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Consult Summer 2010 | Women’s Health


Contents 3 Maternal Fetal Medicine 9 Gynecologic Oncology 15 The Center for Women’s Health 19 News and updates from the Medical Center New clinical research and continuing medical education opportunities


Ohio State’s

Consult Women’s Health

The Ohio State University Medical Center

Maternal Fetal Medicine Program w Updates on our specialized treatments and programs w Learn about the newest perinatal research being conducted w Latest tools to identify candidates for prenatal testing and genetics counseling


Ohio State’s Maternal Fetal Medicine Program Central Ohio’s premier provider of comprehensive high-risk pregnancy care Diabetes in Pregnancy Program

Maternal Fetal Medicine Program

Directors: Celeste Durnwald, MD, and Mark Landon, MD

at a Glance

We have the only multidisciplinary Diabetes in Pregnancy Program in central Ohio; one of the 10 largest such programs in the United States. We have cared for thousands of women with pregnancies complicated by pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes. During the last academic year, approximately 200 women were enrolled in our program.

• 12 maternal fetal medicine specialists and a genetics fellowship-trained maternal fetal medicine specialist • Diabetes in Pregnancy Program (one of largest in the United States) • Premature Birth Prevention Program

Features of our program include nutritional counseling, three dedicated Diabetes in Pregnancy educators and consultative services for blood sugar management, including computerized assessment and insulin pump therapy.

• Prenatal Diagnosis Clinic (risk assessment and testing) • Genetics counseling staffed by three boardcertified genetics counselors

“Often, women who have pre-existing diabetes or who develop diabetes during pregnancy can benefit a great deal from one-on-one maternal fetal medicine consultation and guidance during their pregnancies,” says Mark Landon, MD, director of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Ohio State’s Medical Center. “They can be helped by one of our three Diabetes in Pregnancy educators and continue to see their local physicians for obstetric care. Our primary goal is to help women who have diabetes succeed in having healthy babies.”

• Fetal Treatment Program • Cardiac Disease and Pregnancy Program • Maternal transport service • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (Level III, the highest level available) • Perinatal research, including 20-year membership in the National Institutes of Health Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network • Maternity center (award-winning)

Premature Birth Prevention Program Director: Jay Iams, MD

When your patients experience high-risk pregnancies, you want the assurance that they are being referred to an experienced program that is well-equipped to provide every technology and type of expertise available.

Our specialized Premature Birth Prevention Program for women with a history of preterm birth and those at risk during a current pregnancy is one of a few such programs in the United States devoted solely to this high-risk population.

The Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine at The Ohio State University Medical Center works in consultation with primary care and obstetric providers to ensure the highest caliber of care for patients with high-risk pregnancies and their babies. For a quarter-century, our program has been nationally recognized as a leader in high-risk obstetric care, perinatal research and new technologies.

This program, which serves 150 to 200 women per year, is staffed by Jay Iams, MD, a team of maternal fetal medicine specialists and a dedicated nurse who provides counseling and support to the patients. Our Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine is engaged with Nationwide Children’s Hospital in the Ohio Better Birth Outcomes Initiative aimed at preventing prematurity throughout central Ohio and the surrounding region. We have long been recognized as a pioneer in screening techniques and risk-factor assessment for women at risk for prematurity.

Our 12 maternal fetal medicine specialists and genetics fellowship-trained maternal fetal medicine specialist are pleased to collaborate with you for the well-being of your patients.

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Other Features

“Women who have a history of or who are at risk for preterm birth are a diverse patient group that requires an individualized approach to care,” says Dr. Iams. “Our program is dedicated to assisting these patients with prepregnancy counseling and guidance in lifestyle changes, medication use, risk reduction and symptom awareness.”

Our Maternal Fetal Medicine Program is a leading referral center in the region for maternal transports. In the last two years, more than 800 patients were admitted in transfer from area physicians and hospitals for obstetrical complications. The Ohio State University Medical Center also features the largest neonatal intensive care unit of any obstetric facility in central Ohio, staffed in collaboration with Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Prenatal Diagnosis Clinic and Genetics Counseling Director: Britton Rink, MD, MS Our Prenatal Diagnosis Clinic offers a full array of prenatal diagnostic testing, including first trimester risk assessment for aneuploidy. We were the first provider in the area to offer fetal nasal bone measurement as part of the first trimester screening protocol to detect fetal abnormalities and genetics defects.

Perinatal Research Our scientists and physicians never cease in their efforts to improve the care of mothers and babies. Our Maternal Fetal Medicine Program is a leader in research studies through our 20-year membership in the highly competitive National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network and the North American Fetal Therapy Network. Among the studies being conducted at OSUMC are those to:

Our team of genetics counselors assists patients who may be at increased risk for offspring with genetic abnormalities or a family history of a genetic condition. See Practice Tool for more information.

• Determine if treatment with progesterone will reduce the risk of preterm birth in women found to have a short cervix in their first pregnancy.

Fetal Treatment Program Director: Richard O’Shaughnessy, MD Led by Richard O’Shaughnessy, MD, our Fetal Treatment Program is closely linked to our genetics and prenatal diagnostic programs. The Fetal Treatment Program provides diagnostic and therapeutic options for the most complex prenatally diagnosed structural fetal abnormalities. We were the first perinatal center in Ohio to perform invasive fetal procedures, and we continue to be recognized nationally for the management of these complex disorders.

• Discover if there is an association between the level of anemia in a fetus from the mother’s antibodies and levels of oxidative stress. • Learn which fetuses of women who have lower urinary tract obstruction might benefit from treatment during pregnancy. • Learn if a blood test or test of the amniotic fluid can predict the severity of twin-twin transfusion. • Examine the outcomes of pregnancies treated with radiofrequency ablation.

Cardiac Disease and Pregnancy Program Director: David Colombo, MD

• Evaluate a noninvasive test for fetal Rh type during pregnancy.

In collaboration with cardiologists at Ohio State’s Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, we provide comprehensive, multidisciplinary care for pregnant women who have congenital or chronic cardiac problems. This is an important feature of our Maternal Fetal Medicine Program, as increasing numbers of women of reproductive age have survived congenital heart disease. They represent some of the highest risk pregnancies in addition to those with acquired cardiac conditions. OSUMC’s Maternal Fetal Medicine is the only program in central Ohio to offer this level of specialized care.

