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The Ohio State University Medical Center

Department of Otolaryngology —

Winter 2010

Head and Neck Surgery

Message from the Department Chair

Dear Friends and Colleagues, It has been a banner year at The Ohio State University Department of Otolaryngology. We completed the new Ohio State Eye and Ear Institute and moved in the end of June (see inside photo). This new facility gives our patients easy access from two freeways and free surface parking. They love it. So do we. The building houses an ambulatory surgery center, a 13-station temporal bone and sinus laboratory and a beautiful conference center. Please stop by and see it when you are in town. Our new laboratory space at the Eye and Ear Institute has allowed us to recruit four new researchers to the Department under the guidance of Susan Nittrouer, PhD, in the Communications Sciences Research Laboratory. Jeffrey Marler, PhD, Antoine Shahin, PhD, Bomjun Kwon, PhD, and Puisan Wong, PhD, have been getting their labs established and will make a difference in the way hearing impaired children acquire language. You can view their biographies in this newsletter. We are pleased to have them on our team and eagerly anticipate the research that will emanate from this group. We are also fortunate to welcome four new clinician scientists this year. Eugene Chio, MD, Bradley Otto, MD, Garth Essig Jr., MD, and Matthew Old, MD, have been busy establishing their research and patient care activities. Dr. Chio’s interests lie in medical and surgical aspects of sleep apnea and general otolaryngology. Dr. Otto just completed a two-year NIH-funded fellowship in Dr. Sally Wenzel’s laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, studying the effects of cytokines on nasal polyposis while doing a rhinology fellowship. Dr. Essig completed his residency at the University of Virginia, and an endocrine and cutaneous cancer fellowship in Brisbane, Australia. Dr. Old completed his residency at the University of Michigan, and a head and neck fellowship with James Netterville, MD, at Vanderbilt University. We are delighted to have these new doctors on board. Our faculty and staff are focused on providing the best patient care available. We maintain our commitment to research and teaching because, ultimately, it’s what leads to the best patient care. We have many exciting challenges and opportunities ahead, and will use them to the best of our advantage as we strive to improve. Stop by and see us, and Go Bucks! D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD, FACS Professor and Chair Department of Otolaryngology The Ohio State University Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., 4th Floor Columbus, OH 43212 (614)-293-8706 office (614)-293-7292 fax brad.welling@osumc.edu

Inside this Issue: Eye and Ear Institute Debut, Clinical Trials Active in 2008/2009, Otitis Media in Children, Pelotonia Event, NIH Research Funding, Match Results, Awards, Publications for 2008/2009


Eye and Ear Institute

Eye and Ear Institute Debut

In July 2009, The Ohio State University Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery moved to the new Ohio State University Eye and Ear Institute, located at 915 Olentangy River Road, just southwest of Medical Center campus. This state-of-theart, five-story, 137,000-square-foot facility offers an aesthetically pleasing environment for the delivery of comprehensive ear, nose and throat care from the most qualified experts in central Ohio. Designed to guarantee efficient, personalized care in a convenient neighborhood setting, patients will have access to not only ear and eye care, but a variety of Ohio State’s health services, such as Plastic Surgery, the Center for Women’s Health, Hand Center and Outpatient Surgery Center.

architect Craig Rutkowski (Moody Nolan Inc.), along with Glen Rowe from Daimler, integrated form and function, creating an aesthetically appealing space that draws visitors in. The lab has 12 state-of-the-art work stations plus a teaching station, each outfitted with LCD monitors, operating microscopes, otologic drills, middle ear/mastoid instruments, sinus endoscopy equipments, sinus microdebriders and central video routers. The Department has secured generous donations in equipment from corporate partners Medtronic, Stryker, OsteoSolutions-Anspach, and Zeiss. The Department will use this facility to host regional as well as national Otology/Neurotology, Rhinology, Facial Plastic and Facial Trauma courses in the near future.

From concept to grand opening, Ohio State’s Eye and Ear Institute was a project over three years in the making, largely spearheaded by D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD, chair of Otolaryngology, and Thomas Mauger, MD, chair of Ophthalmology. The new facility offers streamlined patient flow and has brought research, patient care and medical education under one roof, which helps the Department maintain even greater focus on the Medical Center’s goal of improving people’s lives through innovation in research, education and patient care.

To make a donation to the Department’s education mission, please contact Mark Inman at 614-293-3470 or Mark.Inman@osumc.edu.

One of the highlights of the facility is the Otolaryngology Anatomy Skills Laboratory. This lab has been designed for its specific purpose from the ground up. The new lab has double-insulated walls, a dedicated ventilation system, custombuilt cabinetry, integrated solid-state work surfaces, central water and vacuum, and special drainage systems designed to prevent debris from entering the water system. In designing the space, lead

Nationally Ranked Ohio State University Department of Otolaryngology Ranked as One of the Best in Nation For the 17th year in a row, U.S.News & World Report ranked Ohio State’s Department of Otolaryngology as one of the best ear, nose and throat programs in the nation. The rankings are based on discharges, resident’s scores on national tests and reputation. Our Department advanced 13 positions in the rankings this year to No. 18 in the country – an outstanding achievement. The Ohio State University Medical Center was also named to the U.S. News Honor Roll for the first time ever. Of the 4,861 hospitals considered, only 21 made the Honor Roll, and Ohio State was the only hospital in central Ohio to make the list. Our hospitals were ranked in 10 specialties, and our ranking of 18th helped the Medical Center achieve this highly touted accomplishment.

