Page 1

Theofficial officialmagazine magazineof ofthe theCollege Collegeof ofEngineering, Engineering,Architecture Architectureand andTechnology, Technology,Oklahoma OklahomaState StateUniversity University The

IMPACT

2016

All-Around Innovation New Undergraduate Lab Building promotes interdisciplinary, hands-on learning approach.


ON THE COVER

2

I N N O VAT I O N A B O U N D S The new Undergraduate Lab Building will unite the fields of OSU’s College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology in new ways.

7

GOING MOBILE CEAT is making its computer labs mobile for students — no more schlepping to a basement to work on assignments.

8

A LOOK BACK The College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology has come a long way, baby. See just how far on this timeline.

18

And given this structural engineer’s work with the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, he knows of which he speaks. FAREWELL, HEAD SPROCKET

20

Gus Edwin George “Ed” Malzahn, the founder of Charles Machine Works, leaves a huge impact on his friends and family, his company, his alma mater (OSU!) and the world. BRIDGING THE GAP

28

The Summer Bridge program gives CEAT freshmen a head start on their OSU careers.

10

S U R V I V I N G T H AT T O R N A D O OSU researchers are taking a lead role in using unmanned aerial vehicles to enhance severe weather forecasts and lengthen warning times for the endangered public. F LY I N G I N A L A B

DREAM BIG, S AY S T H E   E X P E R T

12

Well, the American Airlines jet did fly into Stillwater, and CEAT is turning it into a hands-on experience for students on the ground.

42

45

A new training program uniting OSU’s Fire Service Training with the Oklahoma City Fire Department and OKC’s Riversport Rapids is teaching first responders how to safely handle swift-water rescues. INDEX

S T U D E N T O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

A small town in Guatemala is getting better access to cleaner water and to hot meals, thanks to the work of OSU’s Engineers Without Borders student chapter. GOOD THINGS COME I N S M A LL PAC K AG E S

PROTECTING FIRST RESPONDERS

DE AN’S LE T TER

30

GLOBAL AID

T R U E G R E E N S PAC E Tulsa’s Guthrie Green center is using environmentally friendly ground source system for its heating and cooling needs.

FAC U LT Y C H A N G E S DE VELOPMENT AND DONOR S H A L L O F FA M E L O H M A N N M E DA L

1 32 54 58 62 64

38

OSU faculty members are making huge technological advances with very small components.

PHOTO / GARY L AWSON, UNIVERSIT Y MARKETING

DEAN, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY Paul Tikalsky, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE, F.ACI, EACR SENIOR DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT Tylerr Ropp MARKETING MANAGER AND MANAGING EDITOR Chelsea Robinson UNIVERSITY EDITOR Dorothy Pugh ART DIRECTOR Mark Pennie

PHOTOGRAPHY Phil Shockley, Gary Lawson, CEAT Staff CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Brittany Belli, Karolyn Bolay, Erin Larson, Janet Reeder, Pam Reynolds, Marketa Souckova is a publication of the Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology and is designed to provide information on college activities and accomplishments while fostering communication among the CEAT family and friends. WWW.CEAT. OKSTATE.EDU. The office of publication for IMPACT is 307 Whitehurst, Stillwater, OK 74078-1024. © 2015, IMPACT. All rights reserved. Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Higher Education Act), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, genetic information, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, disability, or status as a veteran, in any of its policies, practices or procedures.  This provision includes, but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. The Director of Equal Opportunity, 408 Whitehurst, OSU, Stillwater, OK 74078-1035; Phone 405-744-5371; email: eeo@okstate.edu has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies. Any person (student, faculty, or staff) who believes that discriminatory practices have been engaged in based on gender may discuss his or her concerns and file informal or formal complaints of possible violations of Title IX with OSU’s Title IX Coordinator 405-744-9154. This publication, issued by Oklahoma State University as authorized by the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology, was printed by Western Printing Company, inc, at a cost of $13,870 / Sept. 2016 / job #6480.


From the Dean’s Office

T

he College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology (CEAT) is continuing its transformation as a leading innovator in education. Expanding to high-tech, hands-on lab facilities, increasing enrollment and growing programs all contribute to the changing face of the college.

this fall. Top talent consistently finds its way to OSU, and the increase in scholastic achievement has allowed CEAT to expand its scholarship programs to meet the demands of such a talented pool of students.

CEAT has made a global impact by hosting the National Engineering Forum’s Council on Competiveness, bringing thought leaders from industry, academia and legislature together to discuss the importance of engineering’s future in the economy. The region’s leading CEOs, presidents and elected officials joined national leaders in Stillwater to establish the next steps toward maintaining the United States’ competitive advantage in energy and manufacturing.

The college’s top priority is the CEAT Undergraduate Laboratory Building. OSU President Burns Hargis and the OSU Regents are demonstrating the university’s dedication to the future of CEAT through support for the new lab, with a matching commitment of nearly $20 million. The new 72,000-squarefoot lab will include 14 testing, prototyping and experimental labs, multidisciplinary senior design space and a two-story test arena. Construction is set to begin at the end of 2016 with a groundbreaking ceremony on Oct.22 at the building’s future site, between the Advanced Technology Research Center and the Architecture Building, adjacent to Boone Pickens Stadium. The lab spaces are designed to foster interdisciplinary projects through flexible spaces that can adapt to a broad range of experiments. The building itself will also serve as a learning laboratory with exposed building systems, energy monitoring, a solar balcony lab, renewable energy charging stations and student access to the inner workings of the facility.

Our student population continues to grow with enrollment reaching record numbers — 4,158 undergraduates

Alumni support for the building has been good. Several leadership gifts have been established. Alumni leaders like Mark and Beth Brewer have provided a major gift to name an electrical engineering lab.

Over the past year, the college has seen significant developments and continued opportunities for innovative education. Mechanical and aerospace engineers now have an opportunity for hands-on application in an MD-80 aircraft donated by American Airlines. The aircraft has been retrofitted into a lab for students and teachers of all ages and disciplines to explore and understand how engineering and technology affect everyday life.

That gift was matched by OSU funds to create a world-class teaching and innovation lab for OSU students and high school summer programs. The estate of Blair Stone has done the same for a mechanical engineering laboratory with the matching OSU investment. An energy company has added an even larger gift to facilitate student success in the new lab. You can read more about this pivotal project and ways to impact tomorrow’s engineers, architects and technologists in the pages that follow. The OSU Foundation and I have recently established the CEAT Dean’s Club, which is made up of a distinguished group of CEAT supporters who have made significant investments in the college’s priority projects. Those who have given more than $250,000 in their lifetime to the college or $5,000 annually to either the CEAT Fund or Engineering Building Fund receive membership and exclusive benefits — including a $2,500 scholarship in their name funded by a generous CEAT benefactor awarded to a CEAT student in the upcoming academic school year. The support of the group is vital our success and makes a significant impact on every aspect of the college.

1

On behalf of OSU and CEAT, I thank you for your support. The college could not be at the forefront of innovation without the investment of alumni, friends, industry partners and people like you. Go Pokes!

PAUL J. TIK ALSK Y, DEAN, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY

p1_DeansLttr.indd 1

9/20/16 10:25 AM


All-Around Innovation

BY CHELSEA ROBINSON

New Undergraduate Lab will widen the realm of unique at OSU I N N O VAT I O N I S F L U I D.