• Determine if prenatal surgery will improve the outcomes of babies with spina bifida. • Determine the causes of premature labor and pre-eclampsia. • Determine if treatment of maternal sub-clinical hypothyroidism benefits newborns and infants. • Determine appropriate measures for safety and quality in obstetric care. Patients have opportunities to participate in research studies for which they qualify. 5

Maternal fetal medicine


maternal fetal medicine

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Practice Tool

Helping your patients navigate prenatal genetics testing

should not be offered independent biochemical screening for aneuploidy in the second trimester. To enhance the detection rate for trisomy 21, it is possible to combine first- and second-semester analytes. However, this should be done with appropriate counseling and education.

Prenatal genetics screening and diagnosis have evolved rapidly in the last decade. Providers are challenged to identify at-risk obstetrics patients and to discuss available screening technologies, their implications and reproductive outcomes. The Maternal Fetal Medicine Program at The Ohio State University Medical Center provides comprehensive prenatal testing and genetics counseling, and can help personalize risk assessment and prenatal diagnosis options for your patients.

Abnormal first- and second-trimester serum markers or an increased nuchal translucency measurement may indicate risk for other genetic conditions, congenital abnormalities or adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as growth restriction and fetal demise. Ohio State’s Maternal Fetal Medicine Program features one of the region’s only teams of highrisk prenatal specialists and high-quality maternal fetal diagnostic and fetal treatment options for your patients and their families.

Prenatal testing includes risk assessment for: • Chromosome imbalances (aneuploidy) • Ethnicity-based genetic carrier screening

Ethnicity-based carrier screening

• Patient-specific risk evaluation for heritable conditions and birth defects

Enhanced understanding of disease-causing variations in the human genome provides new opportunities to identify heritable disorders that occur more frequently within certain ethnic groups. Taking a family history and inquiring about ethnicity allows a physician to identify patients who may be carriers and at higher risk of having children with a genetic condition.

Screening and diagnosis of aneuploidy In 2007, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued a Practice Bulletin recommending all pregnant women, regardless of age, should be offered screening and diagnostic testing for aneuploidy. Screening and diagnostic tests are available in the first and second trimesters.

Heritable conditions and birth defects Many complex disease processes, such as mental retardation, autism, bleeding conditions and multiple unexplained miscarriages, may reflect an underlying genetic condition yet unknown to the family or medical providers. Patients considering pregnancy or being seen in the prenatal setting should be asked to identify family members with multiple miscarriages, mental retardation, birth defects and other medical complications. A referral to a medical geneticist may be recommended to provide accurate reproductive counseling.

Between 11 and 13 weeks of gestation, risk for trisomy 21, trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 is calculated by combining a measurement of the nuchal translucency, presence or absence of the nasal bone, and two maternal biochemical analytes. The diagnostic testing option in the first trimester, after 10 weeks of gestation, is chorionic villus sampling (CVS). This is used to diagnose chromosomal abnormalities or provide tissue for DNA testing if a specific condition is identified. Because first-trimester screening does not assess risk for neural tube defects, patients are advised to have alphafetoprotein screening in the second trimester.

“Our Maternal Fetal Medicine Program offers a full complement of prenatal genetic testing, including the very important and highly sensitive counseling component to help patients interpret the information they receive,” says Britton Rink, MD. “Communicating potentially life-changing news to expectant patients can be difficult. Our team is available to help you determine when testing is recommended and to provide as much of that service to your patients as needed. In many cases, women can receive testing at OSUMC and continue to receive their prenatal care from their primary obstetrician.”

In the second trimester, screening for aneuploidy and neural tube defects is traditionally done with a combination of four maternal serum biochemical markers. Advanced ultrasound techniques identify structural birth defects. Amniocentesis is the optimal diagnostic test available after 15 weeks of gestation. Women who have first-trimester risk assessment 6

Maternal fetal medicine


Maternal Fetal Medicine Faculty Mark Landon, MD

Wanjiku Musindi, MD

Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Director of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fellowship/Residency: Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School: Cornell University Medical College

Fellowship/Residency: Emory University School of Medicine Medical School: Meharry Medical College School of Medicine

Richard O’Shaughnessy, MD

David Colombo, MD

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Director, Cardiac Disease and Pregnancy Program, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship/Residency: University of Chicago Medical School and The Ohio State University Medical Center Medical School: The Ohio State University Medical Center

Celeste Durnwald, MD Director of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Program, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship/Residency: Summa Health System and Case Western Reserve University Medical School: Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

Fellowship/Residency: Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University, St. Louis School of Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Medical School: The Ohio State University Medical School

Mona Prasad, DO, MPH Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship/Residency: The Ohio State University Medical Center Medical School: Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University

Hugh Ehrenberg, MD Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship/Residency: Cooper University Hospital, Danbury Hospital and MetroHealth Medical Center Medical School: New Jersey Medical School

Britton Rink, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Jay Iams, MD Vice Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Director of the Premature Birth Prevention Program, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship/Residency: University of New Mexico, Phoenix Hospitals, The Ohio State University Medical Center Medical School: University of Wisconsin Medical School

Fellowship/Residency: The Ohio State University College of Medicine - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Medical School: Indiana University School of Medicine

Philip Samuels, MD Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship/Residency: Eastern Virginia Medical School, University of Pennsylvania Health System Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Medical School: Texas Tech University School of Medicine

Chris Lang, MD Clinical Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cynthia Shellhaas, MD, MPH Clinical Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fellowship/Residency: The Ohio State University Hospitals, Riverside Methodist Hospital Medical School: University at Buffalo, The State University of New York School of Medicine

Fellowship/Residency: Akron General Medical Center, Duke University School of Medicine Medical School: Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine

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OSUMC Maternity Center More than 4,500 babies are born each year at the fully renovated labor and delivery unit at The Ohio State University Medical Center and the number grows each year. Having a Level III (the highest) Neonatal Intensive Care Unit qualifies us to handle deliveries with special circumstances. We are well experienced with high-risk, multiples and special-needs deliveries. Our Maternity Center provides state-of-the-art facilities in the warm, home-like environment expectant mothers want from a maternity center. The labor and delivery unit of our Maternity Center received a top award for architectural design in a competition sponsored by Modern Healthcare magazine and the American Institute of Architects’ Academy of Architecture for Health. From a field of more than 200 entries, our Maternity Center was one of two facilities to receive an award. Our 32,000-square-foot unit was judged as providing “a sense of warmth and serenity.”

