Adams spins spellbinding tales of the natural world and its amazing creatures, real and fanciful. The Alice Farley Dancers will be performing. http://www.bpcparks. org or 212-267-9700

Merchant’s House Museum 29 East 4 Street $40 6:00 p.m. and later Creep through this historical recreation of old-world New York and discover the ghouls, mysteries and haunted happenings that simply won’t go away. The tour guide will mix history and horror as you sneak through rooms of the fantastical murders of centuries gone by. http://www.merchantshouse.org/

FALL/FEST with the Polka Brothers

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4-8 p.m. Free Live music from the Polka Brothers Friday, October 25th at our Front/Row Stage for Fall/Fest. The Polka Brothers boast a fearless repertoire that includes polka favorites, pop and rock gone polka, and unforgettable originals. http://southstreetseaport.com

Saturday October 26 Big Apple Chorus

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Tribeca Performing Arts Center 199 Chambers Street 7:30 p.m. $25-$60 The Big Apple Chorus is celebrating 30 years of entertaining audiences worldwide. International Gold Medal winning quartets, Storm Front and Old School, along with District Medalist quartet Up All Night and the Westchester Chordsmen chorus will be performing. www.tribecapac.org

Sale of this business will include real estate brokerage, license trade mark with U.S. government protection as well as local, state and federal taxes all current and in good standing. E. Osborne Smith Development Corporation will also be included in the sale of E. Osborne Smith, Inc. The buyer will own 100% of the company stock, free and clear of any obligations and will be part of one of New York’s oldest, most recognized and admired real estate names.

Sunday October 27 Taste of the Seaport 214 Front Street $30-$100 One year after Hurricane Sandy, Lower Manhattan comes together to support local merchants and PS 397 Spruce Street School at our annual outdoor fall festival of food, beverage, live music, and family-friendly activities on the cobblestone streets of New York City’s Historic Seaport. All proceeds go to enrichment programs for Spruce Street School, PS397 http://www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/487503

Monday October 28th Bach at One Trinity Wall Street 209 Broadway 1 p.m. free The Choir of Trinity Wall Street and Trinity Baroque Orchestra offer a weekly service featuring the music of Johann Sebastian Bach’s cantatas. Conducted by Julian Wachner, Trinity’s Director of Music and the Arts, these services present Bach’s monumental cantata output in a liturgical context, returning these miniature oratorio-like works to their original purpose. www.trinitywallstreet.org

Please send inquiries to arweiner1@gmail.com PAGE 6

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


OUT & ABOUT

Tuesday October 29th Book Discussion Group - “The House of Spirits� by Isabel Allende,� Battery Park City Library 175 North End Avenue 6:15 p.m. Free Come discuss the critically acclaimed author’s first novel. Nypl.org

Wednesday October 30th Art History Alive: France’s Fascinating Art Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts 1 Pace Plaza $25 Travel vicariously through the ages as these richly illustrated lectures examine the highpoints of architecture, sculpture, painting, and decorative arts in France, from the late Middle Ages through Post-Impressionism, approximately 1000-1900. http://schimmel.pace.edu

Battery Park City Library Halloween Party! 175 North End Avenue 4 - 5 p.m. Free Join us for face painting, spooky games, scary story time, creepy crafts, a costume parade, and other surprises! Feel free to wear your costume. For the entire family! (212) 790-3499

Fall can take your breath away.

SO CAN PANDORA’S AUTUMN COLLECTION.

Village Halloween Parade 7 p.m. Free Every year, more than 50,000 folks parade up Sixth Avenue—decked out in some of the City’s scariest, most innovative and most hilarious costumes—while numerous live bands complement the ghoulish revelry. Come up with a creative costume of your own and join the festivities, or take it all in from the sidelines. http://www.halloween-nyc.com/

Wonder of Wonders: A Cultural History of Fiddler on the Roof Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust 36 Battery Place 7 p.m. $15 Author Alisa Solomon in conversation with screenwriter and playwright Tony Kushner. Solomon explores how Sholem Aleichem’s “Tevye the Milkman� was reborn on Broadway and became a cultural touchstone for people around the world. www.mjhnyc.org

Thursday October 31 Bride of Frankenstein Hudson Park Library (66 Leroy Street) 2-4 p.m. Free Just in time for Holloween today. Borus Karloff is the one and only Frankenstein and he is seeking his mate. Hide yourself ladies from this ultimate classic! About 90 mins. http://www.nypl.org

Canstruction’s 21st Annual NYC Competition Brookfield Place Winter Garden at 220 Vesey Street Lobby at 200 Vesey Street 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. Free Teams of architects, engineers, contractors, and the students they mentor will compete to build large-scale structures made entirely out of unopened cans of food and then are dismantled and donated to City Harvest for distribution to those in need. http://brookfieldplaceny. com#sthash.14ES97Pl.dpuf

7"ROADWAYp3OHO .9# 212.226.3413 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

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PAGE 7


Ghost Tours & Pumpkins Continued from page 1

Merchant’s House Museum 29 East Fourth Street 212-777-1089 merchantshouse.org

From Parlor to Grave: 1865 Funeral Reenactment and Graveyard Procession Oct. 27, 4:30 to 6 p.m. $50 In the 19th century, death and funerals took place at home. Join us in the Museum’s double parlors as we recreate the 1865 funeral service of Seabury Tredwell and discuss the funerary customs of 19th century New York City. After the service, mourners follow the coffin to the nearby New York City Marble Cemetery – rarely open to the public – for the graveside service and cemetery talk. 19th century mourning attire encouraged.

Candlelight Ghost Tours Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear the newest tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. 6 p.m. (includes 4th floor Servants’ Quarters) $40; 6:30, 7, 7:30 p.m. $25; 8, 8:30, 9 p.m. $30; 9:30 p.m. (includes 4th floor Servants’ Quarters) $40;

Tales of the Supernatural: Horror on Hallowe’en

$25 Thursday, October 31, Performances at 7 & 8:30 p.m Dramatic readings from 19th century Gothic literature and true ghost stories as reported by visitors of the Merchant’s House through the years told in the Museum’s parlors set for a Victorian funeral.

Screamin’ Green Halloween Battery Park City Winter Garden and Waterfront Plaza, 220 Vesey Street Oct. 27 noon-3pm FREE The event will offer activities for families like bobbing for apples . There will be other art projects, spooky story telling, a costume swap, puppeteers, and a Ghosts & Goblins Parade around Battery Park City led by a marching band at 3pm.

Fishbridge Park Halloween Parade Dover Street between Water Street and Pearl Street Oct. 31, 6pm Kids and Parents will meet in a spookilydecorated park and parade around the Seaport neighborhood getting treats.

Washington Market Park Halloween Parade and Party Chambers and Greenwich Streets Oct.27, 1-3pm FREE The costume parade will lead to games and arts and crafts in the park, including a lie

concert.

Citibabes Halloween Spooktacular

Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade Tompkins Square Park Dog Run, 9th Street between Avenues A and B Oct.26 12-3pm FREE Bring your dressed up doggies and register to compete for prizes, get free dog treats, and maybe adopt another furry friend.

Haunted High Line Halloween Tenth Avenue between 14th and 17th Streets Oct.26, 11am-3pm FREE A giant ghost train, haunted tunnel, and trick or treating awaits!

52 Mercer Street, between Broome and Grand Streets, 3rd Floor Music, spooky storytime, cupcake decorating, crafts, face painting and a professional photographer will be on hand to welcome little ones.

For parents who want to go out the weekend before: Family Friendly Drop-Off Halloween Pajama Parties Project

Harvest Festival Gansevoort Plaza, Gansevoort Street and Ninth Avenue FREE Oct.26 10am-4pm Enjoy treats from local restaurants, face painting, storytelling, live music, and arts and crafts.

Hometown Halloween 74 Trinity Place between Rector and Thames Streets Oct.31 3-7:30pm FREE There will be trick-or-treating in the church graveyard and a screening of the original silent 1920’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, accompanied by organ, in the church at 6pm.

Ages 2-6 Halloween themed parties, let the kids come celebrate in costume so parents can enjoy a night out. There are Halloween themed crafts, dessert, and games to play. Each child also receives a gift bag at the end of the night with some Halloween treats! Date: Friday October 25th Location: Kidville Upper West 466 Columbus Ave 6:30pm-9:30pm Date: Saturday October 26th Location: Citibabes Soho 52 Mercer St. 5:30pm-8:30pm Date: Saturday November 2nd Location: Playgarden Tribeca 95 Franklin St. 5:30pm-8:30pm

Costumes & Candy Local kids and their families flocked to the Madison Square Park kids harvest festival last weekend, donning costumes and taking part in Halloween activities. Photos by Mary Newman

Nathan and Julianne, 2 year old twins

Jasmine, 7 and Evan, 6 PAGE 8

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

Gisele, 4

Jack, 2 and Grace, 3 months www.nypress.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


NEWS

The Economics of the Street Fair view or Mardis Gras, which makes it easier for small businesses. Often, vendors receive discounts if they sign up for multiple fairs, which explains why residents sometimes complain that all of the street fairs look alike. “A lot of people don’t By Joanna Fantozzi choose to go these fairs because New York has too many and they’re very cookie cutter,” he scene is familiar to anyone liv- said Suzanne Wasserman, a historian and the ing downtown: Over here you see director of the Gotham Center for New York a woman blending fruit to make History. smoothies. Over there is a guy The solution to this, said Wasserman is to selling what may or may not be cater toward small businesses. Another opdesigner sunglasses, and right next to him is tion is to have more unique street fairs and the infamous “Zeppole! Fried Snickers! Italian festivals- like the Bastille Day feast in Bryant Sausage!” truck, which smells like a combinaPark over the summer, where only French tion of sweet fried dough and sizzling meat. food, drink and products are sold. Another is It’s autumn in New York, which means the Ukrainian Festival, which takes place on street fairs are out in force. 7th Street between 2nd and To understand why they 3rd Avenues which features Street Fairs: By the seem so ubiquitous, despite traditional Ukrainian food, recurrent complaints from costumes and dancing. Even Numbers residents and some local for non-ethnic festivals, the City revenue from business people, you have to trick is to not give in to the street fair licenses: understand this: street fairs temptation of the mozzarepa. $7,834,000 are big business. The City of “Our festival is artisan, and New York generates nearly $8 Number of street it is not one of these events million from street fair perwhich has a swath of fried fairs: 245 in 2013 mits – paid by the companies food booths- our foods are Average city revenue that produce them. (Three healthful and interesting,’ said per fair: $31,975.51 companies are behind more Paul Weingarten, a reprethan half of all the street fairs sentative from the upcoming in the city.) American Crafts Festival at Given that there are exLincoln Center. pected to be 245 of the fairs by “For the most part, we suffer from street year’s end, that comes to $31,975.51 in revenue fairs,” said Ira Goller, owner of Murray’s for the city -- per fair. Sturgeon Shop. “There’s no traffic, and the foot Randi Horwitz, an Upper West Side resident traffic is in the middle of the street.” who owns Social Eyes NYC, which offers a Goller said that about a decade ago, he comprehensive list of street fairs, is a fan of the used to participate in street fairs just to keep fairs. She said that this year, she has seen more his storefront open, but then the city said small businesses at fairs than ever before. that any vendor needed a health permit, even “There’s not too many mom and pop shops left restaurants and shops that already had permits around here, so fairs and festivals are the only for their brick and mortar storefronts, so he chance small businesses have,” said Horwitz. stopped. For small businesses, the cost of setting up But not every business rains on the street shop at a street fair is relatively small, between fairs’ parades. Nina Chopra, who owns KC $150 and $375, depending on what you’re sell- Signature Jewelry on Lexington and 56th, ing and how much space you’re seeking. When she will always participate in the street fairs compared to the cost of renting retail space because they’re great for business. in the city -- $20,000 a month, on average, for “I want to show people my products so that 1,700 square feet -- it’s easy to see why vendors they will come inside my store,” said Chopra. flock to them. In busy East Midtown, Chopra owns one of Vendors can now register online with any the few small businesses in the area. “We get of the major festival production companies, lots of customers from these street fairs.” including Mort and Ray Productions, Clear-

Curious why they seem to be everywhere downtown? Millions of dollars in city revenue may be an answer

T

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

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*New England Journal of Medicine, August 4, 2011.

