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WEEK OF JULY OPULENCE ON DISPLAY ◄ PG.12

12-18 2018

TWEET WELCOME FROM THE FED SOCIAL MEDIA A “DearJohninNYC” campaign gives the new boss from San Francisco a crash course in New York — and proves central bankers can have a sense of humor BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

A cyclist crosses the 59th Street and Second Avenue intersection using the bus lane. The Department of Transportation plans to install a new bike lane at the dangerous crossing, near the entrance to the Queensboro Bridge. Photo: Michael Garofalo

SECOND AVENUE TO GET BIKING UPGRADES STREETS DOT plan calls for new dedicated lane, pedestrian island at Queensboro Bridge intersection BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

For Manhattan cyclists, the busy section of Second Avenue approaching the Queensboro Bridge often makes for a white-knuckle ride. “I have long since come to the conclusion that if I get killed on a bike, that is where it’s going

to happen,” said Jeremy Posner, an Upper East Side resident who navigates the area frequently using Citi Bike. High traffic volumes and lacking bike infrastructure have long made the 10-block stretch of Second Avenue south of 68th Street one of the most treacherous places to bike in Manhattan — particularly at the complicated intersection between 60th and 59th Streets where vehicles enter and exit the Queensboro Bridge, which one recent study found was the most dangerous crossing in the en-

tire borough. A new proposal from the city’s Department of Transportation, presented the plan to Community Boards 6 and 8 earlier this month, calls for improved bike lanes on Second Avenue and an overhaul of the Queensboro Bridge intersection, improvements DOT officials say will make the area safer for bikers and pedestrians alike. From 105th Street to 68th Street, Second Avenue currently features a southbound

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is best known for formulating monetary policy, regulating depository institutions, redeeming billions in Treasury securities and serving as the banker of the U.S. government. But it isn’t all macroeconomics or post-crisis supervisory stress testing at the Florentine-style palazzo at 33 Liberty Street downtown: The Fed, it turn outs, has been conducting a crash course in New York City 101. The principal pupil is Sacramento native John C. Williams, a 55-year-old economist who started his new post as 11th president of the New York Fed on June 18 after seven years as president of the San Francisco Fed. Williams had never worked on Wall Street. He’d never called the city home. So the Fed’s digital team decided to welcome him and advise him on mastering life in New York — by launching a playful new social media campaign, #DearJohninNYC.

John C. Williams, the new president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. A Sacramento native and ex-president of the San Francisco Fed, he was welcomed to the city last month by Fed staffers who launched a social-media campaign. Photo courtesy of Federal Reserve Bank of New York  

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15 CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

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WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.12

FOR HIM, SETTLING SMALL CLAIMS IS A BIG DEAL presided over Arbitration Man has three decades. for informal hearings about it He’s now blogging BY RICHARD KHAVKINE

is the common Arbitration Man their jurist. least folks’ hero. Or at Man has For 30 years, Arbitration court office of the civil few sat in a satellite Centre St. every building at 111 New Yorkers’ weeks and absorbed dry cleaning, burned lost accountings of fender benders, lousy paint jobs, and the like. And security deposits then he’s decided. Arbitration Man, About a year ago, so to not afwho requested anonymity started docuhe fect future proceedings, two dozen of what menting about compelling cases considers his most blog. in an eponymous about it because “I decided to write the stories but in a I was interested about it not from wanted to write from view but rather lawyer’s point of said Arbitration view,” of a lay point lawyer since 1961. Man, a practicing what’s at issue He first writes about post, renders and then, in a separatehow he arrived his decision, detailing blog the to Visitors at his conclusion. their opinions. often weigh in with get a rap going. I to “I really want whether they unreally want to know and why I did it,” I did derstood what don’t know how to he said. “Most people ... I’d like my cases the judge thinks. and also my trereflect my personalitythe law.” for mendous respect 80, went into indiMan, Arbitration suc in 1985, settling vidual practice

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.20

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up told us she’d like to would and running this year, for serve as an ombudsman city small businesses within them clear government, helping to get through the bureaucracy things done. Perhaps even more also importantly, the ombudsman and number will tally the type small business of complaints by taken in owners, the actions policy response, and somefor ways to recommendations If done well, begin to fix things. report would the ombudsman’s give us the first quantitative with taste of what’s wrong the city, an small businesses in towards important first step fixing the problem. of for deTo really make a difference, is a mere formality will have to the work process looking to complete their advocate are the chances course, velopers precinct, but rising rents, -- thanks to a find a way to tackle business’ is being done legally of after-hours projects quickly. their own hours,” which remain many While Chin “They pick out boom in the number throughout who lives on most vexing problem. said Mildred Angelo,of the Ruppert construction permits gauge what Buildings one said it’s too early tocould have the 19th floor in The Department of the city. number three years, the Houses on 92nd Street between role the advocate She Over the past on the is handing out a record work perThird avenues. permits, there, more information of Second and an ongoing all-hours number of after-hours bad thing. of after-hours work the city’s Dept. problem can’t be a said there’s with the mits granted by nearby where according to new data jumped 30 percent, This step, combinedBorough construction project noise Buildings has data provided in workers constantly make efforts by Manhattan to mediate BY DANIEL FITZSIMMONS according to DOB of Informacement from trucks. President Gale Brewer offer response to a Freedom classifies transferring they want. They knows the the rent renewal process, request. The city They 6 “They do whatever signs Every New Yorker clang, tion Act go as they please. work between some early, tangible small any construction on the weekend, can come and sound: the metal-on-metal or the piercing of progress. For many have no respect.” p.m. and 7 a.m., can’t come of these that the hollow boom, issuance reverse. owners, in business moving The increased beeps of a truck has generto a correspond and you as after-hours. soon enough. variances has led at the alarm clock The surge in permits

SLEEPS, THANKS TO THE CITY THAT NEVER UCTION A BOOM IN LATE-NIGHT CONSTR NEWS

A glance it: it’s the middle can hardly believe yet construction of the night, and carries on full-tilt. your local police or You can call 311

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for dollars in fees ated millions of and left some resithe city agency, that the application dents convinced

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JULY 12-18,2018

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INTERVIEWING FOR DOGGY DAY CARE PETS At the newly rebranded AKC Canine Retreat, every animal gets a behavioral evaluation BY SUSHMITA ROY

In a crowded, bustling city, often the only friendly interaction you might have is with a four-legged animal that many New Yorkers adore. A dog to most people is a companion that pulls them out of loneliness. But can such a companion ever be judged not amiable or social enough in certain situations? At AKC Canine Retreat, a dog gets a

free comprehensive evaluation and is judged fit or unfit for day care based on social interactions with other dogs. “The question really is: is your dog social? Is it a young puppy with no exposure or is it an older dog with bad past experience?” said James Tysseling, COO of American Kennel Club (AKC) Pet Care LLC. “Every dog is judged on their own behavior and it isn’t just that we throw them into a playroom to see if they fit; it’s a long procedure,” he said. AKC Pet Care LLC acquired all of SPOT Canine Club’s locations last year and after a year-long rebranding process officially announced its expansion to five more locations in Manhat-

At the AKC Canine Retreat launch. Photo courtesy of AKC Canine Retreat. The local paper for Downtown

tan in May. The rebranding involved a behavioral management system led by Eva Loomis, an animal behaviorist whom they hired as their dog-care manager. “We re-trained all our employees to better understand dog behavior,” Tysseling said. “It is easier in child care centers because a child can tell you what they feel, but if your [dog is whining] in a corner, there has to be a reason and often it’s not easy to understand.” Before a dog is admitted to day care, their owners, or parents — as they often like to be called — are first interviewed about their dog’s likes, dislikes and behavioral insights. The dog is then introduced to another dog in a private space. Based on that interaction, the dog is either deemed suitable or unsuitable for being let into the playroom with other dogs. “We do tell people your dog’s not fit in terms of their social interaction with the rest of our dogs. For example, if the dog is very anxious, we recommend jogging and running services … over a social environment like day care,” Tysseling said. The AKC offers a program called Running Paw that Tyselling claims is the first dog jogging and running service in the country. The service hires collegiate athletes who are also dog

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Toys and snacks. Photo courtesy of AKC Canine Retreat lovers. They are then trained in dog jogging and running before being certified and licensed to carry out the service. But this too doesn’t come without an extensive interviewing procedure. Dogs go with a runner on a jogging interview. The runner observes the dog’s behavior to see if they pull away from the jogger when they pass other dogs or are oblivious to other dogs. Based on the dog’s interaction and capabilities, a suitable running distance and time is calculated and put in the databases. “They are married to the right athlete and they always have the same one,” Tysseling said. “The dog and athlete are a team.”

Owners may not always be able to follow the recommendations due to time or cost constraints. A yearly unlimited day care package costs $8,085, though additional dog discounts are available. A 30-minute jogging session costs $40 a day and $625 a month. Tysseling, who owns eight basset hounds himself, wears a band inscribed with paws along with his engagement ring. “After the rebranding, we have turned dogs away that were clients before,” he said. “We recommend parents to enroll their dog in personal training ... that could bring the dog back to us.”