Did You Know…? The Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine is part of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at The Ohio State University Medical Center—one of the highest-ranked (US News & World Report) academic Obstetrics and Gynecology departments in the United States. Two of the internationally used leading textbooks in this field, Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice and Gabbe: Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies, are edited by members of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine at The Ohio State University Medical Center. This is but one way that OSUMC physicians are involved in helping educate physicians across the country.

Contact The Ohio State University Medical Center Maternal Fetal Medicine Program 614-293-2222 High-Risk Maternal Transport Line | 1-800-282-6502 We appreciate your referrals and welcome the opportunity to partner with you in the care of your patients. We are committed to providing personalized, high-level care and to communicating with you about the care your patients receive at The Ohio State University Medical Center.

The Ohio State University Medical Center Maternal Fetal Medicine Program medicalcenter.osu.edu/go/MFM

© 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center – 08


Ohio State’s

Consult Women’s Health

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute

Gynecologic Oncology w State-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment w Advanced robotic treatments w How to identify patients for genetic testing


Ohio State’s Gynecologic Oncology Comprehensive, compassionate care for reproductive organ cancers The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James) is dedicated to providing the best gynecologic cancer research and treatment. Having these functions under one roof enables our multidisciplinary team of gynecologic cancer physicians and researchers to better translate the knowledge gained from treating and studying thousands of patients to improve clinical outcomes. Most of the 80,000 U.S. women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer each year will need a major surgery that includes a hysterectomy and lymph node dissection, surgical staging, radical hysterectomy or a tumor debulking procedure. Our gynecologic oncology program features state-ofthe-art methods to diagnose and treat tumors, including robotic surgery, a viable and much less invasive option. David Cohn, MD and Jeffrey Fowler, MD with the daVinci robot.

We were one of the first cancer centers in the nation certified to perform minimally invasive surgery on gynecologic cancers.

About Our Robotics Program • Our Center for Advanced Robotic Surgery has the second-highest volume of robotic procedures in the United States.

Patients have access to unparalleled experience in robotic procedures at OSUCCC-James including:

• Our surgeons perform more gynecologic oncology robotic procedures than any hospital in Ohio.

• Hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy for uterine cancer

• Ohio State has a fellowship-trained gynecologic oncologist and a general gynecologic surgeon who has more than 20 years of experience.

• Radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer

• Our surgeons can treat many patients who are deemed unsuitable for robotic procedures elsewhere, including those who are obese, who have scar tissue from previous surgeries or who have complex cases.

• Removal of ovary with or without hysterectomy, lymphadenectomy and staging for ovarian cancer • Hysterectomy and removal of ovaries as risk-reduction surgery in patients at risk for gynecologic cancer

• Our multidisciplinary robotic team has unparalleled experience – from the nurses and operating room staff to anesthesiologists and surgeons.

• Removal of ovary or ovarian cyst in patients with a pelvic mass • Hysterectomy for precancerous lesions of cervix or uterus

• We have offered robotic procedures in gynecology oncology since they were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006. • We had the first da Vinci robot in the entire country. • Our surgeons perform more robotic procedures in a day than most hospitals do in a month.

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• Our surgeons train other surgeons in gynecologic robotic techniques and are invited to lecture and instruct around the country.

For 12 years, Hope’s Boutique has been a beloved community resource. Women can shop for wigs, prostheses, clothing, scarves, hats and other products, with individual assistance and complimentary fittings in a warm, compassionate environment.

• The Ohio State University Medical Center is one of only 21 training centers for the da Vinci Surgical System in the United States.

Proceeds from sales benefit the Hope Fund, which provides access to Hope’s Boutique products for financially disadvantaged women.

• Our expertise is regularly sought by the FDA when selecting sites for new robotic procedures and clinical trials.

Hope’s Boutique is located in Dublin in the Stoneridge Medical Center (West Dublin-Granville Road, just west of Sawmill Road). In the winter of 2011, Hope’s Boutique will move to a larger facility in the new JamesCare Comprehensive Breast Center on Olentangy River Road.

Research Our researchers lead and participate in privately and publicly funded clinical trials and participate in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical research groups. Patients have access to novel treatments not available elsewhere due to our involvement in groundbreaking research. Current ongoing trials include: • Extending overall survival of advanced ovarian cancer patients by delivering drugs in two separate sites (IV and abdomen) • Increasing the effectiveness and tolerability of paclitaxel for ovarian cancer • Developing a vaccine to decrease ovarian cancer growth • Investigational trials to evaluate PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer • Investigator initiated trials evaluating the use of targeted therapies in ovarian, uterine and cervical cancer

Hope’s boutique - a resource for your patients Women in all stages of cancer may require specialized clothing and body-care products. Hope’s Boutique, the only boutique of its kind in central Ohio, provides these unique resources along with a personal touch to support women who have or had cancer.

OSU Gynecologic Oncology at Mill Run The Lane Family Women’s Cancer Center In the last year the division of Gynecologic Oncology moved to a new home in the Mill Run shopping center in Hilliard. Conveniently located off interstate 270, the facility is easy to get to and provides ample free parking. This 17,000 square-foot state-of-the-art facility provides many resources for patients and their family and friends including a library with internet access and a survivorship clinic. 11 Gynecologic Oncology


Gynecologic Oncology

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Practice Tool

Identifying Patients for Our Clinical Cancer Genetics Program

cause of their cancer. However, breast, ovarian and uterine cancers can have a hereditary component. If a patient is diagnosed with one of those cancers, genetic testing may be appropriate.”

It’s no secret that cancer runs in some families. Some of your patients may believe they have an inherited cancer risk or you may suspect a genetic component. In those cases, you may want to refer them for genetic testing from a reputable resource. This information can help you determine which patients may benefit from genetic testing.