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PAGE 9


NEWS

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Seaport Block Party Kicks Off Revival Businesses long closed after Sandy have finally reopened and hope to keep up community support By Helaina Hovitz

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PAGE 10

Find out what makes PCS the ideal academic  school for children pursuing challenging goals  that may sometimes require time away from school.

n Saturday, October 19, a block party was held to celebrate the re-opening of several restaurants and small businesses forced to stay closed for nearly a year after SuperStorm Sandy hit. The celebration featured old-fashioned carnival games, bands, dancers, costume-clad actors, seafood, Sailors’ Valentine demonstrations and more on traffic-free cobblestone streets. Neighborhood favorites Keg 229, Bin 220, The Paris Café, and SUteiShi, officially reopened for business over the weekend. Peter O’Connell, owner of the Paris Café, said that business has been booming since they reopened last Thursday night, and that it has been almost entirely community support. “Since the Seaport is closed, we know that these are all locals that have been coming out to support us,” said O’Connell. “Now, we just need the city to finish up construction work on the Piazza, but that’s going to be at least another year.” The celebration came two days after ground was broken on the new Pier 17 Mall, under construction by the Howard Hughes Corporation. On Friday, Howard Hughes made a $60,000 pledge to the Old Seaport Alliance, a nonprofit merchants’ association founded in the wake of Hurricane Sandy by the business owners within the historic South Street Seaport neighborhood.



November 5,Tuesday 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

Dancing through Life, Living through Dance PCS alumni, including NYCB principals  Tiler Peck & Robert Fairchild, talk about the  journey from school to careers, in and out of dance

November 18, Monday 6 to 8:00 p.m. OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

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“We just received support from Howard Hughes, that was a surprise,” said Council Member Margaret Chin. “We’re happy, because we want to be able to support the small business fighting to come back from the storm last year.” With help from the Mayor’s Office of the City of New York, the Downtown Alliance and the New York City Department of Small Business Services, the Old Seaport Alliance hopes to promote local businesses and enrich the community through increased programming of the public spaces with events, markets and more. Additionally, the Downtown Alliance has created a program to help brand the district and accurately represent the authenticity and vitality of the 12-block-district. Amanda Byron, owner of the Salty Paw at 38 Peck Slip, said that reopening felt like running a marathon and coming in first place. “It’s amazing to finally cross the finish line and get things up and running. The Old Seaport Alliance is a good thing created out of a very bad situation, and will hopefully help put the Old Seaport back on the map,” she said. ”We hope to make this a place people would like to come to, like the Meatpacking District or Tribeca.”

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


NEWS

Body Art, Like Wedding Vows, Written in Permanent Ink By Adam Janos

T

attoo artist Grant Lubbock, 28, doesn’t do uncertainty. For Lubbock, life is a series of decisive gut-checks: feel, react, and repeat – ad infinitum – until death ends

the cycle. It’s that attitude that drew him to teach himself how to tattoo on his own leg. It’s what moved him from his home state of California to New York and open Red Baron Ink at 621 East 11th Street last October. And it’s what sent him flying headfirst into marriage a mere five months after his first date with Giselle Azcona, native New Yorker, this March. “When you know, you know,” Lubbock says with a nonchalant shrug. When Azcona, also 28, met Lubbock, she was equally certain. In fact, she popped the question. The couple met at Blackbird, an East Village watering hole down the block from Lubbock’s tattoo parlor, and as the days melted into months, Azcona became more and more certain of the permanence of their partnership. “I was at home, just lying in bed, and I realized that I knew it wasn’t ever going to get any better than this,” Giselle says. She sent him a text asking if he’d marry her; five days later they tied the knot at City Hall, and Azcona became Giselle Lubbock.

Now, the couple runs Red Baron Ink together; they’ve turned the 230 square foot space into their own intimate, entrepreneurial nook of the city, creating a warmth through soft candle lighting, which illuminates the homespun folk art on the walls. “We want it to feel like your living room,” Grant says. A living room not just for the those coming for tattoos, but for the artistic community at large. And so Giselle and Grant have decided to open up their wall space to local artists. The couple invites visual artists in the area to contact the store owners to have their work hung and sold in the tattoo parlor. All the proceeds from the sales go straight to the artists. As for those New Yorkers interested in becoming the canvas themselves, the Lubbocks tattoo pricing averages out to $150 per hour, though for more labor-intensive work, discounted rates may apply. For the winter holidays; shoppers will be able to buy gift cards to the parlor at cut rates ($150 for a $200 tattoo, $300 for a $400 tattoo, etc.), that they can then give over to friends. Whether or not those friends want to cash in will, of course, depend on their mentality around body art. “There are three types of clients,” Grant asserts. “First there are the confident people, the ones who know they want it, and have known for a while. Then there are the spur-of-themoment people, who have decided on the spot this is something they’re interested in. Finally, there’s the one percent.” The uncertain one percent. The people

who aren’t sure. “If I can see it in their eyes, that doubt… I send those people home,” says Grant. Don’t count Grant or Giselle in that uncertain category. After getting married, the couple got “Til death do us part” tattooed onto their hands. The piece was done in Giselle’s handwriting; Grant worked the needle, as he does for all the body art on his own body. But how do you know you want something on your body forever? How do know your tastes and feelings won’t change? “It needs to mean something,” Giselle says. “The other day, a woman got a tattoo portrait of her dog. That’ll always mean something to her, you know? And as soon as Grant and I met, it was like… could we have waited? Of course we could’ve. But why?” “Carpe diem,” Grant adds. “Sieze the day, baby,” agrees Giselle. “Why not?” Follow Adam Janos on Twitter: @AdamTJanos Local artists interested in displaying their work at Red Baron can contact Grant and Giselle at redbaroninknyc@gmail.com.

Grant and his wife Giselle

Is there a local business in your neighborhood that you’d like to see us write about? Email news@ strausnews.com with the name and contact information of your favorite local shop.

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Grant Lubbock designs at his shop. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

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PAGE 11


STREET SHRINK

ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL

Why do people give into bad behavior if it makes them uncomfortable? -Micah spite voicing hesitations, anger, and extreme agitation, the “teacher” continued to administer shocks after the experimenter stated “it is The interesting part about hurequired that you continue” or “you have no man behavior is that we can pose other choice, you must go on.” When Milgram hypotheticals all we want, but we may never made predictions of how the study would know how we would react until faced with unfurl, he assumed that most participants a particular taxing situation. On the whole, would refuse to continue the experiment most people would state that they are intrinsiearly on. However, a whopping 65 percent of cally benevolent. But then why do good people participants discharged the maximum level of sometimes commit questionable behavior? shocks to the “student.” All participants were Stanley Milgram, who was a renowned social debriefed after the study and were relieved psychologist, found that when to learn that no one was actually The experimenter’s harmed. placed under extraordinary pressure by authority, good peo- words were enough This study has been used as a ple sometimes exhibit shocking benchmark for the level humans to make people and ignoble behavior. ignore their moral potentially reach when faced with Milgram’s now infamous obepressure by authority figures. imperative and dience study asked participants Though the experimenter did not to take on the role of “teacher” inflict ostensible say anything more than “you must and administer a learning and harm on another go on,” those words were enough memory test to “students.” The to make people ignore their moral human. teachers could hear the students’ imperative and inflict ostensible answers but could not visually harm on another human. What see them, and was asked to administer shocks the Milgram experiment shows is that we’re to the students for wrong answers. In reality, awfully influenced by external social presno one was being shocked - the students were sure, especially when it comes from someone confederates of the study, which means that we deem more powerful or dominant. In the they were employed researchers posting as acMilgram studies, a social situation had more tual participants. The shock levels ranged from sway over behavior than a person’s personality slight shock, moderate shock, severe shock, to characteristics. People demonstrated empathy, presumably the highest level of shock, titled but that wasn’t enough to stop them from “xxx.” inflicting shocks. When a student stated the wrong answer, Later, Milgram replicated this study but had the “teacher” was told by the experimenter, one significant change. Alongside the “teachdonning a lab coat, to administer a shock to er,” Milgram placed another “teacher.” But this the “student.” As the study progressed and the time, one of the “teachers” was also a confed“student” began to miss more correct answers, erate posing for the study and acted rebellious, the “teacher” had to increase the level of refusing to go along with the study. At the shocks. At the lower level of shocks, “teachers” sight of someone else’s refusal, the participants could hear the “students” complain or grunt also refused to continue. Much can be taken loudly. But as the level of shocks increased, so away from Milgram’s study — namely, to be did their pleas to be released. Eventually some cognizant of how social pressure impacts your of the “students” began to complain of heart behavior. It’s important to listen to your own pain and yelled in desperation to be released. moral code — especially when that code tells Though it was noted that the participants you to flip the shock switch off. in the “teacher” role were uncomfortable Street Shrink Kristine Keller received her proceeding, they continued to administer the Masters in Psychology from New York Univershocks at the demand of the experimenter. De- sity.

