OSU-CHS Magazine - Fall/Summer 2016

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OKLAHOMA

STATE UNIVERSITY 1111 W. 17th St., Tulsa, OK 74107

Center for Health Sciences magazine SUMMER/FALL 2016

Graduation Class of 2016


IT ALL STARTS WITH

OPERATION

RESEARCH

ORANGE

High school students from across the state experienced a day in the life of a medical student at Operation Orange, Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine’s annual summer camps. The camps, hosted at partner instititutions across the state in June, introduced students to careers as physicians and sparked an interest in medicine. Students participated in hands-on demonstrations, including studying the anatomy of a heart, lungs and brain and performing intubations using a simulator. Operation Orange was sponsored in part by the Cherokee Nation and Stillwater Medical Center. For more information about Operation Orange visit www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/ operationorange.

Finding new ways to fight cancer. Developing tools to help doctors better detect cardiovascular diseases. Improving the way muscles function for better performance. These are examples of the many research projects being conducted at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences that are advancing the fields of biomedical science, forensic science, medicine, athletic training and health care administration. Our faculty, students and staff are making scientific breakthroughs while training the next generation of researchers and physicians in Oklahoma. Bruce Benjamin, Ph.D., vice provost for graduate programs, discusses OSU-CHS graduate degrees and research in a video at www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/gradprograms.

®

Tulsa, Oklahoma

918-582-1972

www.healthsciences.okstate.edu

®

Tulsa, Oklahoma

918-582-1972

www.healthsciences.okstate.edu


TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the President PAGE 2

Class of 2016 Graduation PAGE 8

Recruitment PAGE 3 Student Life PAGE 6 Native American PAGE 16 Medical Student Profile PAGE 22 Graduate Student Profile PAGE 23

Hunting Illegal Clandestine Labortories PAGE 14

Soft Tissue Massage Therapy PAGE 18

Genetic Disorders PAGE 20

Rural Health PAGE 24

Terminal Liver Disease PAGE 27 Research PAGE 28 Cowboys in Africa PAGE 29 Cowboys Who Care PAGE 30

Outreach PAGE 32 Alumni PAGE 34 Faculty & Staff PAGE 36 Development PAGE 38

Non-Discrimination Statement The Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals based on their status as protected veterans or individuals with disabilities, and prohibit discrimination against all individuals based on their age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, national origin or ethnicity. This publication, issued by Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, as authorized by Marketing and Communication Services was printed by Heritage Integrated Solutions, at a cost of $7,980. 3,500/Sept./2016

Topping Off PAGE 26

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR HEALTH SCIENCES ADMINISTRATION KAYSE SHRUM, D.O. ’98 President & Dean, Professor of Pediatrics WILLIAM PETTIT, D.O. Provost Senior Associate Dean, Professor of Family Medicine JOHNNY STEPHENS, PHARM. D. Chief Operating Officer Interim Vice President for Research Professor of Internal Medicine ERIC POLAK, MBA Vice President for Administration & Finance OSU CENTER FOR HE ALTH SCIENCES

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PRESIDENT’S LETTER S

ummer is usually a time for university faculty and staff to enjoy a few moments of quiet and relaxation. At OSU-CHS, summer has been nothing short of hectic. As soon as we celebrated the achievements of the 190 talented men and women who graduated this past spring from the College of Osteopathic Medicine, School of Healthcare Administration, School of Forensic Sciences and School of Biomedical Sciences, we quickly redirected our focus to finalizing the admissions cycle for the incoming classes and to recruiting hundreds of aspiring students into science and medicine through programs such as Operation Orange, Native Explorers, and Oklahoma Science Training and Research Students (OKstars). This fall, our campus will welcome nearly 250 new students comprised of 115 medical students and over 130 graduate students. Our academic programs are growing by leaps and bounds. At OSU-CHS, we are carrying out our bold vision to recruit and train the next generation of outstanding clinicians, healthcare leaders, research scientists and forensics practitioners. As we continue to grow, we are committed to upholding our standard of excellence in teaching, research and clinical care.

and students, who discover solutions to complex issues and who seek to understand the root causes of illnesses. In Tulsa and beyond, OSU-CHS embraces the responsibility of improving the lives of Oklahomans. Our responsibility takes on many forms. Whether it’s providing health services to rural communities in Oklahoma or sitting down with elementary-aged children in West Tulsa to ignite their interest in science, our faculty, students, staff and alumni are committed to making a difference in society. We also salute Saint Francis Health System and The William K. Warren Foundation for partnering with us to address the primary care physician shortage and are humbled by the vast number of alumni and community partners who have stepped up to support the A.R. and Marylouise Medical Academic Building. The OSU-CHS family is made up of community partners, alumni, faculty, staff, students and supporters who share a common vision of a healthier Oklahoma. This September marks the anniversary of my third year serving as President of OSU-CHS. My work and interactions over the last three years have only reinforced my belief that through the collective efforts of the OSU-CHS family, OSU-CHS can serve as the catalyst to help transform healthcare in Oklahoma. I am extremely proud to be a member of the OSUCHS family and I hope you are too. Thank you for all that you do to enable us to make a difference in the lives and health of Oklahomans.

Kayse Shrum, D.O.’98

In this issue of the OSU-CHS Magazine, we will give you a snapshot of the high caliber of students, faculty, and staff whose contributions enable us to continue to be a premier academic health center. The incredible talent of the people who work and learn here give us the unique ability to position ourselves as a leader in the future of healthcare and biomedical research. Our ability to have an impact on the health and well-being of individuals and communities in Oklahoma comes from the heart, drive, and vision of faculty, staff

Kayse Shrum, D.O.’98 President, OSU Center for Health Sciences Dean, OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine, Professor of Pediatrics George Kaiser Family Foundation Chair in Medical Excellence and Service Saint Francis Health System Endowed Chair in Pediatrics

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RECRUITMENT MAPS CONFERENCE About 120 college undergraduates from across the state attended the Minority Association of Pre-Medical Students (MAPS) conference at OSU-CHS. MAPS, an initiative of the Student National Medical Association, works to promote diversity in all aspects of medicine and patient care. The event offered minority students with an interest in pursuing medicine an opportunity to learn about OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine. Participants practiced in mock interviews and hands on simulated medical stations including intubation, osteopathic manipulative medicine, and heart and lung sounds.

ADMITTED STUDENT DAY

NSU EARLY ADMISSIONS DAY

OSU-COM welcomed about 100 students and their families to campus during Admitted Student Day. The event offered incoming students an opportunity to tour campus, meet their future classmates and learn about OSU-COM from current students.

Approximately 20 undergraduate students from Northeastern State University (NSU) – Broken Arrow and NSU Tahlequah attended the NSU Undergraduate Day as part of the recruiting efforts for OSU-COM's Rural and Underserved Primary Care Early Admissions Program (Early Admissions).

GRADUATE PROGRAM OPEN HOUSE

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE, COLLEGE MED-XTRAVAGANZA

Undergraduate students from various universities had a chance to learn more about the OSU-CHS graduate programs during a special open house. Participants heard from faculty and staff from the OSU School of Forensic Sciences, the OSU School of Biomedical Sciences, the OSU School of Health Care Administration, and OSU School of Allied Health. OSU-CHS offers master’s degree programs in health care administration, biomedical sciences, forensic sciences and athletic training. Biomedical sciences also includes a doctoral program as well as a separate anatomy and vertebrate paleontology track. The OSU School of Forensic Sciences offers specialty options in death scene investigation, DNA Biology, psychology, arson and explosives investigation and toxicology and trace evidence.

OSU-COM hosted over 300 prospective students on campus as part of Med-Xtravaganza. MedXtravaganza held 2 separate events, one targeting undergraduate students and another event aimed at high school students. Prospective students had the opportunity to meet with faculty, advisors, and current medical students. Prospective students learned about admissions criteria and participated in hands-on demonstrations. They observed osteopathic manipulative medicine and listened to simulations of patient’s heart and lungs. In total, 179 undergraduate students and 150 high school students participated in MedXtravaganza events.

The OSU School of Biomedical Sciences offers a degree that is broadly applicable to many disciplines, including anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology and physiology. The OSU School of Health Care Administration program is lauded among the best and most affordable graduate programs of its kind in the country. The OSU Athletic Training program is the newest addition to campus and the first program in the OSU School of Allied Health. The program is the only athletic training program in the state aligned with a medical school.

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RECRUITMENT HIGH SCHOOL MED-XTRAVAGANZA More than 150 high school students from all over Oklahoma stormed the OSU-CHS campus to experience the 2016 High School MedXtravaganza. Med-Xtravaganza is a day-long open house for high school students interested in a medical career. In addition to learning about the admissions process, students participated in hands-on simulated patient activities including listening to heart and lung sound and performing intubations. They were able to study anatomy with a real human heart, brain and lungs and learn how to properly bandage a patient.

YOUTH EXPO

OPERATION ORANGE

Each year at the Oklahoma Youth Expo in Oklahoma City, OSU-COM awards scholarships to FFA high school seniors interested in becoming a physician. The students will receive half of the scholarship their first year at OSU Stillwater and the remaining funds will be available upon matriculation to OSUCOM. This year’s recipients were the following: • Allison Beames, Howe, Oklahoma • Courtney Coulson, Wellston, Oklahoma • Darci DeVous, Tuttle, Oklahoma

A summer tradition since 2013, Operation Orange hit the road once again to bring a mini-medical camp to high school students across the state of Oklahoma. Students interacted with current medical students and participated in hands-on activities such as learning how to suture, how to perform chest compression techniques, and how to intubate a patient using a simulator. This summer, camps were held in Lawton at Cameron University, Weatherford at Southwestern Oklahoma State University (SWOSU), Tahlequah at Sequoyah High School, and Stillwater at Oklahoma State University. In addition to the hands-on activities, students also learned about the different career opportunities within the health care field. Representatives from the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, SWOSU Pharmacy program, OSU-OKC nursing department, and the OSU-CHS athletic training graduate program shared information about their programs. More than 400 high school students participated in the camps. Operation Orange was sponsored by the Cherokee Nation and by Stillwater Medical Center.

Jessica Bradley, Ashley Adkins, Allison Beames, Courtney Coulson, Darci DeVous, Dr. Bill Pettit

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MENTAL HEALTH AND THE MEDICAL STUDENT NATIONAL SURVEY RESULTS BY KATRINA LIN, OMS II Osteopathic medical student leaders across the nation are working to bring awareness to this topic, to shine light on the gravity, prevalence and stigma of mental illness among our peers. I am part of a team of medical students from across the nation working to address these concerns methodically through my role as a member of the Council of Osteopathic Student Government Presidents (COSGP). The Council’s Mental Health Awareness Task Force (MHATF) has approved a scientific study to measure the mental health of current osteopathic medical students. A survey was embraced by college administrations, faculties, alumni associations and student services nationwide. Depending on the findings, the comprehensive, anonymous and cross-sectional survey of medical students had the potential to legitimize policy changes in favor of student wellness.

After finding that an astonishing number of students struggling with mental health, the MHATF will continue to review the findings to learn what resources students believe help them the most and how best to implement those resources on osteopathic campuses nationwide.

Over 10,000 osteopathic students completed the MHATF national survey making it the largest study ever conducted on medical students in the United States.

With the number of medical students around the world screening high for suicide, it is heartwarming to see the osteopathic family coming together and supporting students in their efforts to bring attention to this difficult, but important topic.

The statistically significant results not only show that medical students have a higher level of depression than the general population, but more surprisingly, show that their anxiety is MUCH higher on average than the general population. 87 percent of the student participants screened above the national average for anxiety and 72 percent screened above the National Institutes of Health’s benchmark for being “clinically concerning”, a borderline designation for the disorders. In addition, about 10 percent of the student participants reported thoughts about harming themselves in the last month.

At OSU-CHS, the Student Government Association in partnership with OSU-CHS Wellness Center, Student Services, and Outreach and Special Events Departments held an OMS Day of Wellness in February we encouraged students to take a break from studying to enjoy a crockpot lunch, snack on popcorn, participate in adult coloring, post on the wall of encouragement, enjoy puppy therapy with Pete’s Pet Posse Tulsa, and receive free chair massages.

Schwenk, Davis, and Wimsatt. "Depression, Stigma, and Suicidal Ideation in Medical Students." The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). 2010;304(11):1181-1190. doi:10.1001/jama.2010.1300.

Katrina Lin, OMS II, speaks at the Mental Health Awareness Task Force

OMS Day of Wellness Puppy Therapy Station

OMS Day of Wellness Coloring Station

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STUDENT LIFE SHCARRY CHATMON, OMS III, INVITED TO GIVE COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS TO ALMA MATER Shcarry Chatmon was invited by Central High School located in Tulsa, OK, to present the Commencement Address during the Class of 2016 Graduation Ceremony in May. Chatmon is a 2006 graduate of Central High School where she graduated valedictorian. She obtained her undergraduate degree from OSU Stillwater and her master’s degree from Hampton University in Virginia. In addition to her many accomplishments, she is also the first person in her family to earn a bachelor's degree. Chatmon is passionate about mentoring minority students and feels privileged to serve as an inspiration to the younger generation.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION The mission of the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Student Association (BSGSA) is to enhance the goal of graduate Shcarry Chatmon, OMS III student success through community service activities and fundraisers. BSGSA performs outreach each year to school age children at Eugene Field Elementary. Members of BSGSA organize bake sales and a science fair to open the eyes of elementary-aged children to the wonders of science. This year’s “Harry Potter” themed bake sale raised over $400 that was used to purchase science education supplies. BSGSA also hosted several professional development workshops for graduate students on topics such as planning for a career in science, applying for fellowships, grant writing and authoring a manuscript.