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 2


Clinical Trials Active in 2008/2009

Division

Title

David Schuller, MD

Head and Neck Oncology

Incorporation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Submandibular Gland Transfers to Minimize Treatment Morbidity (pending)

Amit Agrawal, MD

Head and Neck Oncology

A Phase lb Pilot Study Evaluating Oral Administration of FreezeDried Black Raspberries in Pre-Surgical Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (open)CPAP.”

Amit Agrawal, MD

Head and Neck Oncology

A Pilot Study Evaluating Long-Term Oral Administration of Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Post-Surgical Appalachian Oral Cancer Patients

Amit Agrawal, MD

Head and Neck Oncology

Chemoprevention of Oral Cancer in Appalachia

Amit Agrawal, MD

Head and Neck Oncology

A Randomized, Prospective, Controlled Study of Donor Site Healing When Using a Negative Pressure Dressing for Radial Forearm Free Flaps.

Brad Welling, MD, PhD

Otology, Neurotology, Cranial Base Surgery

Delayed Facial Nerve Paresis after Vestibular Schwannoma Resection: A Randomized Prospective Trial Evaluating Prophylactic Antiviral and Steroid Therapy

Abraham Jacob, MD

Otology, Neurotology, Cranial Base Surgery

Mastoidectomy Defect Reconstruction with Lactosorb and Titanium Mesh

Abraham Jacob, MD

Otology, Neurotology, Cranial Base Surgery

Translabyrinthine Craniotomy Defect Reconstruction with Lactosorb Plating

Abraham Jacob, MD

Otology, Neurotology, Cranial Base Surgery

Factors Predicting the Response of Melatonin on Tinnitus

Abraham Jacob, MD

Otology, Neurotology, Cranial Base Surgery

Effectiveness of OtoMimix™ Hydroxyapatite Bone Cement Ossicular Chain Reconstruction for Otosclerosis and Incudostapedial Joint Separation

Charles Albert Elmaraghy, MD

Pediatric Otolaryngology

Incidence of Vestibular Stenosis in NICU Patients on Nasal CPAP

Brad Welling, MD, PhD

Otology

Determination of Intratumoral Concentration of Lapatinib in Vestibular Schwanoma Therapy

Brad Welling, MD, PhD

Otology

Hybriel Cochlear Implant L24 Study.

For more information on the Department’s clinical trials, contact: Mark Inman 915 Olentangy River Road Phone: 614-293-3470

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 3

Clinical Trials

PI


Otitis Media in Children

Does complement system play a significant role in middle ear defense to eliminate the otopathogens during Otitis Media? Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) is one of the major pathogens of otitis media (OM) (middle ear inflammation) in children, accounting for 30 percent of the cases of acute OM and 5 percent of the cases of chronic OM with effusion (OME). While the course of OME, a chronic nonsuppurative form of the disease, is generally benign and self-limiting, hearing loss caused by the presence of fluid in the middle ear space for an extended period of time can affect a child’s language development and education during a highly critical period. Despite advances that have been made in S. pneumoniae OM research in the last decade, much more remains to be learned about how S. pneumoniae interacts with the host innate immune defense systems and becomes established in middle ear and induces OM. Complement system is one the front lines of host innate immune defense system against infection. Clinical observations and experimental studies suggest that the complement system plays a significant role in middle ear defense to eliminate the otopathogens during OM. However, the relevance of complement components and the specific pathway of the complement cascades involved in the protection during S. pneumoniae OM remain largely unknown. We have assessed the role of specific complement activation pathways (classical or alternative pathway, or both) in the middle ear defense against S. pneumoniae invasion. We compared bacterial clearance kinetics, middle

After five years of NIH funded research, Susan Nittrouer, PhD, has published Early Development of Children with Hearing Loss, with Plural Publishing. In this book, she discusses hearing loss and speech development and her findings on hearing aids, cochlear implants and language development. Currently, she and her research team are recruiting subjects for studies funded by her NIH grant, “The Ontogeny of Segmental Speech Organization.” The aim of this grant is to explore the development of phonological abilities in normal children, and what may go wrong in this process for children at risk for language problems. Research under this grant focuses on how children discover: • how to organize the sensory input in order to recover linguistically meaningful structure at a global level • which acoustic properties support phonetic structure in their native language • how each property should be weighted in speech perception in order to efficiently apprehend that structure. Please check out their Web site at http://www.speechdevelopment.org/osso to find out more information about this study and http://www.speechdevelopment.org /edchl for information on her book.