Persons interested in learning more about their family history of cancer can visit https://familyhealthlink.osumc. edu, The Ohio State University Medical Center’s Family HealthLink interactive tool, to estimate risk by reviewing disease patterns in a family. If the personalized risk assessment indicates high risk, a genetic consultation may be in order. If the assessment indicates moderate risk, increased cancer screening may be in order.

Individuals who may want to consider genetic counseling and testing include those who: • have a strong family history of cancer – two or more close family members on the same side of the family with the same or related cancers

Ohio State University Medical Center and OSUCCC-James’ Clinical Cancer Genetics Program Information and appointments:

• had cancer at an early age, had more than one kind of primary cancer or had a close family member with these features

614-293-6694/888-329-1654 cancer.osu.edu/go/genetics

• come from a family that is known to have an inherited cancer syndrome • have a rare cancer, such as breast cancer in men or an adrenal gland tumor The Ohio State University Medical Center and OSUCCCJames’ Clinical Cancer Genetics Program provides cancer risk assessment, including explaining the role of genes in causing cancer, predicting the likelihood the individual will develop cancer or have a recurrence, and estimating the chance that a risk for cancer might be passed along through the genes in the family. Patients meet with a genetic counselor and a physician who specializes in cancer genetics to complete a family medical history, learn ways to lower their risk of cancer and detect it early when it is most easily treated. Program staff members assist patients in tracking down medical records and death certificates of family members to complete a three-generation family tree, and provide a letter that can be sent to family members who may be affected by genetic test findings. “It is important that genetic testing is comprehensive and includes counseling to ensure the patient fully understands the results, the ramifications and the limitations,” says Heather Hampel, a genetic counselor at The Ohio State University Medical Center. “Today, insurance coverage for genetic testing is much better and the criteria are reasonable,” says Hampel. “The good news is that most people do not have a hereditary 12

Gynecologic Oncology


Clinical Team Jeffrey Fowler, MD

Eric L Eisenhauer, MD

Board certified in gynecologic oncology Director, Division of Gynecologic Oncology Co-Director, Ohio State’s Center for Advanced Robotic Surgery Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology John G. Boutselis, MD, Chair in Gynecology

Board eligible obstetrician/gynecologist Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Residency: Brigham & Woman’s Hospital Medical School: University of California, San Diego School of Medicine

Fellowship: Gynecologic Oncology, UCLA School of Medicine and Cedars-Sinai Residency: The Ohio State University Medical Center Medical School: Northwestern University

David O’Malley, MD Board certified in gynecologic oncology Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

David Cohn, MD Board certified in gynecologic oncology Donald G. Jones, MD, and Patsy P. Jones Designated Professorship in OB/Gynecology Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fellowship: Yale University School of Medicine Residency: Case Western Reserve University Medical School: Wayne State University School of Medicine

Fellowship: Washington University School of Medicine Residency: University of Washington Medical Center Medical School: Georgetown University School of Medicine

Ritu Salani, MD, MBA Board eligible obstetrician/gynecologist Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship: Johns Hopkins Medical Institute Residency: Emory University Hospital Medical School: Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine

Larry Copeland, MD Board certified in gynecologic oncology Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology William Greenville Pace III and Joan Norris Collins-Pace Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellowship: University of Texas-MD Anderson Residency: McMaster University Medical School: University of Western Ontario

Contact

Genetics

The OSUCCC-James Gynecologic Cancer Program We often can see your patient who has been diagnosed with cancer the next day. Prompt access to specialty care can help alleviate the emotional duress that accompanies a cancer diagnosis.

Judith Westman, MD Board certified medical genetics and pediatrics Professor of Clinical Medicine Director, Division of Human Genetics Fellowship and Residency: The Ohio State University Medical Center Medical School: The Ohio State University College of Medicine

New Patient Referral Line | 800-293-5066 We appreciate your referrals and welcome the opportunity to partner with you. We are committed to maintaining consistent communication with you about the patients you refer, so you stay well informed about the care they receive at OSUCCC-James. 13

Gynecologic Oncology


Gynecologic Oncology cancer.osu.edu

Š 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center – 08


Ohio State’s

Consult Women’s Health

The Ohio State University Medical Center

Center for Women’s Health w Comprehensive, coordinated care in a single facility w Services for routine to complex care w Advanced robotic surgery capabilities


Ohio State’s Center for Women’s Health Committed to meeting the unique health and wellness needs of women through innovative research, education, and patient care. “The Center for Women’s Health focuses on all health concerns experienced by women across their lifespan – health services used solely by women, more commonly by women than men, or in a unique way by women compared to men,” says Dr. Blumenfeld.

Women’s healthcare needs consist of more than just reproductive health. While women may get many of the same diseases and conditions as men, women are often affected differently and treatments can vary. “Increasing awareness of gender-related health differences is important for providers to personalize treatment plans and for the public to better understand their personal health,” says Laxmi Mehta, MD, assistant program director for Educational Outreach at the Center for Women’s Health. With women comprising more than half of our inpatient and outpatient populations, The Ohio State University Medical Center created a Center for Women’s Health to address women’s health needs in a multidisciplinary environment dedicated to clinical care, research and education.

“The Ohio State University Medical Center, part of a thriving university campus, is uniquely suited to draw upon the expertise, experience and diversity of many aspects of women’s health – not only medicine but also public health, early childhood education, sociology and psychiatry,” says Dr. Blumenfeld. “We strive to engage faculty, staff, students and patients in a common vision for women’s health.”

Research Researchers in the Center for Women’s Health are committed to furthering women’s health issues to meet their evolving needs. At present, researchers have received pilot funding to study:

“Women are busy, working, volunteering and caring for everyone else in the family so we have united a wide array of healthcare services just for women in a single setting for their convenience,”

• Premenstrual asthma

says Michael Blumenfeld, MD, clinical director of the Center for Women’s Health. “Women can benefit from easy access to the many areas of excellence at our University, including seamless referral from one specialist to another within the Center for Women’s Health. Whether a patient’s need is routine or complex, this spacious new clinic provides multidisciplinary care under one roof.”