Pictured above Eugene Field Science Fair participant: Diego

Pictured above Eugene Field Science Fair participants: Jade, Antwauna and David

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Pictured above Eugene Field Science Fair participant: Tyreese

Pictured above Eugene Field Science Fair participant: Angel


STUDENT LIFE MAKERHEALTH EVENT The Center for Health Systems Innovation (CHSI) hosted MakerHealth Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Anna Young, during an event at OSU-CHS. The event introduced examples of how the tools and mindset of the maker movement are revolutionizing the medical device research and development process to create new health technology that improves patient care. Attendees learned how clinicians, patients, and medical students from the MakerHealth Network are creating and experimenting to build the next generation of health hardware inside the care setting. “MakerHealth is bringing the tools and materials of the maker movement to hospitals, healthcare providers and medical schools, giving them the power to improve care,” said OSU-CHS President Kayse Shrum. “The maker movement inspires us to think outside the box when it comes to

healthcare delivery, and CHSI is pleased to have the resources of some of the brightest minds in the country with us.” Alex Thoman, OMS II, showcased his invention during the conference. With a MakerHealth mentality, Thoman created a device for the stethoscope that allows the user to put it on and take it off with one hand. “As we were learning to take blood pressures during the OMS I Clinical Skills Course, I found that holding the patient’s arm and putting on/removing my stethoscope was difficult to do simultaneously. I was left having to decide whether to wear the stethoscope during the entire procedure or awkwardly attempt to take it off using one hand. Leaving the stethoscope on is both uncomfortable and hard to hear, so I set out to invent something that would help me and hopefully other medical professionals circumvent this problem,” said Thoman.

FORENSIC SCIENCE ORGANIZATION This semester Forensic Science Organization (FSO) was as active as ever. In addition to hosting tours and activities on campus, FSO members introduced future scientists to forensics at Clark Elementary’s STEM Night and the Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance’s “You’re Kind Of A Big Deal” banquet. FSO also had outstanding participation in OSU’s Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition. To round out the academic year, FSO hosted an appreciation breakfast for the forensics faculty. Dane Robertson, winner of Three Minute Thesis

KEEP UP TO DATE! HEALTHSCIENCES.OKSTATE.EDU

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OSU-CHS CLASS OF 2016 GRADUATION

RECORD GROWTH IN NEW ADVANCED DEGREE PROGRAMS AND STUDENT ENROLLMENT

T

his past spring, OSU-CHS graduated a record number of medical and graduate students.

In 2016, OSU-CHS conferred 190 degrees -- 106 doctors of osteopathic medicine, 64 masters’ in health care administration, 10 masters’ in forensic science, 8 masters' degrees in the biomedical sciences, and 2 doctorates in biomedical sciences.

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In 2012, OSU-CHS increased the medical school class size in order to address the physician shortage facing Oklahoma. Significant growth is also occurring in the graduate programs. In the past three years, graduate programs in biomedical sciences, forensics sciences and health care administration have increased 236 percent. The new Master's in Athletic Training program is the latest to join the graduate program offerings.


Jamie D.Alexander Ludwigshafen am Rhein, Germany Family Medicine Autumn Leigh Allison Russellville, Ark. Pathology Rafel H. Alvarez Turpin, Okla. Diagnostic Radiology Dayana Arteaga Moore, Okla. Psychiatry Brian Brody Baker Tulsa, Okla. Emergency Medicine Nickolas Aaron Baker Tulsa, Okla. Family Medicine Joanna Michelle Bartholomew Healdton, Okla. Family Medicine

Jennifer Allison Brady Wichita, Kan. Psychiatry

Matthew Lane Else Butte, Mont. Family Medicine

Melissa Ann Harris Edmond, Okla. Emergency Medicine

Jamie Nicole Brown Laverne, Okla. Pediatrics

Lindsey Claire Epperson Oklahoma City, Okla. Emergency Medicine

Sarah Renee Hayden Bixby, Okla. Pediatrics

Christen Brummett Tulsa, Okla. Family Medicine

Melissa Evans-Brave Jenks, Okla. Emergency Medicine

Catherine Marie Hays Webster City, Iowa Family Medicine

Anna Georgiyevna Buzadzhi Broken Arrow, Okla. Traditional Rotating Internship

Jacob Lynn Fisher Yukon, Okla. Family Medicine

Trace Elvin Heavener Kansas, Okla. Internal Medicine

Myles G. Fisher Piedmont, Calif. Emergency Medicine

Heather Nicole Hensley Broken Arrow, Okla. Diagnostic Radiology

Joshua B. Floyd Farmington, Utah Diagnostic Radiology

Brandon G. Hilburn Webb City, Mo. Anesthesiology

Levi James Garrison Ponca City, Okla. Emergency Medicine

Summer Mariah Hill Talihina, Okla. Traditional Rotating Internship

Dustin Wayne Cheney Catoosa, Okla. Family Medicine Pinky Chugani Tulsa, Okla. Internal Medicine/ Pediatrics Max Joseph Cieminski Oklahoma City, Okla. Emergency Medicine

Krystal Diane Bell Oklahoma City, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology

Erin Irene Coyle Fairfield, Ohio Family Medicine

Erica Lynn Benda Union City, Okla. Emergency Medicine

Jacob Curley Monroe, Mich. Pathology

Anish Prakash Bhakta Oklahoma City, Okla. Internal Medicine

Dustin Wayne Davis Heavener, Okla. General Surgery

Rachel Elizabeth Black Rose Hill, Kan. Internal Medicine

Daniel James Dittus Tulsa, Okla. Emergency Medicine

Jacob Andrew Borgsmiller Tulsa, Okla. Family Medicine

Phillip Gene Doerner, III Oklahoma City, Okla. Internal Medicine

Machaille L. Borgsmiller Henryetta, Okla. Family Medicine Jacquelyn DesireĂŠ Boyd Oklahoma City, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology

Deidra Ann Duncan Tulsa, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology Larry Shane Elliott Bartlesville, Okla. Family Medicine

Muna Samir Gharfeh Bartlesville, Okla. Internal Medicine Cody William Griffin Ada, Okla. Orthopedic Surgery John William Ground Edmond, Okla. General Surgery Rebecca Michelle Gupton McAlester, Okla. Internal Medicine Bret Colter Haines Stillwater, Okla. General Surgery Amanda Neline Hale Dickson, Okla. Family Medicine Matthew L. Haney Fairfax, Okla. Family Medicine Robert Drew Haney Owasso, Okla. Family Medicine

Zachary Tyler Hill Talihina, Okla. Diagnostic Radiology Shane Brody Hnatusko Verdigris, Okla. Emergency Medicine Gerrit Woodward Houser Oklahoma City, Okla. Psychiatry Sydni Jones Imel Enid, Okla. General Surgery Heather Anne Jones Muskogee, Okla. Psychiatry Brandy Orr Kalami Chickasha, Okla. Psychiatry Susan Marie Kerns Okmulgee, Okla. General Surgery Laila Sakina Khan Neosho, Mo. Family Medicine

Mohamad Hussien Khattab Tulsa, Okla. Internal Medicine Janell L. Largent Red Rock, Okla. Family Medicine Cameron Bishop Leavitt Cedar City, Utah Obstetrics and Gynecology Carley Elizabeth Legan Edmond, Okla. Internal Medicine Dirk Lee Lenaburg Tecumseh, Okla. Traditional Rotating Internship - Fla. Casey Ray Liston Oklahoma City, Okla. Emergency Medicine Kimberly K. McPhearson Hydro, Okla. Internal Medicine Kale Z. Melton Oklahoma City, Okla. Emergency Medicine Allison Kay Moore Broken Arrow, Okla. Emergency Medicine Lauren Jennette Moore Okay, Okla. Family Medicine Alisha Renee Murrow Tahlequah, Okla. Emergency Medicine Tuan Minh Nguyen Oklahoma City, Okla. Pediatrics Andrea Rydel Partida Tulsa, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology Dana June Pentecost Tulsa, Okla. Emergency Medicine

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Gloria Jordan Perez Clermont, Fla. Obstetrics and Gynecology

Zara Mustajab Siddiqui Tulsa, Okla. B.S., University of Tulsa Family Medicine

Dave Peyok Tulsa, Okla.

Dustin W. Smith Brookland, Ark. Psychiatry

Derek James Pourtorkan Edmond, Okla. Family Medicine Kayla Rachelle Pratt Chickasha, Okla. Family Medicine Caleb Paul Prentice Owasso, Okla. Traditional Rotating Internship Jesse Richards Nashville, Tenn. Internal Medicine Morgan N. Richards Edmond, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology Hilda Rodriguez Clinton, Okla. Family Medicine Constance Ann Rogers Tulsa, Okla. Family Medicine George William Russell Davis, Okla. Family Medicine Laura Ashley Sanford Okmulgee, Okla. Family Medicine Courtney Erin Sauls Tulsa, Okla. Pediatrics Caleb J. Scheckel Owasso, Okla. Internal Medicine Maxwell Kofi Sencherey Lake Jackson, Texas Anesthesiology Shaylea Dawn Shebester Pauls Valley, OK Family Medicine 10

Kevin Brian Smith Madison, S.D. Internal Medicine Matthew Wayne Smith Ada, Okla. Emergency Medicine Eric Michael Sparks Tulsa, Okla. Emergency Medicine Anesthiology Blake Anthony Stepanovich Altus, Okla. Orthopedic Surgery Scott Andrew Stroshine Orem, Utah Pediatrics Peter James Sullivan Tulsa, Okla. Anesthiology Jessica Tucker Sumner Skiatook, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology Michael Scott Sumner Durant, Okla. Internal Medicine Dale Nathan Switzer Tulsa, Okla. Psychiatry Maria Rose Vachapittack Omaha, Neb. Family Medicine Michael Marc Véronneau Edmond, Okla. Internal Medicine Luanne Thanh Vo Oklahoma City, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology

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Stormy Ray Walkup Valliant, Okla. Family Medicine Heather Jean Weber Shawnee, Okla. Pediatrics Nathaniel David Weber Chickasha, Okla. Internal Medicine Amy Joyce Wilson Poteau, Okla. Internal Medicine Micah Ray Wright Ponca City, Okla. Obstetrics and Gynecology GRADUATE PROGRAMS BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES Robert Lewis, Ph.D. Warren Kellen Myers, Ph.D. Tomi Adewumi, M.S. Lauren Chambers, M.S. Dustin Davis, M.S. Rebecca Gupton, M.S. Drew Haney, M.S. Constance Rogers, M.S. Chiedozie Waturuocha, M.S. GRADUATE PROGRAMS FORENSIC SCIENCES Travis Brachtenbach, M.S. Kristin Dickerson, M.S. Ashley Lamothe, M.S. Kimberly Litterell, M.S. April Mitchell, M.S. Dane Robertson, M.S. Sunday Saenz, M.S. Madison Sanders, M.S. Allie Sherier, M.S. Tyler Smith, M.S. GRADUATE PROGRAMS HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION Samon Adib, M.S. Jesse Anderson, M.S. Brad Atherton, M.S. Jamal Bandeh, M.S. Kyle Boone, M.S. Franketa Bell, M.S. Dusti Brodrick, M.S. Todd Brooks, M.S.