A

PAGE 12

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

Is Politics Cyclical? If history repeats itself, the city is due for a big shift in leadership By Tom Allon

H

istorians often point out that political movements work in cycles. After a few terms of Republican presidents, for example, we often see a shift to a Democratic President, like when Obama followed Bush junior and Bill Clinton defeated Bush senior (who succeeded Ronald Reagan). Voters, particularly in a recession, yearn for change and hope that a shift to the other party will bring more prosperity. Generally, it is true that people vote with their pocketbooks, and with the global economic stagnation, we’ve seen more tumult and turnover in leadership around the world in recent years. Here in New York City, we’re also witnessing the pendulum swing back quite dramatically to a likely populist and selfstyled “progressive” mayor, who differs significantly in tone, style and priorities from his two predecessors, Mike Bloomberg and Rudy Giuliani. After 20 years of Republican (albeit of the Liberal variety) mayors, we now are likely to have a very-left-of-center Democrat, Bill de Blasio, running our city. After 20 years of proactive policing and a record drop in all crime categories, many New Yorkers feel that the high price of diminished civil liberties outweighs the decrease in crime statistics. Time will tell whether de Blasio and his new police commissioner will be able to balance a new approach to policing (specifically with a deemphasis on “stop and frisk”)

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and still keep New York the safest large city in the country. The middle class and members of New York’s labor unions will finally have a friend and champion in de Blasio. But here, again, he will have to walk a fine line between being fair with city workers salary increases and the need to assure New York’s business community that our already large tax burden will not increase in the next four years. Was this pendulum shift to a left-of-center mayor inevitable because of the cycles of history? I’ll leave that deep question to the historians and pundits who have a broader view of political cycles. But recall that in 1993 the major issue in the city was crime, and that’s why former crusading U.S. Attorney Rudy Giuliani defeated David Dinkins. In 2001, it was stability and the need to calm Wall Street in the wake of 9/11 that led to the election of billionaire Mike Bloomberg. In 2013, it seems that income inequality, the controversial policing policy of “stop and frisk” and a general yearning for change will propel likely winner Bill de Blasio to City Hall. Where will the pendulum swing over the next 4 to 8 years as de Blasio attempts to put his stamp on the city? Stay tuned. It should be an interesting ride. Tom Allon, the president of City and State, NY, is a former Liberal Party-backed candidate for Mayor. Questions or comments? Tallon@cityandstateny.com.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


cityArts

Edited by Armond White

New York’s Review of Culture . CityArtsNYC.com

Can’t Trust It 12 Years a Slave uses sadistic art to patronize history By Armond White

B

rutality, violence and misery get confused with history in 12 Years a Slave, British director Steve McQueen’s adaptation of the 1853 American slave narrative by Solomon Northup, who claims that in 1841, away from his home in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., he was kidnapped and taken South where he was sold into hellish servitude and dehumanizing cruelty. For McQueen, cruelty is the juicyarty part; it continues the filmmaker’s interest in sado-masochistic display, highlighted in his previous features Hunger and Shame. Brutality is McQueen’s forte. As with his fine-arts background, McQueen’s films resemble museum installations: the stories are always abstracted into a series of shocking, unsettling events. With Northup (played by Chiwetel Ejiofor), McQueen chronicles the conscious sufferance of unrelenting physical and psychological pain. A methodically measured narrative slowly advances through North’s years of captivity, showcasing various injustices that drive home the terrors Black Africans experienced in the U.S. during what’s been called “the peculiar institution.” Depicting slavery as a horror show, McQueen has made the most unpleasant American movie since William Friedkin’s1973 The Exorcist. That’s right, 12 Years a Slave belongs to the torture porn genre with Hostel, The Human Centipede and the Saw franchise but it is being sold (and mistaken) as part of the recent spate of movies that pretend “a conversation about race.” The only conversation this film inspires would contain howls of discomfort. For commercial distributor Fox Searchlight, 12 Years a Slave appears at an opportune moment when film culture--five years into the Obama administration--indulges

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

stories about Black victimization such as Precious, The Help, The Butler, Fruitvale Station and Blue Caprice. (What promoter Harvey Weinstein has called “The Obama Effect.”) This is not part of social or historical enlightenment--the too-knowing race-hustlers behind 12 Years a Slave, screenwriter John Ridley and historical advisor Henry Louis Gates, are not above profiting from the misfortunes of African-American history as part of their own career advancement. But McQueen is a different, apolitical, art-minded animal. The sociological aspects of 12 Years a Slave have as little significance for him as the political issues behind IRA prisoner Bobby Sands’ hunger strike amidst prison brutality 12 Years a Slave visualized in Hunger, or the McQueen’s harshness was trending among pervy tour of urban “sexual Festivalgoers (in Toronto, Telluride and New addiction” in Shame. McQueen takes on the York) suggests that denial still obscures the slave system’s depravity as proof of human history of slavery: Northup’s travail merely depravity. This is less a drama than an inhumake it possible for some viewers to feel good mane analysis--like the cross-sectional cut-up about feeling bad (as wags complained about of a horse in Damien Hirst’s infamous 1996 Spielberg’s Schindler’s List as an “official” Homuseum installation “Some Comfort Gained locaust movie--which very few people went to From the Acceptance of the Inherent Lies in see twice). McQueen’s fraudulence further acEverything,” customs moviegoers to violence and brutality. Because 12 Years of Slave is such a The very artsiness of 12 Years a Slave repulsive experience, it proves the ahistorical is part of its offense. But good art doesn’t work ignorance of this era that 12 Years a Slave’s this way. Art elates and edifies--one might constant misery is excused as an acceptable even prefer Q.T.’s jokey ridiculousness in version of the slave experience. McQueen, Django Unchained, a different kind of sadism. Ridley and Gates’ cast of existential vicMcQueen’s art-world background tims won’t do. Northup-renamed-Platt and recalls Peter Greenaway’s high-mindedness; especially the weeping mother Liza (Adepero he’s incapable of Q.T.’s stupid showmanship. Oduye) and multiply-abused Patsey (Lupita (He may simply be blind to American ambivaNyong‘o), are human whipping posts--beaten, lence about the slave era and might do better humiliated, raped for our delectation just like focusing on the crimes of British imperialHirst’s cut-up equine. But, as with The Exorcist, there is no victory ism.) Instead, every character here drags us into assorted sick melancholies--as Northup/ in filmmaking this merciless. The fact that Platt, Ejiofor’s sensitive manner makes a lousy

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protagonist; the benevolent intelligence that worked so well for him as the translator in Amistad is too passive here; he succumbs to fate, anguish and torment according to McQueen’s pre-ordained pessimism. Michael Fassbender’s Edwin Epps, a twisted slaveholder (“a nigger-breaker”) isn’t a sexy selfish lover Lee Daniels flirtatiously showed in The Butler; Epps perverts love in his nasty miscegenation with Patsey (whose name should be Pathos). Nothing in The Exorcist was more flagrantly sadistic. Some of the most racist people I know are bowled over by this movie. But 12 Years a Slave is ultimate proof that Hollywood’s respect for Black humanity is in absurd, patronizing, Oscar-winning decline. Steve McQueen’s post-racial art games and taste for cruelty play into cultural chaos. The story in 12 Years a Slave didn’t need to be filmed this way and I wish I never saw it. Follow Armond White on Twitter at 3xchair

PAGE 13


CITYARTS GALLERIES

DANCE

New Dances PLUS: Edition 2013 Wed, Dec 11 – Sat, Dec 14 at 8 = Sun, Dec 15 at 3 Peter Jay Sharp Theater Three world premiere commissions by acclaimed choreographers BRIAN BROOKS = DARRELL GRAND MOULTRIE = TAKEHIRO UEYAMA and the first United States performances of PINA BAUSCH’s Wind von West (1975) Tickets $30 available 11/6 at the Juilliard Box Office, or call (212) 721-6500 Online at www.juilliard.edu/newdances TDF accepted at the Juilliard Box Office only

DRAMA Buried Child By Sam Shepard = Daniel Fish, Director

Thu, Nov 21 – Sat, Nov 23 and Mon, Nov 25 at 8 Sat, Nov 23 at 2 = Sun, Nov 24 at 7 Stephanie P. McClelland Drama Theater at Juilliard Tickets $20 at the Juilliard Box Office TDF accepted at the Juilliard Box Office only

MUSIC Juilliard Orchestra

at Alice Tully Hall Juilliard Chamber Orchestra Sat, Nov 9 at 8 Jocelin Pan, Viola Works by Bizet, Grieg, and Tower

Jeffrey Milarsky, Conductor Fri, Nov 15 at 8 Kevin Ahfat, Piano Works by Adams, Barber, Ives, and R. Strauss

Vladimir Jurowski, Conductor Mon, Nov 25 at 8 ALL-SHOSTAKOVICH, early works

Larry Rachleff, Conductor

Nov/Dec 2013 Highlights

Juilliard

Anniversary Songs Revisiting a Costello classic 30 years on By Dennis Myers 

1

983…Elvis Costello’s Punch the Clock was born to be misunderstood and underestimated.  After all, following the incendiary explosions of his first four albums and his successful “experimentation” into Motown, club, and country western stylings, Costello had released Imperial Bedroom the prior year.  Towering in literary emotional exhaustion, that album left little wiggle room for anything else to follow.  Fitting then that Elvis’ eighth opus immediately explodes with a power pop challenge to his critics and possibly the whole world too…Let Them All Talk.  “These are the best years of your life / Now they’re here and gone.”  There’s a moment, maybe as one turns 30, when that the first burn of brutal youth flames out, and you’re left standing around your life, maybe hands down, wondering what’s now, wondering what’s left.  At 30, a time for reflection…and at 30, time to relook at this album left in the shadows.  From the obvious pun of its title on, Punch chronicles the violence brought to character by just putting in time.  Elvis wraps a collection of snapshots in a beguiling bright pop enthusiasm that flirts across the blacker heart

Thu, Dec 12 at 8 Works by Dvoák and Rachmaninoff Tickets $20 at the Alice Tully Hall Box Office, or call (212) 721-6500, Online at www.juilliard.edu/fallorch

Juilliard Historical Performance at Alice Tully Hall Nicholas McGegan conducts Juilliard415 Mon, Nov 4 at 8 Edson Scheid, Violin Dresden and Berlin: A Celebration of Two Courts 12th Annual Jerome L. Greene Concert Works by C.P.E. Bach, Benda, Pisendel, and Zelenka

Monica Huggett leads Juilliard415

of domestic dysfunction found in the home and in the nation.  In Get Happy!, he did Motown; here, Costello reinvents the catchy upbeat for Thatcher’s Britain.  Yes, “Pills and Soap’s” vitriol paints a surreal condemnation of politics and social division, but it’s the sonic near-exception in a daylight playground of power-packed TKO horns and Afrodiziak vocal-backed (Caron Wheeler and Claudia Fontaine) tunes.    Infectiously playful, the commercial standout “Everyday I Write the Book” succinctly crystallizes the album’s themes of domestic failure, love, and owning the moment.  “All your compliments and all your cutting remarks are captured here in my quotation marks.”  A novel tale of literary passion, where, if the singer can’t win the romance, at least the songwriter still owns the story.  Like “a national anthem sung in different keys,” director Don Lett’s video for Book envisions this intertwining with a scary prescience of the tragedy to be experienced by the British royal house:  a frustrated Prince Charles courts his Diana, she distracted by Douglas Fairbanks on the telly.    But by 1983 punk’s royal couple had already been put to rest with Sid’s ashes laid atop his lover fatale Nancy’s grave,  and the first suggestion set in that rock-and-roll, even in its rawest punk form, couldn’t save the world… that, in fact, later in the hands of Disney radio, rock could only sell it.  Punch the Clock skittered across the frying pan of Elvis’ critical fan’s expectations.  If we all couldn’t hear the depth for the flare, at least in “Shipbuilding” Costello crafted in melody and words the universal pain felt in the dysfunctional affairs of home and state, a haunting refrain that echoes 30 years later:   

Mon, Dec 9 at 8

With all the will in the world / Diving for dear life / When we could be diving for pearls.