ear inflammation, S. pneumoniae opsonisation, and opsonophagocytosis, and cytokine and chemokine production in C1qa knock out (KO) (lack of the classical pathway), Factor B (Bf) KO (lack of the alternative pathway), and Bf and C2 double KO mice (lack of all three pathways) to that in wild-type (WT) mice in a mouse model of OM. Our data demonstrated C1qa and Bf are both important in the protection against pneumococcal OM. Furthermore, Bf/C2 deficiency significantly increases susceptibility to pnoumococcal OM beyond that in either C1qa-/- or Bf-/- mice. We further investigated the mechanism of complement resistant bacteria to survive in the middle ear. We compared inflammatory cell recruitments in the middle ear of all the cohorts studied during the early stage of AOM, Our data revealed increased inflammatory cell concentrations in the middle ear lavage samples in both wild-type and complement deficient mice, which indicated that the recruitment of inflammatory cells was not impaired in the complement deficient mice. The influx of inflammatory cells may be driven by the cytokines IL-6, IL-1 and TNFα and S. pneumoniae replication in the middle ears, as our data showed the increased level of these cytokines in the middle ear lavage samples in complement deficient mice compared to wild -type mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both in vivo and in vitro C3 binding to S. pneumoniae surface in the middle ear and blood was greatly reduced in complement deficient mice compared to the wild-type mice. Our data suggest that an intact complement pathway is critical to otological innate immune defense against S. pneumoniae. In addition, the reduced capacity of complement mediated opsonization and opsonophagocytosis in complement deficient mice contributed at a significant level to the impaired S. pneumoniae clearance from the middle ear. An abstract tilted “Role of complement C1q, C2 and factor B in innate immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae during experimental acute otitis media in mice” was presented at the 6th Extraordinary International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media on May 610, 2009, in Seoul, Korea.

New to the Communication Sciences Research Group: • Bomjun Kwon, PhD, joins us from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He is investigating the feasibility of new and improved use of electrode configurations for speech processing in cochlear implants. • Jeffrey Marler, PhD, joins us from James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Va. His primary research focus is auditory information processing associated with language development, specifically sensory, attention and memory mechanisms supporting auditory language processing. His ancillary research area is the investigation of genetic factors contributing to hearing sensitivity and auditory function in chromosome 7 disorders. • Antoine Shahin, PhD, comes to us from the University of California, Davis. His primary research focus is on understanding the neural mechanisms underlying speech and music processing using functional neuroimaging methods. • Puisan Wong, PhD, has come from Brooklyn College, New York. Her primary research interest is to examine the perception and production of speech sounds, and how that relates to language development in normally developing and atypically developing individuals. We are fortunate to have recruited such promising researchers to our highly respected research group.

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 4


Pelotonia Event

According to the Pelotonia.org website, Pelotonia is a grassroots bike tour with one goal: to end cancer. Pelotonia raises money for innovative and life-saving cancer research at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. Pelotonia directs 100 percent of every dollar raised to research. It is a community of people coming together to chase down cancer and defeat it. Lance Armstrong, Jim Tressel, and Ohio State University Gordon Gee participated in the inaugural Pelotonia event, Aug. 28-30, 2009. Pelotonia included four different routes: • 180-mile, two-day ride • 100-mile, one-day ride • 50-mile, one-day ride • 25-mile, one-day ride. The 180-mile ride led the peloton to the city of Athens, where riders spent the evening at Ohio University. Riders from our faculty included: • Amit Agrawal, MD • Theodoros Teknos, MD • Stephen Smith Jr., MD and his wife, Nevada Smith • David Schuller, MD and his son, Michael • D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD • Matthew Old, MD • Christin Hart

Amit Agrawal, MD “As a head and neck cancer surgeon at The James, I witness firsthand the devastating effect that cancer has upon my patients and their families. Despite our many successes, it never becomes easier. It is, however, the tremendous spirit and courage of my patients that motivates me to find better ways to treat this disease, specifically through advancements in patient care, education and in particular, by being actively involved in cancer research. Participating in Pelotonia is a wonderful opportunity to support research at The James by involving the community we serve, and whose warmth and support give personal meaning to our continued efforts to fight this disease.” Theodoros Teknos, MD “My patients (many of whom become my best friends) inspire me daily with their courage, strength, hope and love. I do my best to help them, but I know I need to do more. I rode in Pelotionia in memory of all of those friends who have lost their battle, and in honor of all of those who have triumphed and for a future free from head and neck cancer.” David Schuller, MD “It has been an honor and privilege in my more than 20 years at Ohio State to have served as Director of both the Comprehensive Cancer Center and the James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and as the CEO of The James. In my current role on the leadership team of ProjectONE, the largest expansion project ever undertaken by Ohio State, which will nearly double of the size of the cancer hospital, I’ve had the opportunity to reflect on how critically important the community’s support of our cancer research has been and how,

All of us at The James, and especially our patients, are appreciative of the fine people at NetJets who have provided for the creation of Pelotonia and for all of the riders and volunteers whose efforts will help us become one of the country’s premier cancer research and patient care facilities.” Matthew Old, MD “I am honored to have joined The James and the Head and Neck team this summer to embark on a career of caring for cancer patients. Our lives are shaped by significant events and, unfortunately, cancer tends to create detours for most of us. About 20 years ago, my grandfather developed lip cancer. He had it surgically treated, but soon developed buccal squamous cell carcinoma. After extensive surgery and chemoradiation, he eventually lost his life to angiosarcoma. I did not realize the impact this had on me until now, as I step into the role that his doctors had as they cared for him in exam rooms and surgical suites. He was always strong and caring, making his grandkids laugh even as he received chemotherapy. It always makes me smile to think of him, because he always seemed to have a smile on his face. I rode in Pelotonia not only for my grandfather, but also for my past, present and future cancer patients. I hope to influence their lives and foster the strength, courage and energy needed to fight the battle for a cure.” Fund raising One-hundred percent of the proceeds from Pelotonia go to The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. The Midwest’s first and Ohio’s only freestanding cancer hospital and research institute, Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute is one of only 40 centers in the United States designated by the National Cancer Institute as a Comprehensive Cancer Center. The James is a national leader in creating and testing new therapies based on scientific research, many of which are offered nowhere else in the world. Please check out pelotonia.org for more information.