Clarissa Brown, M.S. Abby Castro, M.S. Wayne Coldwell, M.S. Jamie Collins, M.S. Alexa Deininger, M.S. Michelle Demler, M.S. Katherine Earman, M.S. Kari Easson, M.S. LaFonda Ehlers, M.S. Robert Gaygay, M.S Jenny Gillen, M.S. Leigh Heller, M.S. Brinda Holt, M.S. Kandace Hughes, M.S. Laura Jackson, M.S. Harpreet Jakhar, M.S. Joy Kaopuiki, M.S. Mendy Koscinski, M.S. Sara Kuntz, M.S. Benjamin Lalli, M.S. Kristi Leibold, M.S. Robert Mays, M.S. Maaike McCutcheon, M.S. Bradley McDaris, M.S. Johana Mendez, M.S. Teran Mixon, M.S. Jennifer Morgan, M.S. Ramon Mosqueda, M.S. Lori Mouse, M.S. Kimberly Murphy, M.S. Risha Musapeta, M.S. Julie Niewoehner, M.S. Samantha Overfield, M.S. Erica Pasley-Richards, M.S. Brian Payne, M.S. Patty Pedersen, M.S. Shelby Rauh, M.S. Katie Ruhanen, M.S. Brent Sadler, M.S. Jade Sharp, M.S. Jodi Simmons, M.S. Alexandria Smith, M.S. Ashley Smith, M.S. Leslie Snider, M.S. Steven Taylor, M.S. Beth Tenney, M.S. Bridgett Tiffany, M.S. Harshitha Vanguru, M.S. Brittany Vaughn, M.S. Pam Veale, M.S. Morgan Weldon, M.S. Tori Welker, M.S. Daniel Westerman, M.S. Helen Wheeler, M.S. Kerri Williams, M.S. Judith Wilson, M.S.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Brian Brody Baker, M.B.A. Matthew Else, M.B.A. Carley Legan, M.B.A. Dirk Lee Lenaburg , M.B.A. Dana Pentecost, M.B.A. AWARD RECIPIENTS Regents’ Distinguished Student Award Matthew Haney Academic Excellence Award Joshua Floyd Alumni Recognition Awards Heather Hensley & Matthew Smith Clinical Excellence Award Sydni Jones Imel Leadership and Service Awards Heather Hensley & Matthew Smith Mind, Body and Spirit Award Jacob Curley Outstanding Biomedical Sciences Graduate Student Award Dusti Sloan Outstanding Health Care Administration Graduate Student Award Kandace Hughes Chairman’s Award for Outstanding Forensic Science Student Award Dane Robertson


DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS

RURAL MEDICINE

Anatomy and Cell Biology –Joshua Floyd

Joanna Bartholomew Erica Benda Rachel Black Jake Borgsmiller Amanda Hale Matthew Haney Shane Hnatusko Heather Jones Janell Largent Dirk Lenaburg Allison Moore Alisha Murrow David Peyok Hilda Rodriguez Constance Rogers Laura Sanford Eric Sparks Maria Vachapittack Stormy Walkup Bret Haines

Biochemistry –Caleb Scheckel Family Medicine –Matthew Else Emergency Medicine – Shane Hnatusko Internal Medicine – Muna Gharfeh Microbiology – Joshua Floyd Obstetric and Gynecology – Micah Wright Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine – Dave Peyok Pathology – Jacob Curley Pediatrics – Courtney Sauls Pharmacology – Brandon Hilbum Physiology – Cameron Leavitt Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences – Brandy Kalami Radiology – Rafel Alvarez

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OSU-CHS STUDENT LEADERSHIP AT AACOM AND D.O. DAY ON CAPITOL HILL

Dominican Republic Embassy, including the Minister Counselor and Deputy Chief of Mission, Mr. José Luis Domínguez

Over 1,100 students and D.O.s at D.O. Day on the Hill

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine annually meets to address current and upcoming issues in osteopathic medical education. The conference is attended by deans, faculty, students, admissions, student affairs directors, department heads, development directors, and others contributing to medical education. At the recent AACOM Conference and Council of Osteopathic Student Government Presidents (COSGP) Conference Meeting, Katrina Lin, OMS II had the privilege of transitioning the newly elected Student Government Association (SGA) President Calli Schardein,OMS II, into her national position as a COSGP representative. Karley Koch, OMS III, was recognized for having the third highest number of Translating Osteopathic Understanding into Community Health (TOUCH) volunteer hours. Matthew Smith, D.O. ’16, was recognized for being OSUCOM Student Doctor of the Year. Student leaders were also invited to the Dominican Republic Embassy to recognize D.O. Care and osteopathic student volunteers in global outreach. Student leaders of Student Osteopathic Medical Association (SOMA) met in D.C. during the AACOM Conference as well. This included student leaders for all four classes of OSU-COM, including transitioning members Lindsey French, OMS II, as SOMA President and Michael Sutton, OMS II, as National Liaison. Forty-six OSU-COM medical students travelled to Washington D.C. to attend the 2016 D.O. Day on Capitol Hill, which was

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OSU-CHS lobbying at the office of Rep Jim Bridenstine

a record number of OSU-COM students in attendance. OSUCOM students joined over 1,100 other osteopathic medical students and D.O.s from across the nation to educate members of Congress on the importance of the osteopathic profession and to advocate for policy change. This year, students and physicians addressed the large issue of medical student debt and its effect on students and future physicians. Furthermore, students and physicians helped members of Congress understand osteopathic medicine’s role in the opioid epidemic. In addition to lobbying, outstanding students and professionals demonstrating excellence in healthcare politics were recognized by their induction into the Omega Beta Iota (ΩBI) National Osteopathic Political Action Honor Society. At the induction, two OSU-CHS students were elected into 2016-2017 National Positions. Owais Durrani, OMS III, was elected as the ΩBI National First Year Liaison, and Katrina Lin, OMS II, was humbled to be elected as the ΩBI National Chapters Liaison. "I feel so honored to be part of OSU-CHS, where students are not only strongly supported by administration, faculty, and staff, but also by the Alumni Association, Oklahoma Osteopathic Association, and by physicians in our community. Students are encouraged to be involved and be leaders locally and nationally. Our student leaders yesterday, today, and tomorrow are strong and among the best. Go Pokes," stated Lin.


OSU-CHS STUDENTS AND FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENTS FROM IN HIS IMAGE CARE FOR HUNDREDS IN RURAL MEXICO OSU-COM medical students joined residents from In His Image to deliver health care services to patients In Oaxaca, Mexico as part of a missionary trip over the summer. OSU-COM medical students and In His Image residents served over 400 patients. The Tulsa medical teams converged on the rural, southern Mexico town as a partnership project between OSU-CHS and a Tulsa-based family medicine residency program of Christian doctors called In His Image. Their mission is to provide exceptional training for serving God through medicine. “The trip reminded me daily why I want to work as a family physician for rural people,” said David McVay, OMS III. “There were so many patients with so many needs that all we did was see patients, eat and sleep. My passion for medical ministry was reignited by my days serving the people of southern Mexico.” This is McVay’s second trip to Oaxaca.

OSU medical students and John Micah Powers assist Dr. Drew Haney in patient examination

The teams lived in the mountains around Oaxaca for more than a week. Conditions were very basic – sleeping on the floor, eating little more than beans and rarely getting a cellular window to send even a quick text. The physician teams also learned a new definition for the term “house calls,” by hiking with their medical equipment up the mountain an hour to reach patients who were too weak to travel into town. “I pray our medical care, our servant hearts and our Godly messages help these people in very difficult situations,” concluded McVay.

Below: Medical Missions team in the mountains above Oaxaco, Mexico

OSU medical students join the mission team for mountain top prayers

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HUNTING ILLEGAL CLANDESTINE DRUG AND EXPLOSIVE LABORATORIES

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OSU SCIENTIST’S RESEARCH DESIGNED TO LEAD LAW ENFORCEMENT TO ILLEGAL CLANDESTINE DRUG AND EXPLOSIVE LABORATORIES METH LABS A PRIMARY TARGET

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n OSU-CHS forensic researcher and his team are joining the hunt for bomb makers and illegal drug manufacturers through research conducted in the Forensic Toxicology and Trace Laboratory in the School of Forensic Sciences. “We are exploring new technologies to help law enforcement track hidden or clandestine laboratories where criminals are “cooking” methamphetamine and other illegal drugs,” said Jarrad Wagner Ph.D., director of the OSU-CHS Forensic Toxicology and Trace Laboratory. “Our research is designed to identify and track the signature components illegal “cookers” use to make their drugs, much like a chemical fingerprint. This core research has applications in identifying and locating bomb makers in addition to people that make drugs.” Wagner is part of a graduate program in the Forensic Sciences that is fully accredited by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences through its Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission. Working through a US Department of Justice National Institute of Justice research project alongside the Department of Energy, OSU-CHS scientists are designing a process to detect concealed lab residue in sewage systems. “Our work centers around the concept that chemicals used in these hidden laboratories can be tracked to source neighborhoods, and then source houses, leading law enforcement to those criminals responsible for making illegal drugs. If we can identify the chemical signature of these illegal drug makers, we hope to then track their whereabouts using the sewage system. The next step in our research trajectory is to find these criminals by tracing their signature chemicals through the air.” OSU’s work with both illegal drugs and chemical explosives goes beyond tactics to find clandestine laboratories. “Our research is exploring and identifying the composition and characteristics of methamphetamine to better understand its effects, its dangers, and its impact on individuals and communities both short term and long term. We hope this research pathway leads to new strategies for health care and law enforcement professionals to protect innocent families and first responders who encounter these chemicals and to get the perpetrators of these crimes off the streets.” Methamphetamine, or meth as it is more commonly known, is the most abused hard drug in the world. An estimated 1.4 million users and climbing are in the U.S.

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NATIVE AMERICAN OSU-CHS OAAIMS PROGRAMS MAKING NEW TRIBAL CONNECTIONS AND BREAKING NEW RECORDS The Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science (OAAIMS) at OSU-CHS has been actively making inroads with Native initiatives. OAAIMS has embraced additional tribal allies, partnered with Oklahoma tribes in seeking federal funding, published papers, recruited Native students to OSU-CHS programs, and conducted numerous STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) camps. OAAIMS participated in the following STEM Camps: Chickasaw Nation: • Native Fighting Addiction through Education (F.A.T.E.) for Chickasaw citizens ages 14 – 22 • Summer STEM Camp at the Chickasaw Nation Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma for Native youth ages 6 – 14 • Hosted quarterly meetings for the Junior Explorers program for Native youth grades kindergarten through 12th grade Choctaw Nation: • Camp for underprivileged Native youth in grades 1-6 • Jones Academy for Native American students in 9-12 grades Cherokee Nation: • STEM and medical camp for Cherokee youth in grades 1-6

The OAAIMS student ambassadors play a major role in carrying out the programming and the mission of OAAIMS. The OAAIMS student ambassadors are Rafe Coker, MS IV (Choctaw), Sara Kruczek, OMS III (Choctaw and Cherokee), Lindsey French, OMS II (Choctaw), Andrew Mlady, OMS II (Osage), and Cody Miller, DO/MS (Cherokee).

OSU-CHS American Indian Students

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NATIVE AMERICAN NATIVE EXPLORERS PALEONTOLOGICAL EXCURSION Dr. Kent Smith, OSU-CHS Associate Dean for the Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science and Professor of Anatomy, leads the Native Explorers Paleontological Excursion in Churchill County, West-Central Nevada. During this leg of the two-week' trip, participants learned field techniques in vertebrate paleontology and studied Native American tradition and culture.

NATIVE SCHOLARS FROM OSU CENTER FOR HEALTH SCIENCES NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTS STATISTICS

Sara Kruczek, OMS III, Choctaw and Cherokee, recipient of the Cherokee Nation Higher Education Scholarship

Rafe Coker, OMS IV, Choctaw, recipient of the Chahta Foundation Doctorate Scholarship

OSU-CHS is proud to boast an impressive number of American Indians enrolled in medical and graduate programs. There are 95 American Indian students enrolled in OSU-CHS programs, equaling 12% of the total student body, of which 47 are enrolled in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, 45 are enrolled in OSU-CHS graduate programs, and 3 American Indian students are enrolled in dual degree seeking degree programs such as DO/PhD, DO/MBA, and DO/MS. 58% are Cherokee, 20% Choctaw, 10% Chickasaw, 10% Muscogee Creek, 7% Osage, and the remaining affiliated with 3% Cheyenne, Arapaho, Hopi, or Wyandotte. 60% of students receive financial aid from their affiliated tribal nations and a majority of these students participate regularly in tribal events. Data is based on 29 surveys of OSU-CHS students created by OOAIMS. These percentages do not reflect tribal groupings or the number of respondents, but rather the number of responses.

Shawna Passman, OMS III, Cherokee, recipient of the Directed Studies Program

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ATHLETIC TRAINING PROGRAM MEASURES IMPACT OF SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION TECHNIQUES

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ompetitive athletes push their bodies to the highest level of superior performance so that even the tiniest injury in the body’s architecture can impact their razor sharp abilities. Such is the case with the fascia, a continuous sheet of connective tissues just under the skin and covering the muscle. The fascia helps muscles attach to other systems in the body such as skeletal and neurological. When the fascia has too much tension or has adhesions from injury, the athlete’s muscles know the difference and tighten up or slow down. OSU-CHS researchers in the new athletic training master’s graduate program are looking at a variety of manipulation techniques to “stretch” the fascia with Soft Tissue Mobilization. Soft Tissue Mobilization is growing in popularity as the treatment and manipulation of injuries to such soft tissues as the fascia, muscles, tendons, ligaments, bursa and nerves.