Ying Fang, Soprano = Pippa Macmillan, Double Bass Works by Mozart, Sperger, and Beethoven Tickets $20 at the Alice Tully Hall Box Office, or call (212) 721-6500, Online at www.juilliard.edu/fallhistorical

Juilliard String Quartet Thu, Nov 21 at 8 Daniel Saidenberg Faculty Recital Series Works by Beethoven, Schubert, and a New York premiere by Jesse Jones Tickets $20 at the Alice Tully Hall Box Office or call (212) 721-6500 Online at events.juilliard.edu

1/2-price senior/student tickets for all concerts at the box office only

events.juilliard.edu

Elvis Costello’s Punch the Clock PAGE 14

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CITYARTS FILM

CITYARTS GALLERIES

Lives of the Saints Everlasting Album Art Binoche and Bergman make modern spiritual films

Browsing Don Hunstein’s timeless pop star photography  

By Armond White

By Marsha McCreadie  

E

Y

very Bruno Dumont film resembles an essay. He tells a story as we are accustomed to seeing in mainstream cinema but his focus on plain faces and unprepossessing behavior produces a distinct meditation-this time, in Camille Claudel 1915, on the life of sculptress Camille Claudel, protégé and former lover of Auguste Rodin and sister of the poet Paul Claudel. Dumont films Camille (played by Juliette Binoche) when she is committed to a remote asylum near Avignon during World War I, as a study that cranks-up our concentration on aspects of normalcy and oddity, sanity and health, difference and individuality, physical captivity and psychological yearning. The story of her legal confinement becomes a deepening presentation of personal travail. Dumont’s use of actual mental institution patients is more humane than the bit players in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and is part of his rigorous observation. Resisting the blandishments of commercial cinema, Dumont seems to analyze his story while telling it. Camille’s hospitalization among inmates in this wooded, medieval environment automatically raises metaphorical facets that save the film from any trite political reading. As Dumont’s concentration gets more intense it acquires imaginative richness and a close spiritual reasoning. This is Dumont’s speciality, giving him proximity to the masters of metaphysical filmmaking Bresson, Ozu, Bergman and Rossellini but in an original, distinctive style. In this era of disbelief and skepticism, Dumont’s filmmaking is so perfectly, unavoidably tough that its beauty--as when Camille sits in a courtyard and contemplates a bare, gnarled, up-reaching tree as an object in nature, a raw model for sculpture, a veritable cross--is hard won; simultaneously devastating and victorious. As in recent films Hors Satan and Hadewijch, Dumont goes for a clean, unadulterated light, making Camille Claudel 1915 visually brisk, so as not to be obviously sentimental. His meditative sensitivity is striking when Camille physically reacts to a sunny exterior or the chiaroscuro interiors with Paul (Jean-Luc Vincent), brooding and praying in his own, haunting solipsistic torment Dumont’s essayistic style, begun with La Vie

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

ou got older but they didn’t. 

Juliette Binoche in Camille Claudel 1915 de Jesus and Humanite, proposes mankind’s fallibility and struggling. “Everything shows the creature’s relation to the Creator,” the Claudel siblings are told and Dumont shows it without cruel exploitation of the asylum sufferers. He makes Camille and Paul’s agon equal to theirs--an “Alleluljah” that looks like mockery but said with sincerity and a therapeutic rehearsal of “Don Juan” by patients who could have posed for the satirist Daumier, provoking Camille’s deep anguish. Binoche’s most strikingly compassionate moments achieve Lillian Gish expressive immediacy; she and Dumont achieve a superb collaboration. It’s a welcome coincidence that Camille Claudel 1915 opens at Film Forum just as Criterion releases its boxed set “3 Films by Roberto Rossellini starring Ingrid Bergman.” This trilogy (Stromboli, Europe ‘51 and Voyage to Italy) of extraordinary urbane religious movies set the precedent for Dumont’s contemporary essays. Rossellini was similarly rigorous but used the melodramatic style of his era to complete the unprecedented transformation of a Hollywood icon into a nearly ascetic pilgrim. No question that Ingrid Bergman’s glamour holds these films together; ironically, Rossellini’s three studies of sainthood contain the most erotic portraiture of her career. Binoche’s amazing performance is a complete, unglamorous contrast to Bergman (and to Isabelle Adjani’s 1990 bio-pic Camille Claudel). She abandons herself to Camille’s stress, intelligence, pure joy and sorrow, bursting dramatic convention like Bergman’s exhortation at the end of Stromboli--the moment of revelation that Terence Malick attempted to visualize in To the Wonder. Rossellini’s saintly dramas are bold and Dumont’s are even bolder. Both artists update religious iconography for modern credulity; the result is two kinds of spiritual essays that are cinematic marvels.

See them as they were— Bob Dylan, Miles Davis, Paul Simon, Art Garfunkel, Aretha Franklin, and dozens more--in their best preserved envelope of time.  Photographs by Don Hunstein, the great “in-house photographer” for Columbia Records, are in a show encompassing 30 years, and on display 90 miles north of New York City.  For each music luminary there is that perfect instant:  on the cusp of becoming themselves, of success, even hopefulness.  Sometimes it coincides with a moment of great cultural change.  It’s all in a gallery exhibit at the Bethel Center for the Arts.   Yes, that Bethel, a showcase in many ways for the Woodstock era.  But this exhibit exceeds being a 60s time warp.   “Keeping Time: The Photography of Don Hunstein” is unique because it’s not just publicity shots, though there’s that.  We are on, but also behind, the stage.  Most will gravitate to the generation-defining, watershed image of Dylan and his girlfriend in a snowy February in the Village, used for the cover of  “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan”  in 1963.   But there are photos of a happily relaxed Dylan in his apartment, comfortable enough with Hunstein to let him into his life.   A vulnerable Barbra Streisand is hard at work recording in a series shot at the 30th  Street Studio: long hair, dark sweater, beads/ pearls, essence of early 60s.  Some of the gestures associated with the power Babs are there in embryo, yet her eagerness and baby fat cheeks are endearing.      Hunstein started working at Columbia in 1956, so this is a musical history of prerock, timeline from jazz to rock and beyond

Hunstein’s “Miles Davis, NYC, 1958”

with a few classical musicians thrown in.   There’s Charlie Mingus, Thelonius Monk, all reminders of the days when 52nd street in New York had wafting jazz inviting you into smoke-filled intimate venues.  There’s Monk alone between sets at the Blue Angel.   Coltrane serious in the studio.   My favorite is a casually shot, poignant Johnny Mathis and Pat Boone taping a car commercial together in the 1950s; contrast with Mathis’ elegant image at the L.A. Coconut Grove in 1960.   A startling, scarifying  look is in the uncredited image of “Miles” on a 1969 Rolling Stone cover, but another picture shows him looking worried, introspective, hand on forehead.     Hunstein’s work makes a sham of the current  vogue for “anybody can do it” digital photography.  Anybody can’t.  An eye is still required.  Yes, he had access, but impressively the ability to recognize, and grab, the telling moment.   Modestly, he has always said he was just doing his job.  Others have used the current drop-in compliment, documentarian.   Yet the liveliness of the images, the love (hokey, but no other word for it)  through the lens, shows his admiration for his subjects.   It also makes a lie of Susan Sontag’s proclaiming photography as voyeuristic, even  proprietorial about the images it captures: It is death,  where movies are life.  If anything, these pictures fairly leap off the page (O.K., especially those presented in sequential fashion).  You feel part of the action. (Which in some cases was your life.)   Better to see Johnny Cash becoming the “man in black” photographed from the angle of stage lights; or outdoors in a plaid shirt and straw hat; rather than trying to grasp him in the current biopic about Cash. Why go for bad reenactment when you can get real photos?   Hunstein “got” his subjects all right, if not in Sontag’s ownership way.  Nor is it about his style (fill in your own overly mannerist photog. with his/her  “look” ).   Nevertheless, the museum’s director and the show’s curator, photographer Wade Lawrence, reminds of Hunstein’s compositional skills, citing the perfectly framed image of Tony Bennett performing.        A soundtrack reflecting each decade enhances the more than 130 photographs, numerous contact prints, and 24 album covers, from the 1950s through 1983.       “Keeping Time: The Photography of Don Hunstein” is on view at the Museum at the Bethel Woods Art Center, until December 31, Thursday through Sunday, 10-5:00 pm.  $15.00. 

Follow Armond White on Twitter at 3xchair

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PAGE 15


NEWS

Lower Art Side Two neighborhood entities team up to showcase emerging LES art and artists By Daniel Fitzsimmons

F

ounders of The Lo-Down teamed up with The Yard, a co-working space on the Lower East Side, to showcase art inspired by the LES and its residents.

Andy Smith, a writer and producer with The Yard, said the space had a long-running exhibit and it was time to change things up. Traven Rice, who handles arts coverage for The Lo-Down, said her angle has always been to promote the LES art scene. For them, it simply made sense that the two enterprises team up on a show. The guidelines were simple: artwork must have been created in the Lower East Side area sometime in 2013. Our Town Downtown stopped by to speak with some of the 10 artists exhibited about their work. The show, called “Our Lower East Side,� will run at The Yard – 85 Delancey Street - through Nov. 14.

jdx – “Thousand Yard Stare� Taken with an iPhone from a window in his 10th floor apartment, the photographer known as jdx, age 38, made this photo without any filters, proving that it’s possible to get a different – and compelling – shot of a Lower East Side sunset without Instagram. jdx said it’s still possible to find beautiful moments in the city, but you have to look for them.

jdx with “Thousand Yard Stare� graphs - one of foliage taken in his hometown of Chagrin Valley, Ohio, with an antique Hasselblad film camera, and the other taken of the This piece is a combination of two photoFreedom Tower with a Nikon digital camera - that Young said symbolizes the re-birth of downtown Manhattan in the wake of 9/11. “I think there’s just something about growth and cycles and rebirth,� said Young about the piece. Young, who lived downtown on 9/11, said it’s impossible for a New Yorker to not be affected by the attacks. Making the piece was cathartic and therapeutic for him. “There was something about combining my two homes,� he said. H. Spencer Young’s “Natural Composites�

H. Spencer Young - “Natural Composites�

Marvin Pique – “Flag� and “Open Your Eyes�

*RWDQHZVWLS" :KHQ\RXFRPHDFURVVVRPHWKLQJWKDW \RXWKLQNZRXOGEHRILQWHUHVWWR\RXU QHLJKERUVZHZDQWWRNQRZ 5HDFKXVE\SKRQHRURQOLQH

Marvin Pique, 42, made “Flag� soon after moving to New York City from the Netherlands. The piece consists of newspaper clippings, “some good news, some bad,� he said, with the American flag juxtaposed on them to signify his arrival. The mixed media “Open Your Eyes� came about from Piques interest in re-arranging disparate parts of prior endeavors to form a cohesive whole, which he said is a favorite part of his process. Both pieces were made on paper that he made himself from the cardboard of banana boxes.