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

What Does It Mean to Be an American: Conformity, Silence, and Lies

FRIDAY, JULY 13TH, 7PM The Strand | 828 Broadway | 212-473-1452 | strandbooks.com Catch a duo of talks on American identity and history. The first will look at “whiteness” and dominant narratives of U.S. history; the second will examine the origins of the Mexican border and “white supremacy rooted in the myth of Manifest Destiny” ($20, includes complimentary beer).

The Making of Fiddler on the Roof

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18TH, 6:30PM Museum of Jewish Heritage | 36 Battery Pl. | 646-437-4202 | mjhnyc.org Explore Fiddler’s rich history through a conversation featuring Sheldon Harnick, Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning lyricist of Fiddler on the Roof, and Alisa Solomon, acclaimed author of Wonder of Wonders: A Cultural History of Fiddler on the Roof ($5).

Just Announced | The Science of Pleasure: Why We Like What We Like

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15TH, 2PM The Schafler Forum | 7 W. 83rd St. | 212-362-8800 | onedayu.com Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science at Yale Paul Bloom leads an intensive seminar providing insight into quirks of pleasure like the appeals of ISIS and celeb memorabilia ($95).

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For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.


JULY 12-18,2018

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG SUBWAY MUGGING

STATS FOR THE WEEK

At 3 a.m. on Thursday, June 28, a 22-year-old Brooklyn woman was riding the southbound N train near the City Hall station when she was approached by five people who forcibly took her phone. The victim suffered abrasions to her left knee during the struggle and was treated for injuries by an EMS team. The stolen phone IS valued at $900. Shamya Matthews, an 18-year-old, was arrested and charged with robbery, police said.

Reported crimes from the 1st district for the week ending June 24 Week to Date

Year to Date

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

1

1

0.0

Rape

2

1

100.0

14

9

55.6

Robbery

1

0

n/a

36

33

9.1

Felony Assault

0

3

-100.0

28

40

-30.0

Burglary

2

0

n/a

32

32

0.0

MOTORCYCLE STOLEN

Grand Larceny

16

17

-5.9

489 477 2.5

A man’s Ducati motorcycle was parked on the street for less than five hours before it disappeared. At 3:30 p.m. on Monday, June 25, a 26 man parked his bike on the southeast corner of Third Place and Battery Place. The bike was gone when he returned about 8 p.m. Police searched the neighborhood but couldn’t find the stolen vehicle, a white 2016 Ducati Hypermotard with New York plates. The bike is valued at $11,000.

Grand Larceny Auto

1

0

n/a

11

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

CARD SHARK Police collared a shopper trying to make an unauthorized credit card purchase of nearly $4,500 at Saks Fifth Avenue. At 6:44 p.m. on Tuesday, June 26, a police officer responded to a radio call about a fraud incident at the Saks store on Vesey Street. When the officer arrived he was informed by loss prevention personnel that a 37-yearold woman, later identified by police as Michelle Espinoza, had tried to make a

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purchase using a fraudulent credit card. The credit transaction was declined, and the store contacted the owner of the card, a 54-year-old woman residing in Moorestown, N.J. She told the store that she was in possession of the actual card and had not authorized the charge, police said. The items included garments valued at $4,496. Espinoza was arrested and charged with grand larceny, police said.

ILORI STORY

Handbags continue to be a hot item among shoplifters. At 7:28 p.m. on Thursday, June 28, a man went into the RealReal store at 80 Wooster St., took a Chanel handbag valued at $2,750 and hid it in a bag before walking out of the store without paying.

A shoplifter made off with a gaggle of goggles recently. At 2:31 p.m. on Friday, June 29, a man entered the Ilori Optical store at 138 Spring St., took six pairs of Tom Ford sunglasses totaling $2,550 from a display and left the store. He was last seen fleeing eastbound on Spring, but police were unable to locate him in the neighborhood.

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Useful Contacts

Drawing Board

POLICE NYPD 7th Precinct

19 ½ Pitt St.

212-477-7311

NYPD 6th Precinct

233 W. 10th St.

212-741-4811

NYPD 10th Precinct

230 W. 20th St.

212-741-8211

NYPD 13th Precinct

230 E. 21st St.

NYPD 1st Precinct

16 Ericsson Place

212-477-7411 212-334-0611

FIRE FDNY Engine 15

25 Pitt St.

311

FDNY Engine 24/Ladder 5

227 6th Ave.

311

FDNY Engine 28 Ladder 11

222 E. 2nd St.

311

FDNY Engine 4/Ladder 15

42 South St.

311

ELECTED OFFICIALS Councilmember Margaret Chin

165 Park Row #11

Councilmember Rosie Mendez

237 1st Ave. #504

212-587-3159 212-677-1077

Councilmember Corey Johnson

224 W. 30th St.

212-564-7757

State Senator Daniel Squadron

250 Broadway #2011

212-298-5565

Community Board 1

1 Centre St., Room 2202

212-669-7970

Community Board 2

3 Washington Square Village

212-979-2272

Community Board 3

59 E. 4th St.

212-533-5300

Community Board 4

330 W. 42nd St.

212-736-4536

Hudson Park

66 Leroy St.

212-243-6876

Ottendorfer

135 2nd Ave.

212-674-0947

Elmer Holmes Bobst

70 Washington Square

212-998-2500

COMMUNITY BOARDS

LIBRARIES

HOSPITALS New York-Presbyterian

170 William St.

Mount Sinai-Beth Israel

10 Union Square East

212-844-8400

212-312-5110

CON EDISON

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

TIME WARNER

46 East 23rd

813-964-3839

US Post Office

201 Varick St.

212-645-0327

US Post Office

128 East Broadway

212-267-1543

US Post Office

93 4th Ave.

212-254-1390

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WHAT DO YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU SHOW UP?

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OPEN HOUSE – Saturday, July 21, 9 a.m. VIRTUAL INFO. SESSION - Tuesday, August 14, 7 p.m. WALK-IN WEDNESDAYS July 18, 25; August 1, 8, anytime 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. REGISTER - sps.nyu.edu/appliedUG/events39

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TELEMEDICINE IN THE CITY HEALTH How virtual connections to medical professionals can help New Yorkers deal with certain health issues The concept of telemedicine — a doctor-patient consultation conducted remotely via technology — was once thought of as a solution for providing rural communities with health care. Telemedicine has come to include phone calls, text messages, and video and audio components, explains Innovations Manager Jessica Zhang at NewYork-Presbyterian. Now telemedicine is enabling NYC residents to deal with questions about health issues in innovative ways: • In the ER — For non-lifethreatening situations that may bring people into emergency rooms, telemedicine can reduce waiting time. As an example, Zhang said, someone who gets a cut from a pedicure can be seen quickly in the ER using telemedicine. By zooming in on a patient with a hi-res camera, physicians on site or at a related hospital can make a recommendation for treatment. • Urgent care — Telemedicine could replace certain types of visits to urgent care locations. Some conditions that physi-

JULY 12-18,2018

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5 WAYS TO BEAT THE HEAT ■ Avoid drinking excessive amounts of alcohol, caffeine, soda or fruit juice, which contribute to dehydration. ■ Check in on your elderly or debilitated neighbors. People at extremes of age — the very young or very old — are more prone to heat-related illness and dehydration. ■ Limit exercise and other forms of exertion to cooler periods of the day, either early morning or in the evening. ■ Be aware that some medications may make you more vulnerable to dehydration from heat exposure. ■ If the air temperature is more than 95 degrees Fahrenheit, fans may be ineffective at cooling. Use air conditioning instead. Tips from Dr. Alexis Halpern, Emergency Medicine physician at NewYorkPresbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center

Telemedicine via NewYork-Presbyterian’s ED Express Care is offered in the emergency room at NewYorkPresbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. Photo courtesy of NewYork-Presbyterian cians can examine visually – eye problems, rashes — people can do from home through an app. “I used it for myself in February when I thought I had the flu,” said Zhang. “A physician asked me to describe my pain, asked me to push on certain areas and did the entire exam virtually.” The doctor was then able to prescribe medication for her through the app. In January and February 2018, NewYork-Presbyterian started a kiosk program with