Aric Warren, Ed.D., OSU-CHS Associate Professor of Athletic Training

“Soft Tissue Mobilization is a burgeoning field for treatment of athletic injury, but also for geriatric and even pediatric populations who can have both micro and macro injuries to these vulnerable tissues,” said Aric Warren, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Athletic Training. “We want to scientifically examine the value of these high level massage techniques to document both therapeutic and preventative evidence-based practices.” Treatment can be delivered through Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization that compresses at-risk or injured fascia. Another similar treatment is Cupping Therapy, which evolved from an ancient Chinese technique using suction to lift these tissue layers for improved healing and the more standard Manual Therapy, where a certified therapist uses his or her hands to manipulate the tissues. “The goal of all the techniques is to increase tension, which does stretch the fascia and smooths out the kinks of the adhesions,” continued Warren. “Soft Tissue Mobilization can help recipients with athletic performance, muscle stiffness, tenderness and range of motion. On the prevention side, these practices can be used as a screening tool to diagnose and correct muscle imbalances and avoid surgical intervention.” OSU CENTER FOR HE ALTH SCIENCES 19


OSU-CHS STUDIES SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND GENETIC DISORDER

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t acts like a cellular transmission tower and looks a little like the character Plankton from Sponge Bob Square Pants – it’s the cilia or flagella of the cell. These tiny organelles on the cellular level of the body play a tremendous role in the development of the human body and OSU-CHS scientists are dedicated to better understanding that role. “We know the cilia and flagella organelles on the surface of each cell play a communication function and our research is designed to see how that works in different tissues,” said Nedra Wilson, Ph.D., OSU-CHS Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology. “These cilia are dynamic and Nedra Wilson, Ph.D., OSU-CHS especially sensitive to Associate Professor of Anatomy their environment often and Cell Biology becoming too short, too long, paralyzed or completely destroyed as part of a disorder called ciliopathy. The results to the human physiology can be as catastrophic as blindness, obesity and neuro cognitive loss or as simple as the cause of a cough. Our research focuses on learning what forces impact the assembly and disassembly of these vital organelles in the hopes this research will ultimately lead us to therapeutic solutions to correct or prevent the ciliopathy mutations.” Wilson’s previous research into the relationship of the mental health drug Lithium on cilia of the brain is leading her OSU-CHS team to study the impact of cilia on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) patients. This earlier research project demonstrated clear changes, both protective and destructive, at the cilia and therefore the neurons of the brain when Lithium was introduced in different doses. “Our goal of discovery in this new study is to better understand PTSD on the molecular level documenting the cilia of the brain and their condition,” continued Wilson. “Specifically, we are exploring whether the cilia mutations will help us detect changes in the neurons of the brain that impact the anxiety, depression, memory loss and cognitive loss associated with PTSD.” Pictured to the left: Immunofluorescent 40x magnification of cilia in the hippocampus of the brain

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MEDICAL STUDENT PROFILE HEATHER HENSLEY, D.O.’16, M.P.T.

Heather Hensley, D.O.’16, M.P.T.

May 2016 was a busy month for Heather Hensley, D.O.’16. Hensley graduated from OSU-COM, married a professional baseball umpire, and started to prepare for the next chapter of her career progression as a diagnostic

radiology resident. Hensley is joining a diagnostic radiology residency program at OSU Medical Center in Tulsa. Diagnostic radiology is a major departure from the education plan she began in college at the University of Oklahoma. “I was committed to becoming a physical therapist and joined the OU pre-physiotherapist program for

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my undergraduate work and then went on to the OU Health Sciences Center to complete a Master's in Physical Therapy,” said Hensley. She worked as a physiotherapist and managed an entire clinic before the medical school bug struck. “I shadowed several referring physicians at the physical therapy clinic and wanted to learn more and train for medical missions - so medical school became my next goal,” Hensley continued. “I knew I wanted to go the osteopathic physician track because the D.O. program closely aligned with my medical philosophy and my physical therapy training.” In medical school Hensley became active in the advocacy side of medicine, first with the OSU-CHS Political Action Committee and other leadership roles and finally getting involved on the national level with the American Osteopathic Association as the Student Representative on the Council of New Physicians in Practice. Balancing medicine, faith, family and medical advocacy became a deciding factor in her choice of a medical specialty. “I chose the diagnostic radiology route because I love the people in both the medical school and residency programs and because the specialty offers me the flexibility to meet my career and personal goals.”


GRADUATE STUDENT PROFILE LACEY MCCOMBS - ATHLETIC TRANING For as long as she can remember, Lacey McCombs has loved sports. At age four she was swinging a bat in teeball and was running 10k races before she was 10-years old. “My dad had a huge influence in my passion for all things sports,” noted McCombs. “In high school at Newkirk, Oklahoma I played basketball, softball and ran track.” It was when Lacey became a student manager for the Newkirk Tiger football team that her career path started to take shape. “When I took the job I thought I would be a water girl for the team and I would just get to hangout on the field during games,” McCombs continued. “I quickly realized being an athletic trainer was much more. I was inspired by the school's female athletic trainer and was surprised by the relationship between the trainers and coaches. I quickly noticed I was watching the players and how they moved rather than the action around the ball. I began to see the whole field during a game seeing injuries in real-time as they happened.” Anatomy classes in high school fueled her passion but when she went to enroll in athletic training at OSU in Stillwater her dreams collided with the popularity of a growing new academic field of study. Athletic training was about to move to Tulsa and become a Master’s level program. “I was able to change my major in Stillwater to get a comparable degree in Health Education Promotion,” Lacey continued. “But I had my eye on the new Athletic Training Master’s program being created at OSU-CHS.”

mechanisms of how the different injuries occur in a variety of sports formats. I found our rotations fascinating moving from high school sports to jucolevel sports, I worked with a professional soccer team and experienced Lacey McCombs, Athletic Training such nonMaster's Student sports athletic training as professional bull riding and hope to add military preparation and conditioning, ballet and physical therapy with non-athletes to my resume.” McCombs expects to graduate with her Master’s in Athletic Training in May of 2017. “I would really like to work at a small college that would allow me to build personal relationships with the athletes,” Lacey continued. “I love the idea of working with multiple sports, different athletes in different seasons of sports who have very different injuries.”

She was able to join the inaugural class of the new master’s program. “I love better understanding the

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OSU-CHS CENTER FOR RURAL HEALTH HELPING SMALL HOSPITALS SURVIVE TOUGH TIMES

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ural healthcare in Oklahoma is on life support. The United Health Foundation ranked Oklahoma 45th in the nation in overall health. Oklahoma ranked 40th in smoking, 45th in obesity and 43rd in diabetes. Those who live in rural Oklahoma face more health challenges than those who live closer to primary healthcare facilities.

students. The Center also funds programs aimed at providing Oklahoma’s rural practitioners, hospitals, and clinics the support necessary to ensure health care access to rural residents. Knoke credits the OSU-CHS Center for Rural Health as being a critical partner.

On the front lines serving rural communities are rural hospitals such as Sequoyah Memorial Hospital (SMH) in Sallisaw, Oklahoma. SMH is one of the rural hospitals supported by the OSU-CHS Center for Rural Health. “The rural population has the same basic healthcare needs as others, but the challenge is for rural areas to provide the resources needed from primary care to specialty services,” said Debra Knoke, CEO of SMH.

Debra Knoke, CEO of Sequoyah Memorial Hospital

The OSU-CHS Center for Rural Health has been a vital resource to rural Oklahoma. The Center oversees the rural rotations of OSU-COM third and fourth year medical

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“The team there has always responded promptly to us from providing information and data regarding the demographics of our population to directing us to the appropriate agency or person to assist with our needs,” Knoke says. “We have worked on many projects alongside the OSU-CHS Center for Rural Health from grant opportunities to performing community health needs assessment. They have, for many years, provided our organization with guidance in conducting this assessment, including leading us through the entire process from beginning to end.”

Located 30 minutes from Arkansas, SMH is an acute care/general medical hospital licensed for 41 beds. Knoke says hospitals such as hers face other challenges.


“Smaller hospitals are challenged with financial sustainability. These challenges are brought about by the costs of operating. Many of our costs are fixed such as infrastructure, while our patient/service volumes may be lower and have wide fluctuations. Also, many smaller hospitals are older and require continual maintenance and investment in renovations to operate in optimal condition and to meet regulatory compliance.” The OSU-CHS Center for Rural Health has opened the door to telemedicine for SMH, and Knoke credits these efforts for SMH becoming an award winning certified TeleStroke Center in 2011.

Medicare and Medicaid, which causes rural hospitals to be very dependent on government payors and declining trends in reimbursements,” Knoke explained. “It is a challenge to provide quality services at the same volume for lower reimbursements. SMH has always focused on excellence in quality outcomes for our patients.” The hope of both the OSU Center for Rural Health and Knoke is that OSU-COM medical students who complete rotations at SMH and at other rural hospitals will have a positive experience and become inspired to return to serve in those communities. Growing the rural physician pipeline would have a huge impact on the health of rural Oklahomans.

Funding concerns are present at all hospitals, large and small, but she adds they have hit rural areas especially hard. “The patient population (payor mix) in rural areas is largely

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TOPPING OFF CEREMONY

Trudy Milner, D.O.’88, signs an orange steel beam to signify the project's progress as Paul Giehm, A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation representative, and President Kayse Shrum, D.O.’98 look over.

TOPPING OFF CEREMONY CELEBRATES CONSTRUCTION MILESTONE FOR A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY MEDICAL ACADEMIC BUILDING

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SU-CHS hosted a special Topping Off Ceremony marking the last beam put in place during construction of the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Medical Academic Building.

“The Tandy Medical Academic Building will take us one step closer to fulfilling that mission of equipping our students with the medical knowledge and clinical skills needed to become outstanding, yet caring and compassionate physicians,” said OSUCHS President Kayse Shrum. Trudy Milner, D.O.’88, OSU/A&M Board of Regents member, and Paul Giehm, senior vice president of Trust Company of Oklahoma and A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation representative, signed an orange steel beam to signify the project’s progress during the ceremony. After the ceremony, students, faculty and staff also signed the beam. The A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation provided $8 million toward construction of the 84,000-square-foot building, the largest private gift ever received by OSU-CHS. Other significant donors to the Tandy Medical Academic Building include the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, Morningcrest Healthcare Foundation, Osteopathic Founders Foundation, Pedigo Products, Inc., the Honorable Terry Kern and Jeanette Kern, Tim Headington, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, and Jean and Gary Goodnight, D.O. To date, over $10.2 million in private contributions has been secured to support the Tandy Medical Academic Building.

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The Tandy Medical Academic Building will be a community resource, enabling OSU-CHS to strengthen training partnerships with health care educators and providers in Tulsa and across Oklahoma. It will house a state-of-the-art hospital simulation center with a fully operational emergency room, operating room, intensive care unit, birthing suite and ambulance bay, enabling students to practice procedures and skills commonly utilized in hospitals across the country. The facility also will include an expanded clinical skills lab, a new osteopathic manipulative medicine lab, a tiered lecture hall, 18 exam rooms, classrooms, two lecture halls, conference facilities, more than 20 small breakout rooms, 55 student study carrels, a student kitchen, faculty and staff office space and an adjoining five-level parking garage. Others in attendance at the ceremony include George Erbacher, D.O., a member of the OSU-COM Advisory Council, Rant Tandy, son of A.R. and Marylouise Tandy, and his wife Karen; Carol Tandy, daughter of A.R. and Marylouise Tandy; Paula Huck, director of community affairs at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma; Peter Aran, M.D., medical director, population health management at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, Rebecca and Adam Smith, D.O., Daniel and Dennis Whitehouse, D.O., Sherri Wise, president and CEO of Osteopathic Founders Foundation, and Michelle Hardesty and Dana Wilkes of the Hardesty Family Foundation.


OSU-CHS RESEARCHERS SEEKING FDA APPROVAL OF NEW TREATMENT FOR TERMINAL LIVER DISEASE COLLABORATIONS WITH NEW MEXICO TEAM LOOKS AT IMPACT OF LIPOIC ACID INJECTIONS Research from the biochemistry department at OSU-CHS could offer terminal liver disease patients new hope for treatment from an unexpected source. OSU-CHS researcher and biochemistry professor Martin Banschbach, Ph.D. is looking into a novel approach for treating advanced liver disease by engaging an antioxidant found naturally Martin Banschbach, in the body called lipoic acid. Lipoic Ph.D., OSU-CHS acid, also known as alpha lipoic acid, Professor of Biochemistry is present naturally in every cell of the body. Lipoic acid is a crucial part of the body’s metabolic system that converts blood sugar glucose into energy to fuel the body.

“Our research aims to document how lipoic acid injections can supercharge the body’s ability to combat inflammation in the liver that could be the source of the liver disease, especially in patients whose disease was caused by alcohol abuse,” said Banschbach. “Lipoic acid has proven effective in patients with diabetic neuropathy by fighting the inflammation believed to be the cause of the damage to their peripheral nerves. We are seeking FDA approval on a study to confirm similar results in patients with life threatening liver disease.” “Lipoic acid injections have the potential to treat vascular disease, liver cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis and forms of dementia but no solid research has proven the correlation,” continued Banschbach. “We hope this FDA study will be the first of many looking into the efficacy of this antioxidant in attacking a broad spectrum of diseases.”

Dr. Banschbach is collaborating with a team in New Mexico that has seen improvement in chronic liver disease patients after lipoic acid injections.