Marvin Pique with “Flag� and “Open Your Eyes�

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PAGE 16

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PAGE 17


RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

October 11 - 18, 2013

Zampa

306 West 13 Street

Grade Pending (43) - Cold food item held above 41º F; food worker does not wash hands thoroughly after using the toilet, coughing, sneezing, smoking, eating, preparing raw foods or otherwise contaminating hands; food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service; food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

August

359 Bleecker Street

A

Cafe Panini Mucho Gusto

551 Hudson Street

A

Jekyll & Hyde

91 Seventh Avenue

A

Tue Thai Food

3 Greenwich Avenue

A

Wallse

342-344 West 11 Street

Grade Pending (27) - Hot food item that has been cooked and refrigerated is being held for service without first being reheated to 1 65º F or above within 2 hours; cold food item held above 41º F; appropriately scaled metal stemtype thermometer or thermocouple not provided or used to evaluate temperatures of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, cooling, reheating and holding.

The Dove Parlour

228 Thompson Street

A

The Crosby Street Hotel

79 Crosby Street

A

Estela

47 East Houston Street

A

Jane

100 West Houston Street

A

Sullivan Bistro

169 Sullivan Street

Grade Pending (22) - Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan; live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Little Cupcake Bake Shop

30 Prince Street

Grade Pending (18) - Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Juice Press 7

156 Prince Street

A

Dig Inn

17 East 17 Street

Grade Pending (18) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F; cold food item held above 41º F except during necessary preparation.

Hi-Collar

214 East 10 Street

A

Num Pang

21 East 12 Street

A

Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken

28 East 1 Street

A

Restaurant Grades The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website on October 11, 2013 and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurantinspection.shtml. 10011

Pier Sixty One-The Lighthouse

000 Chelsea Piers A

Joe’s Pizza

211 Eighth Avenue

Progressive Era Association

73 Washington Place

A

Cold Process

Pier 57

A

VIP Club

20 West 20 Street

Grade Pending (16) - Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation; raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan; evidence of mice or live mice present; filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present.

La Bergamote

Aldea Restaurant

10014

Grade Pending (30) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F; cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation; evidence of mice or live mice present; food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

177 Ninth Avenue

31 West 17 Street

Grade Pending (24) - Cold food item held above 41º F; food not cooled by an approved method; food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Grade Pending (48) - Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation; personal cleanliness inadequate; sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored; food not labeled in accordance with HACCP plan.

Bocca di Bacco

167 Ninth Avenue

A

Populence

1 West 8 Street

A

Chateau Cherbuliez

47 West 20 Street

Grade Pending (33) - Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan; filth flies or food/refuse/ sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred; sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Kettle of Fish

PAGE 18

59 Christopher Street

10012

10003

A

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS Noodle Zen Cafe

31 Saint Marks Place

Grade Pending (31) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F; cold food item held above 41º F except during necessary preparation; evidence of rats or live rats present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas; evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Wendy’s

20 East 14 Street

A

Yakinku West Restaurant

218 East 9 Street

Grade Pending (18) – Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Maoz Vegetarian

59 East 8 Street

Grade Pending (18) - Cold food item held above 41º F except during necessary preparation; food not cooled by an approved method.

16 Handles

153 Second Avenue

A

Porsena

21-23 East 7 Street

Grade Pending (48) - Food not cooked to required minimum temperature; evidence of mice or live mice present; HACCP plan not approved or approved HACCP plan not maintained on premises.

Heartland Brewery

35 Union Square

Grade Pending (2) – (no critical violations)

National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park

Grade Pending (31) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F; cold food item held above 41º F; food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours; evidence of mice or live mice present.

Ukrainian Restaurant

140-142 Second Avenue

Grade Pending (49) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F; evidence of mice or live mice present; personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant.

Wichcraft

11 East 20 Street

Grade Pending (26) - Cold food item held above 41º F; food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Murray’s Falafel

261 First Avenue

Grade Pending (18) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F; evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Natori Japanese Restaurant

58 Saint Marks Place

A

Dieci

228 East 10 Street

Grade Pending (42) - Cold food item held above 41º F except during necessary preparation; evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service; sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored; wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

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PAGE 19


RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS 10009

Ten Degrees

Cherry Tavern

Dumpling Man

121 Saint Marks Place

441 East 6 Street

Address

Apt.

Sale Price

BR BA Listing Brokerage

Grade Pending (31) - Filth flies or food/refuse/ sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas; hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room; food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

123 Washington St.

#35A

$1,380,671

1

1

Shvo

123 Washington St.

#36B

$2,026,875

123 Washington St.

#41A

$1,380,672

1

1

Corcoran

123 Washington St.

#43B

$2,026,875

2

2

Corcoran

123 Washington St.

#36D

$1,264,896

1

1

Corcoran

123 Washington St.

#41B

$2,030,400

Grade Pending (23) - Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan; evidence of mice or live mice present; live roaches present; filth flies or food/ refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present.

123 Washington St.

#36A

$1,380,672

1

1

Corcoran

123 Washington St.

#43A

$1,380,672

1

1

Corcoran

123 Washington St.

#44B

$2,030,400

2

2

Shvo

15 Broad St.

#1516

$1,615,000

2

2

Douglas Elliman

15 Broad St.

#1930

$1,185,000

2

1

City Connections Realty

10 W 15 St.

#322

$410,000

0

1

Douglas Elliman

260 Park Ave. South

#12H

$2,585,000

2

2

Douglas Elliman

1

1

Douglas Elliman

100 Saint Marks Place

A

V Bar

132 First Avenue

A

Casa Gusto

199 Avenue A

A

Drom

85 Avenue A

A

Korzo Haus

178 East 7 Street

A

Neighborhood

Flatiron

Fulton/Seaport Gramercy Park

10013 Greenwich St Tavern 399 Greenwich Street

A

102 Noodles Town Restaurant

Grade Pending (18) - Filth flies or food/refuse/ sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present.

Winnie’s Bar

102 Mott Street

Greenwich Vill

104 Bayard Street Grade Pending (21) - Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan; filth flies or food/refuse/ sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present.

NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SALES Lower E Side

Reported October 11-18, 2013

254 Park Ave. South

#5R

$654,347

170 John St.

#3/4B

$1,125,000

99 John St.

#1504

$692,410

310 E 23 St.

#Res1

$417,000

321 2 Ave.

#3R

$415,000

0

1

Brown Harris Stevens

201 E 15 St.

#7B

$950,000

2

1

Douglas Elliman

312 E 22 St.

#3B

$755,000

1

2

Exit Realty Landmark

60 E 9 St.

#508

$358,333

0

1

Douglas Elliman

2 5 Ave.

#18F/G

$6,450,000

41 5 Ave.

#2A

$1,225,000

69 W 9 St.

#4D

$405,000

0

1

Corcoran

101 W 12 St.

#7M

$455,000

0

1

Stribling

67 E 11 St.

#309

$824,782

1

1

Douglas Elliman

77 Bleecker St.

#515

$710,000

1

1

Corcoran

42 W 13 St.

#2E

$625,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

417 Grand St.

#A403

$535,000

1

1

Loho Realty

530 Grand St.

#J1f

$525,000

575 Grand St.

#D103

$419,000

1

1

Halstead Property

#2G

$2,995,000

2

2

Corcoran

#4A

$1,485,000

2

2

Corcoran

Neighborhood

Address

Apt.

Sale Price

BR BA Listing Brokerage Noho

21 Astor Place

Battery Park City

333 Rector Place

#606

$2,700,000

4

3

Nestseekers

Nolita

259 Elizabeth St.

21 South End Ave.

#207

$749,000

1

2

Nestseekers

Soho

229 W 16 St.

#4Er

$413,500

1

1

Halstead Property

85 8 Ave.

#3T

$635,000

1

1

Bond New York

305 W 16Th St.

#7D

$3,234,750

140 7 Ave.

#3S

$620,000

0

1

140 W 22 St.

#5F

$1,695,000

1

257 W 17 St.

#Phcd

$9,500,000

123 3 Ave.

#7A

226 E 12 St. 77 E 12 St.

Chelsea

E Village

Financial Distri

PAGE 20

2 Charlton St.

#11A

$929,500

1

1

Halstead Property

468 W Broadway

#2F

$2,300,000

2

2

Corcoran

1

1

Douglas Elliman

3

2

Sotheby’s International

2

1

Corcoran

255 Hudson St.

#5E

$1,500,000

250 W St.

#F

$763,687

Dg Neary Realty

354 Broadway

#5

$3,870,000

2

Town Residential

52 Laight St.

#R6

$3,054,750

5

4

Douglas Elliman

155 Franklin St.

#2N

$5,870,000

$2,000,000

2

2

Douglas Elliman

405 Greenwich St.

#3

$2,585,000

#5B

$615,000

1

1

Halstead Property

200 Chambers St.

#21E+

$2,520,000

#5A

$470,000

0

1

Corcoran

100 Bank St.

#5H

$1,415,000

120 Greenwich St.

#10A

$638,000

1

1

Town Residential

652 Hudson St.

#2S

$4,650,000

15 Broad St.

#2124

$1,290,000

2

2

Cooper & Cooper

400 W 12 St.

#6D

$5,000,000

123 Washington St.

#43F

$1,425,550

1

1

Corcoran

165 Christopher St.

#3Kl

$1,275,000

2

2

Corcoran

55 Wall St.

#627

$645,000

0

1

Corcoran

22 Cornelia St.

#6

$510,000

0

1

Douglas Elliman

75 Wall St.

#36B

$1,180,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

166 Perry St.

#Ph

$10,400,000

40 Broad St.

#26B

$1,050,000

88 Greenwich St.

#411

$482,500

0

1

Douglas Elliman

3 Hanover Square

#7E

$580,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

Tribeca

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PAGE 21


CELEBRITY PROFILE

Twenty Writers’ Worth of Crime in New York City Editor and writer Jonathan Santlofer gives us a behindthe-scenes look into his collaborative crime novel By Angela Barbuti

I

t is said that the generosity of crime fiction writers exists because the authors get their frustrations out on their twisted pages. There is no better tribute to their kindness than when they use their words to benefit charity. The book Inherit the Dead was born because 20 bestselling writers in the crime fiction world took time out from other projects to contribute a chapter each to this collaboration. Editor Jonathan Santlofer saw this gracious spirit first-hand after prolific writers like Lee Child, Mary Higgins Clark, and Charlaine Harris signed on immediately. To begin what would seem like a daunting task to most, Santlofer skillfully created the story’s outline and worked with all the writers by preserving their unique styles, while creating a cohesive thriller. The royalties from the sale of the novel, which is already a bestseller after only being released on October 8th, benefit Safe Horizon, the largest victims’ service agency in the country. New York-based Santlofer, who sets the book in a penthouse on the Upper East Side, put it best when he said, “What better place for crime writers to give their money than a place that helps victims of violent crime? Here are writers who make their living out of writing about violent crime, so let’s pay back.”