I

T’S AN EVER-EVOLVING CONCEPT THAT MORPHS TO FILL GAPS IN TECHNOLOGY. IT’S AN OMNISCIENT IDEA OF WHAT SOCIETY NEEDS TO REACH NEW HORI-

ZONS. IT’S THE ASPIRATIONAL FOUNDATION OF THOUGHT-LEADING ENTITIES LIKE OSU’S COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY,

AND IT’S TAKING FORM IN THE NEW UNDERGRADUATE LABORATORY BUILDING.

Enrollment in the college has been on an exponential increase over the past five years, demonstrating both a positive response to the need for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professionals and boosting the need for additional facilities. Current CEAT students receive an exceptional

2 FA L L 2 0 16

p2-5_UGLab.indd 2

9/15/16 9:28 PM


education as part of OSU’s land-grant mission; the proposed building will enhance that experience through opportunities for practical application of theory. The building will foster a multidisciplinary atmosphere for students of all areas of focus to interact and learn.

THE FLOOR PL AN

Designed with the future of engineering education in mind, the facility will house more than 72,000 square feet of stateof-the-art lab space. Three floors will include 17 labs, several design suites, a two-story test arena, seminar rooms and sticky spaces. The labs will support a wide range of academic fields throughout the college, including: Mechatronics + Robotics Instrumentation + Sensors Energy + Power

Unit Ops + Environmental Flow Systems Materials + Design

multidisciplinary education, making it a place where the college as a whole comes to work together.

Industry-Aligned Labs Fabrication Lab + Shop Spaces

THE FUNCTIONALIT Y

The building will allow faculty members to develop and implement new pedagogies focused on how undergraduate engineering, architecture and engineering technology students understand, apply and innovate engineering principles and operations.

Students from throughout the college will be able to combine their areas of study through group and capstone projects. The ability to work with other disciplines as part of an undergraduate degree program will give students a wellrounded experience that better prepares them to enter the workforce.

Randy Seitsinger, associate dean of academic affairs, says the building will be a teaching tool in every aspect. Parts of the building’s systems will remain exposed, so students can learn about the construction, operation and sustainability of a modern building. The concept of the facility is to keep the focus on

“The new laboratory building will be an innovative hub of learning that shifts the college’s pedagogy from a traditional engineering education to a robust combination of theory and systems education with hands-on applications in order to better educate and prepare the next generation of engineers,” says

“This facility will make CEAT the only place in the [U.S.] where engineers, architects and technologists can come together in an academic setting.” — Randy Seitsinger, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs

p2-5_UGLab.indd 3

3

9/15/16 9:28 PM


“The new laboratory building will be an innovative hub of learning that shifts the college’s pedagogy from a traditional engineering education to a robust combination of theory and systems education with hands-on applications in order to better educate and prepare the next generation of engineers.” — Paul Tikalsky, College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology dean

4 FA L L 2 0 16

p2-5_UGLab.indd 4

9/26/16 10:45 AM


Paul Tikalsky, dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology. This experience will be unprecedented, setting OSU apart from its peers. “This facility will make CEAT the only place in the United States where engineers, architects and technologists can come together in an academic setting,” says Seitsinger. “This venue will help students understand how important collaboration is and how vital the other disciplines are to the big picture.” CEAT works with industry partners to ensure it is providing the skills and knowledge needed in today’s society and industry. College leadership is eager to build on CEAT’s long-standing partnerships in determining ways to educate the next generation of engineers, architects and technologists.

Seitsinger says the industry recruits employees who can collaborate with people outside their discipline. The CEAT Undergraduate Laboratory Building will help these companies’ future employees be better trained, setting them apart from other graduates.

THE FUTURE

The space between the Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) and the Donald W. Reynolds School of Architecture Building, south of Boone Pickens Stadium, is set to transform into one of the premier engineering lab buildings in the region. A groundbreaking ceremony is planned for Oct. 22. Construction should begin shortly after the groundbreaking, and the first classes are scheduled to be held in the new building in fall 2018.

leadership gifts have built up momentum for the projects, and the college looks forward to connecting with those who are interested in participating in this next step. There are countless ways to support the future of engineering, and the most impactful is through a contribution to the Engineering Building Fund (26-71500). To change the lives of thousands of engineering, architecture and technology students and bring the college into the next era of education, visit osugiving.com/yourpassion/ ceat-undergraduate-lab. Watch a video about the CEAT Undergraduate Laboratory Building and see how this new, innovative facility will alter engineering education at OSU: http://okla.st/2cR6KQ J.

CEAT is in a time of tremendous growth, and it is dependent upon the support of alumni, friends and partners. Several

5

p2-5_UGLab.indd 5

9/26/16 10:45 AM


“Unlike the traditional lab model, where students are compelled to work in certain facilities during certain hours, the mobile lab model removes constraints of time and space, freeing students to be productive and creative at any time or place.”

CEAT IT MANAGER DAVID ELLER

6 FA L L 2 0 16

p6-7_wireless.indd 6

9/15/16 10:20 PM


Transitioning from Traditional CEAT is making computer labs mobile for students

P

ICTURE A BASEMENT ROOM FULL OF AGING BUT WORKING PCS, WITH

A COUPLE OF WORKHORSE LASER PRINTERS AND A BIRD’S NEST OF ETHERNET CABLES. THIS IS THE SCENE OF THE TRADITIONAL MODEL OF

A UNIVERSITY COMPUTER LAB, CONTAINING EQUIPMENT PURCHASED BY THE UNIVERSITY THAT RESIDES IN A FIXED, CENTRALIZED LOCATION.

In contrast, the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology is transitioning to the model of a mobile lab: a virtual facility untethered to any specific location.

“Students equipped with a variety of mobile computing devices such as laptops, tablets and even phones can form their own ‘lab’ anywhere they find a reliable Wi-Fi connection,” says CEAT IT manager David Eller. “CEAT will continue to provide spaces such as the Student Excellence Center that feature high-speed wireless connections and publicly accessible printers, but students can just as easily work from dorm rooms, industry conferences or field research stations.” Expanding the concept of a workspace will empower students to determine the work environment best suited to their needs.

“Unlike the traditional lab model, where students are compelled to work in certain facilities during certain hours, the mobile lab model removes constraints of time and space, freeing students to be productive and creative at any time or place,” says Eller. “Latenight brainstorms can come to immediate fruition by simply rolling out of bed and grabbing a laptop. In addition, students with physical limitations are free to work in the environment best suited for their needs.” Transitioning away from the traditional lab model frees the college to make more targeted investments in student success. Funds formerly dedicated to university-owned computers, which are utilized during only part of the year, can now be allocated to CEAT-specific facilities and equipment such as the new Undergraduate Laboratory Building.

resources and solutions. CEAT has negotiated a deal with Dell and OrangeTech to provide high-performance mobile computers at a reasonable cost to students and negotiated with several software vendors such as Autodesk and ANSYS to offer discounted, and even free, software. “In addition, CEAT IT will offer face-toface support in both the CEAT IT office and the Student Excellence Center,” says Eller. “Printers and high-speed networks will remain readily available to students throughout CEAT facilities.”

7

CEAT IT is also evaluating virtual desktop infrastructure as a means of offering high-performance computing to students. With this technology, students would be able to connect a consumer-grade laptop, or even a tablet computer, to a virtualized high-performance workstation to run processor and memory-intensive applications such as simulations.

In order to facilitate a smooth transition to the mobile lab model, CEAT and CEAT IT will offer a variety of

p6-7_wireless.indd 7

9/15/16 10:20 PM


Through the Years W I T H T H E CO LLEG E O F ENG I N EER I NG, A RCH I T ECT U R E A N D   T ECH N O LOGY

1898

1957

1915

OSU’s first graduate is an engineering student.