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RESEARCH INDIAN RESEARCHER JOINS OSU-CHS VIA PRESTIGIOUS INTERNATIONAL CANCER FELLOWSHIP Noted research scientist Dr. Showket Hussain, from the World Health Organization’s Southeast Asia human papillomavirus (HPV) referral center in India, has joined OSU-CHS to conduct fellowship training in cancer research. Dr. Hussain is a scientist and senior research officer with the Indian Council of Medical Research in India working under the Indian Council for Medical Research International Fellowship.

Hussain will work with OSU-CHS faculty and researchers Drs. Anil and Rashmi Kaul investigating how infectious disease such as HPV and Hepatitis C can lead to the development of cervical and liver cancers. Hussain is one of six Indian scientists sent to the United States to facilitate the establishment of a National Cancer Institute in India by building collaborative relationships with U.S. cancer research institutions such as OSU-CHS.

“Dr. Hussain was selected from a large Hussain started his academic career at the group of cancer researchers in India to University of Kashmir in the city of Srinager join our laboratory as part of a prestigious in the Indian state of Kashmir. He conducted international visiting fellowship studying his post-graduate work in microbiology from infectious disease causes in cancer,” said Anil Barkatulla Univerity in India and earned his Kaul, M.D., D.DS., M.P.H. OSU-CHS Faculty doctorate from Jamia Millia Islama in New and Director of Clinical Labs. “He has made Delhi. Dr. Hussain later went on to complete his outstanding contributions in the field of cancer Dr. Showket Hussain postdoctoral research training at the M.D. Anderson Cancer research, particularly research related to HPV associated cervical Center in Houston. cancers. We are thrilled he has joined our team for his six months' fellowship.”

GRANT RESEARCH AWARDS

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RESEARCH TITLE AND AMOUNT

Paul Gignac, Ph.D. - NSF Collaborative Research: Iodine-enhanced micro-CT Imaging: Repeated Measures Design to Improve Visualization of Vertebrate Soft-tissue Anatomy First Year: 01/15/15 - 12/31/15 $58,555 Second Year: 01/01/16 - 12/31/16 $89,485 Jarrad Wagner, Ph.D.

Savannah River Nat Lab/NIJ - One Pot Effluent Characterization & Standoff Detection Feasibility Nine Months: 01/01/16 - 09/30/16 $135,921

Colony Fugate, D.O.

Pathways to Health Community Partnership - Cowboys Get Healthy, Get Fit Period: 12/11/15 - 12/31/16 $1,000

Denna Wheeler, Ph.D.

Rural Health Projects Inc. - Community Diabetes Education Outreach Program Three Years: 05/01/15 - 04/30/18 $27,000 ($9,000 a year)

Kent Smith, Ph.D. Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science (OAAIMS) Indian Education Demonstration Grant - Collaboration with Osage County Inter-local Cooperative Grant to provide STEM programs for pre-K-12 students located within the Osage Nation Reservation and the Otoe-Missouria tribal land in northeastern Oklahoma. OAAIMS will provide mentorship in STEM activities during the regularly scheduled school year with scientists and medical and graduate students serving as mentors. 10/01/15 - 09/30/19 Year 1 $86,964 Year 2 $72,572 Year 3 $72,345 Year 4 $70,206

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COWBOYS IN AFRICA PROS FOR AFRICA CLUB RAISES FUNDING FOR UGANDA The Pros for Africa (PFA) student organization at OSU-CHS is a student-led volunteer club whose mission is to encourage professionals of every field to share their talents with the people of Africa. PFA at OSU-CHS is dedicated to providing medical students unique clinical experiences on a global scale while helping those in need in Uganda. While away from Uganda, PFA members devote their time in fundraising for the people of Uganda. One goal of the club is to raise twenty five hundred dollars per year to fund the medical education of a Ugandan student in Gulu. Currently, the club is sponsoring Andrew Omito who enrolled in his first medical school class last year. Andrew has been a dedicated paramedic in Uganda for years with the dream of becoming a doctor. Without financial assistance, Andrew may have never realized his goal due to the tuition required. The PFA student organization will be paying for all four years of his medical school. Once his education is complete, Andrew will serve as the first full time physician at the clinic in Gulu.

The club continues to raise money to support Sister Rosemary in her mission to help the girls in Gulu. This year PFA raised over $12,000 which will be used to build an orphanage in Atiak, Uganda and build a library for the children at St. Monica’s. In January, the PFA Club hosted its largest event, the first annual PFA Benefit Dinner. This black tie event was held at the Tulsa Historical Society and was attended by over one hundred guests. Featured speakers included Reggie Whitten, the founder of Pros for Africa, and Sister Rosemary. Sister Rosemary encouraged the people to continue to stand as one with Uganda, and gave a heartfelt speech about how much she appreciated what the PFA Club had accomplished. Members of the PFA Club worked tirelessly for months to gather donations and organize the dinner. The PFA Club raised more than $10,000 that night to help Sister Rosemary build an orphanage in Atiak, Uganda.

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VALENTINE’S PARTY AT LEGEND SENIOR LIVING Volunteers from OSU-CHS hosted a Valentine’s Day party at Legend Senior Living, a retirement and assisted living community located in Tulsa. Residents in the Memory Care Unit decorated yummy treats with the help of volunteers and enjoyed a wonderful visit with OSU-CHS faculty, staff and students. Residents especially enjoyed the vibrancy stemming from some children who volunteered alongside their parents.

ORANGE DAZZLE OSU-CHS partnered with Kendra Scott to host Orange Dazzle where faculty, alumni, staff, students and supporters spent the evening shopping with OSU-CHS President Shrum. Proceeds from the event benefited The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis.

MINH NGO – REACH AND RISE MENTOR After learning about YMCA’s Reach and Rise Mentoring program at one of OSU-CHS’ Lunch and Learn events, lab manager in the Department of Forensic Sciences, Minh Ngo, volunteered with the program. Ngo completed a 5-weeks' mentor training session and was matched with a student in the Reach and Rise program. She spends at least one hour per week with her mentee doing fun activities like going to baseball games, swimming lessons, reading and learning new skills like knitting or crochet. “I believe that time spent with my student will impact my life as much as it does theirs and I hope to help them grow into someone they can be proud of,” said Ngo. As a step towards enriching her student’s life, Minh raised over $400 to help a Reach and Rise participant and their sibling attend a YMCA summer camp of their choosing.

Minh Ngo

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EUGENE FIELD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OUTREACH OSU-CHS faculty, staff and students continue to give back to the community by volunteering at Eugene Field Elementary School. Ten staff members volunteered to serve as chaperones for a second grade class at Eugene Field Elementary to visit Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa as part of the Kennedy Center’s Any Given Child program. Faculty, staff and students also donated over 500 individually wrapped snacks and bottled water for students to consume during the Oklahoma standardized testing in April. The OSU-CHS Alumni Association brought lunch to teachers and administration at Eugene Field Elementary School in honor of Teacher Appreciation week. OSU-CHS and the Alumni Association recognize the impact teachers have on the lives of children. “Their impact extends beyond the boundaries of the classroom,” stated Ryan Miller, Director of Alumni Affairs. MINI-MED The OSU-COM Club of American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians hosted forty students during the annual mini-med for kids. Eugene Field Elementary School students participated in interactive stations where they learned about the food pyramid and healthy snacks, exercised, handled a human heart and lungs, and cared for a teddy bear during the teddy bear wellness clinic. EUGENE FIELD COMMUNITY NIGHT OUT The OSU-COM chapter of the Student National Medical Association (SNMA) partnered with area organizations for a Eugene Field Community Night Out. SNMA hosted six stations including: diabetes awareness, vision screening, smoking cessation, voter registration, cereal giveaway, blood pressure tests and osteopathic manipulative medicine. Approximately 300 Eugene Field community members attended the event.

Eugene Field Mini-Med participants examine plastic models of the human organs

OSU-CHS students at Eugene Field Community Night Out

Eugene Field Mini-Med participants examine bones on the skeleton

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OUTREACH CURIOUS COWBOYS The inaugural Curious Cowboys: A STEM camp for Kids hosted over 100 third-graders from Roy Clark Elementary. The day-long event was full of interactive events highlighting each program OSU-CHS has to offer. Children who attended the event tried their hand at intubation, distinguishing heart and lung sounds, attempted to catch a cookie thief, learned the brain’s role in taste, warmedup with athletic training, engineered a boat made of aluminum foil, and went to great depths digging for dinosaur fossils. “Thank you OSU-CHS, you’re the best,” exclaimed one inspired student.

OKSTARS/NATIVE OKSTARS High school juniors and seniors spent the summer working alongside biomedical, forensic, human sciences and clinical researchers at OSU-CHS through the Oklahoma Science Training and Research Students summer intern program (OKstars) and Native Oklahoma Science Training and Research Students summer intern program (Native OKstars). Both programs enabled students interested in research careers to participate in cutting-edge studies and investigations. “High school students had a unique opportunity to work with our university faculty and make important scientific contributions through the OKstars and Native OKstars programs,” said Dr. Nedra Wilson, OSU-CHS Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Faculty Coordinator of OKstars and Native

OKstars. “This type of research is usually reserved for graduate students, so participants are getting an early chance to work on innovative projects and expand their laboratory skills that will help them when they are applying for college.“ OSU-CHS hosted about twenty OKstars participants and five Native OKstars participants. They attended weekly lunch presentations where they learned about STEM careers, research ethics and the programs offered at OSU-CHS. As part of the internship program, OKstars and Native OKstars students were encouraged to participate in a service learning component where they led elementary-aged children through interactive STEM activities.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY - INDIAN CAPITAL VO-TECH Educators in the Biomedical Science and Medicine degree program at Indian Capital Technology Center in Muskogee visited with OSU-CHS faculty and staff in an effort to provide their students with knowledge about everything CHS has to offer. The visit consisted of tours of the college of medicine and biomedical sciences labs, one-on-one discussions with faculty regarding research interests, and internship opportunities available to high school students. Students in the program earn Project Lead the Way credit and are encouraged to pursue secondary and graduate studies in medicine, anatomy, physiology, biomedical science, genetics and public health.

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OUTREACH OKLAHOMA MICROSCOPY SOCIETY DELIVERS PRIZES TO UGLY BUGGERS Bill Meek, Ph.D., OSU-CHS professor of anatomy and cell biology and other members of the Oklahoma Microscopy Society (OMS) were busy delivering stereomicroscopes and posters to Oklahoma elementary schools that were selected as winners for the 19th Annual OMS Ugly Bug Contest. About 100 elementary schools throughout Oklahoma submitted their ugly bug. With the help from their teachers elementary students caught an insect, completed a write-up about that insect, packaged the bug and sent it to an Oklahoma university or research center with a scanning electron microscope for close-up viewing. OMS members photograph the “bug” (actually insects) and then vote in a meeting or online for the ugliest. This year the Society awarded 13 Leitz stereomicroscopes, valued at $525 each, to happy elementary Dr. Bill Meek with Garth Fisher of Shiloh Christian Academy, Tahlequah, and the beetle he students all across Oklahoma; “Oh, the caught for a winning entry in the amazing things that Ugly Bug Contest. you see!” Students also received a poster with the ugliest bugs as well as an 8x10 photograph of their special insect. Ugly Bugs can be seen at http:// www.uglybug.org/ or @OklaUglybug

Jacob Curley, D.O.’11, with stereoscope and student Liam Puls of Riverfield Day School Elementary in Tulsa.

Matt Lundwahl, OMS member from Phillips 66, on the left poses with 6th graders in Joe Smiley’s (far right) science class, Norwood Elementary in Hulbert, OK.

OSU-CHS GRADUATE COURSE TEACHES KIDS WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A SCIENTIST As part of the course, graduate students Branden Carr, Tomi Adewumi, Stephanie McGlothin, Amie The graduate students are enrolled in a course that teaches them Francis and Sheri to develop and institute a scientific outreach program in area elementary schools that will increase understanding of science and Core launched an after-school science its benefits to society. club at Eugene Field that meets on “In the Scientific Outreach course, OSU-CHS graduate students work to demystify science by replacing kids’ preconceived notion Wednesdays. They have led a series of experiments and the children are encouraged of science with real world examples,” said Kathleen Curtis, to ask questions and share ideas about the experiments. Ph.D., OSU-CHS associate professor of physiology and course coordinator. “Seeing the excitement of scientific discovery through the eyes The graduate students learn useful strategies and gain insight into of these fourth-graders has inspired us to look for additional opportunities to continue this scientific outreach,” said Core. implementing scientific outreach programs in schools. They also spark enthusiasm among the fourth-graders about science. When a group of OSU-CHS graduate students asked fourthgraders at Eugene Field Elementary School in Tulsa to describe what a scientist looks like, they got a lot of stereotypical answers: “Scientists wear white coats and glasses and have big hair like Albert Einstein,” they were told.

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ALUMNI

ALUMNI NEWS

OSU CENTER FOR HEALTH SCIENCES ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The OSU-CHS Alumni Association would like to thank the Oklahoma Chapter ACOFP for helping sponsor another great reception at the 2016 ACOFP national convention. The Alumni Association hosted the alumni reception in San Juan, Puerto Rico at Oceana Condado. Over 140 guests attended and enjoyed mingling with fellow alumni and friends.