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 5

Peletonia

Several of our staff members also volunteered during the event. Our team members had this to say about the event:

collectively, we are making a difference with this common and dreaded disease.


NIH Research Funding NIH Research Funding Amit Agrawal, MD

12/01/07-08/30/12

NIH/NCI

Christopher Weghorst, PhD

09/1999 - 08/2009

R01CA127368 Food-Based Modulation of Biomarkers in Human Tissues at High Risk for Oral Cancer

Lauren Bakaletz, PhD

09/20/02-08/31/13

NIH RO1 R01DC05847 Antimicrobial Peptides and Innate Immunity in Otitis Media

Subinoy Das, MD

The goal of this project is investigate the role of innate immunity in otitis media and identify methods to augment these defense mechanisms in order to develop a novel approach for the treatment and/or prevention of otitis media. Lauren Bakaletz, PhD

01/01/04-12/31/10

R01DC006468 RSV Upper Airway Infection and Otitis Media

Joan Durbin, MD, PhD

NIH Research Funding

R01DC006468

The goal of this project is to explore the mechanism of protection as well as the ability of a recently developed RSV vaccine to inhibit bacterial otitis media following viral and bacterial co-infection. Lauren Bakaletz, PhD

09/30/99-08/31/09

NIH RO1 R01DC003915 Determinants of H. influenzae Virulence in Otitis Media The goal of this project is to continue to enhance our understanding of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae pathogenesis in otitis media as well as continue to identify and characterize putative virulence determinants and assess their potential as vaccine or therapeutic targets.

Lauren Bakaletz, PhD

4/01/06-3/31/09

NIH/NIDCD R01DC007153 M. catarrhalis pili: Role in colonization and infection

Anthony A. Campagnari, PhD Lauren Bakaletz, PhD

7/17/09-10/15/11

NIH/NIDCD Determinants of H. influenzae Virulence in Otitis Media Supplement

Subinoy Das, MD

02/01/09-01/31/11

NIH KL2RR025754 Improving Patient Care via Proteomics Based, Microbe-Specific Detection of Chronic Rhinosinusitis The goals of this project are to 1) identify patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), specifically due to the presence of NTHI biofilms, utilizing a high throughput proteomics-based assay, and 2) test a priori assay that will predict the development of CRS in an in vivo chinchilla model. Results from this project may lead to the development of biomarkers to be used as clinical diagnostic tools to diagnose CRS at very early stages of disease progression, and aid in the development non-surgical therapies for CRS.

Abraham Jacob, MD

08/01/09-08/01/14

NIH/NCI 1K08DC009644-01A1 Preclinical testing of a novel PDK1 inhibitor for treating vestibular schwannoma Vestibular schwannomas (VS), brain tumors arising from the balance nerve, are one of the few deadly diseases of the ear, and patients with VS are currently treated with high risk modalities such as surgery and/or radiation therapy because no effective drugs are available. Our proposal seeks to study OSU-03012, a new drug that may revolutionize the treatment of VS. We plan to better understand how OSU-03012 inhibits VS tumor growth and profile its safety/efficacy parameters in order to transition this drug into human clinical trials.

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 6


NIH Research Funding Bomjun Kwon, PhD

12/01/08-11/30/11

NIH/NIDCR R03DC009061 Perceptual effects of mixed channel configurations in cochlear implants

Susan Nittrouer, PhD

09/01/03-08/31/09

NIH/NIDCD R01DC006237 Early Development of Children with Hearing Loss The goal of this project is to investigate outcomes for children with hearing loss as a function of age of identification, whether signs were used in early intervention or not, and type of prosthesis.

Susan Nittrouer, PhD

12/01/88-11/30/09

NIH/NIDCD R01DC000633 Ontogeny of Segmental Speech Organization The goal of this project is to investigate how children acquire access to segmental structure in the speech signal which largely lacks any explicit acoustic structure.

Quintin Pan, PhD

07/01/08-05/31/13

NIH RO1 R01CA135069 Role of PKCepsilon in Oral Cancer

Hua Hua Tong, MD

07/01/08-06/30/12

NIH RO1 R01DC009235 Complement in S. Pneumoniae Otitis Media The goal of this project is to explore the critical role of complement in the middle ear in host innate immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, a primary pathogen of otitis media.

Brad Welling, MD, PhD

05/10/05-04/30/10

NIH RO1 R01DC005985 Phenotypic Determinants of Vestibular Schwannomas The goal of this project is to examine the role of regulatory regions in the NF2 gene in schwannomas and further identify and understand factors which affect phenotypic expression in vestibular schwannomas.