Oklahoma A&M is renamed the Oklahoma State University of Agricultural and Applied Sciences.

Maude A. Spear becomes first woman to receive a degree in engineering from Oklahoma A&M.

1940

1890

1930

Oklahoma A&M College is founded.

1920 1910

1900 1890

1950

1896

1939 First engineering building (now Engineering South) opens.

Engineering courses are first offered.

8 FA L L 2 0 16

p8-9_Timeline_v2.indd 8

9/15/16 10:17 PM


0

2020 2010

1986

2000

A college alumni association is established as a part of the OSU Alumni Association.

1990 1980

1970 1960

1966 Construction on Engineering North begins.

1991 The Melvin R. Lohmann Medal is established.

The Melvin R. Lohmann Medal honors alumni of the College for contributions to the profession or to the education of engineers, architects or technologists that merit the highest recognition.

2009

1972

The School of Architecture moves into a new building.

2015

Five students are accepted to Cambridge University.

2016 $2.4 million in scholarships are awarded.

9

2018

New Undergraduate Lab is scheduled to open.

Department establishes the Office of Student Services to advise first- and secondyear engineering students.

p8-9_Timeline_v2.indd 9

9/15/16 10:17 PM


Decoding the Skies

THE GLIDERSONDE MODEL UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE. IMAGE / CEAT

OSU researchers’ UAV project may improve forecasts for severe weather

STORY BY MARKETA SOUCKOVA PHOTO BY PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

A

s technology has improved, so has weather forecasting. But even today, tornado warnings give you a maximum of around 12 minutes to get to safety. If your shelter is elsewhere — say you’re at home but need to seek shelter in a basement at work — 12 minutes simply may not be enough time. But what if you had an hour’s notice to get to shelter?

10

A team of researchers from Oklahoma State University, the University of Oklahoma, the University of Nebraska and the University of Kentucky is working on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that will assist in increasing the warning time during severe weather.

OSU is leading this research; three schools or departments within OSU are collaborating: mechanical and aerospace engineering, computer science and geography. Professors leading the project are: Jamey Jacob, professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering Christopher Crick, assistant professor in computer science and Amy Frazier, assistant professor in geography. “Being able to work with the professors has been great,” says Nicholas Foster, a mechanical and aerospace engineering sophomore. “It’s added that extra connection to the professors that you wouldn’t get in classrooms.” A $6 million National Science Foundation grant provides the necessary resources for the researchers. As a leading university in the research, OSU gets one-third of the grant.

The goal is to develop the tools and capabilities to fly UAVs daily to get the data needed to improve forecasting methods. The project is scheduled to take about four years. “Right now, what most researchers do to get data for forecast models or to get daily bulletins for weather is to fly balloons,” says Jacob. “They have very limited time, and they don’t really get a whole lot of data.” In April, Jacob and OSU received the Federal Aviation Administration Section 333 exemption, allowing the legal flight of UAVs. Without the exemption, it is illegal to operate drones and UAVs commercially. Jacob requested to operate an unmanned aircraft system to conduct training courses and imagery of energy, infrastructure management, natural resource monitoring and management, precision agriculture and terrain modeling. OSU is one of 4,982 institutions that got the permission.

FA L L 2 0 16

p10-11_UAV.indd 10

9/15/16 10:18 PM


11

“This gives us the ability to fly the UAVs on a research basis,” says Jacob. “Until this time, we primarily had been working on systems and components inside the laboratory, but this gives us the opportunity to go outside and fly on a daily basis.” Part of the research goal is to develop multiple similar UAVs that have the same function to sample the atmosphere to provide increased information about the atmosphere before a severe storm or any other weather condition. Researchers, including several students, work on

p10-11_UAV.indd 11

UAVs such as a rocket-sounding system and deployable wing unmanned aircraft or sonde equipped with a multi-rotor UAV platform. “I have been working in Dr. Jacob’s lab for seven years, since I was a freshman,” says Shea Fehrenbach, mechanical and aerospace engineering graduate student. “I have been conducting research in rocketry and deployable winged UAVs that would be beneficial for rapidly deploying them in severe conditions and would also be deployable from any location.”

By the time this research concludes, meteorologists should be able to collect data at lower altitudes that could provide insight into the formation of severe storms and allow for the creation of a three-dimensional weather forecast as opposed to two-dimensional forecasts, used extensively today. Ultimately, the research could save lives. An hour should be time enough for people to get to a shelter before a tornado hits.

9/15/16 10:18 PM


Grounded for a New Life

BY CHELSEA ROBINSON

12 FA L L 2 0 16

p12-15_MD80.indd 12

9/20/16 10:35 AM


Donated aircraft transforms into a hands-on lab

H

IGHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS PRIDE THEMSELVES ON OFFERING HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE FOR THEIR STUDENTS. SOME HAVE LABS WHERE STUDENTS CAN FABRICATE MATERIALS. SOME HAVE AREAS TO OPERATE EQUIPMENT. OTHERS HAVE TECHNOLOGY TO SIMULATE REAL-LIFE SCENARIOS.

The OSU College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology’s School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering has the MD-80 N491AA.

American Airlines delivered the retired 170,000-pound passenger aircraft to the Stillwater Regional Airport on Sept. 23. What was once a commercial vehicle that carried a total of more than 4 million passengers during more than 45,000 flight hours is being transformed into the Aerospace Systems Discovery Lab (ASDL). Clinical associate professor James Kidd, Ph.D., is leading the efforts to turn a workhorse jet into a learning laboratory. Kidd says mechanical and aerospace engineering students are exposing the inner workings of the aircraft. This process shows students how complex the systems are, and efficient the design needs to be, in order to make the aircraft function properly.

13

Visitors to the ASDL experience the details of the plane in an unprecedented manner. From exploring the emergency equipment in the tail and opening the exit window in the center to getting up close with hundreds of gears in the belly and sitting in the cockpit, people of all ages can appreciate this asset.

p12-15_MD80.indd 13

9/20/16 10:35 AM


The ASDL has already been put to work offering educational experiences for MAE students, STEM teachers and K-12 groups. Kidd personally gives tours and lectures at the site. A typical trip to the ASDL begins under one of the aircraft’s wings that extend out 50-plus feet. Kidd gives the history of the plane and an overview of its specifications. He encourages visitors to ask questions and present ideas for ways to continue expanding the demonstration opportunities. From there, eager students and teachers climb the stairs into the front of the plane. They get to sit in the pilot’s seat, flip switches and take selfies in the cockpit. Kidd uses the excitement to generate conversation about what the switches, buttons and levers do and how they control other parts of the plane. At this point, the group moves to the middle of the aircraft.

About halfway through the length of the plane, Kidd has loosened part of the floor board. The group gathers around to see what is under their feet — thousands of pulleys and gears, controlling the basic functions of the plane. They also get to sit in the exit seat and follow the instructions to remove the emergency exit panel. Kidd continues by explaining the engineering behind how the shape of the door is designed to offset pressure and describe what the experience would be like if a passenger were to open the door in an emergency. Kidd says he is constantly coming up with new ideas to generate excitement for engineering and aerospace systems by using the aircraft. Some of his best feedback comes from the younger audiences who are passionate about planes and eager to talk about the ending capabilities of flight.