Candy Ting, D.O.’86, Mary Shaw, Kayse Shrum, D.O.’98, Frank Shaw, D.O., and Darren Shrum

Trudy Milner, D.O.’88 and Ronnie Martin, D.O.’79

OOA STATE CONVENTION – EXHIBIT AND PRESIDENTIAL RECEPTION At the Oklahoma Osteopathic Association (OOA) state convention, six OSU-CHS departments pooled together and took over the center section of the exhibit floor, “oranging up" an entire exhibit hall. OSU-CHS alumni had the opportunity to find ways to stay connected with the OSUCHS community and become involved with the OSU-CHS Alumni Association. OSU-CHS Alumni Association saluted Mike Ogle, D.O.’86 for his contribution to the OOA as outgoing President, and welcomed Gabriel Pitman, D.O.’99 as the incoming OOA President.

OOA State Exhibit Hall

Gabriel Pitman, D.O.’99 inaugurated by Mike Ogle, D.O.’86

CLASS OF 2016 SENIOR BRUNCH

Senior Brunch

Glass name blocks presented to the Class of 2016

The OSU-CHS Alumni Association hosted the Class of 2016 Senior Brunch for newly minted graduates. Ryan Miller, Director of Alumni Affairs for OSU-CHS and Amber Hinkle, Coordinator of Alumni Affairs for the OSU system welcomed the new alumni to the OSU and OSU-CHS family. Robin Dyer, D.O.’92, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs spoke on behalf of the OSU-CHS administration. Integrated Financial presented on student debt and future budget planning. Each student was presented with our traditional glass name block as gifts from the OSU-CHS Alumni Association.

You can always update your info on our website by clicking the update info link here: http://www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/alumni/update.php

Also, remember to follow us on facebook and twitter: www.facebook.com/Oklahoma-State-University-College-ofOsteopathic-Medicine-Alumni

Also, if you have new news to share, please go to our webpage and click the submit a class note link: http://www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/alumni/classnote.php

Twitter: https://twitter.com/OKstateDOalumni

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GO POKES!


OSU-CHS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION HONORS MATT SMITH, D.O.’16 AND HEATHER HENSLEY, D.O.’16 FOR THE OUTSTANDING STUDENT ALUMNI AWARD AT THE 2016 OSU-CHS AWARDS BANQUET

ALUMNI ALUMNI MILESTONES WENDY MCCONNELL, D.O.’09 McConnell joined Integris Canadian Valley as their new Otolaryngologist with rhinology focus. After graduating from OSU-COM, she moved to St. Louis to complete residency training and then to Boston for a rhinology fellowship. McConnell was able to move back to her hometown of Mustang, Oklahoma. She sees patients ranging from babies needing ear tubes to adults with sinus and throat problems. “No two patients are ever the same, so it is always a challenge,” she says. She has been on three medical mission trips, including one to Nicaragua, one to Malawi and one to Uganda with Pros for Africa. She volunteers as much as she can and recently spoke at an Upward Bound Program for high school students. McConnell has also worked with the Starkey Hearing Foundation, and she says her volunteerism has helped make her who she is today. “It helps me be humble and not take things for granted,” she says. BAILEY RUNKLES, D.O. Runkles will join the Jamestown Regional Medical Center physician staff in the summer of 2017 as an OBGYN. She is trained in high-risk obstetrics and diverse gynecology and is currently a third year OB-GYN resident at OSU-CHS.

IN MEMORIAM:

“As one of three sisters I love how my job allows me to be there for my patients from the birth of their first child throughout the rest of their life,” Runkles said. “Jamestown has a wonderful group of family physicians who provide excellent obstetric care. My goal is to be an asset to their practice and provide prenatal care to those higher-risk patients who would otherwise have to drive an hour away for care.” Runkles said she and her husband prefer the small-town atmosphere and said Jamestown is a nice fit. She said she enjoys that JMRC is an active participant in community festivals and events and would like opportunities to teach at area colleges and universities. “When we were looking for a place to land my husband and I were searching for a small town with a community that we could grow into,” Runkles said. “We were overwhelmed by the welcome and support we received when we came to visit. I believe the Jamestown community will benefit us just as much as will be of benefit.”

Craig Daniel Abernathy, D.O.’93 passed away at his home after suffering an apparent heart attack on February 9, 2016. Abernathy received his doctor of osteopathic medicine degree from OSU-COM and served as an emergency room physician for Ozark Community Hospital in Springfield.

KATHLEEN MURRAY, D.O.’08 Murray is joining King's Daughters in Ironton as their new family physician. She completed residency at Oklahoma University/Southwest Oklahoma Family Medicine. Murray is board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

TARA HEENEY, D.O.’12 Tara Heeney, D.O.’12 joined the Portland Family Clinic. Heeney spent most of her life in Oklahoma before joining the clinic. She has a “whole person” philosophy of care, with special interests in pediatrics, women’s health and geriatrics.

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FACULTY AND STAFF OSU-CHS AND OSU-TULSA CELEBRATE ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONALS DAY Administrative Professionals Day has been celebrated for over 60 years. Today, it is one of the largest workplace observances besides employee birthdays and major Terry Brown, Executive Assistance to the holidays. Each Chief Operating Officer at OSU-CHS year OSU-CHS and OSU-Tulsa come together for an appreciation luncheon for administrative professionals from both campuses. This year’s theme was “Standing Tall” reflecting current trends in professional and personal development. Executives representing each campus started the program following Just Catering by Orr. OSU-Tulsa’s President Howard Barnett and OSU-CHS Chief Operating Officer and Interim Vice President for Research Johnny Stephens shared their words of

appreciation for the OSU-CHS and OSU-Tulsa administrative professionals. “We were honored that one of our own administrative professionals from OSU-CHS was the featured speaker, Terry Brown, Executive Assistant to the Chief Operating Officer and Interim Vice President for Research. Her presentation was a motivational piece called ‘Believe in Yourself,’ said Debbie Butler, Human Resources Coordinator and Chair of the event. Attendees were able to take home some wonderful parting gifts that included a webinar donated by the International Association for Administrative Professionals (IAAP) and some OSU swag along with a drawing of a few special items from OSU-CHS President Kayse Shrum. As America’s Healthiest Campus, the closing session gave some tools and techniques of relieving stress at their desk with Office Yoga by Sunny Ray. “We try to improve the program each year, and this year’s event will be hard to top,” said Butler. “I hope administrative professionals from both Tulsa campuses enjoyed ‘Standing Tall,’" continued Butler.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE ANNUAL CONFERENCE Angela Bacon, MS, Director of Student Services, and Tanya O'Grady, MBA, Career Development Specialist presented during the 2016 American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s Annual Conference in Washington D.C. They presented, “Tips on Helping Your Students Create Powerful Documents to Enhance Their Residency Applications" for the Pre-Conference workshop entitled, "The Match and Me: How to Maximize Your Students Success" for the Osteopathic Career Counseling and Advising Committee.

Angela Bacon, MS, and Tanya O'Grady, MBA presenting at the AACOM

NEWLY HIRED FACULTY BOBBY ABERNATHY, D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine ADAM BRADLEY, D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery TYSON BRYANT, D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine JOHN A. CARABELLO, D.O., PH.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Cardiology

ALICIA FORD, PH.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences RICCARDO GIGANTE, D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine JAMES HERRINGTON, D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine KELLY MURRAY, PHARM.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

MATTHEW TUCKER, D.O. Assistant Professor for Clinical Education MATTHEW O'BRIEN, PH.D. Associate Professor of Athletic Training MATT VASSAR, PH.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences ARIC WARREN, ED.D. Associate Professor of Athletic Training

DANIEL WILDES JR., D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor of Cardiology KIMBERLEE WILSON, D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

RETIRED FACULTY RICHARD T. GLASS, DDS PH.D., Professor of Pathology and Dental Medicine SUSAN K. REDWOOD, PH.D., Professor of Behavioral Sciences RICHARD WANSLEY, PH.D., Associate Professor of Behavioral Sciences 36

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FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS

OSU-CHS DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

The OSU-CHS Faculty Distinguished Service Award recognizes superior effort and accomplishment by a faculty member in service to Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, his/her profession, and the community/public. The recipient of the award was selected based on the evidence of outstanding and meritorious service. The 2016 Distinguished Service Award recipient is Sarah Hall, D.O. ’05, Assistant Professor of Family Medicine.

REGENTS’ DISTINGUISHED TEACHING AWARD

The Regents’ Distinguished Teaching Award recognizes a full-time faculty member that has shown unusually significant and meritorious achievement in the instruction of students for a minimum of four years. The 2016 Regents’ Distinguished Teaching Award recipient is Mousomi Som, D.O., Associate Professor of Internal Medicine.

REGENTS’ DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH AWARD

AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

The Regents’ Distinguished Mark Thai, D.O., Clinical Research Award recognizes Assistant Professor of research excellence at OSU Osteopathic Manipulative Center for Health Sciences. The Medicine at OSU-CHS, received term research includes all creative the Award of Excellence during scholarly activities. The recipient the Oklahoma Osteopathic State of this award was selected based Convention in Norman. This on the evidence of outstanding award recognizes the recipient for and meritorious achievements exemplifying and preserving and in research. The 2016 Regents’ teachings of A.T. Still, D.O. Thai Distinguished Research was recognized for his dedication Award recipient is Gerwald to the students at OSU-CHS Koehler, Ph.D., Associate College of Osteopathic Medicine Professor of Microbiology. and for furthering the skills of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine.

PROMOTIONS

TINA TAPPANA

Director of Human Resources

LESLEY VANVOLKINBURG, M.S.

Osteopathic Medical Education Consortium of Oklahoma (OMECO) Executive Director in Rural Health

ASHLEY ADKINS, M.S.

Director of University Affairs

JOHN J. FRUCCI III, ED.S.

Director of IMPEX, Program Director, Master of Science in Arson and Explosives Investigation.

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DEVELOPMENT MATTERS: INVESTING IN OSU-CHS The future of OSU-CHS has never been brighter thanks to our many generous alumni, friends, and supporters. During the six months’ period from November 1, 2015, to April 30, 2016, fundraising at OSU-CHS reached historical milestones. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, our medical scholarship program is the strongest it’s ever been and support for the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Medical Academic Building has exceeded $10 million! In this issue, we celebrate the generosity of The William K. Warren Foundation and Saint Francis Health System for establishing the largest medical scholarship endowment in the history of OSU-CHS. We also share the story of four classmates from the Class of 1988 who banded together to rally their classmates to name an exam room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. OSU-CHS is fortunate to benefit from the generosity of so many individuals, corporations, foundations and sovereign nations as we work towards helping Oklahomans live longer, healthier and happier lives. We hope the stories in this issue inspire you to be part of our story and consider contributing to our growing success.

ADDRESSING THE PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE THE WILLIAM K. WARREN FOUNDATION AND SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM CREATE $2 MILLION SCHOLARSHIP Oklahoma consistently ranks near the bottom nationally in various aspects of overall health. One of the most significant contributing factors is the state’s shortage of primary care physicians. The Saint Francis Health System and The William K. Warren Foundation have united to create an Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences scholarship program aimed at addressing that problem. Saint Francis and its founding organization, The Warren Foundation, each contributed $1 million to establish The William K. Warren Foundation – Saint Francis Health System OSU School of Medicine Scholarship Fund. The $2 million endowment is designed to increase Oklahoma’s number of primary care physicians by supporting future pediatricians, family medicine physicians, obstetricians and gynecologists. “Based on all forecasting available, by 2020 the nation is going to face a significant shortage of physicians,” says Jake Henry Jr., president and chief executive officer of the Saint Francis Health System. “We need to do what we can to attenuate that shortage, so we are helping students in undergraduate medicine, medical school years one through four, and in their postgraduate training as well with this gift. This gift is very consistent with our strategy to support medical education, schools of nursing and schools of allied health.” GROUNDBREAKING GENEROSITY The Warren Foundation and Saint Francis have combined to give more than $6.5 million in total contributions to OSU-CHS. That makes them the Tulsabased school’s second most generous donors, behind only T. Boone Pickens. “We are so grateful for the support of The Warren Foundation and Saint Francis, which have been creating a healthier Oklahoma for decades,” says Burns Hargis, president of Oklahoma State University. “Not only do they hire our graduates, but they also help us create the best possible educational experience for the young men and women who are developing into the physicians that will ensure a healthier future for our state.” According to the United Health Foundation, Oklahoma ranks 48th nationally with 85.2 primary care physicians per 100,000 people. It trails all six states with which it shares a border – Colorado (23rd, 123.3), New Mexico (26th, 119.9), Missouri (28th, 115.2), Kansas (35th, 108.3), Arkansas (39th, 105.3) and Texas (43rd, 99.4). Dr. Kayse Shrum, President, OSU-CHS with Jake Henry, Jr., President and CEO, Saint “It is well-known that a state’s health is strongly related to access and to Francis Health System the number of physicians in that state,” Henry says. “This gift will certainly not solve the problem, but we see it as a step toward increasing the number of physicians who provide the poor with access to quality healthcare. It’s a very big, complex problem, and each of us must do what we can to help with a part of it.”