Brad Welling, MD, PhD

06/01/09-05/31/10

NIH RO1 R01DC005985-05S1 Phenotypic Determinants of Vestibular Schwannomas-Supplement The goal of this project is to examine the role of regulatory regions in the NF2 gene in schwannomas and further identify and understand factors which affect phenotypic expression in vestibular schwannomas.

Gregory Wiet, MD

08/01/04-07/31/09

NIH RO1 R01DC06458 Validation/Dissemination of Virtual Temporal Bone Dissection The overall goals of this project are to further develop, evaluate, and validate a virtual environment for training of surgical techniques of temporal bone surgery by residents.

Quintin Pan, PhD

07/01/08-06/30/11

Flight Attendant Med. Res. Inst. GRT00013551 Development of PK-Cepsilon Inhibitors for Treating Head and Neck Cancer

Quintin Pan, PhD

07/01/08-06/30/12

American Cancer Society Mechanism of PKC-Induced Tumorigenesis in Head and Neck Cancer

Theodoros Teknos, MD

2008-2013

SPORE, Project 1 Metronomic Small Molecular Inhibitor of Bcl-2 in Head and Neck Cancer Therapy

Christopher Weghorst, PhD Amit Agrawal, MD

07/01/06-06/30/11

American Cancer Society Chemoprevention of Oral Cancer in Appalachia

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 7

NIH Research Funding

The goal of this project is to study the biological role of PKCepsilon in the devel opment of metastasis, a recalcitrant challenge in oral squamous cell carcinoma.


Match Results Once again, we are most pleased to have matched outstanding candidates to our Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery Program here at The Ohio State University. All four are tremendous individuals whose cumulative Step 1 USMLE scores are in the 99th percentile. We look forward to great things from them through their five years with us and well beyond. Brian Boyce, MD

Anna Marcinow, MD

Medical College of Georgia

University of Iowa School of Medicine

• Born in Atlanta, GA.

• Born in Wroclaw, Poland and moved to United States at age 10

• Graduated Magna Cum Laude with Honors from University of Georgia with a BS in Biology

• Completed her undergraduate education at Iowa State University, earning a BS with honors and distinction in Biochemistry and German

• President of AOA at Medical College of Georgia

Match Results

• Coca-Cola Scholar Athlete (2001) • Hobbies include: playing the piano, guitar

• Participated in 2009 Iowa MOST Cleft Lip and Palate trip in Huehuetenango, Guatemala

Lauren Cunningham, MD

• Conducted research involving genetics of cleft lip and palate and quality of life in head and neck cancer patients at the University of Iowa

George Washington University School of Medicine

• Enjoys golf, hiking, reading, Wii, traveling and cooking

• Born in Buffalo, N.Y.

Lisa Steketee-Weaver, MD

• Graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2004, where she was President of the Golden Key Honour Society

Indiana University School of Medicine

• At the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, she assisted in research in a species differentiation study and gut retention study on Pfiesteria, a major dinoflagellate implicated in fishkills on the Eastern sea board

• Born in East Grand Rapids, Mich. • Completed her undergraduate degree at Colgate University, where she graduated Magna Cum Laude with a major in Cellular Neuroscience and was elected to Psi Chi and Phi Eta Sigma National

• Voted Most Athletic Female in her medical school class • Personal interests: playing any sport or outdoor activity, playing piano, enjoying wine and cheese, baking and knitting

Honor Societies • Her husband Tim will be starting a general practice residency in Dentistry at Ohio State • Received Howard Hughes research grant and participated in six months of research investigating the “mucus slurper” and its utility in preventing nosocomial pneumonia • Enjoys spending time with family and friends, downhill skiing, running and cooking

Recent Graduates This past July, we saw three of our residents and two fellows graduate from our program: Eugene Chio, MD, Alfred Fleming Jr., MD, and Kris Jatana, MD. Dr. Chio joined the Department as a full-time faculty member and general otolaryngologist. Dr. Fleming accepted a position in private practice with Ohio ENT and Dr. Jatana will be completing a pediatric fellowship at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Our graduating fellows are Brad deSilva, MD, and Matthew Miller, MD. We are proud of our graduates and wish them the best of luck.

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 8


Awards

Abraham Jacob, MD, was recently awarded the NIH/NIDCD (K08) Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award, effective 8/1/2009-8/1/2014. Dr. Jacob started out as a fellow in Ohio State’s Neurotology Program (2004-2006), and is currently an assistant professor on the tenure track within the Department. This $1.2 million NIH grant, titled: “Preclinical testing of a novel PDK1 inhibitor for treating vestibular schwannoma,” seeks to better understand how inhibiting intracellular AKT signaling in vestibular schwannomas (VS) suppresses cell cycle progression and initiates apoptosis. Dr. Jacob received the 2007 Nicholas Torok Award from the American Neurotology Society for his work demonstrating that AKT was pathologically active in VS as compared to normal vestibular nerves. Along with several collabora-

tors at Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, he has recently published data demonstrating that OSU-03012, a novel small molecule inhibitor of AKT, inhibits VS growth in cell culture as well as in animal models (European Journal of Cancer). OSU03012 has recently entered Phase I human clinical trials for cancer and, by further evaluating the mechanism of action, efficacy and safety profile of this drug during long-term oral administration, Dr. Jacob hopes one day to transition it into human clinical trials for VS. As part of his grant, Dr. Jacob will be matriculating in the Masters of Medical Science program at Ohio State, focusing his curriculum on molecular biology and translational research. He plans to remain clinically active three days a week, seeing exclusively Otology and Neurotology patients. This K08 award is another example of how The Ohio State University Department of Otolaryngology uses cutting-edge, patient-centered translational research to improve clinical care. His mentors on the KO8 are Long-

Sheng Chang, PhD and D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD.