The ASDL brings unlimited opportunities to CEAT, the community and the region. However, the site is in need of improvements, which are being made over time, says Kidd. Signage was completed in the summer and the inside of the plane is slowly being developed into micro-labs as students disassemble and display other parts. Support from industry partners like American Airlines and the dedication of alumni and friends is making progress a reality. In future years, Kidd says he can envision more learning spaces where each part of the plane is converted into a small lab space. The MD-80 N491AA may have retired from the sky, but it will remain hard at work on the ground. For more information or to support the Aerospace Systems Discover Lab, visit asdl.okstate.edu.

14 FA L L 2 0 16

p12-15_MD80.indd 14

9/20/16 10:35 AM


Pete says,

“Help Recruit a Future Cowboy.” Do you know someone who would make a great engineer, architect or technologist? Everyone looks good in orange! Connect them with our great programs by visiting

orange.okstate.edu/register/knowafuturecowboy and noting that you’re a CEAT alumnus. We will send them information about the college.

p12-15_MD80.indd 15

9/20/16 10:35 AM


S TAT E S S E R V E D T H R O U G H PROFESSIONAL DE VELOPMENT TR AINING

41

YE ARS OF PA R T N E R S H I P WITH FPP TO BET TER TR AIN FIRE PROFESSIONALS

80

I T E M S S O L D BY FIRE SERVICE T R A I N I N G S TA F F AND PROGR AMS

261,523

CEAT by the Numbers D E G R E E S G R A N T E D I N 2 014 -2 015

616 240 35 B AC H E L O R ’S

M A S T E R ’S

DOCTOR AL

18 9

PROGR AMS

UNITS

16 FA L L 2 0 16

p16-17_statistics.indd 16

9/15/16 10:32 PM


C O S T S AV I N G S A N D C O S T AV O I D A N C E T H R O U G H CLGT

STUDENTS TR AINED BY F I R E S E R V I C E TR AINING AND PROGR AMS

$2 million

36,916

I G S H PA M E M B E R S WO R L DW I D E

5000

GR ANTS AND INDUSTRY SUPPORT DE VELOPED THROUGH NPDC

91 41 TENURED FAC U LT Y

T E N U R E -T R AC K FAC U LT Y

$5.9 million

U N D E R G R A D U AT E ENROLLMENT

3,856

TRIBES SERVED IN F O U R S TAT E S BY T H E TRIBAL TECHNICAL A S S I S TA N C E PROGR AM

44

790 G R A D U AT E ENROLLMENT

17

$1 billion T O TA L E C O N O M I C I M PAC T S I N C E A E P O P E N I N G I N 1997

p16-17_statistics.indd 17

9/15/16 10:32 PM


The Sky’s the Limit Engineer involved with world’s tallest building tells students to dream big BY BRITTANY BELLI

N

ot too long ago it would have seemed impossible for man to walk, let alone live or work, among the clouds. But Larry Novak, director of structural engineering at the Portland Cement Association, has made those dreams a reality with his contributions to the design for the world’s tallest structure: the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The multiuse skyscraper stands over half a mile tall at 2,717 feet. Condominiums, offices, a hotel and retail space fill the 3- million-square-foot reinforced concrete tower. Novak shared the details behind the design for the structure at OSU CEAT’s Halliburton Global Innovators Series, where he spoke about the importance of structural engineering in modern construction.

18

“Structural engineering is part of the natural fabric that ties us all together,” Novak says. “What we do occurs on all scales, from the nano scale of cement to the size of a beam to an entire building and even something the size of a national transportation system.”

“Construction [on the] building took about five to six years to complete, and there were many challenges to overcome, such as how to deal with the wind with such a tall structure,” Novak says. “The engineers worked closely with the architects to develop a building that is both structurally sound and elegant.” Adrian Saenz, a civil engineering major with an environmental option, was inspired by Novak’s passion and innovation.

the same ‘wow’ factors can be carried over to design, whether it’s a stream restoration or a water treatment system. The inspiration and innovation can be put toward a lot of different directions.” Before his lecture, Novak toured several engineering facilities such as the Bert Cooper Engineering Laboratory. He advised students to take advantage of the impressive opportunities available at OSU.

“I find it absolutely amazing that someone can design and build something like the Burj Khalifa, and I use it as a source of inspiration for my own career path,” Saenz says. Even though he has no plans to take on the challenge of beating the Burj Khalifa in height, Saenz says Novak’s advice is still applicable. “I’m a unique case because I’m more focused on the environment and water aspect instead of structure,” Saenz says. “I don’t want to build the world’s tallest building, but with technology and creativity, a lot of FA L L 2 0 16

p18-19_Novak.indd 18

9/15/16 10:34 PM


“OSU is one of the few universities in the world that has the equipment to do certain tests such as slump, cone and concrete pumping tests,” Novak says. “And that is really, really cool.” Saenz definitely agrees that students receive a first-rate engineering education at OSU, especially since he is experiencing it himself. “If you think about the labs and spaces Novak presented in and visited, they’re all geared toward our dean’s initiative to make the college more friendly toward our students,” Saenz says. “Novak is a professional, so he can look at our tools, draw similarities to the real world and see that our college and OSU does a fantastic job of providing its students with the right resources to be successful.” While Novak can add “tallest building in the world” to his résumé in addition to other impressive projects, he wanted to remind students “to dream big.”

19

“I think it’s important that the students understand there are tremendous opportunities out there,” Novak says. “Think of the buildings we had 30 years ago versus the buildings we have now, and imagine the years of opportunity and the structures they could be building when they’re my age.”

p18-19_Novak.indd 19

9/15/16 10:34 PM


From Curious Kid to Head Sprocket BY KAROLYN BOLAY

OSU alumnus ‘Ed’ Malzahn’s inquisitive mind built a global engineering company

W

H E N A YO U N G B OY B E G A N T I N K E R I N G W I T H T H E

TO O LS I N H I S FAT H ER ’S B L AC KS M I T H A N D M AC H I N E S H O P I N A R U R A L O K L A H O M A TOW N , I T S PA R K E D

A L I F E LO N G J O U R N E Y I N TO E N G I N E E R I N G .

Gus Edwin George “Ed” Malzahn was always known for his inquisitive personality and questioning mind. He even caught the eye of the FBI — which resulted in two visits from the organization to his home for inventions he had developed at the ages of 14 and 17. “He was just very creative and innovative — even at a young age,” says Tiffany Sewell-Howard, Ed’s granddaughter and executive chair of Charles Machine Works. “He was just so curious. From the time he was able to as a young child, he tinkered.”

20

After graduating from Perry High School in Perry, Okla., in 1939, Ed went on to attend Oklahoma A&M College, now Oklahoma State University. He completed his degree in mechanical engineering and began to turn the “tinkering” into a successful career. PHOTO ABOVE: BEFORE AT TENDING OKL AHOMA A&M COLLEGE, ED MALZ AHN AT TENDED WENT-

Ed can also credit OAMC for leading him to the love of his life, Mary Corneil. Ed and Mary were wed May 22, 1943. The two were inseparable and provided an example of the importance of family to all who knew them as a couple. With the start of a family, Ed began to take the vision of his father, Charles, and develop it into Charles Machine Works. The company began when he noticed residential utility lines had to be laid by hand, the trenches dug slowly with shovels and picks. He set out to change this in 1949 with the Ditch Witch Model DWP Service Line Trencher — his first mechanical trenching machine. Charles Machine Works went on to produce and sell more than half of the world’s trenching machines today. In fact, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers designated that first machine a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark in 2002.

WORTH MILITARY ACADEMY IN LEXINGTON, MO.