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DEVELOPMENT MATTERS A WIN-WIN PARTNERSHIP Dr. Kayse Shrum, president of OSU-CHS and dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine, says The William K. Warren Foundation – Saint Francis Health System OSU School of Medicine Scholarship Fund is OSU-CHS’ largest scholarship endowment. It is initially providing two scholarships per year, with that number expected to increase as the fund grows. Recipients will be full-time OSU-CHS medical students who have expressed interest in practicing primary medicine in Oklahoma, especially in the Tulsa area. Shannon McBeath, MSII and Kailey Shuler, MSII were selected in the fall of 2015 as the inaugural recipients of The William K. Warren Foundation – Saint Francis Health System OSU School of Medicine Scholarship. “The Warren Foundation and Saint Francis’ historic investment in the OSU Center for Health Sciences will enable us to increase financial aid for our talented students,” Shrum says. “This is an enduring gift that will benefit medical students today and for generations to come. It’s gratifying to know that the leadership at both The Warren Foundation and Saint Francis share our vision that the future of medicine in Oklahoma depends on our ability to recruit and train the brightest students to become primary care physicians.” The connections between OSU-CHS and Saint Francis are not limited to scholarships. Saint Francis recruits heavily at OSU-CHS, highlighted by hosting an annual dinner for residents finishing at the school. “We try to put our best foot forward,” Henry says. “For those who are not going on for further specialty training, we try to persuade them to come work for us. … We consider the Center for Health Sciences very much a partner to our organization. It’s only by working together that we are able to solve the many problems we have in health care today.” ABOUT THE WILLIAM K. WARREN FOUNDATION William K. Warren Sr. created The William K. Warren Foundation in 1945 to provide financial assistance to charitable organizations dedicated to improving quality of life for humankind. As part of that charitable mission, the foundation provided the funding to create Saint Francis Hospital in 1960. It added Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital in 1989. Today, the Saint Francis Health System also includes Warren Clinic, The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, Saint Francis Heart Hospital and Saint Francis Hospital South. “Although The Warren Foundation and Saint Francis are separate and distinct entities, we work closely to benefit the community, to create healthier communities and to ensure, to the degree we have the means to do so, that we provide access not only for the insured and well-off but also to the most vulnerable and marginalized,” Henry says. If you are interested in making a gift to support OSU-CHS in creating a healthier Oklahoma, please contact the OSU Foundation at 918.594.8189 or support-CHS@osugiving.com

CAMPAIGN FOR THE A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY MEDICAL ACADEMIC BUILDING CROSSES $10 MILLION MILESTONE The campaign for the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Medical Academic Building has passed a key milestone, crossing the $10 million mark. More than 60 donors, comprised of alumni, parents and community partners, contributed $10,207,760 to support our vision of providing future generation of OSU medical students with a world-class, state-of-the-art clinical skills learning facility. This astonishing accomplishment was made possible by the collective efforts and dedication of the entire OSU-CHS family, with gifts coming from across the nation and from every part of Oklahoma. Recent gifts totaling $850,000 secured from the Morningcrest Healthcare Foundation, Osteopathic Founders Foundation, Pedigo Products Inc., and Penelope and Nabil Srouji, MD, pushed the fundraising efforts pass the $10 million mark. “We are humbled by the incredible support of the OSU-CHS family for the Tandy Medical Academic Building, and excited by how this investment will empower our faculty and students to continue OSU-CHS’ pursuit of academic and clinical excellence,” President Shrum said. The construction of the Tandy Medical Academic Building is on track and on budget with completion expected by the summer of 2017. If you are interested in learning more about naming opportunities available in the Tandy Medical Academic Building, please contact the OSU Foundation at 918.594.8189 or support-CHS@osugiving.com.

NAMED FACILITIES* (AS OF APRIL 30, 2016) A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY MEDICAL ACADEMIC BUILDING ANNE AND HENRY ZARROW FOUNDATION LECTURE HALL OSTEOPATHIC FOUNDERS FOUNDATION ICU SUITE KERN-HEADINGTON CLASSROOM KERN-HEADINGTON STUDENT LOUNGE PEDIGO PRODUCTS, INC. CONFERENCE ROOM PENELOPE AND NABIL SROUJI, MD EXAM ROOM BEN SWANNER EXAM ROOM CLASS OF 1988 EXAM ROOM JEREMY DANIEL STUDY CARREL *Undesignated spaces to be named by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of OSU CENTER FOR HE ALTH SCIENCES 39 Oklahoma and Morningcrest Healthcare Foundation.


DEVELOPMENT MATTERS AN EXAM ROOM FOR THE FUTURE - THE CLASS OF 1988 NAMES AN EXAM ROOM Thirty two years ago, four medical students — Trudy Milner, D.O.’88, Jim Melton, D.O.’88, Scott Mitchell, D.O.’88, and Adam Smith, D.O.’88 – met during their first year of medical school and began a friendship that has lasted over three decades. They became close friends and banded together to tackle the rigors of medical school. Now, they are teaming up once more to honor their class and their alma mater. These four classmates have joined efforts to rally their classmates to name the Class of 1988 Exam Room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building.

excellence in medical education. “It’s an exciting time to be part of OSU-CHS, and we are thrilled to contribute,” says Dr. Mitchell. Dr. Melton says, “I look back fondly on our education and how prepared we were for our respective fields. I also witnessed how well OSU-COM prepared my son Kale for his residency. My hope is the students will utilize the exam room to further enhance their learning experience and in the process make lasting friendships as well.” Although the Class of 1988 has reached their fundraising goal of naming an exam room, the fabulous four are not done. They have decided to keep the momentum going and now have set their sights on naming a classroom. “Trudy and I are so pleased that the Class of 1988 has reached our original goal of $25,000, but we are not done. I believe that we have the momentum and energy to make a bigger impact on OSUCOM. Now we want to name a classroom in the Tandy Medical Academic Building.”, says Dr. Smith.

By reaching out to their classmates and encouraging them to give back to OSU-CHS, the four classmates have raised $28,250 to support their alma mater. Dr. Milner and Dr. Smith serve as class leaders for the fundraising endeavor. Between the two of them, they brought in Dr. Melton and Dr. Mitchell. Members of the Class of 1988 are scattered across the nation, Fundraising efforts practicing in every to name an exam field of medicine, Future Exam Room room are currently but the thread of underway with eight their memories and classes participating – Class of 1978, Class of 1979, Class of 1981, experiences in medical school kept them connected to each other. Class of 1983, Class of 1985, Class of 1987, Class of 1988, and Class Support for the Class of 1988 Exam Room has poured in from of 1990. Combined, the eight classes have raised close to $60,000 in across Oklahoma and from far away as Walla Walla, Washington. support of the Tandy Medical Academic Building. To make a gift to support the Class of 1988 Classroom or to any of the exam rooms Dr. Milner is proud of their success and hopes that it will inspire listed above, please go to osugiving.com/OSUCHSClassExamRoom. others to give. “I really consider it an honor to be part of the Class of 1988 Exam Room, and I hope the four of us will serve as a model If you are interested in leading your class to name an exam room, for alumni to honor their alma mater,” she says. In addition to paying please contact Alea Hubbard at 918.594.8455 or ahubbard@ osugiving.com. homage to OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine, the classmates wanted to leave a lasting legacy and have their class aligned with

Adam Smith, D.O.’88 40

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Jim Melton, D.O.’88

Trudy Milner, D.O.’88


DEVELOPMENT MATTERS WE ARE GRATEFUL TO THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES WHO HAVE SUPPORTED THEIR CLASSES’ NAMING EFFORTS (AS OF APRIL 30, 2016)

CLASS OF 1978 Cynthia & Robert Blubaugh, D.O. Marguerite & O. Keith Enlow, D.O. Teresa & Phillip A. Nokes, D.O.* Deborah & Harry Payton, D.O. CLASS OF 1979 Patrice Aston, D.O. Marge & Wallace Champlain, D.O. Lee & Philip Henbest, D.O. Lisa & Mark Snell, D.O.* Elaine & H. Dean Vaughan, D.O. CLASS OF 1981 Lisa & Ronald Bruce, D.O. Pam & Ronald Graham, D.O. Tonja & Thomas Osborn, D.O.* CLASS OF 1983 Karen & William Allen, D.O. Jenny & Steve Ayers, D.O. Daria Davidson, D.O. & John Fox Jill & Terence Grewe, D.O.* Janie & Gerald Hale, D.O. Bobby Kang, D.O. Suzanne & Randy McGivney, D.O. Karen & Ted Mickle, D.O. M.P.H., Colonel Carolyn Petrey, D.O. & Dallas Petrey, D.O. Kathryn Pifer, D.O. & George Pifer Barbara & James Zimmer, D.O.* CLASS OF 1985 Vicki & Ronald Eimen, D.O. Beverly & Gerald Flatt, D.O. Jean & Gary Goodnight, D.O.* Lee & Troy Harden, D.O. Douglas Stewart, D.O. CLASS OF 1987 Sheri & Dennis Carter, D.O.* Teri & Jay Cunningham, D.O.*

CLASS OF 1988 Deborah & Joseph Braden, D.O. Trish & Mark Gunby, D.O. Terri & David Keuchel, D.O. Linda Lantrip, D.O. Trudy Milner, D.O.* Laura & Scott Mitchell, D.O. Victoria Rowland, D.O. & Terry Rowland, M.D. Rebecca & Adam Smith, D.O.* Susan Steele, D.O. Lori Stewart, D.O. Bonnie & Matt Stroemel, D.O. Mary & H. Kuper Upchurch, D.O. CLASS OF 1990 Scott Anthony, D.O.* Jill & Christopher Billings, D.O. Diane Cooper, D.V.M. & Michael Cooper, D.O.* Melinda & Kenny Grider, D.O. Joanie & Timothy Koehler, D.O. Shelley & J. Michael Wieting, D.O. *Class Leader

THE PRESIDENT’S WHITE COAT SOCIETY WELCOMES SIX NEW MEMBERS The President’s White Coat Society honors those who support OSU-CHS through unrestricted giving at leadership levels. These generous donors enhance OSU-CHS’s efforts to improve the state’s health by providing President Shrum with unrestricted dollars to invest in the areas of greatest need. Our recent successes has inspired five alumni families and one current parent to make gifts and join this new distinguished group of supporters. We are honored and grateful to welcome into the President’s White Coat Society: Tonja and Thomas Osborn, Jr., OSU’77, D.O.’81, April Smith, PAR’18, Rebecca and Adam Smith, D.O.’88, Kimberly Sorensen, D.O.’97 and Sam Sorensen OSU’96, Penny and Dennis Whitehouse, OSU’81, D.O.’97, and Cynthia Wilkett, D.O. and Matthew Wilkett, D.O.’99. Dr. Tom Osborn, OSU’77, D.O.’81 practices family medicine in Holdenville – a small rural community in Southeastern Oklahoma with a population of less than 6,000 people. By taking care of rural families, he is carrying out the OSU-CHS’ mission to train primary care physicians for rural and underserved Oklahoma. “I am proud of OSU-CHS’ commitment to addressing the primary care physician shortage facing rural communities in Oklahoma. Rural Oklahomans deserve access to healthcare services. Tonja and I are delighted to make this investment in my alma mater”, said Osborn. In addition to being a member of the President’s White Coat Society, Dr. Osborn also serves as the class leader for the Class of 1981 in their efforts to name an exam room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. “Oklahoma need more doctors like Dr. Osborn dedicating their life and profession to serving rural Oklahomans. We are proud to have Dr. Osborn as an alumnus of OSU-CHS and am grateful for his and his family’s generosity to OSU-CHS,” said President Shrum. If you are interested in helping to enhance health care in Oklahoma by joining the President’s White Coat Society, please contact the OSU Foundation at 918.594.8189 or support-CHS@osugiving.com.