• Endocrine resistant breast cancer • Effects of aspirin on HDL in postmenopausal women

Education The Center for Women’s Health is committed to furthering education about women’s health. We provide continuing medical education (CME) courses for providers and also programs for members of the community. Recent programs have addressed coronary artery disease, supplements and vitamins, and robotics and minimally invasive gynecologic procedures. For information about CME courses, visit ccme.osu.edu.

Clinical Care The Center for Women’s Health was officially established in 2007, and our clinical center opened in 2009. In a single setting, patients can see providers specializing in: • Primary Care • Integrative Medicine

Contact

• Gynecology

Center for Women’s Health at The Ohio State University Medical Center | 614-293-2076

• Menopause • Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

The Center for Women’s Health is conveniently located close to the Medical Center at 915 Olentangy River Road. This 4,700-square-foot clinic is the only multidisciplinary women’s health center in Columbus. The clinic offers ample free parking and is easily accessed off of State Route 315, between Third Avenue and Goodale Boulevard.

• Cardiology • Endocrinology • Osteoporosis

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Center for Women’s Health Team

Rebecca Jackson, MD Endocrinology and Osteoporosis

Robotic Surgery Capability Michael Blumenfeld, MD

The Center for Women’s Health has a close affiliation with our Center for Advanced Robotic Surgery, allowing us to offer full-spectrum care from benign conditions to urogynecology and oncology. Women who need surgery for benign gynecologic conditions including hysterectomy can be evaluated for their suitability for minimally invasive robotic procedures at our center. Our surgeons are experienced in complex procedures, including ovarian and uterine masses and benign tumors. Patients who have robotic surgery benefit from less blood loss, pain and scarring, and less risk of infection.

Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

Laxmi Mehta, MD Cardiology

Ohio State’s Center for Advanced Robotic Surgery has the second-highest volume of robotic procedures in the United States. We have offered robotic procedures since they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006. In fact, we had the first robot for these procedures in the entire country.

Priscilla Bresler, MD General Internal Medicine - Primary Care

Our Center for Advanced Robotic Surgery provides gynecologic procedures for: • Hysterectomy for benign gynecologic abnormalities

Ruslana Kurpita, MD

• Hysterectomy for risk-reduction for patients with BRCA genetic mutations who are at high risk for ovarian cancer

Integrative Medicine and Family Medicine – Primary Care

• Myomectomy for removal of uterine fibroids • Benign ovarian tumor removal • Sacral colpopexy and other procedures for pelvic organ prolapse • Gynecologic oncology “Our robotic team is large and multidisciplinary and has unparalleled experience, from the nurses and operating room staff to anesthesiologists and surgeons,” says Dr. Blumenfeld. “Robotics has revolutionized gynecologic surgery. Today, many procedures can be performed through small incisions with robotic techniques. However, robotic surgery is only a tool. It is optimally effective only in the hands of experienced surgeons. Ohio State’s team of robotic surgeons includes a urogynecologist, gynecologic oncologist and general gynecologic surgeons. You will not find this depth elsewhere.”

Cynthia Evans, MD Gynecology and Menopause

Jennifer Dush, CNP Gynecology and General Internal Medicine – Primary Care 17

Center for women’s health


Ranked among the best The Ohio State University Medical Center’s gynecology program has earned a spot as one of the nation’s top 20 programs in the latest rankings by U.S. News & World Report. The rankings, contained in the magazine’s “America’s Best Hospitals” edition, are based on several criteria including patient safety and mortality. In addition to gynecology, 10 other Ohio State medical specialties are recognized for excellence in the magazine, deemed one of the country’s leading consumer guides to top-performing hospitals. OSU Medical Center is the only central Ohio hospital listed in the rankings. For nearly two decades, U.S. News & World Report has consistently named OSU Medical Center as one of the nation’s best hospitals.

The Ohio State University Medical Center Center for Women’s Health cwh.osu.edu

© 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center – 08


Ohio State’s

Consult | Summer 2010 |

Advanced Plastic Surgeries Offered at New Facility We have everything right here.”

Ohio State’s Division of Plastic Surgery has expanded to keep pace with the growing demand for its advanced surgical procedures. Outpatient surgeries are performed in a new state-of-the-art facility at 915 Olentangy River Road, just off State Route 315, in addition to a facility at Easton, where the primary focus is on cosmetic surgery and body contouring.

The Most Comprehensive Breast Reconstruction in the Region With four microsurgeons trained at the renowned MD Anderson Cancer Center, Ohio State offers the most comprehensive breast reconstruction services in central Ohio for: • • • •

TRAM flap (microsurgical and non-microsurgical) DIEP flap GAP flap TUG flap

With thirteen surgeons, Ohio State Plastic Surgery is the largest plastic surgery group in the state. The plastic surgery team also provides sophisticated reconstructive surgery for defects involving the head and neck, torso and extremities. The plastic surgery team provides the following services:

“Our plastic surgery team is an integral part of breast cancer consultations at The James. We work collaboratively with physicians to create a complete treatment plan for each patient, so they have all of their options up-front and can make informed decisions about their care,” says Michael Miller, MD, director of the Division of Plastic Surgery. “With breast reconstruction, we arrange to have a plastic surgeon involved in the original surgery, reducing recovery time and risk of infection for the patient, who would be required to undergo a second surgery at many other institutions.” James Boehmler, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Plastic Surgery, performs a variety of secondary breast reconstruction surgeries. For some women who had radiation therapy to treat breast cancer, it may be best to allow time for healing prior to performing breast reconstruction. For others, the original surgery may have been overly complex for the doctor or there could have been complications from the original reconstructive surgery. “With a team of surgeons as well-trained and experienced as we have here at Ohio State, a patient will never be turned away or referred elsewhere. 19

Reconstruction for: • Breast • Head and neck • Torso • Upper extremities, including hand • Lower extremities • Pediatric congenital deformities • Cancer • Trauma • Chronic wounds • Burns, including late scar deformities Cosmetic Surgeries for: • Facial rejuvenation • Rhinopasty • Breast enhancement • Abdominoplasty • Post-bariatric body contouring To refer patients or to learn more about our plastic surgery offerings, call 293-8566 or visit www.surgery.osu.edu/plastic.