Ed never planned to take his shop worldwide. But that first machine changed the way utility infrastructure was built globally — Charles Machine Works now provides products in 195 countries. “We always think about Perry, but there is a big impact worldwide by the number of dealerships and the people that work there,” says Sewell-Howard. “We employ close to 4,000 people within the family of companies and the dealer organization. That is a lot of people that this little company that started in Perry touches and impacts on a daily basis.” Charles Machine Works is well known for its fun and family-like work environment. With family days that bring together employees and their families for food and fellowship to a celebration of Ed’s birthday every year, the company policy remains to have fun. “The last line of our mission statement is, ‘It’s OK to have fun here,’” says SewellHoward. “He took that to heart. He really fostered that type of environment. He had as much if not more reverence and appreciation for the machinist and the welder on the factory floor to the highest-producing engineer or sales person. He was very relatable and people

FA L L 2 0 16

p20-21_Malzahn.indd 20

9/19/16 11:12 PM


admired him, looked up to him and loved him.”

based in Perry, and the local community was always important to him.

who supported him through his ups and downs.”

Ed was also famous for his spontaneous trips around the halls of Ditch Witch — spreading fun and smiles along the way.

“He set up a foundation for the benefit of Perry, so we can continue to support all the things that he loved and had a specific interest in,” says Sewell-Howard. “We will continue to support what he wanted to happen here.”

Paige Cloud, graduate assistant for CEAT prospective students, says because of generous donors like Ed, she and other students can pursue college.

“People would celebrate their birthdays, and he would go blow bubbles as part of their birthday celebration,” says his granddaughter. “I was cleaning out his desk last week, and the bottom drawer of his desk was full of bubbles.” Ed was recognized throughout his life with awards and left behind an engineering legacy when he passed Dec. 11, 2015. He will continue to influence lives of passion, generosity and innovation. While the business grew to a global scale, Ed never forgot his roots. Charles Machine Works’ global headquarters are

Ed’s generosity helped local organizations, citizens and institutions and extended to his alma mater, as he provided scholarships to students in the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at OSU. “He just wanted to be in service to everything and everyone that helped him achieve what he achieved in his lifetime,” says Sewell-Howard. “He gave to OSU; he gave to Perry; those were the people

“It helps students who can’t afford college and give them scholarships,” says Cloud. “Ed also gave a lot of students the opportunity to work in his company to gain experience.” “The world will remember him as an innovator but he was so humble and unassuming. He was just a common man who had some great ideas,” says SewellHoward. “Everybody called him — very lovingly — Head Sprocket. It shows he is innovative, but it is still fun.”

21

FAMILY VALUES ARE AT THE CORE OF CHARLES MACHINE WORKS, WHICH IS VISIBLE AS ED (CENTER) AND HIS GRANDDAUGHTER TIFFANY SEWELL-HOWARD (RIGHT) AND GRANDSON CODY SEWELL WORKED TOGETHER IN THE COMPANY.

p20-21_Malzahn.indd 21

9/19/16 11:12 PM


“OV ER THE PAS T 18+ Y E AR S, IT H AS BEEN M Y PLE AS UR E TO WOR K ON A UNIQ U E S E T O F PL AT F O R M S W H O S E R O LE I S TO PR OV ID E IM AGERY FROM V ERY HIGH ALTITUDE UNM ANNED AIR CR AF T OV ER ALL PAR T S OF THE WOR LD.”

— D R . A L F R E D “ T E D ” Z AVO D N Y

In the Midst of Change ‘Ted’ Zavodny just does his job to help protect the United States

S

INCE THE END OF WORLD WAR II, TECHNOLOGY HAS BEEN CHANGING AT L ASER SPEED. OSU COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY ALUMNUS DR. ALFRED “TED” Z AVODNY (BACHELOR’S IN 1962, MASTER’S IN 1965, AND DOCTORATE IN 1970; ALL IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING) HAS BEEN IN THE THICK OF IT AS GLOBAL HAWK CHIEF SCIENTIST & TRITON SENSOR CHIEF TECHNOLOGIST FOR NORTHROP

GRUMMAN CORP. WE HAD THE OPPORTUNIT Y TO VISIT WITH HIM. SOME HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR CONVERSATION :

Q: Is it true that a WWII plane landed near your family farm in Perry, Okla.?

A: I believe you are referring to the B-47 that crash-landed north of Perry. This was in the early 1950s. The B-47 was a large [U.S. Air Force] post-WWII, sixengine jet aircraft. It was the first time a B-47 three-man crew was able to safely crash-land, and the crew was able to walk away. Q: That must have sparked an engineering interest for not only you, but the whole town.

22

A: The plane had minimal damage and was put on skids and towed to the airport, where it was repaired. The

takeoff was announced ahead of time, and hundreds of local folks turned out to watch it.

Q: Oklahoma State University

Q: How did you decide on

for multiple engineering disciplines

will soon begin building a new undergraduate laboratory for CEAT. It will have state-of-art technology

Oklahoma State University and

housed in a three-story world-class

specifically, electrical engineering?

facility. What were the facilities like when you were on campus?

A: My first two years were at Northern Oklahoma College (NOC) in Tonkawa, Okla., after which I went to OSU. I had an older brother who had gone to OSU and majored in mechanical engineering, so I decided to also major in engineering. Wanting the challenge of the hardest field of engineering, I chose electrical, which at the time I knew very little about. Zavodny has been named to the NOC Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame.

A: I began my experiments in a space on the fourth floor of the electrical engineering building, but a renovation project was soon initiated that caused me to find a new space. Somehow I was able to obtain space in the basement of the physics building, which was nearby and rather new at the time. Since there was no help available to move the equipment, I did it myself after midnight, moving some rather expensive equipment

FA L L 2 0 16

p22-23_Zaviodny.indd 22

9/19/16 11:28 PM


and a “stable table” block of granite that weighed about 200 pounds. Quite surprisingly, no one ever challenged the sight of all that equipment moving across campus in the dead of night. Q: You earned your bachelor’s (top 10 in a class of 2,500), master’s and doctorate at OSU. What was your dissertation?

“A Determination of the Effect of the Dispersive Term on the Fresnel Drag Coefficient Using a Ring Laser (1970).” Q: Can you explain the premise? A: Here’s the simple explanation: the ring laser was a device I fabricated that held a refillable HeNe laser tube in one side of a three-sided mirror arrangement that allowed two counter-rotating laser beams to constructively interfere, producing fringes that could be counted. By introducing rotating materials within the laser beams, I was able to repeat experiments that French engineer and physicist Augustin-Jean Fresnel had done 100 years earlier with significantly more precision and to extend those results to liquids to include experiments never done previously. After graduation, I left those devices with Dr. Bilger for his other graduate students to use. Hans Bilger says his years of research with students, especially Zavodny and W.K. Stowell in the 1970s, gave him the background necessary to create an enlarged ring laser.

“Only from our extensive OSU experiments did I know the tricks to eliminate the guesswork involved in building a ring laser this big,” he says. “Our breakthrough in ring lasers was not anticipated and, in fact, was considered impossible,” says Bilger, who presented the design to a team of scientists at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand, as part of his 1986 Erskine Fellowship. New Zealand’s ring laser, the Canterbury I (C I), produced its first signals on Oct. 4, 1991. (Excerpt from “Ring Laser Technology Circles the Earth,” CEAT Impact magazine, Vol. 3 No. 1, 1996) Q: You’ve had a long, successful career. What was your first position post-graduation?

Northrop Grumman for an impressive endeavor called the HALE Global Hawk platform.