Welcome We wish to express our thanks to Ed Dodson, the screening and selection committee, and all who assisted in interviews, tours and other arrangements. We know it is a great investment of time but, as you can see, it has again yielded a great return on your investment. It looks like we got four blue-chip recruits this year! Thank you all for your help. We also welcome Neurotology fellow Matthew Bush, MD, and incoming Head and Neck Oncology fellow Bradford Bader, MD.

Matthew Bush, MD

Bradford Bader, MD

University of Kentucky Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

University of Michigan Health System

• Born in Charleston, W.V.

• Born in Dallas, Texas

• Completed medical school at Marshall University School of Medicine

• Completed medical school at University of Texas Medical School

• Has already completed a one year research fellowship within our Department • Married, with two sons

• Completed undergraduate at Southern Methodist University, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BA in Business Administration and also played Division I soccer

• Enjoys medical missions, medical history and golfing

• Married, with one daughter

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 9


Publications for 2008/2009

Amit Agrawal , MD

Subinoy Das, MD

Sharma S, Casto BC, Fisher JL, Knobloch TJ, Agrawal A. , Weghorst CM. (2009). Oral cancer in Appalachia. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Becker AM, Das S, et. al, Kountakis SE. (2008). Serum inflammatory protein profiles in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis undergoing sinus surgery: A preliminary analysis. Am J Rhinol. March, 139-143.

Waltonen J, Schuller DE, Ozer E, Agrawal A. (2009). Tonsillectomy vs. deep tonsil biopsies in detecting occult tonsil tumors. Laryngoscope. Vol. 119, no. 1. (January 1): 102.

Das S, Maeso PA, et. al., Kountakis SE. (2008). The use of portable intraoperative computed tomography scanning for real-time image guidance: A pilot cadaver study. Am J Rhinol. March, 166-169.

Yang L, Lang JC, Balasubraman P, Jatana K, Schuller D, Agarwal A, Zborowski M, Chalmers JJ. (2009). Optimization of an enrichment process for circulating tumor cells from the blood of head and neck cancer patients through depletion of normal cells. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 102 (2), 521-34.

Charles Elmaraghy, MD

Publications

Agrawal A, Hussein O, Schuller DE. (2008). Esophageal reconstruction with larynx preservation using forearm free flap. Laryngoscope, 118(10), 1750-2. Agrawal A, Hall NC, Ringel MD, Povoski SP, Martin EW. (2008). Combined Use of Perioperative TSH-stimulated 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and gamma probe radioguided surgery to localize and verify resection of iodine scan-negative recurrent thyroid carcinoma. Laryngoscope dec;118(12): 2190-4.

Jatana K, Elmaraghy CA. (2008). Bilateral vestibular stenosis from Nasal CPAP and Cannula. OHNS, 137(2), 261-262.

Russell Faust, MD, PhD Faust RA. (2008). Paradigm shift in pediatric surgery: Invasion of the robots. Clinical Pediatrics, 47(2): 122-127.

L. Arick Forrest, MD Husein OF, Husein TN, Gardner R, Chiang T, Larson DG, Obert K, Thompson J, Trudeau MD, Dell DM, Forrest LA. (2008). Formal psychological testing in patients with paradoxical vocal fold dysfunction. Laryngoscope, 118(4), 740-747.

Abraham Jacob, MD Oplatek A, Liu J, Agrawal A. (2008). Pathology quiz case: Atypical lipomatous tumor. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, 134(9), 1013, 1014-5. Ozer E, Agrawal A, Ozer HG, Schuller DE. (2008). The impact of surgery in the management of the head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery. Laryngoscope, (10), 1771-4.

Jacob A, Lee TX, Neff BA, Miller S, Ratner, N, Welling DB, Chang LS. (2008). PI3-kinase/AKT Pathway Activation in Human Vestibular Schwannoma. Otol Neurotol, 29, 58-68. Jatana K, Jacob A, Slone HW, Ray-Chaudhury A, Welling DB (2008). Spinal myxopapillary ependymoma metastatic to bilateral internal auditory canals. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology, 117(2), 98-102.

Lauren Bakaletz, PhD Bookwalter JE, Jurcisek JA, Gray-Owen SD, Fernandez S, McGillivary G, Bakaletz LO. (2008). A carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 homologue plays a pivotal role in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae colonization of the chinchilla nasopharynx via the outer membrane protein P5-homologous adhesin. Infect Immun, 76(1):48-55.