How did this book come about? There was a book before this, No Rest for the Dead, that is a serial novel that Touchstone put together. I did a lot in that book, so Touchstone asked me if I’d do another, and I said I would if I could choose the authors and the charity. It’s been done before, but truthfully, I think we did the best. I’m amazed at how all these different writers just picked up the thread.

I read that all the authors were writing their individual chapters at the same time. They were. I created a story, which I kind of stole from the greats. The idea of searching for the missing heiress, very cliché, but I thought, “Let’s make it contemporary; it will be fun.” I knocked out a story of 10 pages, but then thought it was too long for the writers. I reduced it to a page and a half. I made an outline of chapters 1 through 20 and sent it to them.

Did you pick a chapter for each writer? That became too hard. For example, I had asked another writer to write that chapter about the heiress and she said, “I don’t want to write a bad girl.” And so I called Val McDermid in Scotland and said, “How do you feel about writing a bad girl?” And she said, “I am a bad girl.”

In the introduction, Lee Child writes about the legend that “crime fictions writers are the nicest of all.” Is that really true? That’s what everybody says. I came out of the art world, which is not a kind and gentle place. But the crime fiction world is. Most people are incredibly generous and nice. There’s a lot of comradery and you get to be friends.

Some writers you asked to participate didn’t come on board.

Nine of the Inherit the Dead writers, from left to right top: Jonathan Santlofer, Alafair Burke, Heather Graham, Lee Child, Brian Gruley, Lisa Unger; bottom from left to right: Mary Higgins Clark, Sarah Weinman, Linda Fairstein. PAGE 22

I was shocked; I thought everyone would say “yes.” It was really interesting to see the writers who said “yes,” and the ones who didn’t. I was really surprised when people told me they were too busy. So Lee Child isn’t busy? People make choices. I wouldn’t name the people who said “no,” but I think a lot of them are sorry that they didn’t participate. Marcia Clark, prosecutor in

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

the O.J. Simpson case, writes a chapter. She is so great. I had met Marcia once at a mystery conference. Her chapter is really funny.

How did the editing process go? I edited along with Michelle Howry at Touchstone. She was great. We didn’t always see eye to eye, but she was sensible and didn’t like when things conflicted. I didn’t mind; I thought it was sort of fun. I’ve edited a bunch of anthologies; I just love working with a lot of authors.

The NYPD is a big part of the book. Who has the police background?

Jonathan Santlofer signs a copy of the book at the launch party.

Most people learn it. In one of my other books, I wrote about a police sketch artist. I sent out an internet search and got to know all these sketch artists. You just get to meet people. I’ve gotten to know a lot of cops. And the stereotype of cops is often very wrong. They have a really hard job.

upstate that I go to. I also write in Saratoga, at a place called Yaddo - the oldest artists’ colony in the United States.

What books are on your book shelf?

How much of the book’s profit goes to Safe Horizon? People got paid a flat fee for their chapter. Every royalty that’s made is going to charity.

You studied art in college. What made you pursue writing? I went to Boston University, then I went to Pratt and got a masters. I had a really successful painting career and lost a ton of work in this big fire in a gallery in Chicago. It changed my life in an interesting way; I never would have been writing.

Your first novel, The Death Artist, became a bestseller. Were you surprised? Nobody was more surprised than me. I wrote this book, took me 10 years. I was really lucky to get attached to a really good agent. She sold it in four days and it went into twentysomething languages. It’s being developed for a movie, knock on wood.

Explain the Crime Fiction Academy that you started in the city. It’s this really intense program; the students are fantastic. We have really small classes, 8 to 10 people in a workshop. It’s already producing the next generation of great crime writers. It’s amazing.

Where do you live? Where do you find quiet places to write? I live on West 28th, the flower market, which is really noisy. I work in the back of my loft; it was a fur vault. I also have a place

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Presents the 2013

BUILDING SERVICE WORKERS

OF THE YEAR AWARDS Fred Roldan

Rudy Gonzalez

Hurley Jones

Albert Staszkiewicz

Steven Cohan

Abul Basher

Mary Rosario

Jesus Ayala

Marta Davila

Thomas Clarke

Otis Slaton

Ideniz Cintron

Eugene Amankwah

Steven Castro

Irene Love-Legendre

John Egan

Cordele Nichols

Ana Rodriguez

Proudly Sponsored By GLENWOOD B U ILD ER O W N ER M A N A G ER

BUILDING MAINTENANCE SERVICES

Formerly Cooper Square Realty


From this year’s Lower Manhattan Office Cleaner, the idea that “There’s no man above another, we’re all here to help one another” runs as a common theme throughout the stories of these remarkable people.

Welcome

Prepare to be inspired and humbled by many of the stories that follow. In profiling the 2013 Building Service workers awardees, we were struck by how many of the honorees we spoke with mentioned their passion for people Straus Media-Manhattan, the publisher of Our Town, The West and love of service to others. Side Spirit and Our Town Downtown is proud to partner with 32BJ SEIU, From a female security worker who the country’s largest property services works the nightshift and stopped a workers union in the country to rape in progress, to a window cleaner present this list. Special thanks to who was rescued by workers inside, to Hector Figueroa, Elaine Kim and a musician turned building manager, Theresa Candori at 32BJ SEIU for their these are compelling true life stories wonderful collaboration on this project. about compelling people. Thanks also to all our sponsors listed

on the following pages. And at Straus Media, shoutouts to Ceil Ainsworth, Lajla Abrams, Eliza Appleton, Gina Conti, Alissa Fleck, Megan Bungeroth, Matt Dinerstein, Sharon Gannon, Gerry Gavin, Courtney Kniffin, Mary Newman, Seth Miller, Beth Moriarty, Pete Pinto, Kate Walsh. Congratulations to all the awardees and thanks to all the men and women who work as building service workers throughout this great city to keep it running so smoothly.

Kyle Pope Editor in Chief

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PAGE 2

OUR TOWN

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

Alissa Fleck Section Editor


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Doorman of the Year - East Side Rudy Gonzalez

Watching Families Grow Keeps This Doorman Going Rudy Gonzalez has been a doorman at 1040 Park Avenue on the Upper East Side since 1996, and he says one of the most interesting things about his job is watching people go through their own lives. He has seen children born, grow up, go off to college and even start their own families. Being a father himself, Gonzalez finds pleasure in watching these families grow and expand. Gonzalez also takes great pride in serving people and giving off good energy.

What ‘s your favorite part of the job? “I see the reaction when [people] respond and they say ‘thank you’ or ‘you’ve made my day.’”

Where are your favorite places in Manhattan?

“Making

Gonzalez says two places come to mind: “I like Central Park for the unique atmosphere and all the different people there,” he says. “I also like Union Square. I like the restaurants, but also the vibe—it’s very mellow.”

[people] feel good about themselves makes me feel good.” “Making them feel good about themselves makes me feel good,” he adds.

What are your hobbies? When Gonzalez is not on the job, he spends time with his five-year-old daughter, often helping her with her homework. He also plays guitar and sings, and enjoys the fellowship of his church, particularly with family.

Photo by Mary Newman

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ʹͲͳ͵ĚĎđĉĎēČĔėĐĊėĘĔċęčĊĊĆėĜĆėĉĘ

Formerly Cooper Square Realty

Congratulations to all of the winners for a job well done! THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

www.nypress.com

PAGE 3


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Doorman of the Year - West Side Eugene Amankwah

Witness to Life Beginnings With a Dash of Humor Eugene Amankwah, a doorman at 372 Central Park West on the Upper West Side, has seen a lot in his many years on the job. He’s been around twice when women from the building were going into labor. Amankwah stepped up to the task, doing whatever he could to make them comfortable. When The West Side Spirit mentions that those experiences could be a bit hair-raising, Amankwah jokes, “If I had hair that would be hair-raising.”

What are your hobbies? “I like to write, I’ve written a pilot for a sitcom.” What Amankwah enjoys so much about writing is how, “you get to be

creative and articulate.” He also enjoys spending time with his family—his parents and sisters— the most important people in his life.

What do you like most about your job? “I feel like I lucked out with the people in this Central Park West building”. “All the people are so down-to-earth there. In a service job, people often act like you’re beneath them, but they don’t treat me like that.”

“I feel like I lucked out with the people in this Central Park West building.” “You can always catch me at TJ Maxx or Crumbs,” he says with a laugh. He doesn’t feel that his work makes him want to race straight home afterward. On winning “Best Doorman of the Year,” Amankwah notes, “I feel amazing. I was in shock when I found out I won.”

What do you do after work? “After work or during lunch break, I can be found around the neighborhood.”

Photo by Mary Newman

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OUR TOWN

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Doorman of the Year - Downtown Hurley Jones

Providing Service and Making People Smile Hurley Jones, a doorman at 270 Broadway as well as 80 Chambers, takes his job very seriously. His job means providing a full service and giving as much of himself as he can to the people in his buildings.

What do you like most about your job? “I like dealing with people and making them smile. Sometimes people are not in a good mood and I have a way of cheering them up.” “I do whatever I need to do,” he adds.

Photo by Mary Newman

Jones’s hopes are ambitious and far-reaching. He adds he would also like to see minimum wage raised and a greater focus on the environment and the issues surrounding global warming.

“Sometimes people are not in a good mood and I have a way of cheering them up.”

“There are a lot of important issues,” offers Jones.

frequents the gym and tries to stay active within the union, attending union meetings whenever possible. Jones also notes how important his friends are in his life.

What do you do when you’re not on the job?

What issues are most important in the upcoming mayoral election?

“Family definitely comes first.” Jones enjoys spending time with his 16-year-old daughter. He also

“The most important issues are homelessness, poverty, healthcare and education.”

CONGRATULATIONS T O T H E 2 0 1 3 BU I L D I N G WO R K E R S O F T H E Y E A R

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

Eugene Amankwah p. 4

Rudy Gonzalez p. 3

Doorman of the Year - West Side

Doorman of the Year - East Side

Jesus Ayala p. 11

Hurley Jones p. 5

Public School Cleaner

Doorman of the Year - Downtown

Abul Basher p. 6

Irene Love-Legendre p. 14

Security Officer of the Year

Lifesaver

Steven Castro p. 14

Cordele Nichols p. 21

Window Cleaner

Lower Manhattan Office Cleaner

Ideniz Cintron p. 11

Ana Rodriguez p. 19

Doorwoman of the Year

Midtown Office Cleaner

Thomas Clarke p. 19

Fred Roldan p. 16

Super of the Year

Lifesaver

Steven Cohan p. 21

Mary Rosario p. 8

Outer Borough Building Worker

Stadium or Theater Cleaner

Marta Davila p. 6

Otis Slaton p. 17

Porter of the Year

Longevity Award

John Egan p. 22

Albert Staszkiewicz p. 12

Building Manager of the Year

Green Award

OUR TOWN

www.nypress.com

PAGE 5


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Porter of the Year

A Family Woman Who’s All About People

Marta Davila

Marta Davila works as a porter at 700 Washington Street in the Village.