Medical Center Earns 11 Spots on U.S. News “America’s Best” List

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he Ohio State University Medical Center’s heart program jumped 17 places – from 37 to 20 – to earn a spot as one of the nation’s best in the latest rankings by U.S. News & World Report. The rankings, contained in the magazine’s “America’s Best Hospitals” edition, are based on several criteria including patient safety and mortality.

onology, rehabilitation, urology, and ear, nose and throat as being among the best in the country.

In addition, 10 other Ohio State medical specialties are recognized for excellence in the magazine, deemed one of the country’s leading consumer guides to top-performing hospitals. OSU Medical Center is the only central Ohio hospital listed in the rankings.

For nearly two decades, U.S. News & World Report has consistently named OSU Medical Center as one of the nation’s best hospitals. The “America’s Best Hospitals” issue, considered by many consumers and health care industry analysts as a leading indicator of quality care and performance, is compiled using data collected annually from more than 5,000 U.S. hospitals.

Earlier this year, Ohio State’s Department of Pediatrics, housed at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, was ranked 19th by U.S. News & World Report among the top pediatric programs at medical schools in the United States.

The magazine also recognized Ohio State programs in cancer, diabetes & endocrinology, gynecology, kidney disorders, neurology & neurosurgery, orthopaedics, pulm-

New 136,000 Square-Foot Outpatient Facility Coming to Ohio State

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he Ohio State University Medical Center is purchasing a 136,000 square-foot building near University Hospital East. Expected to open in 2011, the new facility will provide expansion for the Medical Center’s orthopaedic surgery program and alternate sites for several other medical services including cardiology and pulmonary medicine. The facility, named OSU Medical Center CarePoint East, is two blocks from Ohio State University Hospital East at the Leonard Avenue exit of I-670, providing easy access for patients traveling from all areas around Ohio. “CarePoint East will allow us to grow many key programs, including orthopaedics, and it’s a great location – adjacent to a major highway corridor and in a neighborhood that we have called home since 1999 when we opened OSU Hospital East,” said Elizabeth Seely, executive director of University Hospital East. Other programs expected to expand into the new facility include the spine center, imaging, physical therapy, endocrinology, infectious diseases, nephrology and rheumatology among others.

Regional Outreach Team...

Here to Serve You

Our Regional Outreach team is here to assist you in accessing the resources, education and patient referral information you need most from OSU Medical Center. Call on your Regional Outreach Coordinator at any time for information such as: • Help with referring patients • Requests for visits/calls with OSU physicians

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• Requests for patient materials • Access to CME and clinical research opportunities Franklin County: Noreen Palmer | 614-366-6680 East/Southeast Ohio: Karen Mitchell | 614-293-4352 North/West Ohio: Bill Cox | 614-293-2824


Diabetes Self-Management Training Offered

New Specialty Clinic for Patients with Non-Emergent Chest Pain

Benefits at a Glance: • Training offered for lifestyle, devices, diet and glucose management

Benefits at a Glance:

• Ideal for educating pre-diabetics, diabetics and caretakers

• Expedited physician referral • The only clinic of its kind in the area

The Ohio State University Medical Center Division of Endocrinology is offering “The Scarlet and Gray Way to Diabetes Management” classes aimed at training patients with diabetes to successfully self-manage their disease. People with pre-diabetes will also find the classes beneficial, reducing the progression to diabetes. Family members and friends are encouraged to attend. Physician referral is required. General Management Classes This class is ideal for people who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or are newly diagnosed with diabetes. Concepts covered in Class One include blood glucose monitoring and target levels, carbohydrate counting and meal planning, medications and exercise. Class Two concepts include making a day-to-day plan for living with diabetes, avoiding long-term complications, treating short-term complications, eating heart-healthy and evaluating current diabetes management.

• Rapid, same-day appointments in most cases

Ohio State’s Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital created the Rapid Response Chest Pain Clinic to provide prompt care to patients experiencing chest pain or potential coronary ischemic symptoms not requiring immediate emergency department assessment. An expedited referral process makes it faster and easier to refer your patients. Referral Guidelines Located in the Ambulatory Care Center (ACC) at the Ross Heart Hospital, the clinic provides consultative assessment for higher risk patients with: • Chest pain or possible acute coronary syndrome • New onset angina or angina equivalent • Known coronary disease with change in symptoms

Intensive Management Classes Intensive classes are for people who are managing their diabetes by monitoring blood glucose levels and taking rapid-acting insulin prior to each meal. Class One concepts include monitoring and recording blood glucose levels, carbohydrate counting and dosing insulin based on insulin: carbohydrate ratio and a sensitivity factor. Class Two concepts include evaluating blood glucose trends, medication, eating heart-healthy, avoiding long-term complications and treating acute complications. 1:1 Nutrition Classes These limited spots are for individuals who are current on their diabetes management but need to fine-tune the nutritional aspects of their diabetes management.

Get Started: To refer a patient, call 614-366-1279 with the patient’s name and date of birth. • Patients will be seen the same day as the referral if they can arrive before 3:30 p.m. All other patients will be seen on the next clinic day. • After 4:30 p.m., on holidays or on weekends, please leave a message with pertinent patient information and the patient will be seen at 9 a.m. the next business day at Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital ACC. • To help expedite referrals, after calling the Chest Pain Clinic, please fax referral to 614-293-7285.

Get Started: To refer a patient, please call 614-292-3800. • Classes take place on the campus of Ohio State University Medical Center and University Hospital East. • A new series of classes start at the beginning of each month.

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Attend the Personalized Health Care National Conference

New Program Addresses Mood, Anxiety Disorders

What you’ll learn:

Benefits at a Glance:

• Transforming medicine from sick care to wellness care

• New outlet for treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders

• How personalized healthcare will change the way you treat and interact with your patients

• Treatment options for obsessive-compulsive disorder and major depression

• How genomic testing will aid in the prediction of clinical events

• Pioneering techniques include deep-brain stimulation

The Ohio State University Medical Center will host its Third Annual Personalized Health Care National Conference: Advancing Predictive, Preventive, Personalized and Participatory (P4) Medicine October 14 - 15, 2010, in Columbus. A special discount on registration is offered to readers of Consult. See details below.