Pawan Kumar, PhD

Novotny LA, Partida-Sanchez S, Munson Jr. RS, Bakaletz LO. (2008). Differential uptake and processing of an OMP P5-derived immunogen by chinchilla dendritic cells. Infect Immun, 76(3).

Kumar P, Ning Y, Polverini PJ. (2008). Endothelial cells expressing Bcl-2 promotes tumor metastasis by enhancing tumor angiogenesis, blood vessel leakiness and tumor invasion. Lab Invest, 88, 740-749.

Kamran Barin, PhD

Bomjun Kwon, PhD

Zeinali S, Hemami H, Barin K, Parnianpour M, Shirazi-Adl A.(2008). Dynamic stability of spine using stability-based optimization and muscle spindle reflex. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 16(1), 106-18.

Kwon BJ, van den Honert C. (2009). Spatial and temporal effects of interleaved masking in cochlear implants. Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, 10, 447-457.

Kumar P, Gao Q, Ning Y, Wang Z, Krebsback PH, and Polverini PJ. (2008). Arsenic trioxide enhances the therapeutic efficacy of radiation treatment of oral squamous carcinoma while protecting bone. Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, 7, 2060-2069.

Jas Lang, PhD Long-Sheng Chang, PhD Chang LS, Welling DB. (2009). Molecular biology of vestibular schwannomas. Methods In Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.). Vol. 493. (January 1): 163. Dorogova NV, Akhmameteva EM, Kopyl SA, Gubanova NV, Yudina OS, Omelyanchuk LV, and Chang LS. (2008). The role of drosophila merlin in spermatogenesis. BMC Cell Biol. 9, 1-15. Jacob A, Lee TX, Neff BA, Miller S, Ratner, N, Welling DB, Chang LS. (2008). PI3-kinase/AKT pathway activation in human vestibular schwannoma. Otol Neurotol, 29, 58-68.

Yang L, Lang JC, Balasubraman P, Jatana K, Schuller D, Agarwal A, Zborowski M, Chalmers JJ. (2009). Optimization of an enrichment process for circulating tumor cells from the blood of head and neck cancer patients through depletion of normal cells. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 102 (2), 521-34. Colella S, Colella S, Richards KL, Bachinski LL, Baggerly KA, Tsavachidis S, Lang JC, Schuller DE, Krahe R. (2008). Molecular signatures of metastasis in head and neck cancer. Head Neck.(10),1273-83

Susan Nittrouer, PhD Nittrouer S. (2009). Early Development of Children with Hearing Loss. Plural Publishing (San Diego).

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 10


Publications for 2008/2009

Nittrouer S, Lowenstein JH. (2009). Does harmonicity explain children’s cue weighting of fricative-vowel syllables? J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 1679-1692. Nittrouer S, Lowenstein JH, Packer R. (2009). Children discover the spectral skeletons in their native language before the amplitude envelopes. J. Exp. Psych.: Human Percep. and Perf., 35, August. Nittrouer S, Lowenstein JH. (2008). Spectral structure across the syllable specifies final-stop voicing for adults and children alike. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 123, 377-385. McGowan R S, Nittrouer S, Chenausky K. (2008). Speech production of twelve-month-old children with and without hearing loss. J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res, 51, 879-888. Lowenstein JH, and Nittrouer S. (2008). Patterns of acquisition of native voice onset time in English-learning children. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 1180-1191.

Enver Ozer, MD

Ozer E, Agrawal A, Ozer HG, Schuller DE. (2008). The Impact of Surgery in the Management of the Head and Neck Carcinoma Involving the Carotid Artery. Laryngoscope, (10), 1771-4. Ozer E, Waltonen J. (2008). Transoral Robotic Nasopharyngectomy: A Novel Approach for Nasopharyngeal Lesions. Laryngoscope, 118(9), 1613-6.

Quintan Pan, PhD Mitra RS, Goto M, Lee JS, Maldonado D, Taylor JMG, Pan Q, Carey TE, Bradford CR, Prince ME, Cordell KG, Kirkwood KL, and DiSilva NJ (2008) Rap1GAP promotes invasion via induction of matrix metalloproteinase 9 secretion, which is associated with poor survival in low N-stage squamous cell carcinoma. Cancer Res. 68:3959-3969.

David Schuller, MD Klopfenstein KJ, Scott S, Schuller DE, Ruymann F. (2008). Prolonged Survival with Continuous Infusion Topotecan: A Report of 2 Cases. Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, 30(6), 468-470. Samlowski WE, Moon J, Kuebler JP, Nicols CR, Gandara DR, Ozer H, Williamson SK, Atkins JN, Schuller DE, Ensley JF. (2008). Evaluation of the combination of docetaxel/carboplatin in patients with metastatic or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN): a Southwest Oncology Group Phase II study. Cancer Invest 25(3), 182-188. Agrawal A, Hussein O, Schuller DE. (2008). Esophageal Reconstruction with Larynx Preservation using Forearm Free Flap. Laryngoscope, 118(10), 1750-2.

Stephen Smith, MD Smith Jr. SP, Buckingham ED, Williams III EF. (2008). Management of cutaneous juvenile hemangiomas. Facial Plast Surg 24, 050-064. Janatan K, Smith SP, Williams III EF. (2008). The scientific basis for lipotransfer; Is fat the ideal filler? Facial Plastic Clinics of Norht America, 16(4), 443-8.