“This is a people’s job, you know.”

What do you like most about your job? “My favorite part of the job is interacting with people and the shareholders I work with.” “This is a people’s job you know,” explains Davila, perhaps surprisingly a woman of few words.

Photo by Mary Newman

time in New York City?

trying new restaurants, seeing movies and just getting away from the city.” Davila is quick to note the most important people in her life are her parents, her children and her grandchildren.

“That’s tough, but I would say Brooklyn, in general.”

What do you do when you can get away from your job?

Where do you like to spend

“When I’m not working, I like

BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Security Officer of the Year

Abul Basher

Saving Lives and Building a Sense of Community Abul Basher works as a security officer for the Royalty Realty group, which sends him on jobs throughout the city.

What are some of the craziest things you’ve seen on the job?

“I enjoy giving the right kind of help or the right answer.”

“One morning, in 2010, I found a coworker, Keith, supposedly asleep on the job. Everyone else assumed Keith was simply taking a nap, but I knew better; I was aware Keith was a diabetic and this could be more serious.” “I called, ‘Keith, wake up’ and he did not wake up,” explains Basher, who knew Keith was not one for dramatics. “I called 911, the building manager and the maintenance supervisor.” “When the ambulance came, they said in two more minutes Keith would likely have been dead.”

“I like the sense of community, as well as helping visitors feel at home.” “I enjoy giving the right kind of help or the right answer,” he explains. “I feel satisfied and proud.”

What do you do in your free time? “I am connected to so many community activities, I attend many community meetings and rallies.” Basher volunteers with an organization called Sheba, which helps new immigrants adjust to their community. He also helps kids in his neighborhood with math and physics. Basher is affiliated with numerous other organizations, and elected officials that help build a stronger and more tightly knit community. “When I have free time, I use it to help people in the community,” he explains.

Instead, he recovered fully. He talks about another instance that also springs to mind.

PAGE 6

What do you enjoy most in your line of work?

OUR TOWN

While he continues to do good work for his community, above all, Basher’s sons are the most important people in his life.

www.nypress.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

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PAGE 7


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

E S T. 1 9 11

Stadium Cleaner of the Year Mary Rosario

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“I’m always trying to better myself,” says Rosario, “I lead by example.”

“I’m always trying to better myself... I lead by example.”

Leading by example is something she picked up from one of her sisters. “She is a role model,” notes Rosario. “She has opened my eyes.”

Who is most important in your life? “My family members, including my role model younger sister, my two sons, Jose and Rafael, my fiancé, James, and my six grandchildren.”

Who do you think should be our next mayor? Rosario is rooting for Bill de Blasio because he is “family-oriented and supportive of middle- and working-class workers.”

What’s the most exciting part of your job? “I’ve seen a little bit of everything. All the celebrities...it’s so exciting.”

100 Years of Excellence

Kaufman Organization vision for the future PAGE 8

OUR TOWN

Among these celebrities are Elton John, Rod Stewart and players for the Knicks and the Rangers.

How do you spend your spare time? “I spend time with the union, but one of my favorite things to do is watch movies.” Her favorite movie is The Green Mile. “I love the story and message behind it,” she says.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


Stonehenge Management Congratulates the nominees and winners of the 2013 SEIU Local 32BJ Building Service Workers Awards We thank the loyal and hard working building workers of Stonehenge Management. Stonehenge Management is proud to be a sponsor of this prestigious event.

www.stonehengenyc.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

www.nypress.com

PAGE 9


The City University of New York congratulates

The Building Service Workers of the Year and distinguished honorees

represented by Local 32BJ of the SEIU on the occasion of the

32BJ SEIU Workers Awards OCTOBER 23, 2013 BENNO SCHMIDT

WILLIAM P. KELLY

CHAIRPERSON, BOARD OF TRUSTEES

1-800-CUNY-YES PAGE 10

OUR TOWN

INTERIM CHANCELLOR

WWW.CUNY.EDU www.nypress.com

CUNY TV-Channel 75 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Public School Cleaner Jesus Ayala

A Custodian with the Unlikeliest of Hobbies At first glance, Jesus Ayala, with his full bodysuit tattoo, might not appear a likely candidate for a favorite among parents at P.S. 118 on the Upper West Side, but that assumption would be incorrect. In fact, Ayala, who has been a custodian at the school for 13 years, takes great pride in his relationships with students and their families.

What do you like most about your job? “I love the parents here,” says Ayala, who takes pleasure in meeting new people. “I love seeing children go from K-8 and then out the door, and getting to know their families.” “All the children with special needs here are super-cool,” he adds. Ayala has also been around to see teachers get married and have children of their own. Unfortunately, Ayala has also witnessed the darker side of things life in the citiy has to offer, from knifings to even deaths.

Have you bonded with any students in particular over the years?

“I try to be there for all students equally.”

“I love seeing children go from K-8 and then out the door…”

What are your passions outside of your job?

What issues are most important to you? “Cleaners have not had a raise in eight years.” “There have been a lot of changes in the system,” says Ayala. “We’re short employees. We do the work of 20 men with five.” “When they cut our budget, we never gained an employee,” he adds. “We have to keep up our standard, we have a reputation to keep.”

“I play a lot of volleyball and spend time with my cats.” Ayala, who has three cats himself, helps find homes for strays in need of shelter. He points out he used to foster until he took in his own three who were found in the garbage. “They’re my daughters of nine years,” says Ayala. “They are my kids.” Ayala also enjoys watching people get tattooed or relaxing in front of the TV. “I’m pretty boring and basic,” he jokes.

BUILDING WORKER AWARDS Ideniz Cintron

Doorwoman of the Year

Doorwoman Who Loves Family — Residents’ and Her Own The extraordinarily humble Ideniz Cintron has been a doorwoman at the downtown Riverhouse condominium complex for over five years.

What’s the best part of being a doorwoman?

“I have seen the progression of our towns into very culturally diverse communities.”

“I must say my favorite part of the job is the residents,” says Cintron, adding she enjoys getting to know families personally and watching the children she sees regularly grow up.

and her children.”

Who is most important in your life?

Where do you like to spend your time in the City?

“My children mean everything to me; they are my world. Nothing can compare to the love between a mother

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

“I would say I’m a definite Brooklynite.”

OUR TOWN

“Born and raised,” says Cintron of her Brooklyn roots. “I have seen the progression of our towns into very culturally diverse communities.”

What are some of your favorite pastimes? “I really enjoy traveling.” In fact, when Our Town Downtown got in touch with Cintron, she was in the process of preparing for a vacation. When she is home in Brooklyn, however, Cintron likes trying new restaurants and attending shows and venues, always with her family.

www.nypress.com

PAGE 11


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Green Award Albert Staszkiewicz Exceptional Management Impeccable Reputation

An AKAM® Living Services Company

AKAM Associates, Inc., New York’s premier co-op, condo, and management company, is proud to be a sponsor of the Manhattan Media and 2013 Building Service Workers Awards. We congratulate this year’s winners, and we acknowledge the excellent work of all 32BJ SEIU members in AKAM-managed buildings and throughout New York. 260 Madison Ave., 12th Floor New York, New York 10016 212-986-0001 www.akam.com

We Honor 32BJ SEIU and congratulate the winners of the Building Service Workers of the Year Awards Photo by Mary Newman

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CONGRATULATIONS 32BJ SEIU & Award Winners! We honor your valuable service to our community.

“My job is about fixing things,” notes Albert Staszkiewicz, who has been working in the same E. 80th Street building for 20 years. Those things involve plumbing, electrical problems, leaks and other issues a building might face.

Staszkiewicz also performs cleaning and general maintenance to make sure things run smoothly in the apartments. His job involves both “small and big things,” according to Staszkiewicz.

What do you like about your job? “I like that every day is basically different and you never know what will happen. Sometimes it’s easy, sometimes, it’s hectic—that’s what keeps it interesting.”

I like that every day is basically different and you never know what will happen. “

How do you stay green on the job? “I ensure efficient and environmentallyfriendly light bulbs are used as well as surveying water efficiency, many things that are actually regulated by the city. I also use more natural chemicals.”

He adds he regularly interacts with many different kinds of people. “I was offered a job as a doorman and I declined because it’s more boring,” he says. “I like to do something with my hands, I don’t want to stand by a door and just open it.”

What do you do when you’re not fixing things? “I do outdoor activities, especially in the summer. I like hiking, swimming and climbing.” “That’s my favorite stuff,” he says, “being outdoors.”

PAGE 12

OUR TOWN

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


Congratulations to the

Building Service Workers of the Year

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

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PAGE 13


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Window Cleaner of the Year Steven Castro

A Window Cleaner Who’s Addicted to Dangling Steven Castro, a window cleaner since 1987, was first scared out of his wits by the job.

“I didn’t think I’d last long…but I pushed myself and I became accustomed to it.”

“I didn’t think I’d last long,” concedes Castro, “but I pushed myself and I became accustomed to it.” Now Castro even finds himself exhilarated by the job. “You get addicted to the high of the job,” he says. “You’ll be working on the side of a building that’s 500 feet in the air and dangling off a cable.”

Have you ever had any terrifying moments on the job? “One time my hooks detached and I was dangling from a single hook. Some workers inside the office building I was cleaning managed to pull me in through the window.”

It’s kind of fun sometimes,” he explains. “You meet regular people, but also people you might not otherwise meet, like the commissioner of the NFL and CEOs.” Castro adds he often receives helpful tips from the various people he meets.

What do you do when you’re not dangling off buildings? “It was more surreal than anything,” says Castro. “I was just thinking, did this really happen?” He adds, “You can plan for it, but in that situation, it just happened and thank god everything worked out and I didn’t get hurt.”

What’s the most enjoyable part of the job?

“I like to spend time with my dog, my kids and at church.”

What’s your favorite haunt in New York City? “My first building was 9 W. 57th Street,” he says, nostalgically. “It’s been in so many movies and it’s an awesome building, and you’ve got the park...that’s my favorite area.”

“I like all the different people you meet.

BUILDING WORKER AWARDS Irene Love-Legendre

Life Saver Award

A Life Saver Not Fazed by the Most Chilling of Late-night Circumstances Irene Love-Legendre works nightshift security at the Fountain Avenue Landfill in Brooklyn, an area long notorious for being a “body dumping ground.”

“I take pride in protecting people.”

Is your job scary? “It is scary. A couple years back a bouncer murdered a girl and dumped her body at the site.” “It’s a long strip and it’s very secluded,” she adds. “Cars hang out there and there is a lot of prostitution.” Most recently, 40-year-old Love-Legendre, armed with only a cellphone, stopped a rape in progress while on the job. “I’m always on alert,” she says. “I work alone,

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Do you enjoy your job?