A: Over the past 18-plus years, it has been my pleasure to work on a unique set of platforms whose role is to provide imagery from very high altitude unmanned aircraft over all parts of the world. The aircraft does not have a pilot, it flies itself but can be controlled via mouse and keyboard from anywhere in the world. Its camera and radar images are instantly viewable from anywhere around the globe. Designing those sensors and providing that imagery has been my responsibility and has been tremendously rewarding professionally. Q: Are there any fellow OSU-CEAT graduates at Northrop Grumman?

After getting my Ph.D., I taught math at Northern Oklahoma College for two years, worked for a laser company for two years, then went into aerospace where through a succession of five companies, I have enjoyed my work for the past five decades.

A: Yes, there are several, including at least two with whom I work, and many more I have not met. Trying to name them would be a disservice to those I have not yet met. Because of those OSU alumni and their contacts, one of our major suppliers is Frontier Electronic Systems in Stillwater.

Zavodny was a member of the team developing the first fully autonomous unmanned airplane.

Q: I hear that you have made

23

contributions to the safety of the United States that we, as citizens,

Q: Most recently, you’ve been sharing your expertise of sensor technology as the chief scientist and chief technologist with

may never know. I’m beginning to think you are our very own superhero. Any chance I could talk you into an orange cape?

A: Just doing my job in trying to help protect our national servants who provide our daily security, at home and around the world.

“TED’S EXPERTISE IS IN THE SENSOR TECHNOLOGY FOR VARIOUS UNMANNED AIR VEHICLES. HE IS THE GENIUS TO SEE THE BIG PICTURE OF HOW ALL THESE UNMANNED PLATFORMS WILL WORK AND COOPERATE IN THE SAME AIRSPACE ENVIRONMENT. WITHOUT HIS LEADERSHIP AND VISION, THIS WOULD TAKE MANY MORE YEARS OF DEVELOPMENT AND NOT HAVE THE GLOBAL SUCCESS IT NOW ENJOYS.”

p22-23_Zaviodny.indd 23

— DA R I U S K A R A L I S , C E O, J C - 3 I N C.

9/19/16 11:28 PM


BY BRITTANY BELLI

VAUGHN BERKHEISER VISITS WITH HIS GRANDSON AND CL ASSMATE, HUNTER SUNTKEN, IN FRONT OF THE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH CENTER.

VAUGHN BERKHEISER STUDIES WITH A

24

GROUP DECADES YOUNGER AND FINDS HE’S LEARNING THE MATERIAL T WICE AS QUICKLY AS STUDYING SOLO. THOSE STUDYING ARE (FROM LEFT) BERKHEISER, MARLO ZOLLER AND CONNOR PARIS.

FA L L 2 0 16

p26-27_Vaughn.indd 24

9/20/16 12:06 AM


Unlimited Education BY MARKETA SOUCKOVA

Student with Ph.D. goes back to the beginning in mechanical engineering

O

KL AHOMA STATE UNIVER SIT Y’S COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY WELCOMES STUDENTS OF ALL AGES AND BACKGROUNDS AND PROVIDES THEM WITH EQUAL OPPOR-

TUNITIES AND GREAT EDUCATION.

One student is a living testament to the lifelong pursuit of education. Vaughn E. Berkheiser is an undergraduate mechanical engineering student who was born in 1946 in San Marcos, Texas. In August 1976, he received a doctorate in soil science from Michigan State University. And in 2015, Berkheiser decided to go back to school as a fulltime student. His journey back to school can be traced back to 2011, when he and his wife moved to Guthrie, Okla., to be closer to family and grandchildren. He went to work as a field geologist and logging analyst for ALS Empirica in Edmond, Okla., preparing mud logs (graphical pictures of drilling parameters plotted on a foot-by-foot scale) for client company geologists.

For another, he reconsidered his future. Outside of school and work, he always built new things and came up with new ideas. A lot of his thinking and talent for building came from his father, who did woodworking for a living. A young Berkheiser often helped his dad and enjoyed it. “I have a mechanical mind,” says Berkheiser. “And I like to make things. I’d like to be able to make better things and make things better.” He has always been passionate about mechanical engineering. Even while working on his undergraduate degree at Purdue University, he thought about switching his major to mechanical engineering instead of soil science, but he never did.

“The life as a mud logger wasn’t satisfying and didn’t leave too much room for a life outside of work,” says Berkheiser. “I wasn’t happy with this job, even though I enjoyed the oil industry.” Berkheiser’s wife died in August 2014. Less than six months after that, he lost his job in layoffs due to the oil industry crisis. These occurrences prompted Berkheiser to take care of things he hadn’t had time for before. For one thing, he underwent shoulder surgery.

p26-27_Vaughn.indd 25

In 2015, the time was right. He decided to enroll at Oklahoma State University and pursue a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. It didn’t hurt that his grandson, Hunter Suntken, was also getting his degree in mechanical engineering at OSU. The transition from work to school hasn’t been easy. Just like every other freshman, Berkheiser had to take the math placement test and his electives. Much has changed since he last attended school, but he praises the help that he gets from the professors, students and the college in general, and he loves his classes. “CEAT and the professors offer so much help,” say Berkheiser. “At the beginning of the year, I would study at home by myself, and then I realized that I can use the help that is provided to CEAT students, and it takes me half the time now.”

25

“He is doing great at school,” says Laura Emerson, his college academic counselor. “And he is making a lot of friends among students.” He plans to graduate in 2019 and get a job in North Central Oklahoma. The fact that he will be past his 70th birthday then doesn’t bother Berkheiser, who believes he still has contributions to make.

VAUGHN BERKHEISER’S DAD MADE THIS TOY CRANE THAT CAUGHT THE YOUNG BOY’S INTEREST.

“He always says he will work until he dies,” says his grandson, Hunter Suntken.

9/20/16 12:06 AM


Access the world with two daily hassle-free

to either OKC or Tulsa, and you’ll see the

flights to DFW from Stillwater. Factor in

convenience and simplicity of jet service

free parking and quick boarding with short

out of Stillwater Regional Airport with

lines. Factor out travel time and expense

American Airlines.

You can get there from here. Fly Stillwater.

Aircraft operated by Envoy ÂŽ

p26-27_ads.indd 28

9/20/16 10:38 AM


p26-27_ads.indd 29

9/20/16 10:38 AM


Bridging the Gap

BY PAM REYNOLDS

Summer Bridge students get a jump-start on campus life

T

HE SUMMER BRIDGE PROGRAM PREPARES INCOMING FRESHMEN TO SUCCEED IN OSU’S COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE, AND

TECHNOLOGY. STUDENTS IN SUMMER BRIDGE SAY THE PROGRAM MAKES THEIR TRANSITION FROM HIGH SCHOOL TO COLLEGE EASIER.

THE RECENT GROWTH OF THE PROGRAM HAS ALLOWED MORE INCOMING FRESHMEN TO GET A HEAD START ON COLLEGE.

“We want to expose the students to all the things they need to know in our college while they’re here so when school starts they are ahead of the game,” says Lance Millis, director of CEAT student academic services. “By the time classes start, they already know their way around. We get them ready academically and connect them to the campus socially and geographically.” Summer Bridge is an 18-day residential, on-campus program packed with activities to prepare incoming students for the rigors of college.