Duane Reade/Walgreens in Manhattan and Brooklyn. The program was “rolled out in phases,” said Zhang. There are now six such kiosks, equipped with an HIPAA-compliant internet connection, high-definition video cameras, forehead thermometers, blood-pressure cuffs and pulse oximeters that measure the amount of oxygen in the body. The busiest kiosk, at 40 Wall Street, has had 5060 consultations to date, according to Zhang. (All patients

who use NewYork-Presbyterian’s telemedicine platform, NYP OnDemand, are evaluated and treated by board-certified emergency medicine physicians.) At this time of year, telemedicine kiosks may be helpful for dealing with heat-related illness or dehydration in young children and the elderly that can be addressed remotely by board-certified ER doctors (see box). For more information about

kiosks: www.nyp.org/ondemand/urgent-care-kiosk • Virtual visits — includes primary care as well as outpatient follow-up visits after surgery or hospitalization. Patients can have a FaceTime visit with physicans without leaving home. • Second opinion program — The program reviews medical charts and puts patients in touch with NY-Presbyterian specialists. “We found that some of these cases result in a different course of treatment,” said Zhang. Zhang also mentioned other ways in which telemedicine can help patients. In emergency rooms in outer NYC boroughs that may not have a full complement of specialists — where one would otherwise, for instance, “have to wait for a psychiatrist to come on site,” says Zhang, “now we can connect that emergency room with

a specialist” remotely. And for critical cases involving mobile stroke units — ambulance vans with CT scanners — telemedicine can “connect stroke patients with neurologists to decide [whether] to administer medications while you’re en route to the hospital,” says Zhang. “Time is of the essence” in treating strokes, she adds — “you can get a quick physician consultation before the patient gets to the hospital. You can make that decision about a life-saving treatment.” There are medical emergencies for which telemedicine is NOT recommended — chest pain, trouble breathing, severe abdominal pain, heavy bleeding and other symptoms that require an immediate visit to the emergency room or calling 911. For a full list of medical emergencies, see www.nyp. org/ondemand/urgent-care/ faqs-about-digital-urgent-care


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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to otdowntown.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

DUSTUPS, POLITICAL AND OTHERWISE EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

No can do — CB8’s chairwoman broke the cardinal rule of keeping politics out of governmental meetings by allowing a then-political candidate challenging U.S, Rep. Carolyn Maloney for her Congressional seat in the recent Democratic primary to address the board. The candidate spoke against the Marine Transfer Station, a hot-button issue for many Upper East Siders. Someone at CB8’s monthly meeting disputed the candidate’s seemingly newfound advoca-

cy against the facility and reminded him that, when he was out campaigning, he said that the MTS was “a done deal” and “to get over it.” As the wannabe congressman backtracked, he was cut off by another audience member, not by the chairwoman, who later acknowledged knowing the speaker was running for political office when he spoke. Political candidates are not allowed to campaign at Community Board meetings. Let’s keep it that way.

Diner down — Timothy’s on York Ave opposite Asphalt Green bit the dust. Is no more. With the bus stops along the avenue and the busy

sports facility, seems a likely spot for a casual food place. On second thought, brick-and-mortar food business in remote locations are not high priority — remote, of course, being relative. The corner of York has a great deal of foot traffic but is not a dining destination per se. Another food spot, The Vinegar Factory around the corner from Timothy’s, left the block about a year ago.

Changing spaces — first they’re out, then they’re in — Domino’s Pizza, a stalwart for some years on Third and 89th, has moved to First and 95th. In the last year Roma’s Pizza on Third and 88th moved several

storefronts north to a larger space. Kind of like musical stores — but at least they are still in business and staying local. Panera’s on East 86th Street is gone. No local replacement. Just a notice saying see us in our other locations. Will do.

Conflict of ads — interesting ad, or faux pas — the Metropolitan Republican Club’s e-blast for former TV Judge Jeanine Pirro’s new book, “Liars, Leakers, and Liberals” came with an events calendar promoting Pirro’s tome and upcoming events, including a launch party and town hall meeting for a local State Senate candidate Pete Holmberg. Interestingly, the blast included a link with ads for Democratic primary (November election) candidates. And there was Pirro, President Trump cheerer-in-chief, appearing along-

side Democratic candidates Alessandra Biaggi (running for Assembly in the Bronx) and Liz Handidge (running for office in Pennsylvania). The Dem ads were in the section of the email under “other events you may be interested in.” Interesting, maybe. Odd, for sure.

Street protest — When are the city streets in Manhattan going to finally be finally paved? For weeks, months — not yet years — the street have been tarred and peebled but hardly paved. Walking and traversing the streets — to say nothing of the bumps and grinds that result from cars and buses and bikes as they ride the pavement — is a dangerous daily activity. Come to think of it, the sidewalks with all the scaffolding and boarding up to accommodate new construction also are no comfort.

WHY I’M NOT ASHAMED TO MOVE BACK IN WITH MY PARENTS BY MATT ROSENBLUM

I didn’t grow up in NYC, but my parents moved to West 96th Street from Livingston, NJ, a few years ago while I was in college. Most people are amused that my parents moved into the city after living in the suburbs for 20 years. Don’t most families follow the opposite trajectory? My parents have always been very active people, and while the suburbs were a great place for me and my siblings to grow up, there wasn’t a lot left for them to do there after we went to college. My little brother was still in high school when my parents moved to NYC, but he wanted to transfer to the Rudolf Steiner School in NYC. It was always my parent’s intention to come to the city after we all went to college, but my little brother’s desire to change schools sped up the process. After graduating from Hampshire College, I worked as a freelance writer and parttime debate teacher to save up some money to move out of my parents’ place. It took me six months after college to get all

the finances together, find a place and roommates to be able to move out. Six months was a little longer than I planned it to be, but it could have been much worse. At the time, I really wanted to live on my own in the city more than anything. My parents actually liked that I was home since I had been away for four years. Fortunately for me, they are nothing like the Syracuse, New York couple who sued their 30-year-old son in an effort to get him to leave. At first, I found that being home, as an adult, was very annoying. I was working non-stop managing blogs for clients from my laptop. Having my mom nagging me to put the dishes away, clean up clutter or walk the dog during my work hours made it a lot harder to focus. I tried working from nearby cafes and coffee shops, but finding space is always competitive, and the WiFi at Whole Foods on 100th and Columbus is not reliable (I hope management is listening). After six months, I moved to 124th Street in Harlem, and it felt good to rent my first apart-

Matt Rosenblum with his mother. Photo: Lena Rosenblum

ment in the city and take a step forward with my adult life. I was living with three random roommates — we found each other on the roommate matching app Diggz and the NYC Facebook Gypsy Housing group. One of these roommates became one of my best friends, but the other two didn’t work out for various reasons. What I’ve learned over the past two years is that if you’re not friends or friendly with your roommates, it will lead to a toxic living environment. A lot of people say you don’t need to be friends with your roommates, but I disagree. If you’re friends with your roommates and have healthy boundaries, everything about your living situation becomes so much more enjoyable. Having neutral roommates or worse makes going home a lot less fun. After a year and a half of living in Harlem and Bushwick, I’m actually excited to move back home with my parents. By moving home, I get more money to invest in my business and creative projects. If anything, my social

life gets enhanced because I have more to spend on going out in the city. And I don’t lose privacy. I had just as much privacy living at home in the city versus not living at home in the city. My room in Bushwick didn’t even have a door. I’ve learned that I don’t need privacy as much as I think — and I’m a pretty introverted person. If I do need privacy, there’s a million places I can go, other apartments to stay at, and hotels I can rent. I’m glad I moved out when I did, but I’m a lot more patient with myself — and my parents — now that I’m returning home. Living at home simply gives me the best chance to succeed with my business, personal and creative goals. I’ve even found a coffee shop to work at that always has space (it’s a secret). I’m truly grateful my parents are happy to have me stay with them. Matt Rosenblum is the owner of Advanced Life Coach Marketing, which helps life coaches grow their practices, create online courses and more.

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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

WELCOME CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;John has never lived in New York, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming from San Francisco, and we thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it be cute if we told him a little bit about New York City,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? said Christine Sommo, an officer in the digital-strategy unit. Soon, a call went out seeking volunteers at the 3,000-employee central bank, and in no time, economists, statisticians, researchers, regulators, software engineers, information technologists and staffers in outreach, administration and communications had raised their hands. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The campaign gave us the opportunity to humanize the institution,â&#x20AC;? Sommo said. In a series of two dozen short video tweets, acted out by about 30 bankers and other staff around Manhattan, Williams is visually instructed in how to become a New Yorker. One woman demonstrates the proper angle at which to ďŹ&#x201A;ag down a passing cab above a caption reading, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The taxi hail is all about the lean.â&#x20AC;? A man displays the â&#x20AC;&#x153;pizza foldâ&#x20AC;? as he consumes a slice, an art form that â&#x20AC;&#x153;might take practice, but is worth it.â&#x20AC;? Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up with the New York accent? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fuhgetaboutit. No such thing.â&#x20AC;? That fabled span across the East River? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fair market price or not, the Brooklyn Bridge is not for sale.â&#x20AC;? Meanwhile, a fast-moving walker appears stymied on video as he tries to

get by three slow-footed pedestrians on the sidewalk. Capturing the frustration of the true New Yorker, the caption declares, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slow walkers and large groups keep to the right. (Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mon, people.)â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got more than 8 million stories,â&#x20AC;? one post proclaimed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re glad youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re now one of them. Welcome John!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wow!â&#x20AC;? Williams tweeted back on the day he started at his new job. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When my new colleagues told me about their #NYCtips, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when I knew that I could not refuse. Thank you for the warm welcome as I join you at the New York Fed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and as an official New Yorker,â&#x20AC;? he added. Sommo wrote the text to accompany the videos, each of which repeats in a loop and lasts just two or three seconds. She says the final product reďŹ&#x201A;ects the personalities of the indi-