OUR TOWN

at night, and you can’t see anything. The lights are dim and it’s right off the highway...people make a wrong turn and end up there, or are there for the wrong reason and you never know.” Love-Legendre adds a lot of guys like to hang out there in their cars and it’s crossed her mind that, “[she] could be a rape victim herself.” Prior to working the Fountain Avenue Landfill area, Love-Legendre worked security at both the airport and the World Trade Center.

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“I love it. It’s overnight so I can focus on my studies.” Love-Legendre is studying social science with ambitions of receiving a degree in public administration. “There is also beautiful scenery by the water; they’re trying to turn it into a park.” Above all, “[she] takes pride in protecting people.”

What do you do to unwind? “I’m very athletic, I like any sport. I love basketball, handball, riding my bike, working out...even bowling.” Photo by Mary Newman

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


We salute

Building Service Workers 32BJ SEIU

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

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BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Live Saver Award Fred Roldan

Proud Sponsor of the 7th Annual

Building Workers of the Year Awards

School Custodian Tackles Garbage and Intruder Fred Roldan never had expectations of becoming a hero in his daily life as a custodian at P.S. 45 in Bushwick. One day, however, that changed for Roldan and the entire school. Roldan talks about the day that earned him this year’s Live Saver award. “I was taking out the garbage and when I came back into the building, I saw a man outside who looked agitated,” explains Roldan. “He wanted someone to call him a cab.”

“There was nothing heroic about it. I was in the right place at the right time, it all happened in three to five seconds.” him up against the wall.

Robert Derector Associates

As Roldan stood by the building’s entrance, he saw the man begin pacing around and noticed a commotion outside.

is proud to support 32BJ SEIU and the 7th Annual Building Service Workers of the Year Awards

“The man wanted to go into the building,” and “he was getting really agitated.”

·

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OUR TOWN

·

Roldan then heard someone outside call out, “He’s in the building!” As the man tried to run further into the school, Roldan stopped him, told him he could not enter the building and that he had to wait. As police started pouring in, the man ran toward the security desk and pulled out a gun. Roldan followed his instincts and threw the man to the floor, disarming him and throwing

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Was your son (who is a 7th grader at PS 45) proud of you? “He felt so good about it.” Still, he notes humbly, “There was nothing heroic about it. I was in the right place at the right time, it all happened in three to five seconds.”

What do you do when you’re not saving the day? “I like to play baseball with my kids or take them to the park. My wife and four sons are the most important people in my life. “

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Longevity Award Otis Slaton

WE SALUTE YOU. We proudly support

Photo by Mary Newman

An Assistant Super with a Love of Theatre Otis Slaton has been an assistant super at the same apartment building in Inwood for the past 46 years. Slaton has also been a shop steward with the union for the past 38 years and is a member of the grievance committee.

“I like repairing things and making sure everything goes smoothly.”

Why have you stuck around your building as long as you have? “I like working with people. I also like that the job was unionized.”

“I like what I do,” adds Slaton. “I like repairing things and making sure everything goes smoothly.”

32BJ SEIU in its 7th Annual Building Service Workers Awards and are pleased to congratulate all the nominees.

What do you do when you’re not working at the building? “I like traveling or seeing whatever stars might be in town. I also like seeing Broadway plays.”

Who is most important in your life? “Nobody but Jesus.” While Jesus is most important to Slaton, his wife and children are a close second.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

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is proud to support

The Building Workers of the Year Awards and congratulates all of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honorees

PAGE 18

OUR TOWN

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

He Came for A Vacation and Stayed Forty Years

Super of the Year Thomas Clarke

Thomas Clarke’s tale of how he got started in New York City is straight out of a film. Forty years ago, Clarke traveled to New York from Ireland with three of his brothers (one of 14 siblings; Clarke’s home was getting a bit crowded.) Clarke was working as a handyman at the time, and the brothers only anticipated staying for a short vacation. Instead, while walking down Park Avenue, a young, shy Clarke popped into a building and asked if he could get any work. Andy, the super at the time, told Clarke he could get started the next day, and Clarke has not looked back since.

What are some of the most interesting stories from your building? Clarke, who has been a super at the same building since 1982, jokes some of the building’s more interesting stories he’s not at liberty to share. However, what regularly makes the job most interesting for Clarke is interacting and working with all the people he sees day-in, day-out, helping with any services they may require and looking after them in general.

“It doesn’t matter what type of job you have, it has to be done and [you] just do it.”

What keeps you going on the job? “It doesn’t matter what type of job you have, it has to be done and [you] just do it.” He also says a job like his depends on a solid workforce. “Without them you would not be a super,” says Clarke of his coworkers and staff.

“Times change too,” adds Clarke. “In 1982, things were a very different way—this was an easier and quieter job, but life becomes complicated.” Clarke notes another way times have changed for him: “I used to not be able to wait for the day to end, now there’s not enough hours in the day.”

How do you spend your free time? “I do a lot of cycling, I ride for charity events like a 30-miler to raise money for multiple sclerosis.” “I had one shareholder who had MS and that’s how I got started [in charity work],” he says, “seeing how she suffered.”

What’s your favorite part of New York City?

What are some of the hardships you face on the job? “[The boards] change occasionally,” notes Clarke. “The board president could change, and ways of doing the job change and you have to adapt.”

After all these years, Clarke remains particularly fond of the neighborhood he could first truly call home in America. “The Upper East Side is my favorite part of the city,” says Clarke.

BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Midtown Office Cleaner Ana Rodriguez

Ana ("Annie") Rodriguez is the midtown office cleaner of the year. When we reached out to Annie for her comments on being the recipient of this award, she reported back that she is too busy undergoing treatment for her brain cancer to be interviewed at this time.  "I am looking forward to my future," notes Rodriguez. "We have time to work and time to stop working and relax." She adds: "This is the time to believe in God and take care my health."  Many jumped at the opportunity to speak about her in her place. We are pleased to award midtown office cleaner to this courageous, optimistic and dearly-loved woman for her service to the community.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

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&

2 01 3 BUILDING

SERVICE WORKERS

AWARDS Sponsored by GLENWOOD B U ILD ER O W N ER M A N A G ER

BUILDING MAINTENANCE SERVICES

Formerly Cooper Square Realty

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


BUILDING WORKER AWARDS Cordele Nichols

Lower Manhattan Office Cleaner

An Office Cleaner With a Sense of Adventure Who Works Hard Cordele Nichols has been an office cleaner in lower Manhattan for the past 15 years. Hurricane Sandy immediately pops to mind when Nichols thinks of the most interesting things he’s seen on the job. “We walked to the river and watched it spill over,” recalls Nichols. “Stuff was blowing all around, it was chaotic and pitch black.” “We were stuck at work,” he adds. “It was an adventure.”

What do you like most about your job? “Definitely the camaraderie. We’re

“There’s no man above another, we’re all here to help each other... that’s what makes me get up in the morning.” one good unit,” says Nichols. “One guy I’ve been working with for 15 years, two others for eight years. There’s no man above another, we’re all here to help each other...that’s what makes me get up in the morning.”

How do you spend your free time? “I enjoy traveling, something I’ve been getting in to more and more—I just recently got off a cruise.” “I work hard enough,” he says. “I like traveling and trying different restaurants and foods.” Nichols likes to spend time in Midtown and downtown Brooklyn, taking in the restaurants, lounges and nightlife the areas have to offer. Nichols also enjoys spending time with his kids, but says his mother is truly foremost in his heart.

BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

Outer Borough Building Worker of the Year Steven Cohan

A Doorman Who Takes His Job Very Seriously Steven Cohan is a doorman who does not take his job lightly. In a typical day on the job—in the building where he’s been working for nearly 13 years— Cohan is responsible for greeting and helping people, dealing with distributing packages and much more. While some might believe the duties of a doorman run the risk of being mundane, Cohan, who loves dealing with all the different people he knows well, is quick to prove that notion wrong.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

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“It’s always

What do you do with your spare time?

something different, not just the same thing day after day.”

What’s the best thing about your work? “It’s always something different, not just the same thing day after day.”

“I’m active within the union. I’m also involved with the Knights of Pythias [a fraternal organization that devotes itself to friendship, charity and benevolence].” Cohan also enjoys fishing and spending time with his family, including his wife and 10-year-old son Jordan.

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BUILDING WORKER AWARDS

The New York Yankees are proud supporters of the SEIU Local 32BJ and salute all of the 2013 honorees

A Former Musician Turned Security Expert At 778 Park Avenue, where you can find John Egan working as building manager, things run as smoothly as possible.

Building Manager of the Year John Egan

The things that make Egan great at what he does are fairly basic, but also crucial to keeping a building functioning properly.

What are the best parts of your job? “I enjoy meeting people and working out their problems,” says Egan. “Hopefully I will have the answers they need.” Our Town wanted to find out some of the crazier or more interesting things Egan had witnessed in the line of duty, but the beloved building manager remained tight-lipped. “Nothing that interesting has happened at the building,” says Egan, “at least not off the top of my head.”

“Security is my top priority.”

What do you do when you’re not helping people out on the job? “I enjoy going for runs and playing soccer.” Egan says he’s too old for league play, but enjoys training others.

Who is most important in your life? “That would be my parents. They gave me the lead in life,” he says. “When I wanted to leave school and become a professional musician, they were always behind me.” He jokes he should probably not publicize that.

PAGE 22

OUR TOWN

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“No matter my decision, they always gave me the rope,” adds Egan.

What concerns do you feel need to be addressed on a city-wide level? “Security, security, security,” says Egan. “We can’t be responsible for so many lives and these large buildings. Security is my top priority.”

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


Congratulations to all the Nominees and Winners of the 2013 Building Service Workers

AWA R D S

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013

OUR TOWN

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PAGE 23


Attention Voters: For the 2013 General Election voters will use the ballot scanner and/or Ballot Marking Device (BMD).

The General Election is Tuesday, November 5, 2013 Polls are Open 6 am - 9 pm

VOTING IS AS EASY AS 1 - 2 - 3

1 2

Get Your Paper Ballot. Pick up your paper ballot and privacy sleeve at the sign-in table from the poll worker.

Mark Your Paper Ballot. Use a pen or ballot-marking device (BMD) to mark your choices on your ballot. Fill in the ovals above or next to the names of the candidates/ proposals of your choice with the pen provided.

Correctly Marked Oval.

JOHN DOE

Scan Your Paper Ballot.

3

Insert your marked ballot into the scanner to cast your vote.

To correctly mark your ballot, fill in the ovals above or next to the names of the candidates or proposals of your choice using the pen provided.

Accessible ballot marking devices (BMDs) are available.

Only registered voters can vote in this election. Sign up to receive the latest news and information from Board of Elections in the City of NY, by visiting the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website:

www.vote.nyc.ny.us To locate your pollsite and view your sample ballot, visit Using your smartphone, download the FREE QR code reader. Once downloaded, open the application to point, click, and discover.

PAGE 24

www.nyc.pollsitelocator.com 866-VOTE-NYC (866-868-3692) â&#x20AC;˘ TTY 212-487-5496 OUR TOWN

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013


Our Town Downtown October 24th 2013  

The October 24th, 2013 issue of Our Town Downtown.

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