The Medical Center’s new Treatment-Resistant Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, led by Radu Saveanu, MD; Stephen Pariser, MD; and Ali Rezai, MD, provides consultation and diagnostic services for patients with complex, treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders.

Now in its third year, the Ohio State conference is one of the most dynamic and interactive annual discussions among healthcare leaders, government policy-makers, healthcare providers, researchers, industry experts, academic leaders, and consumer-advocacy groups on the subject of personalized health care (PHC).

Qualified patients will be evaluated by team specialists over the course of several appointments who will then collaborate on a personalized recommendation for continued care. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, electroconvulsive therapy and now deep brain stimulation for obsessivecompulsive disorder.

Rooted in genetics and DNA analysis, personalized health care is a form of care in which disease prevention and treatment are customized to each individual based on his or her unique biology, behaviors and environment.

Patients eligible for consideration by the team must have treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder or major depression with the following criteria: • Failure to respond to three well-documented trials with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) for at least three months at maximum tolerated dose (one of the three can include clomipramine)

Sponsored by the Institute for Systems Biology, the OSU Center for Personalized Health Care, and the Personalized Medicine Coalition, a keynote address will be provided by Dr. Leroy Hood, president and founder of the Institute for Systems Biology and inventor of the technologies for DNA gene sequencing and synthesis, and protein sequencing and synthesis.

• One failed trial of SSRI with clomipramine • One failed trial of SSRI with an atypical antipsychotic • Well-documented evidence of 20 cognitive behavior therapy sessions with exposure and response prevention Referring physicians will receive a comprehensive report, detailing the team’s findings and recommendations for the patient’s continued care under the supervision of the referring physician.

Discounted registration for Consult readers: We are offering a 20% discount on your registration to

Get Started: For more information or to schedule an evaluation for a patient, contact Megan Swart, Psychiatry coordinator, at 614-366-4600 or Megan.Swart@osumc.edu or Jenna Stump, Neurosurgery coordinator, at 614-366-6952 or Jenna.Stump@osumc.edu.

the conference. Visit cphc.osu.edu to register and enter the code “member” to receive your 20% discount.

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New Program Addresses Psychiatric Stress and Trauma Benefits at a Glance: • One-of-a-kind program offering much-needed access to help victims of trauma • Evidence-based trauma-informed practices and approaches to improve patient outcomes

Patients Being Accepted at New Outpatient Facility

• Ongoing education for mental health care providers

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The Department of Psychiatry’s Stress Trauma and Resilience (STAR) Program is an innovative and exciting initiative that advances the mission of personalized health care.

he recently opened CarePoint at Gahanna outpatient facility is fully staffed and ready to accept new patient referrals. CarePoint at Gahanna gives your patients access to services they might normally find at the Medical Center in a more convenient community setting. Many talented specialists have transferred their practices from the Medical Center’s main campus to this new location. Services offered include:

The STAR Program recognizes the importance of addressing experiences of trauma both prior to and as a result of an injury or illness, utilizing evidence-based trauma-informed practices and approaches to care. Specifically the STAR Program will: • Serve as a resource for psychological trauma education and training for students, faculty and professionals from The Ohio State University and the central Ohio region.

• • • • • • • •

• Conduct interdisciplinary research on the biological causes, and behavioral markers, prevention and treatment approaches of psychological trauma. • Provide trauma-informed personalized health care.

Digital mammography 3T MRI Non-invasive vascular testing Cardiology testing Athletic asthma care Concussion management Reconstructive foot and ankle surgery Treatment of diabetic ulcers

For more information on specific services available and patient referrals, please use the phone numbers below:

Comprehensive Community Education The STAR Program is committed to providing ongoing education for care providers in the hospital, campus and public mental health communities. The program brings nationally recognized leaders in the field of trauma to Columbus to share innovative research and evidencebased best practices.

Cardiovascular Medicine | 614-293-1965 Imaging | 614-293-4333 Neurology | 614-293-4969 Orthopaedics | 614-366-4332 Physical Therapy | 614-293-7600 Podiatry | 614-293-3668 Rheumatology | 614-293-1965 Sports Medicine | 614-366-4332 Wound Care Clinic | 614-293-1965

Learn More: For more information about the STAR Program, please contact Jessica Auslander, program coordinator, at 614-293-1415 or Jessica.Auslander@osumc.edu or at psychiatry.osu.edu/12973.cfm.

CarePoint at Gahanna 920 N. Hamilton Road Gahanna, Ohio 43230 medicalcenter.osu.edu/go/Gahanna

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Omission

In the most recent edition of Consult, Pat Ross, MD, was not listed among the surgical team for Cardiac and Cardiothoracic surgery. We Pat Ross, MD apologize for the omission. Dr. Ross is the division chief of Thoracic Surgery with clinical and research interests in thoracic oncology, photodynamic therapy, lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplant. Referrals to Dr. Ross can be made by calling 614-293-9059.

Do you have a copy?

Mark Landon, MD, to Chair Obstetrics and Gynecology Mark Landon, MD, will chair the OSU Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology pending OSU Board of Trustees approval. Dr. Landon has led the Department as Interim Chair since June 2009. He has also served as Director of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine since 2002 and as Vice Chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology since 1997. Mark Landon, MD Dr. Landon is a widely published researcher and an internationally recognized authority on diabetes in pregnancy and on vaginal birth after cesarean delivery. He built Ohio State’s Diabetes in Pregnancy program into one of the largest in the United States, serving more than 200 new patients annually. He has also served as principal investigator for two studies in the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), focused on gestational diabetes and cesarean delivery.

Dr. Landon was principal investigator of the largest prospective study ever performed on vaginal birth following cesarean delivery, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. He also chairs the cesarean delivery registry subcommittee of the NICHD Maternal FetalMedicine Units Network. Dr. Landon has published more than 200 articles and book chapters. Dr. Landon joined our faculty in 1987. He completed his medical degree at Cornell University Medical College, and his residency in obstetrics and gynecology and a fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Ohio State’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty continue to be nationally recognized for their contributions to the advancement of women’s health, and the department is ranked among the top 20 programs in the country.