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vidual Fed employees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to make the videos playful, but with a little bit of that New York sensibility,â&#x20AC;? Sommo said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were hoping to highlight some of the unique aspects of New York City, and what makes it the place that it is, and it was very important to get the tone right. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New York may be confusing to newcomers, it has this reputation as being hard to ďŹ gure out, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot more welcoming and friendly than many people may know,â&#x20AC;? she added. Unfortunately for Williams, one tweet posted at #DearJohninNYC offered a bit of rather glum news: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sorry, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get you @HamiltonMusical ticketsâ&#x20AC;? it said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hear even @Lin_Manuel canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get them these days.â&#x20AC;? invreporter@strausnews.com

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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

NEIGHBORHOOD’S BEST Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

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In the 1800s, Five Points was a notorious slum in lower Manhattan, infamous for decades as New York City’s center of violent crime, unemployment, prostitution, gambling, infectious diseases and filth. All that has changed. Join guide Lloyd Trufelman for a tour of the sites of the Old Brewery/Mission House, Bandit’s Roost, the African Burial Ground, Collect Pond and others places where the voices of Five Points echo through our modern streets.

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Thu 12 Fri 13

Sat 14

THE LIFE & DEATH OF ALEXANDER HAMILTON

▲ LOMOWALK: A GUIDED PHOTOGRAPHY TOUR

Fraunces Tavern Museum 54 Pearl St. 5:30 p.m. $20 Just one day after his notorious duel with Aaron Burr, Alexander Hamilton died on July 12, 1804. Commemorate the life and death of Hamilton with an evening of special programming. The Hudson River Ramblers will perform “Alexander Hamilton: His Life in Story and Song”, preceded by a processional at Trinity Churchyard to memorialize Hamilton at his grave site. 212-968-1776 frauncestavernmuseum.org

SUMMER JAM ON THE HUDSON Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park 20 Battery Place 6:30 p.m. Free Follow the lead of professional drummers as they guide you through the pulsating beats of traditional African drumming techniques. Drums provided, dancing welcome. Enjoy a summer night of rhythm and grooves. 212-566-6700 bpcparks.org

The Strand 828 Broadway 3 p.m. $18.95 lomography camera purchase required Jump lens first into the bustling streets of New York, one frame at a time. Join other analogue enthusiasts and start shooting great urban imagery with a lomography camera on a guided tour. This “LomoWalk” is inspired by Jeremiah Moss, whose work on the blog and the bestselling book “Vanishing New York” has chronicled the changes afoot in our 21st century city. 212-473-1452 strandbooks.com


JULY 12-18,2018

11

Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

Sun 15 Mon 16 Tue 17 ▼ SHELL-EBRATE OYSTERS

‘SCULPTURE IN GOTHAM’

Pier 25 in Hudson River Park, cross at North Moore St. 4 p.m. Free Oysters filter water, engineer reef habitat and stabilize shorelines. Work alongside Hudson River Park staff to restore oysters and learn how these bivalves benefit the health of the River. Summer Sundays through Sept. 30. 212-627-2020 hudsonriverpark.org

Skyscraper Museum 39 Battery Place 6:30 p.m. $5 In the mid-1960s, cultural activists and city officials, for a time, shifted away from traditional monuments and joined forces to sponsor ambitious sculptural projects for urban revitalization. At this book talk, art history professor and “Sculpture in Gotham” author Michele Bogart will recount how the city became committed to public art patronage. 212-945-6324 skyscraper.org

STRICTLY TANGO Washington Square Park, Fifth Avenue and Waverly Place 6 p.m. Free Put on your dancing shoes and learn that “authentic Buenos Aires Tango feeling” with Strictly Tango NYC Dance. Come with your partner, your friends, or find a new dancing partner. Every Tuesday through Sept. 11. 212-408-0243 nycgovparks.org

Wed 18 DISCUSSION: DISMANTLING THE GAZE ICP Museum 250 Bowery 6:30 p.m. Free with Registration This event marks the launch of the International Center of Photography’s new series, which considers looking, power and visual culture in the #MeToo moment. Art historian and popular culture scholar Maria Elena Buszek, along with artists Patricia Silva and Endia Beal, will discuss examples that demonstrate and subvert gendered hierarchies in visual media. 212-857-0000 icp.org

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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

JULY 12-18,2018

OPULENCE ON DISPLAY A virtual visit to Versailles BY MARY GREGORY

No plans for a trip to Paris this summer? The Met’s “Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)” offers a sense of French travel and time travel as well. The expansive and innovative exhibition brings together close to 200 works of art, costume, architecture, jewelry and furnishings from more than 50 international collections, including the Palace of Versailles, to give a sense of the history, aesthetic and grandeur of the French royal court. Versailles, just 12 miles outside of Paris, was a hunting lodge — a kind of weekend home in the Poconos for the kings and queens of France — until Louis XIV (1638–1715) transformed it into a dazzling, glittering spectacle unlike any other. From 1682, when the Sun King moved himself and his court out of Paris and into the palace at Versailles, it was the center of political power and a destination for visitors from around the world. The magnificent gardens, exquisite architecture and over-the-top opulence announced to all the elegance, taste and power of the French. Versailles was open to royals and ambassadors from abroad, as well as artists, writers, scientists, philosophers, socialites, tourists and day-trippers from Paris. One of the facts the exhibition brings out is the rare accessibility of the king. The royal court at Versailles was open to all who cared to make the trip hoping for a glimpse of Louis XIV — with one stipulation. Like those lining up outside Studio 54 in the ‘70s, visitors had to be deemed fashionable enough to get in. So, suits and gowns start the show. Gorgeous garments for men and women in silk and brocade, with textiles lavishly adorned and punctuated by silver buttons and dazzling embellishments, greet visitors to the exhibition. They’re accompanied by a special audio guide, available at no cost. It’s billed as a 3-D tour (actually it’s stereo) and features music, birdsong, background noises and actors with European accents delivering dialogue about what it was like to visit the royal palace, what they hoped to see, and how they prepared. It may bring the sense of a “visit” to life for some. For others, it might get in the way, making

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)” WHERE: Met Fifth Avenue WHEN: through July 29 the experience more like watching an episode of “Outlander” than a chance to see objects of artistic and historical import. But there’s no wrong or right way to enjoy a Met exhibit, so go for it, if it sounds fun. Subsequent galleries highlight various aspects of the palace and life at court. There are portraits, porcelains and fans, three-cornered hats, tapestries and rugs. One section presents the famed gardens, with statuary placed in small bays in front of flowery backgrounds (here, the audio includes the sounds of fountains and actors talking about the palace’s menagerie of exotic animals). Paintings portray parties held on the magnificent grounds designed by André Le Nôtre in the 1660s. Royal hunts, visiting dignitaries, the private apartments and their furnishings are all presented. There’s an astonishing architectural model of the Ambassadors’ Staircase, made by Charles Arquinet in 1958 so detailed it calls to mind Alice’s magic potion. If you could just shrink temporarily, you could pop in for an ersatz visit. Busts of Louis XIV, XV and XVI, all in a row, gaze down from an imposing height just a few feet away. Some of the most dazzling objects in the exhibition give a sense of sumptuousness of gifts from foreign kings and queens. A tiny golden throne from Thailand and a fabulous Ottoman jeweled hunting quiver with an emerald the size of a walnut are particularly stunning. All this lavishness came at great cost, both literally and politically. In 1789, King Louis XVI had to leave a Versailles in deep decline and put upon by angry protestors. In 1792, the monarchy was abolished. The king was beheaded in January 1793, with Marie Antoinette following several months later. The last thing on display is a reproduction of a notice announcing “Ventes de meubles et effets, à Versailles” or an auction to sell off the contents of the palace. Rather than just shining baubles, the exhibition offers a final bite to chew on in another time of significant wealth disparity.

Model of the Ambassadors’ Staircase, by Charles Arquinet, 1958, from the collection of the Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles. Photo: Adel Gorgy

Lavish needlework on a man’s suit, like the type worn at Versailles, from about 1780. Photo: Adel Gorgy

A “grande robe à la française” in silk brocade on loan from The Kyoto Costume Institute. Photo: Adel Gorgy


JULY 12-18,2018

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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

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JULY 12-18,2018

Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

Luzzo’s

211 1st Ave

Grade Pending (41) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided.

Ramen Takumi

1 University Pl

Grade Pending (24) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/ sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Lenz’s

514 E 20th St

Grade Pending (23) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

JUN 27 - JUL 2, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. The Thirsty Scholar

155 2 Avenue

A

Big Daddy’s Diner

239 Park Avenue South

Grade Pending (21) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared.