President’s White Coat Society CHAMPION

Beverly Schafer, OSU ’67 and Richard Schafer, OSU ’66, D.V.M.’68, D.O.’93

LEADER

Diane Cooper, OSU ’84, D.V.M.’89 and Michael Cooper, OSU ’83, D.O.’90 The Honorable Terry Kern, OSU ’66 and Jeanette Kern, PAR ’14 Penelope and Nabil Srouji, M.D., PAR ’19 Walgreens Penny and Dennis Whitehouse, OSU'81, D.O.’97

PHYSICIAN

Mallory Spoor-Baker, D.O.’93 and Damon Baker, OSU ’87, D.O.’93 Tonja and Thomas Osborn, Jr., D.O.’81 Marnie and Bill Pettit, D.O. Christa and Gabriel Pitman, D.O.’99 April Smith, PAR ’18 Rebecca and Adam Smith, D.O.’88 Lisa and Mark Snell, OSU ’74, D.O.’79 Kimberly Sorensen, D.O.’97 and Sam Sorensen OSU ’96 Sarah-Ann Stephens, Pharm.D. and Johnny Stephens, Pharm.D. Suzanne and William K. Warren, Jr. Cynthia Wilkett, D.O. and Matthew Wilkett, D.O.’99 OSU CENTER FOR HE ALTH SCIENCES 41


DEVELOPMENT MATTERS RECENT LEADERSHIP GIFTS (NOVEMBER 1, 2015 - APRIL 30, 2016) Gay and John V. Barson, D.O.’79 made a gift of $2,500 to support the Dr. John and Mrs. Eleonora Barson Endowed Scholarship Fund, established by Dr. Barson and his siblings in honor of their parents. His father, Dr. John Barson, was the founding President of the Oklahoma College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery, the predecessor to the OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine. Cancer Sucks made a gift of $15,000 to support cancer research currently taking place at OSU-CHS under the direction of Rashmi Kaul, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Immunology. Patti and Rick Horton co-founded Cancer Sucks in 1998 in memory of Rick’s mother, Donna Holland White, who passed away from cancer in 1996. Since 2006, Cancer Sucks has supported OSU-CHS with gifts totaling over $165,000. The Mary K. Chapman Foundation made a generous pledge payment of $30,000 to support medical scholarships for students interested in practicing primary care medicine in Oklahoma. The Chapman Foundation has been a steadfast support of OSU-CHS with gifts to medical scholarships, women’s health and the OSU School of Forensic Sciences. Cherokee Nation Businesses made a generous gift of $5,000 to support the high school summer recruiting program, Operation Orange. The Cherokee Nation partners with OSU-CHS in numerous ways to advance rural health initiatives. Community of Hope United Church of Christ made a generous gift to the HIV Specialty Clinic to support community outreach. Diane Cooper, OSU’84, D.V.M.’89 and Michael Cooper, OSU’83, D.O.’90 renewed their support of the President’s White Coat Society at the Leader level. Dr. Michael Cooper also serves as serves a class leader for the Class of 1990 in their efforts to name an exam room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. Teri and Jay Cunningham, D.O.’87, made a generous gift to the OSU-COM General Fund and a pledge towards the Class of 1987 Exam Room. Dr. Cunningham serves as serves a class leader for the Class of 1987 in their efforts to name an exam room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. Walli and Bobby Daniel, D.O., PAR’18 made a generous pledge payment towards the Great Physician Endowed Scholarship and the Tandy Medical Academic Building. The Daniels established the scholarship in 2014, which is earmarked for medical students who are interested in family practice and who demonstrate outstanding character, faith and moral leadership. They are proud parents of Jeremy Daniel, MSIII, and have named a study carrel in the Tandy Medical Academic Building in his honor. Sherry Eastman, Program Coordinator at the OSU-CHS Center for Rural Health, made a generous pledge payment towards the Eastman Primary Care Endowed Scholarship. Sherry established the scholarship in 2014 through an inheritance she received from 42

OSU CENTER FOR HE ALTH SCIENCES

her mother. The scholarship is earmarked for students interested in practicing primary care medicine in rural Oklahoma. Jean and Gary Goodnight, D.O.’85, made a generous pledge payment towards the Ben Swanner Exam Room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. Dr. Goodnight’s generous gift was made in memory of his beloved friend Ben Swanner who passed away in 1999. Fayenelle and Jay Helm, OSU’70, made a generous gift of $100,000 to establish the Jay and Fayenelle Helm Endowed Scholarship for Primary Care. The Helms have been long time supporters of OSU and OSU-CHS. Jay currently serves as an Oklahoma State Regent for Higher Education and board member of the OSU Medical Authority and Trust. Audrey Hendershot made a gift of $20,000 to fund the Audrey Hendershot Scholarship for Early Entry Rural Physicians. Audrey established the scholarship in 2013 to support medical students participating in the Rural and Underserved Primary Care Early Admissions Scholarship Program. The George Kaiser Family Foundation made a generous payment of $25,000 to support the George Kaiser Family Foundation Scholar in Urban Medicine. The scholarship supports a medical student who is interested in practicing primary care medicine in an underserved area of Tulsa. In addition to supporting medical scholarships at OSU-CHS, the George Kaiser Family Foundation endowed four chairs at OSU-CHS in 2008 with a gift of $4 million. Jeanette Kern and Judge Terry Kern, OSU’66, and parents of Julie Shelley, D.O.’14, made a generous gift of $2,500 towards KernHeadington Endowed Scholarship for Primary Care, which they established in 2014. The scholarship supports medical students who are interested in practicing primary care medicine in Oklahoma. Jeanette and Judge Kern are members of the President’s White Coat Society and have also named the Kern-Headington Classroom and the Kern-Headington Student Lounge in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. The Mellam Family Foundation made a generous grant of $10,000 to support Native Explorers and Native Oklahoma Science Training and Research Students (Native OKstars). Both programs are designed to encourage American Indians to pursue a career in science and medicine. Laura and Scott Mitchell, D.O.’88, made a generous gift to Class of 1988 Exam Room. The Morningcrest Healthcare Foundation mmade a generous pledge of $500,000 over five years to support hospital simulation equipment slated for the Tandy Medical Academic Building. This is the second major gift received by OSU-CHS from the Morningcrest Healthcare Foundation for the purchase of medical equipment. Morningcrest Healthcare Foundation generously underwrote the


DEVELOPMENT MATTERS purchase of ophthalmological equipment in 2012. Gay and Thomas Osborn, OSU’77 and D.O.’81, joined the President’s White Coat Society at the Physician level. The Osborns also generously contributed towards the Class of 1981 Exam Room Fund. Dr. Osborn serves as serves the class leader for the Class of 1981 in their efforts to name an exam room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. The Osteopathic Founders Foundation made a generous pledge of $250,000 over five years to support the Tandy Medical Academic Building. In recognition of their generosity, the ICU hospital simulation suite in the Tandy Medical Academic Building will be named The Osteopathic Founders Foundation ICU Suite. The Osteopathic Founders Foundation have made numerous gifts to support OSU-CHS. Founders Hall is named in their honor. Pedigo Products, Inc. generously donated $75,000 worth of medical equipment to be used for the hospital simulation suites and exam rooms in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. Rick Pedigo, CEO of Pedigo Products, Inc., is the proud parent of OSU undergraduate Kendall Pedigo. Pedigo Products is a leader in the manufacturing and innovation of high quality medical equipment. In recognition of their generosity, a conference room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building will be named The Pedigo Products, Inc. Conference Room. John Pickett, made a generous donation of firearms to the OSU Center for Improvised Explosives. April Smith, PAR’18 made a generous gift to the President’s White Coat Society at the Physician level. In addition to her support of the President’s White Coat Society, April has also supported A Stately Affair. April is the proud parent of Dylan Smith, MSIII. Rebecca and Adam Smith, DO’88, made a generous pledge to the President’s White Coat Society and a gift to the Class of 1988 Exam Room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. Dr. Adam Smith also serves as serves as a class leader for the Class of 1988 in their successful endeavor to name an exam room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. Lisa and Mark Snell, DO’79, renewed their support of the President’s White Coat Society at the Leader level. In addition to their support of the President’s White Coat Society, the Snells established the Hettie Griggs Bridge Medical Scholarship in 2009 in memory of a beloved family friend. Dr. Snell also serves as serves as the class leader for the Class of 1979 in their efforts to name an exam room in the Tandy Medical Academic Building. Kim Sorensen, D.O.’97, and Sam Sorensen, OSU’96, made a generous gift to the President’s White Coat Society at the Physician level.

the Tandy Medical Academic Building will be named The Penelope and Nabil Srouji, MD Exam Room. The Sroujis are also members of the President’s White Coat Society and the proud parents of second year medical student, Derek Srouji. Sarah-Ann Stephens, Pharm.D. and Johnny Stephens, Pharm.D. renewed their support of the President’s White Coat Society at the Physician level. In addition to their support of the President’s White Coat Society, the Stephens have also supported A Stately Affair. Lori Stewart, D.O.’88 and Doug Stewart, OSU’82, D.O.’85, made a generous gift to the Class of 1988 Exam Room and the Class of 1985 Exam Room. Stillwater Medical Center made a generous gift of $5,000 to support the high school summer recruiting program, Operation Orange. Stillwater Medical Center has served as a champion of OSU-CHS’ rural health initiatives. The A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation made a generous pledge payment of $4 million towards the pledge of $8 million to A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Medical Academic Building. This transformative gift represents the largest private donation ever received by OSU-CHS. Bruce Thomas, OSU’85, D.O.’89, made a generous gift to the College of Osteopathic Medicine Alumni Association Endowed Scholarship. Anhna Vuong and Darrell Ross, made a pledge payment towards their scholarship fund, the Nhan Do Vuong Endowed Scholarship for Rural Medical Track, named in honor of Anhna’s mother. The Warren Charité renewed its support of the President’s White Coat Society. Suzanne and William K. Warren, Jr., have been champions of healthcare in Tulsa and of OSU-CHS. Mr. Warren’s parents, William K. Warren, Sr. and Natalie O. Warren, founded The William K. Warren Foundation and Saint Francis Health System. Penny and Dennis Whitehouse, OSU’81, D.O.’97 made a generous gift to the President’s White Coat Society at the Leader level. Cynthia Wilkett, D.O. and Matt Wilkett, D.O.’99, increased their support of OSU-CHS by joining the President’s White Coat Society at the Physician level. The Wilketts established in 2015 the Cynthia Wilkett, D.O. and Matt Wilkett, D.O. Endowed Scholarship. Mary and Davey Wilkett, PAR’99 made a generous gift of $25,000 to establish the Wilkett Family Endowed Scholarship. Mary and Davey are proud parents of alumnus Matt Wilkett, D.O.’99. The medical scholarship has a first preference for members of the Choctaw Nation, and then a second preference for any Native Americans.

Penelope and Nabil Srouji, M.D., PAR’19 made a generous pledge of $25,000 over five years to support the Tandy Medical Academic Building. In recognition of their generosity, a medical exam room in OSU CENTER FOR HE ALTH SCIENCES 43


DEVELOPMENT MATTERS The William K. Warren Foundation made a generous pledge payment of $1,000,000 towards The William K. Warren Foundation – Saint Francis Health System OSU School of Medicine Scholarship. The scholarship supports medical students interested in practicing primary care with preference for pediatrics, family medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology. This extraordinary gift created the largest medical scholarship endowment at OSU-CHS. The Anne & Henry Zarrow Foundation made a gift of $25,000 to support the Rural and Underserved Primary Care Early Admissions Scholarship Program. The Anne & Henry Zarrow Foundation has supported the Early Admissions Program for the three years and made a generous pledge of $1 million to name The Anne & Henry Zarrow Foundation Lecture Hall in the Tandy Medical Academic Building.

To make a gift to OSU-CHS, or for more information, please contact the OSU Foundation at 918-594-8189 or at support-CHS@osugiving.com.

College of Osteopathic Medicine presents the

33RD ANNUAL PRIMARY CARE UPDATE NOVEMBER 4-6 DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Tulsa—Warren Place Tulsa, Oklahoma Feature Presentation: PRESCRIBING OF CONTROLLED DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES Program Chair: W. Stephen Eddy, D.O., M.P.H. Professor of Family Medicine and Director of Continuing Medical Education • •

20 AOA Category 1-A CME credits pending the approval of the AOA Council on Continuing Medical Education 20 Prescribed credits pending the approval of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)

For more information about this program, please call 800-274-1972 or 918-561-1411 or visit the CME events web page at www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/cme.html

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OSU CENTER FOR HE ALTH SCIENCES


IT ALL STARTS WITH

OPERATION

RESEARCH

ORANGE

High school students from across the state experienced a day in the life of a medical student at Operation Orange, Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine’s annual summer camps. The camps, hosted at partner instititutions across the state in June, introduced students to careers as physicians and sparked an interest in medicine. Students participated in hands-on demonstrations, including studying the anatomy of a heart, lungs and brain and performing intubations using a simulator. Operation Orange was sponsored in part by the Cherokee Nation and Stillwater Medical Center. For more information about Operation Orange visit www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/ operationorange.

Finding new ways to fight cancer. Developing tools to help doctors better detect cardiovascular diseases. Improving the way muscles function for better performance. These are examples of the many research projects being conducted at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences that are advancing the fields of biomedical science, forensic science, medicine, athletic training and health care administration. Our faculty, students and staff are making scientific breakthroughs while training the next generation of researchers and physicians in Oklahoma. Bruce Benjamin, Ph.D., vice provost for graduate programs, discusses OSU-CHS graduate degrees and research in a video at www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/gradprograms.

®

Tulsa, Oklahoma

918-582-1972

www.healthsciences.okstate.edu

®

Tulsa, Oklahoma

918-582-1972

www.healthsciences.okstate.edu


OKLAHOMA

STATE UNIVERSITY 1111 W. 17th St., Tulsa, OK 74107

Center for Health Sciences magazine SUMMER/FALL 2016

Graduation Class of 2016