Contact your Regional Outreach Coordinator to request your copy of our Physician Directory or Physician Referral Guide. 24


Ohio State Physicians

In The News

of Virginia. Dr. Higgins earned his medical degree at Yale University School of Medicine. He performed his residency in general surgery at the Hospitals of the University Health Center in Pittsburgh, where he served as chief resident. He completed a transplant fellowship at Papworth Hospital, an affiliate of the University of Cambridge, England, and continued his training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he was a Winchester Scholar and a fellow in cardiothoracic surgery.

Thomas Best, MD, co-director of Ohio State’s Sports Medicine Center, has been named president of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Best previously served as president-elect of ACSM, vice president and associate editor-in-chief of the organization’s journal, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Carlo Croce, MD, who leads the Human Cancer Genetics Program at Ohio State, is among 229 leaders in the sciences, social sciences, humanities, the arts, business and public affairs who have been elected to the 2010 class of the American Society of Arts and Sciences. Established in 1780 by John Adams and other founders of the nation, the Academy undertakes studies of complex and emerging problems.

Donald LeMay, DO, of OSU Sports Medicine, has been selected Team Physician of the Year by the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association. Sidney F. Miller, MD, professor of surgery, director, Burn Center, Division of Critical Care, Trauma, and Burn, has been elected the president of the American Burn Association.

Timothy Hewett, PhD, has accepted the newly created position, Director of Research of The Ohio State University Sports Medicine Center. He will also be a tenured Professor in the Department of Physiology and Cell Biology. This appointment is effective January 1, 2011. Dr. Hewett currently directs the Sports Medicine Biodynamics Center at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

Steven M. Steinberg, MD, professor of surgery; chief, Division of Critical Care, Trauma, and Burn; vice chairman for Clinical Affairs, has been selected as the recipient of the American College of Surgeons/American Surgical Association Health Policy Scholarship for the year of 2010.

Robert Higgins, MD, has been appointed as professor of Surgery, and director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center, the Medical Center’s Transplant Signature Program and the Division of Cardiac Surgery. Prior to joining our team at the Medical Center, Dr. Higgins led the department of cardiovascular-thoracic surgery at Rush University in Chicago and served as chair of cardiothoracic surgery at the Medical College

Marc J. Tassé, director of The Ohio State University’s Nisonger Center, has been elected to a four-year leadership term with the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. In his first year, Tassé will serve as vice president, followed by each subsequent year as president-elect, president and past president.

HealthGrades Ranks Ohio State’s Emergency Departments Among the Best The Ohio State University Medical Center’s emergency departments at University Hospital and University Hospital East have been named recipients of the HealthGrades 2010 Emergency Medicine Excellence Award™. Recipients of the award represent the top five percent of hospitals in

emergency medicine in the nation. This study found that a typical patient is much more likely to survive an emergency hospitalization at a top-performing hospital than at all other hospitals. Ohio State’s Medical Center is one of 255 nationally and one of only 37 in Ohio to receive this award.

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Tools You Can Use: Mobile Physician Referral Guide We’re making it easier than ever before to get the information you need to refer patients to Ohio State’s Medical Center. We have recently created our Physician Referral Guide in a mobile format for your Smartphone. Now you can find listings of our medical services and patient referral information right on your phone. You’ll also be able to search our physician database. Access it by visiting: www.medicalcenter.osu.edu from your Smartphone and it will auto-display.

Your Resources DocLink healthsystem.osu.edu Web-based program allowing referring physicians access to their patients’ OSU Medical Center visit-specific treatment results

Physician-to-Physician Consultation Line 800-293-5123, option 1 Consult with an OSU Medical Center physician, discuss specific patient-related cases, appointment referral, transfer a patient

Referring Physicians medicalcenter.osu.edu/referringphysicians Referring physician information, links, downloads and forms, patient education materials, maps and directions

Physician Relations 800-293-4326 or mdrelations@osumc.edu Physician Relations supports the needs of community physicians and their staff as they interact with OSU Medical Center

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center– Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute The James Line: 614-293-5066 cancer.osu.edu Patient referral center, clinical trials and research information, patient education materials

OSU Regional Outreach Program Franklin County, Noreen Palmer....................614-366-6680 East/Southeast Ohio, Karen Mitchell..........614-293-4352 North/West Ohio, Bill Cox..............................614-293-2824 Outreach provides access to OSU Medical Center services, specialty physicians, continuing medical education and other Medical Center programs Physician Directories To request a copy of our physician directory or to request updated sections for your existing directory, please call your Regional Outreach Coordinator (above).

Continuing Medical Education ccme.osu.edu Continuing Medical Education programs, including Category I CME offerings online through OSU MedNet21, traditional lecture series and Grand Rounds

UHOS20100089-07

Physician Referral Guide To request a copy of the Physician Referral Guide, call your Regional Outreach Coordinator or visit medicalcenter.osu. edu/referringphysicians to access an online version. 26


Physician Resources

Contact

DocLink healthsystem.osu.edu

Web-based program allowing referring physicians access to their patients’ OSU Medical Center visit-specific treatment results

OSU Medical Center medicalcenter.osu.edu

Referring physician information, patient education materials, maps and directions

The Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and www.cancer.osu.edu Richard J. Solove Research Institute

Patient referral center, clinical trials and information, patient education materials

OSU Medical Center http://ccme.osu.edu Center for Continuing Medical Education

Web site featuring Continuing Medical Education programs including: Category I CME offerings online through OSU MedNet21, traditional lecture series and Grand Rounds

1-800-293-5123; option 1 Physician-to-Physician Consultation Line

Consult with an OSU Medical Center physician, discuss specific patient-related cases, appointment referral, transfer a patient

Physician Relations 1-800-293-4326

Physician Relations supports the needs of community or mdrelations@osumc.edu physicians and their staff as they interact with OSU Medical Center

OSU Regional Outreach Program Franklin County: 614-366-6680 East/Southeast Ohio: 614-293-4352 North/West Ohio: 614-293-2824

Outreach provides referring physicians with access to OSU Medical Center services, specialty physicians, continuing medical education and other medical center programs

www.medicalcenter.osu.edu/referringphysicians

Consult - Women's Health - Summer 2010  

Consult - Women's Health - Summer 2010

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