Chawlas2

216 3rd Ave

A

Sal Anthony’s Restaurant

226 3rd Ave

A

Downtown Bakery II Mexican Food

69 1 Avenue

Grade Pending (26) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Hudson Clearwater

447 Hudson Street

A

Vivi Bubble Tea

205 Allen St

Grade Pending (29) Food not cooked to required minimum temperature. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Tender Greens

900 Broadway

A

Sweetgreen Gansevoort

32 Gansevoort St

A

Kung Fu Tea

28 Saint Marks Pl

A

Gimme Coffee

228 Mott Street

A

Cho-Ko Restaurant

59 1st Ave

Grade Pending

The Grisly Pear

Subway

113 E 14th St

Grade Pending (21) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas.

Panya / Autre Kyoya

810 Stuyvesant Street Grade Pending (21) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas.

107 Macdougal Street Grade Pending (21) Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Soho Sushi

231 Sullivan Street

Grade Pending (20) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Starbucks

45 West 4 Street

A

Mottsu

285 Mott Street

A

Carbone

181 Thompson Street

A

Uncle Ted’s

163 Bleecker Street

Grade Pending (27) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Dumpling Kingdom

227 Sullivan St

A

Terra Blues

149 Bleeker Street

A

Broadway Gourmet

584 Broadway

Grade Pending (44) Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Favela Cubana

543 La Guardia Place

Grade Pending (17) Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or nonfood areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/ sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Il Buco Restaurant

47 Bond Street

A

Miyabi Sushi & Asian Cuisine

118 W 3rd St

A

Stromboli Pizza

83 St Marks Place

A

Chop’t

24 East 17 Street

A

Barbounia

250 Park Avenue South

A

114 4 Avenue

Grade Pending (27) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Paradis To Go

Otto’s Tacos

141 Second Ave

Grade Pending (30) Toilet facility not provided for employees or for patrons when required. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Roast Kitchen

27 E 13th St

Grade Pending (23) Food not cooked to required minimum temperature. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Hunan Bistro

96 3rd Ave

Grade Pending (35) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Food prepared from ingredients at ambient temperature not cooled to 41º F or below within 4 hours. Insufficient or no refrigerated or hot holding equipment to keep potentially hazardous foods at required temperatures.

Divya’s Kitchen

25 1st Ave

A

Happy Bowls

61 4th Ave

A


JULY 12-18,2018

15

Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

RIVERSIDE STAIR REPAIRS TO COST $2 MILLION PARKS Steps leading to soccer field at 102nd Street have been fenced off since 2015 BY RICHARD KHAVKINE

A rendering showing the Department of Transportation’s proposal to add a bike lane and new pedestrian crossing to the Queensboro Bridge intersection, on Second Avenue between 60th and 59th Streets. Image: NYC DOT

BIKING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 protected bike lane, which is separated from vehicle traffic by a lane of parked cars. (Ridership on the avenue has nearly doubled since the protected lane was finished in late 2016.) But below 68th Street, the protected lane ends; bikers must share a lane with vehicles in the often heavily congested approach to the Queensboro Bridge entrance. Second Avenue would be reconfigured to include a new dedicated curbside bike lane under the DOT’s plan. During off-peak hours, bikers will be protected from traffic by a loading and parking lane. During peak hours, the parking lane will become a fifth travel lane and bikers will be distanced from moving vehicles by a 3-foot painted buffer. In its current configuration, the Queensboro Bridge intersection is exceedingly perilous for cyclists, who must avoid vehicles turning left onto the bridge entrance ramp in order to continue south on Second Avenue. Rather than risk a collision with a left-turning car in

the shared lane, bikers often opt instead to cross several lanes of traffic to ride in the bus lane along the opposite curb. Four cyclists and one pedestrian were injured at the intersection last year. The DOT’s proposed makeover would install a safer crossing dedicated to cyclists at the intersection, including a new island that will shorten the crossing distance at 59th Street. The plan would also add pedestrian crosswalks on the east side of Second Avenue (currently, pedestrians can cross 60th and 59th Streets only on the avenue’s west side). The bicyclist and pedestrian advocacy organization Transportation Alternatives has called for the city to improve safety along this portion of Second Avenue for years. Chelsea Yamada, the group’s Manhattan community organizer, said the changes are “much needed” and “will do a much better job than what’s currently on the street. But, she said, a full-time protected lane north of 60th Street would be preferable to the DOT’s proposal for the bike lane, which would be shielded by parked cars only during off-peak hours.

“The rush-hour design raises a lot of concerns, especially for our most vulnerable riders,” Yamada said. “There’s no time when protection isn’t valuable to a cyclist.” Posner said that the lane should be parking-protected at all times. “I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve almost been hit in that bike lane during rush hour,” he said. Posner said the proposal represents “a major step in the right direction,” but is concerned that the new bike lane and crosswalk at the Queensboro Bridge exit ramp will often be blocked by oversized trucks turning left onto Second Avenue. The obstruction of bike lanes by cars, often owing to congestion issues, is endemic across the Upper East Side, Posner said, adding that violations are rarely enforced. “A real comprehensive solution requires not just a redesign of the intersection but a rethinking of traffic enforcement in Manhattan in general,” he said. The agency hopes to implement the changes by early 2019. Michael Garofalo: reporter@ strausnews.com

BIKE PLAN INCLUDES NEW UES CROSSTOWN ROUTES The DOT also plans to install new crosstown bike lanes on 65th and 66th Streets between Fifth Avenue and York Avenue and on East 84th and 85th Streets between Fifth Avenue and East End Avenue. DOT officials presented the proposal to Community Board 8’s transportation committee on July 9. Community boards play a nonbinding advisory role in the transportation planning process. DOT installed two pairs of painted crosstown bike lanes on 70th and 71st Streets and 77th and 78th Streets in 2016 over the objections of Community Board 8, which voted against the proposal. —Michael Garofalo

Repairs to the steps leading to a Riverside Park soccer field have been budgeted at just over $2 million but will not be completed until 2021, according to city Parks and the Riverside Park Conservancy. That amount is roughly twice an initial estimate from June 2015, shortly after the steps, at the level of 102nd Street off the park promenade, were fenced off while both the Conservancy and the city sought funds for repairs. According to the Parks Department, Council Member Helen Rosenthal contributed $800,000 from her discretionary capital fund, Borough President Gale Brewer’s office contributed $550,000 and Mayor Bill de Blasio’s, $700,000. A parks spokeswoman said the project is now fully funded. Should the repairs follow a typical capital project process, the design phase will take 12 months; procurement, nine months; and construction, 12 to 18 months, the spokeswoman, Crystal Howard, said. Once project details are fleshed out, likely within a few months, residents will have an opportunity to review and comment on it, Rosenthal’s spokeswoman, Sarah Crean, said, adding that the project is now fully under the sponsorship of the Parks Department. “Parks has made a commitment to the project and will be able to see it through to the end,” Crean said. “It’s not floating out there.” Howard said a preliminary site investigation will start later this month, with the design phase expected to begin in the fall. She said the project was initially estimated at $1.2 million, while other estimates had put the figure at roughly $500,000. “The estimate increased because of a reevaluation of the complexity of the project, the difficulty in doing construction at this location, and normal cost escalation,” Howard

Stairs leading to the Riverside Park soccer field at the level of about 102nd Street have been fenced off since 2015. Repairs will take another three years. Photo: Richard Khavkine wrote in an email. She also said an uptick in construction had driven up bid prices. Howard did not respond to a repeated request for details concerning the “complexity” and “difficulty” of the project. John Herrold, the current park administrator and until recently the Conservancy’s president and CEO, referred inquiries to the city Parks Department. Since the stairs were fenced off more than three years ago, the entrance at the southwest end of the park is now the only practicable entry to the turf field, which is on the park’s lower level and is used by several youth leagues nearly yeararound. During weekends, practices and games take place throughout the day. A $1.4 million field house is also being built under the stairs. The gate to the stairway, under which is an Amtrak train tunnel, was closed in early 2015 after several long flagstone steps loosened. Workers then discovered a hole through one of the landings. Cyclone fencing has surrounded the gate since then. Youngsters nevertheless scamper around the fencing, climb along a retaining wall about 15 feet high and then around anti-climbing iron spikes. Charles McKinney, the Riverside Park administrator from 1984 until 2001 as well as a former city Parks Department chief of design, said the steps deteriorated because of salt used to melt ice during the winter months. But that remedy, while quick and easy, he said, is ultimately

destructive of concrete, which he said is proving endemic throughout the parks system and of transportation infrastructure. “The use of salt, because it is very effective and cheap, has a cost that is many times greater than the savings, as it is inevitable that the concrete will be dissolved and have to be replaced,” McKinney said by email. But the use of salt, and its ultimate corrosion of concrete, McKinney said, is an example of quick-fixes and cut-rate budgeting of care and repair that will ultimately prove costly. “There is a need for the Parks Department to evaluate how its bare bones funding of parks maintenance is contributing to the degradation of its masonry structures, landscapes, and architecture. I think that there is a need for rebalancing how the funding for citywide park operations is allocated, with a focus on funding skilled maintenance personnel, rather than administration,” he said. In a recent report by the Center for an Urban Future, he recommended swift masonry repairs by contractually dedicated crews to “eliminate the need for more expensive capital projects.” That report, out last month, says that Parks “has no formal system of maintenance for streets, sidewalks, or stairs.” McKinney said a “systematic stair repair” routine is vital. “ You cou ld f u nd work throughout the system for the same cost as this one capital project,” he said in the email. Richard Khavkine: editor.dt@ strausnews.com