Students take classes during the mornings, including chemistry, pre-calculus and English composition. The instructors provide a review of what the students should have already learned in high school, as well as introduce the students to what they will be expected to do in college. In the afternoons, students work on engineering design projects. The design projects in 2015 were provided by the CEAT departments of civil engineering, industrial engineering, chemical engineering

and aerospace and mechanical eEngineering. Each student had to complete three of the four design projects. The program also includes industry tours and presentations from various organizations on campus. Colton Tubbs, a freshman in mechanical engineering, is one of 20 current students serving on the CEAT Freshmen Council. “I learned about CEAT Freshmen Council during Summer Bridge and then applied for it once the semester started,” says Tubbs. “I probably wouldn’t have applied for it if I hadn’t gone to Bridge. The first week of Summer Bridge, you’re wandering around dazed just trying to catch up. I would have been the same way my first week of my freshman year if I hadn’t been in Bridge. I wouldn’t have thought, ‘Hey, I can go do that, and I should go do that.’”

2012–15 S U M M ER B R I DG E PA RT I CI PAT I O N 86 56 32 17

26

20 12

20 13

20 14

20 15

20 16

MORE AT TENDEES WERE EXPECTED FOR SUMMER 2016.

FA L L 2 0 16

p28-29_Bridge.indd 26

9/20/16 12:25 AM


Many CEAT students in Summer Bridge say that meeting people and becoming familiar with the campus have been extremely beneficial. Masen Stewart, a freshman in chemical engineering, says friendships he made in Summer Bridge have continued. “Currently, there are six or seven Bridge students in my physics class,” says Stewart. “So if we need help, we know who we can go to. We can bounce ideas off of each other and figure out what’s going on.” Isaiah Chitica, a junior in civil engineering, says he still connects with students, advisers and professors he met in Summer Bridge nearly three years ago. “By the time I came here my first semester, I knew people and knew where the facilities were and where to go for the bursar or other services, which was a big concern since I’m not from Oklahoma,” says Chitica. Statistics show that Summer Bridge helps students stay in college. The retention rate for Summer Bridge students is 88 percent, compared with OSU’s student retention rate of 81.5 percent.

p28-29_Bridge.indd 27

An awards banquet is held at the end of Summer Bridge. Scholarships are presented to the top performers in the classes and engineering design projects. In 2015, approximately $10,000 in scholarship funds was split among a dozen students. “It’s important to note that the staff members we hire for this program are current CEAT students, some of whom participated in Summer Bridge when they were coming into school,” says Millis. “They are mentors, counselors and guides who also help tutor Bridge participants during study hall. The participants hear from the counselors what it’s like to be a student and how to prepare.”

people. I like letting them know this is possible; you’re going to make it. You don’t have to be scared.” Sponsorship from several companies has allowed the program to grow. Most Summer Bridge attendees receive scholarships to help cover the $1,500 cost per person for housing, meals, curriculum, transportation and other activities and supplies during the program.

Myriah Worthen attended Summer Bridge in 2013 and worked as a counselor for the program in 2015. She is currently a junior in architecture. “I met a lot of people who were invested in me and the other people in the class,” says Worthen. “It lets you know there are people there to help you. So it made me want to give back and be a counselor. I really like being a mentor and connecting with other

27

9/20/16 12:25 AM


Going Global

BY CHELSEA ROBINSON

Student group works to improve the lives of thousands with engineering projects in Guatemala HAVE YOU FILLED UP A WATER BOTTLE TODAY? EATEN A HOT MEAL?

It was pretty quick and simple to do that in your kitchen, right? What takes you a few minutes requires hours of hard labor in places like Santa Rosa, Guatemala. The College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology’s Engineers Without Borders (EWB) student group is dedicated to alleviating these issues and improving the quality of life for the people of Santa Rosa. THE PROBLEM

Mothers of schoolchildren heave fivegallon containers of food onto inadequate stoves that can barely heat food. They spend the majority of their day inhaling smoke and straining their backs to feed groups of 100 children or more. Proper stoves typically sell for approximately $125, a month’s income in most cases, far beyond the budgets of families and even schools.

an assessment trip to the area this past summer, EWB student leaders determined they can bring the cost of a stove down by nearly $50. The community is required to invest in a portion of the cost of the stove, which has been proven to increase the ownership of the equipment and its proper maintenance. EWB is also planning an additional water assessment trip and water implementation trip in the coming year. The group hopes to dig and install water wells and bio-sand filters to give more people access to clean water. The group’s work will improve the lives of hundreds of people, especially women and children who often prepare the food and collect the water. YO U R R O L E

The trip for the stoves will cost $30,000 for travel, food, accommodations for 14

CEAT students plus supplies for the project. The group needs the support of loyal and true alumni and friends to reach their goal. This group of inspirational leaders is hosting a fund-raising tailgate on Oct. 8 at the Phillips 66 Student Plaza on the OSU-Stillwater campus prior to kickoff of the OSU vs. Iowa State football game. A limited number of combo tickets that include the tailgate and the game will be available for $80; tailgate-only tickets will be $15. The game will be streamed in the Student Excellence Center on the first floor of the Advanced Technology Research Center for those not wanting to attend the game. To purchase tickets, email EWB public relations officer Stephen Ziske at Stephen.ziske@okstate.edu. Donations can be made at osugiving.com/EWB.

And that’s for just one meal. Water gathering can take four or more hours a day. Travel to and from water sources includes trudging across unpaved terrain; returning, there’s up to 50 pounds of water (six gallons) strapped to one’s back. Often, dirty water is taken from surface sources.

Future Plans OSU’s Engineers Without Borders chapter is planning its trips for the next four years. The total for all the trips will be $135,000, and donations are welcome. STOVE IMPLEMENTATION

POST-MONITORING TRIP (for both

TRIP | $30,000

trips listed above) | $25,000

WATER WELL AND FILTERS ASSESSMENT TRIP | $25,000

30

THE SOLUTION

In spring 2017, EWB plans to install stoves in three Santa Rosa schools. After

For more information on the student group, visit ewb-osu.okstate.edu.

MONITORING TRIP (for both trips

listed above) | $30,000

FA L L 2 0 16

p30-31_ewob.indd 30

9/20/16 10:41 AM


CHILDREN IN SANTA ROSA WILL HAVE AN IMPROVED QUALIT Y OF LIFE THROUGH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NEW STOVES AND WATER WELLS.

A CURRENT WATER SOURCE IN SANTA ROSA, GUATEMAL A.

31 STOVES ARE INADEQUATE, REQUIRING SIGNIFICANT TIME TO HEAT FOOD. SMOKE INHAL ATION AND BACK STRAIN ARE ALSO PROBLEMS CAUSED BY THE CURRENT STOVES.

CEAT’S ENGINEERING WITHOUT BORDERS STUDENT GROUP IS DEDICATED TO USING ENGINEERING TO IMPROVE LIVES.

IN SANTA ROSA, GUATEMAL A, RESIDENTS NEED IMPROVED STOVES AND WATER WELLS.

p30-31_ewob.indd 31

9/20/16 10:41 AM


CEAT Student Organizations AEI Chris Maxwell Provides timely technical information, professional advocacy, continuing education and

American Institute of Architecture Students

American Society of Mechanical Engineers

Cameron Patterson

Michael Reed

pcam@okstate.edu

michael.reed10@okstate.edu

opportunities to excel in their architectural

Promotes excellence in architectural

Promotes ethics and fellowship among

engineering careers.

education, training and practice, and fosters

mechanical engineering students.

an appreciation of architecture and related

Alpha Epsilon Danielle Bellmer danielle.bellmer@okstate.edu Honorary organization recognizes outstanding agricultural, food and biological engineering students.

Alpha Omega Epsilon

disciplines.

American Institute of Chemical Engineers

Professional and social sorority for women in engineering and technical sciences.