Theodoros Teknos, MD Worden FP, Kumar B, Lee JS, Wolf GT, Cordell KG, Taylor JMG, Urba SG, Eisbruch A, Teknos TN, Chepeha DB, Prince ME, Tsien CI, DiSilva NJ, Miller TH, Wallace NE, Bauer JA, Bradford CR, Carey TE. (2008). Chemoselection as a strategy for organ preservation in advanced oropharynx cancer: Response and survival positively associated with HPV16 copy number. JCO Jul 1, 3128-3137 Worden FP, Kumar B, Lee JS, Wolf GT, Cordell KG, Taylor JMG, Urba SG, Eisbruch A, Teknos TN, Chepeha DB, Prince ME, Tsien CI, DiSilva NJ, Miller TH, Wallace NE, Bauer JA, Bradford CR, Carey TE. (2008). EGFR, p16, HPV Titer, BclXL and p53, gender and smoking as indicators of response to therapy and survival in oropharyngeal cancer. JCO Jul 1, 3138 – 3146.

D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD Chang LS, Welling DB. (2009). Molecular biology of vestibular schwannomas. Methods In Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.). Vol. 493. (January 1): 163. Ealy M, Chen W, Ryu GY, Yoon JG, Welling DB, Hansen M, Madan A, Smith RJ. (2008). Gene expression analysis of human otosclerotic stapedial footplates. Hear Res, 240, 80-86. Jacob A, Lee TX, Neff BA, Miller S, Ratner, N, Welling DB, Chang LS. (2008). PI3-kinase/AKT pathway activation in human vestibular schwannoma. Otol Neurotol, 29, 58-68. Jatana K, Jacob A, Slone HW, Ray-Chaudhury A, Welling DB (2008). Spinal myxopapillary ependymoma metastatic to bilateral internal auditory canals. Annals of Otology, Rhinology, & Laryngology, 117(2), 98-102. Fernandez SA, Wiet GJ, Butler NN, Welling DB, Jarjoura D. (2008). Reliability of surgical skills scores in Otolaryngology residents: Analysis using generalizability theory. Eval Health Prof, 4:419-436.

Gregory Wiet, MD Fernandez SA, Wiet GJ, Butler NN, Welling DB, Jarjoura D. Reliability of Surigical Skills Scores in Otolaryngology Residents: Analysis using generalizability theory. Eval. Health Prof. 2008 Dec; (4): 419-36. Epub 2008 Oct 7.

Ozer E, Agrawal A, Ozer HG, Schuller DE. (2008). The Impact of Surgery in the Management of the Head and Neck Carcinoma Involving the Carotid Artery. Laryngoscope, (10), 1771-4. Yang L, Lang JC, Balasubraman P, Jatana K, Schuller D, Agarwal A, Zborowski M, Chalmers JJ. (2009). Optimization of an enrichment process for circulating tumor cells from the blood of head and neck cancer patients through depletion of normal cells. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 102 (2), 521-34

The Ohio State University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology page 11

Publications

Waltonen J, Schuller DE, Ozer E, Agrawal A. (2009). Tonsillectomy vs. deep tonsil biopsies in detecting occult tonsil tumors. Laryngoscope. Vol. 119, no. 1. (January 1): 102.

Colella S, Colella S, Richards KL, Bachinski LL, Baggerly KA, Tsavachidis S, Lang JC, Schuller DE, Krahe R. (2008). Molecular signatures of metastasis in head and neck cancer. Head Neck. (10),1273-83


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The Ohio State University Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Eye and Ear Institute 915 Olentangy River Rd., 4th Floor Columbus, Ohio 43212 614-293-8150 ent.osu.edu

Academic Bowl Championship In his introduction of the competition, Academic Bowl coordinator J. David Osguthorpe, MD, predicted that the winning medical school residency team would answer 85 percent of Bowl questions correctly. When the dust settled at the conclusion, two of the teams did considerably better than that, "proving that these are the top residency programs in the country," Dr. Osguthorpe said. Competing against one another in the AAO-HNS/F Annual Meeting Academic Bowl were teams of residents from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, the University of North Carolina Medical School, Wake Forest University Medical School, and The Ohio State University Medical Center.

Correctly answering 95 percent of presented questions, the teams from Ohio State (Drs. Cherie Ryoo, Ryan Hendricker & David Melon) and the University of North Carolina tied for first place and will share a prize that includes travel grants to attend the Annual Meeting, as well as subscriptions to the Home Study Course for the residency program. Presented with 34 clinical questions covering broad areas of otolaryngology as well as general medicine, each team was given 10 to 30 seconds to agree on an answer. At the same time, answers from the audience were recorded on individual keypads and compared with residency team responses. The AAO-HNSF Education Steering Committee organizes the Academic Bowl using questions created by Academy educational faculty, or selected from educational materials such as the Home Study Course, Patient of the Month, SIPacs, and the Slide Lecture Series. To learn more about the academic bowl and the American Academy of Otolaryngology please visit the Academy's webpage at http://www.entnet.org/

Winter Newsletter 2010  

Otolaryngology Newsletter, Winter 2010

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