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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

ALL IN THE FAMILY Inside Motel Morris and The Commons, two Chelsea restaurants owned by Sam Nidel with the help of his relatives BY MICHAEL DESANTIS

Sam Nidel graduated from college in 2009 thinking he’d spend his years working in the family business of real estate. Instead, Nidel helped launch another type of family business: food. Nidel, 31, now owns two businesses on Seventh Avenue — a coffee shop cafe called The Commons, and Motel Morris, a comfort food restaurant. With the help of his family, Nidel achieved his goal of bringing two food establishments to serve the Chelsea community. Now that they’re here, Nidel and the rest of his team are hoping to not only survive, but thrive, in a city that has a track record of being tough on small businesses. Nidel worked for his uncle’s real estate company, Paley Management, for three years after graduation. During that time, he helped his brother, Brett, and an old friend with their hot cocoa stand on the High Line. Brett Nidel and his friend had won a competition that led to them to open a winter stand when the High Line was just starting to venture into food and beverages. “I helped them out during that venture and I really loved it,” Sam Nidel said. The trio opened a second location in Hudson River Park’s Christopher Street, which was an all-day cafe. Nidel helped manage that on weekends. From there, he fell in love with service and interacting with people seeking food and coffee. Nidel quit his real estate job in 2011. Later that year, he, his brother a family friend Matthew Mogil transformed

The Commons’ hot cocoa. Photo: Michael DeSantis

an old shoes store into The Commons. From then on, it was a family affair. Nidel the opened Motel Morris in April 2017 after signing a lease for it in 2016. With the help of his family, Nidel was able to get the businesses off the ground. Sam, along with Brett and Mogil, is the co-owner of both The Commons and Motel Morris but focuses on the former venture. Brett is the “brains” of the behind-the-scenes work that includes venting, electric and plumbing. Brett’s wife, Tamara McCarthy, is the business’s graphic designer and designed the Motel Morris bathroom. Nidel’s cousin, Jessica Corr, designed the restaurant’s furniture and lighting. Mogil takes care of a lot of the company’s finances. Arlene Novick, Sam and Brett’s mother, bakes a dessert called Arlene’s Special. And their father, Richard Nidel, is a lawyer for their business. In fact, Nidel and at least a dozen of his family members live in the apartments above Motel Morris. Though the building essentially serves as a motel, that’s not how it got its name. Morris Paley, the Nidel brothers’ late grandfather, served as part of the motivation. Mogil’s greatgrandfather was named Morris Minsker. The way Sam described growing up with his family evokes his passion for food. “Every day growing up, I was lucky enough to have two parents who loved to cook,” he said. “There wasn’t a day where I wasn’t obligated to come home and have dinner with my family. My brother and I used to hate it when we were little because we weren’t able to go out and be with our friends all the time. Our mom would kind of be like, ‘You have to come home for dinner.’ But now I definitely think that was a major contributing factor too for our love of food and this industry.” The Commons serves roughly 30 drink options ranging from coffee and tea to hot cocoa and cocktails. Foodwise, it offers egg sandwiches with bacon or sausage, scrambled eggs,

The bacon , egg and cheese sandwich at The Commons. Photo: Michael DeSantis

JULY 12-18,2018

Business

Sam Nidel, co-owner of Motel Morris and The Commons, sits by a wall of family photos inside Motel Morris. Photo: Michael DeSantis mushroom or avocado toast, a variety of sandwiches and more. “It started off as something that we thought the neighborhood needed desperately,” Sam Nidel said of his motivation to found The Commons. “Being that we live [in Chelsea] and there weren’t any coffee shops, really. Or places to get a good, quick breakfast. The need of the neighborhood really drove that.” Eileen Millan, 67, who has lived in Chelsea for 40 years, only began going to The Commons this summer. She said she now goes twice a week after falling in love with the sausage, egg and cheese sandwich. “It was one of the best egg sandwiches I’ve had,” Millan said. Motel Morris, where Nidel takes more of a backstage approach, is run by a dating couple, Bill McDaniel and Jamie Steinberg. They serve as the head chef and general manager, respectively. McDaniel, 49, is responsible for putting the Motel Morris menu together. Under his lead, the restaurant offers American comfort food. “The whole idea about American food is that they’ve taken things from everybody’s culture,” McDaniel said. “I feel as though being a chef in the United States is a great opportu-

nity because you get to just pick all the great things.” Lunch items include soups, salads, chili, a burger with cheddar, bacon, onion rings and black garlic barbecue sauce, a noodle bowl and a crispy fried chicken thigh sandwich (a personal favorite of McDaniel’s). Dinner features skirt steak, roast chicken, chicken fried buttermilk pork chop, grilled trout or roasted salmon. If diners still have room, they can have dessert: butterscotch banana pudding pie, a chocolate s’mores sundae, or Arlene’s Special, which rotates. McDaniel, who grew up in Arizona and has been cooking for 32 years, said he tried to take as many individual preferences into account as possible when creating the menu. “The American cuisine now has really developed through understanding the diversity of people and what they need,” McDaniel explained. “Restrictions, likes, dislikes, gluten issues, allergies. It is, to a different degree, a new way to write menus.” Steinberg, 44, also runs the beverage program. Motel Morris serves about 10 different cocktails, dozens of wines and a handful of different craft beer selections. Between The Commons and Motel Morris, Sam Nidel heads a well-oiled

machine. However, there’s always the risk of dealing with rent and wage increases. New York City isn’t the easiest place to run a small business. Millan said she’s seen numerous restaurants and other long-time mom and pop shops leave Chelsea in her 40 years of living there. “The problem with Chelsea is that it wasn’t always expensive and it wasn’t always as hip to live here,” Millan said. “It’s gone through a gentrification. Most of the mom and pop shops are gone.” Nidel’s restaurants are doing well with rent and the owners have a good relationship with the landlord, but he feels he may need to make some changes with the minimum wage set to increase to $15 on December 31. “I love that our workers can make more money and that’s what we want for them,” Nidel said. “But we’re going to have to raise prices most likely.” Nidel is concerned that restaurants around the city having to raise their prices could scare off customers. Millan has a feeling that Nidel’s family business will be able to manage and that the community will stick with them. “I think they’ve gotten their customers,” she said. “The buzz is out about them. The food is really, really good.”


JULY 12-18,2018

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JULY 12-18,2018

Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

CRAFTING A KENNEDY LEGACY THEATER A new play about a proposed sculpture of JFK and his son sparks debate about art history and historical accuracy BY MARC B. BOUCAI

Steven Skybell and ensemble in the Yiddish version of “Tradition.” Photo: Victor Nechy / ProperPix.com

IT TAKES CHUTZPAH CULTURE Joel Grey directs a Yiddish version of “Fiddler on the Roof” BY KAREN MATTHEWS

It might seem meshuga — crazy — to stage a beloved musical in a language that most of the audience won’t understand. But Tevye the dairyman and his family will speak Yiddish in an off-Broadway production of “Fiddler on the Roof” directed by Oscar and Tony winner Joel Grey. Previews started Wednesday for the show, which will be the first-ever U.S. production of “Fiddler” in the language its characters would have spoken. “I always knew what this play was about and that’s how I had the chutzpah to tackle it,” Grey said during a rehearsal at the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene, which is housed at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in lower Manhattan. “We work in English first on the scenes so that everybody understands the characters, and the third or fourth time we do it in Yiddish, and we just keep at it.” There will be supertitles in English and Russian for theatergoers who don’t know their schmaltz from their schmutz. “Fiddler on the Roof” opened on Broadway in 1964 starring Zero Mostel as Tevye and ran for eight years. It has been a favorite of schools and community theater groups ever since and has been revived on Broadway four times. Its songs including “Sunrise, Sunset” and “If I Were a Rich Man” are familiar even to people who’ve never seen the show. Based on stories by Sholom

Aleichem originally written in Yiddish, “Fiddler” is set in 1905 in a Jewish village in czarist Russia. A Yiddish version of “Fiddler” translated by actor and writer Shraga Friedman as “Fidler afn Dakh” was performed in Israel in 1966 but was never staged in the United States until now. In the Yiddish version of the show, the song “To Life!” doesn’t have to be translated from “L’Chaim!” — It’s just “L’Chaim!” “If I Were a Rich Man” becomes “Ven ikh bin a Rotschild,” from a story by Aleichem about a man who imagines he were as wealthy as a member of the Rothschild family. The new production shows how decades of work to preserve Yiddish by organizations including the Folksbiene — Yiddish for World Stage — have paid off. “For more than a generation we’ve had an explosion of contemporary Yiddish arts and culture by musicians, poets, theater makers, scholars and writers who have studied the language and its history and its incredible volume of modern literature and eclectic music,” said Alisa Solomon, the author of “Wonder of Wonders: A Cultural History of Fiddler on the Roof,” published in 2013. Solomon said “Fiddler” is “free to just kind of be itself in a way that 50 years ago it couldn’t be in some circles because there was an absence of that vibrant Yiddish culture.” Yiddish, which is based on German with elements taken from Hebrew and other languages and is written with the Hebrew alphabet, was once spoken by millions of Eastern European Jews but fell victim both to the Holocaust and the

pull of assimilation. Isaac Bashevis Singer, who won a Nobel Prize for his stories written in Yiddish, famously said the language “has been dying for a thousand years, and I’m sure it will go on dying for another thousand.” Immigrants to the United States built a thriving Yiddish theater scene that launched the careers of famed acting teacher Stella Adler and stars such as Edward G. Robinson. The Folksbiene was founded in 1915 and was once one of more than a dozen Yiddish theater companies on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. It presents plays from the Yiddish theater canon as well as new work and adaptations of Yiddish literary works such as “Yentl,” based on Singer’s story “Yentl the Yeshiva Boy.” Grey’s father, Mickey Katz, was a musician and actor who performed Yiddish comedy songs, but Grey said he doesn’t speak much Yiddish himself and has been learning while rehearsing. Grey watched as the actors rehearsed the tavern scene from “Fiddler” in which Tevye agrees to let the butcher Lazar Wolf marry his eldest daughter. To a non-Yiddish speaker, the most easily understood words were schnapps and vodka. The 86-year-old is best known for his role as the master of ceremonies in “Cabaret,” a musical that improbably turned the rise of Hitler into popular entertainment. “He brings a whole other dimension in terms of his theatrical knowledge and sense,” said Zalmen Mlotek, the Folksbiene’s artistic director. “It’s an experience.”

What responsibility does an artist have when representing a cherished historical figure? What standards of “authenticity” must the work achieve in order for a community to support local public art? When the lauded figure in question is none other than former President John F. Kennedy, the answers can often be controversial and contestable. Claude Soln ik’s f inely wrought new play, “A Walk on the Beach,” billed as a “Kennedy story you haven’t heard,” tells the story of retired plumber turned sculptor and Hyannis native David Lewis, and the over eight year-long battle he fought to build and fund a statue imagining JFK and his son walking arm in arm down the beach as adults. Solnik’s play is based on extensive interviews with David Lewis, the play’s protagonist, who, circa 2000, began sketching various possible images for a bronze sculpture commemorating both JFK and his son JFK Jr. After garnering initial support from Caroline Kennedy and Ted Kennedy, Lewis’s sculpture project hit a few snags when the local paper in Hyannis began to accuse the artist of changing history and tarnishing JFK’s legacy. Other members of the community cited that, just a few years after the tragic plane crash that took the life of JFK Jr., the statue could be seen as an insult, not a tribute. It is precisely the importance of JFK’s legacy that is at stake in both Lewis’s statue and Solnik’s play. The playwright stressed the importance of JFK as symbol, both real and constructed: “If this was a statue of anyone else, I don’t think people would have such strong feelings. Many feel like the Kennedys are part of their family — or they are part of the Kennedys. The passions are very strong ... He became an icon. He made many, many mistakes. And yet, people think of him as an

Sculptor David Lewis (played by Jack Coggins, right) has a private moment with JFK (played by James Earley) in his thoughts. Photo: Claude Solnik idealist ... Our view of JFK to begin with is imagination as much as actual events.” It is this line between history and artistic liberty, between truth and imagination that gives “A Walk on the Beach” its dramatic momentum. The tension between sculpture as representing historical “truth” and artistic interpretation come to a head when the editor of the local paper begins to accuse Lewis of tainting JFK’s memory. Solnik explains how, “at least in the play, the media does everything it can to turn the statue into an issue. The local paper writes editorials and articles questioning the idea of ‘imagination’ rather than history as the basis for a sculpture. It appears that the publication favors negative letters rather than those that support it. The voices of those opposed to things can be louder than those in favor. That’s the way media operates frequently.” The play’s most heated scene occurs between the sculptor (played by Jack Coggins) and the local paper’s editor (John Carhart). Lewis tells the editor (and the audience) that “art can be about imagination, changing reality. You can use art to imagine a different world. You can try to stop the bullet. You can try to put John John’s plane back in the air.” Solnik empathizes with Lewis’ position, noting that as an artist, “you don’t have to be a reporter. You can recreate the world and imagine it differently.” Though set in a pre-social

media landscape (Cape Cod between 2000 and 2007), Solnik’s play touches on contemporary issues around the role of the artist, the activist and the citizen journalist. It demonstrates how an artist, simply by sticking to their creative ideas, can inadvertently stir up a local dialogue about the role of art in civil society. In the case of Lewis, his initial sculpture was never fully produced. A miniature of the JFK/ John John piece is on display at the JFK Museum, and recently, a life-size sculpture of JFK alone designed by Lewis opened in front of Kennedy’s memorial in Hyannis. Solnik, a reporter by profession, uses the ear of a journalist and the heart of a poet to make clear how questions of art and accuracy, history and truth, memory and slander can be summoned up by one image. Although technically a story about the Kennedys, “A Walk on the Beach” is about the role of art in everyday life, and the way the act of creation can be a political, civic act, one that “can try to stop the bullet” and imagine a better, more just world.

IF YOU GO Where: Theatre for A New City, 155 First Ave. When: July 5 - 15, 8 p.m. weeknights, Sat. 3 p.m. & 8 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. Price: $15.00 - $18.00


JULY 12-18,2018

Following pronounced community concerns, an initial proposal for a lounge with live music and a capacity of 100 in the basement of 261 West 21st St., near Eighth Avenue, has been scaled back. Photo: Michael DeSantis

WEST 21ST ST. LOUNGE PLAN REVISED NEIGHBORHOODS Residents feared late hours, noise, mayhem would compromise quality of life BY MICHAEL DESANTIS

Raul Avila is revising his liquor license application for a proposed West 21 Street lounge following heavy criticism from the Chelsea community. Avila’s initial proposal was for a bar in the basement of 261 West 21st St., a residential building, that would stay open until 4 a.m., host 75-100 people, and feature live music with a DJ. But residents came out strongly against the application at a meeting of Community Board 4’s Business Licenses and Permits Committee, which first debated the application last month. They cited noise concerns, danger from the max occupancy and overall disturbance on the residential block. Avila appears to have heard the criticism. He now says he will not have live music and intends to revise the lounge’s hours so that it stays open no later that 11 p.m. weeknights and 1 a.m. on weekends. He also said he would reduce patron ca-

19

Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

pacity to a maximum of 60 and is prepared to hire security to prevent loitering. He’s adamant that the soundproofing he plans to invest in will be enough to stifle noise. “I never wanted live music and dance because it’s not a nightclub,” Avila said recently. “That was never my intention.” Avila said the lawyer he hired to assist with the application process was unfamiliar with the neighborhood and suggested to Avila that he apply for live music, late hours and everything else that would fit the mood of a bar. “We were misguided,” Avila said, adding that he is no longer working with that lawyer. “I’m looking for someone who specializes in something I want to do and knows the rules and regulations of the neighborhood.” Frank Holozubiec, co-chairman of CB4’s Business Licenses and Permits Committee, suggested the committee would have likely voted to recommend the full Community Board 4 to deny the bar a liquor license. Avila is taking a month or two to revise his application to fit the desires of Chelsea’s residents, as well as his own. The committee forwards recommendations to the full board, whose vote for or against is then sent to the New

York State Liquor Authority, which then decides on the application. Avila intends to bring his revised application to the CB4 committee next month at the earliest. Joshua David, a 33-year resident of West 21st Street nearby, was starkly against the original application, but said Avila’s revisions would better fit the neighborhood. “This issue is noise first and foremost, and the ability for people to live a sane and tranquil life in their homes,” David said. “If they can manage to run the business so that residents are not impacted by noise, I don’t have any objection to this.” Pamela Wolff, a representative of the Chelsea West 200 Block Association and a longtime neighborhood resident who opposed the original application said she’s open-minded to whatever Avila come back with. “These two people seem to be very agreeable fellows,” she said of Avila and a colleague. “They seemed stunned by the confrontation of so many people who seemed strongly opposed and the position the board took. There’s a chance they rethink the whole concept and their business plan. That’s my real hope.”

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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

“I WISH SOMEONE WOULD HELP THAT HOMELESS MAN.”

BE THE SOMEONE. Sam New York Cares Volunteer

Every day, we think to ourselves that someone should really help make this city a better place. Visit newyorkcares.org to learn about the countless ways you can volunteer and make a difference in your community.

JULY 12-18,2018


JULY 12-18,2018

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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to otdowntown.com/15 minutes

IN THE PITS, ON BROADWAY The clarinetist Todd Palmer has accompanied performances of “South Pacific,” “Sunset Boulevard,” “The King and I” and now “My Fair Lady” BY MARK NIMAR

Todd Palmer is no stranger to Broadway. Having played clarinet in “South Pacific” with Kelli O’Hara, “Sunset Boulevard” starring Glenn Close and “The King and I” with Ken Wantanabe, he has become a veteran clarinetist in orchestra pits across the Great White Way. This spring, he joined the “My Fair Lady”’ orchestra, and is currently accompanying — and appearing in — the show at Lincoln Center eight times each week. Palmer sat down with us to dish about the show’s offstage shenanigans, glamorous party scene and his favorite post-show cocktail.

How did you get the job playing in the orchestra of “My Fair Lady”? Well, as it is with most things in life, it’s about who you know. I knew Ted Sperling, “My Fair Lady’s” music director, from doing jobs around the city, and 10 years ago, he asked me to do “South Pacific” at Lincoln Center. That gig led me to do “Sunset Boulevard” with Glenn Close, “The King and I” again at Lincoln Center, and now “My Fair Lady.” I knew all the orchestra members of “My Fair Lady” before

Lerner & Loewe’s “My Fair Lady” at the Lincoln Center Theater. Photo: Joan Marcus we started rehearsals. Lincoln Center likes to rehire their musicians. It’s a family affair, really.

Do you have a favorite moment in the show? In the show, the orchestra has a 10-minute cameo onstage. For the party scene, all 30 of us come onto the stage in our white tuxes and white ties. We get to watch Eliza Doolittle come down the staircase in an exquisite ball gown. We play on a big bandstand, which a giant machine pushes up and down. The audience always applauds when the platform descends.... It’s all very grand.

How do you keep the show fresh and interesting for yourself while playing it night after night?

Todd Palmer, a veteran clarinetist, joined the “My Fair Lady”’ orchestra this spring. Photo courtesy of Todd Palmer

Well in the show, there are long, eight-minute stretches of dialogue on stage where we have no music to play. And to ease the boredom, there ARE some shenanigans that go on in the pit. We throw sock puppets at one another, read magazines or stand up and play to keep ourselves entertained. I’ll even go out into the hall and exercise while the show is going on. Of course, the audience sees none of it, because we are in the pit below the stage. It is also cool to see how the actors deliver their lines night after night. The dialogue is so well crafted and witty,

and they deliver it a different way each night, depending on the audience’s energy, applause or the actors’ moods. The actors also forget their lines, and improvise. Or sometimes, someone in the orchestra comes in at the wrong time, and there’s lots of laughter. It’s live theatre; you never quite know what’s going to happen. That is what makes the show different and fresh every time, and makes it interesting for us night after night.

With the ongoing #MeToo movement, “My Fair Lady” has generated controversy in the press. How has the show’s creative team addressed elements of the show that some perceive as misogynistic? I think Eliza is a much stronger character in this revival. In the Hollywood film, Eliza stays with Henry Higgins, even after he mistreats her. But at the end of our show, Eliza is ambivalent; she ends up running off the stage. You’re not really sure what she is thinking: is she in a moment of indecision, or not? Bartlett Sher was very aware of not making this revival a reincarnation of a museum piece. He knows how to dust stories off, and make them relevant in this day and age. I think that’s one of the reasons why Bart wanted to do this show. It hasn’t been seen on Broadway in 25 years, and a lot has happened since

then with women in the workforce and at home. For many years, we were lying to ourselves, saying that women were equal. But now, in this unique time that we are living in, change is in the air. And I know Bart Sher is trying to convey that in his staging.

What do you do after the show to decompress? Good question! Well, I make a cocktail before I go to the show every night. I mix Amsterdam vodka, triple sec, fresh lime juice and a delicious mango mixer. It’s not a cosmo; I call it a ‘Tozmo.” Before I leave, I put it in the freezer, and it is sitting there waiting for me when I get back home at 11:30. And when I get home, it is frozen to perfection. I nurse my cocktail, and sip it slowly instead of downing it all at once. And then, I watch reruns of “Modern Family” on my couch. It is the perfect way to decompress after a three-hour show.

How did you start playing the clarinet? Well, I grew up in Hagerstown, Maryland. I went to the local elementary school and played trumpet in the fourth grade. But my sister played the clarinet, and would leave her clarinet in her closet. And I would sneak into my sister’s room, and take it out. And I would teach the fingerings to myself while she wasn’t home; I was com-

pletely self-taught. I one day went to my band teacher, and told him that I would be switching from trumpet to clarinet. And that was that.

Do you still practice? I still do warm up exercises. I was doing them as I was watching Wimbledon this morning.

As a young musician, did you ever think you would have all this success? At 19, I moved to New York. I came here, bright-lights-big-city, and made a career out of this. If I had gone to a fortune-teller back when I started, and had they told me things would work out the way they did, I would not have believed them. I feel so blessed to have had this career. Because of music, I have played in China, have swum in the Aegean Sea. Growing up, my family would never travel farther than a car would take us.... So without music, I never would have done any of this. So I am very appreciative of the things that have come my way.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to otdowntown.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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JULY 12-18,2018

Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

Downtowner COLOR GREENWICH VILLAGE by Jake Rose

C.O. Bigelow C.O. Bigelow’s landmark apothecary has been providing prescriptions, healing remedies, unique and unusual beauty products and hard to find apothecary items since 1838.

Scan or take a picture of your work and send it to molly.colgan@strausnews.com. We’ll publish some of them. To purchase a coloring book of Greenwich Village venues, go to colorourtown.com/gv

CROSSWORD by Myles Mellor

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JULY 12-18,2018

CLASSIFIEDS MASSAGE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE - SALE

PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF COOPERATIVE APARMENT SECURITY PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: By Virtue of a Default under Loan Security Agreement, and other Security Documents, Karen Loiacano, Auctioneer, License #DCA1435601 or Jessica L Prince-Clateman, Auctioneer, License #1097640 or Vincent DeAngelis Auctioneer, License #1127571 will sell at public auction, with reserve, on August 1, 2018, in the Rotunda of the New York County Courthouse, 60 Centre Street, New York, NY 10007, commencing at 1:30pm for the following account: Edith N. Gonzalez, as borrower, 32.50 shares of capital stock of Seward Park Housing Corp. and all right, title and interest in the Proprietary Lease to 387 Grand Street Apt K1004, New York, NY 10002 Sale held to enforce rights of Citibank NA, who reserves the right to bid. Ten percent (10%) Bank/Certified check required at sale, balance due at closing within thirty (30) days. The Cooperative Apartment will be sold “AS IS” and possession is to be obtained by the purchaser. Pursuant to Section 201 of the Lien Law you must answer within 10 days from receipt of this notice in which redemption of the above captioned premises can occur. There is presently an outstanding debt owed to Citibank NA (lender) as of the date of this notice in the amount of $190,864.83. This figure is for the outstanding balance due under UCC1, which was secured by Financing Statement in favor of Citibank NA recorded on May 11, 2004 in CRFN 2004000293519.

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Our Town|Downtowner otdowntown.com

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every effort to avoid mistakes in your classified ads. Check your ad the first week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the first incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classified ads are pre-paid.

PUBLIC NOTICES

Please note this is not a payoff amount as additional interest/ fees/penalties may be incurred. You must contact the undersigned to obtain a final payoff quote or if you dispute any information presented herein. The estimated value of the above captioned premises is $719,000.00. Pursuant to the Uniform Commercial Code Article 9-623, the above captioned premises may be redeemed at any time prior to the foreclosure sale. You may contact the undersigned and either pay the principal balance due along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Citibank NA. and the undersigned, or pay the outstanding loan arrears along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Citibank NA, and the undersigned, with respect to the foreclosure proceedings. Failure to cure the default prior to the sale will result in the termination of the proprietary lease. If you have received a discharge from the Bankruptcy Court, you are not personally liable for the payment of the loan and this notice is for compliance and information purposes only. However, Citibank NA, still has the right under the loan security agreement and other collateral documents to foreclosure on the shares of stock and rights under the proprietary lease allocated to the cooperative apartment. Dated: June 7, 2018 Frenkel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP Attorneys for Citibank NA 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706 631-969-3100 File #01-088514-F00 #95152

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JULY 12-18,2018

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Our Town Downtown - July 12, 2018  
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