Alpha Pi Mu Recognizes academic excellence and promotes scholarly activities related to industrial engineering education and fosters

American Society of Mechanical Engineers Technology Richard Beier

Professional Student Government Association.

Chi Epsilon Lauren Pate

(faculty)

lauren.c.pate@okstate.edu

Serves OSU students, especially chemical

Provides an understanding of the mechanical

Recognizes scholastic achievement in civil

engineers, and provides a place where they

engineering industry.

and architectural engineering.

American Society of Safety Engineers

Concrete Canoe

can come together outside of class.

American Society for Quality

Qingsheng Wang qingsheng.wang@okstate.edu

Concretecanoe@okstate.edu Gives students the opportunity to work independently and develop skills that are

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

(faculty)

Adam McKay

events.

Construction Management Society

Architectural Engineering Institute

eli.herzog@okstate.edu

cultural, food and biological systems through networking with industry professionals.

Bonnie Arnold bonnie.arnold@okstate.edu

Cory Hopcus

American Society of Civil Engineers

chopcus@okstate.edu

Jacob Hoak

engineers on campus and preparing students

jhoak@okstate.edu

for their careers.

Alaskan Natives in engineering, science and

Provides a communication link between

other related technology-based disciplines.

students of civil engineering and their professional society.

sought in the workplace.

Founded in 1911 as the United Association of Casualty Inspectors in the wake of tragic

ajmckay@okstate.edu

faculty.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

student groups, specifically the Graduate and

patrick.williamson@okstate.edu

Acquaints students with engineering in agri-

Recruits and retains Native Americans and

Promotes the professional development via its programs and its relations with other

rick.beier@okstate.edu

social interaction between students and

American Indian Science and Engineering Society

Samyukta Koteeswaran samyukta.koteeswaran@okstate.edu

Patrick Williamson

Megan Henderson megan.henderson@okstate.edu

Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Association

Social and professional society aimed at creating a community among architectural

Eli Herzog

Promotes the success of students in construction.

Construction Specifications Institute Elizabeth Williams elizabeth.m.williams@okstate.edu

Architecture Students Teaching Elementary Kids Suzanna Bilbeisi

Promotes the integration of construction, architecture and engineering through extracurricular activities, networking with local practicing professionals and more.

Shawn Parsons

American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers

Educates elementary children about aspects

Cowboy Motorsports

shawn.m.parsons@okstate.edu

Omer Sarfraz

of architecture and art, strengthens camara-

Carson Brian

sarfraz@okstate.edu

derie among students of the OSU School of

carson.brian@okstate.edu

OSU aerospace engineering students

Promotes the sciences of heating, refrigerat-

Architecture and develops leadership.

and enhances members’ professional

ing and air-conditioning.

Encourages and facilitates activities of

suzanne.bilbeisi@okstate.edu (faculty)

Design competition geared toward providing undergraduate students with experience

development.

CEAT Student Council

designing and building a quarter-scale vehicle.

John Hiett

32

john.hiett@okstate.edu Represents students of the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology.

FA L L 2 0 16

p32-33_StdntOrg .indd 32

9/20/16 12:31 AM


Cowboy Waterworks

Freedom by Designs

Vidhya Venugopal

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers

Institute For Operations Research and Management Science

vidhya.venugopal@okstate.edu

July Perez

Spreads awareness and promote automation

Stimulates and develops minority student

and control systems as a discipline at OSU

interests in science, technology, engineering

leadership among its members through

Uttara Tipnis

and aims to provide professional understand-

and mathematics; also creates and sponsors

participation in branch activities and

uttara.tipnis@okstate.edu

ing to coursework, bridging academics and

events that help students focus on academics,

industry.

service and community outreach.

Pi Tau Sigma

Society of Petroleum Engineers, Oklahoma State University

Alec Cannon alec.cannon@okstate.edu Promotes public awareness and education of water quality and water power, develops

competes in ASABE environmental design competition.

Engineers Without Borders Scott Gallaway austin.gallaway@okstate.edu Works to improve the quality and length of life for others around the world.

Interdisciplinary branch of math, engineering and science that applies analytical methods to make better decisions.

Alexandra Martin

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers

supports developmental activities, develops

George Scheets

leadership and citizenship among members.

Joseph Austin joseph.austin@okstate.edu Nationally recognized honor society promotes scholarship, community and service in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Educates students and interested parties on aspects of electrical and computer engineering.

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Technology

Zachary Willard zachary.willard@okstate.edu Provides students with opportunities in public service, academic and professional development and social interaction with other

Institute of Industrial Engineers Connor Mojo connor.mojo@okstate.edu Professional society that serves the needs of

Solomon Sanchez solomon.sanchez@okstate.edu Aims to produce well-rounded engineers with

SAE BAJA

the ability to apply their skill sets to the oil and gas industry.

Carson Depew Carsowd@okstate.edu Provides students with a challenging project that involves planning and manufacturing tasks found during the introduction of a new product to the consumer-industrial market.

Society of Women Engineers Grace Harrell grace.harrell@okstate.edu Encourages women to consider science and

Zachary Langley zachary.langley@okstate.edu

Fire Protection Society

Fosters high ideals in engineering professions,

george.scheets@okstate.edu (faculty)

Eta Kappa Nu

OSU Automation

technology fields, especially engineering, and

SAE Formula Racing

assists men and women in leadership and

Kristen McKinney

professional skills.

kristen.mckinney11@okstate.edu Automotive design team that designs and manufactures a quarter-scale race car every year and competes against other FSAE teams in several international competitions.

Tau Beta Pi Joshua Sorenson joshua.sorenson@okstate.edu

students in the Fire Protection and Safety

industrial engineers. Student officers lead the

Honors the best engineers and fosters

Program.

OSU IIE chapter, advised by a faculty member

culture within engineering colleges, forging

from the School of Industrial Engineering.

Firefighter Combat Challenge

Mercury Robotics

Shane Drury

Nathan Lea

Educates members about the fire service.

nathan.lea@okstate.edu

Fluid Power Society

National Society of Black Engineers

Houston Snow,

Skylar Little

houstbs@okstate.edu

skylar.little@okstate.edu

Professional organization for engineers

Assists black engineering, technology

interested in fluid power.

and architecture students in their college careers to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically and succeed professionally.

Omega Chi Epsilon Josh Cole

Student Association of Fire Investigators Alexander Cooper alex.cooper@okstate.edu Unites public officials, students and private persons engaged in fire investigation and the control of arson.

33

relationships between engineers.

Tau Sigma Delta Spencer Wilson spencer.wilson@okstate.edu Honor society for students who have completed five semesters of the architecture

Society of Fire Protection Engineers Virginia Charter

curriculum and are in the top 20 percent of their class entering the School of Architecture.

virginia.charter@okstate.edu

Theta Tau

(faculty)

James Higgins

Maintains a high ethical standard among

jim.higgins@okstate.edu

its members and fosters fire protection

National professional co-ed engineering

engineering education.

fraternity develops and maintains a high standard of professional interest among its members, and unites them in fraternal fellowship.

josh.cole@okstate.edu Recognizes and promotes high scholarship, original investigation and professional service in chemical engineering.

p32-33_StdntOrg .indd 33

9/20/16 12:31 AM


muse

BY BRITTANY BELLI

Architecture students create nomadic art studio for museum Look but don’t touch.

T

hat’s the motto of most museums and art galleries. However, the museLAB exhibit at the OSU Museum of Art allows visitors to (literally) get their hands on a whole new form of interactive architecture.

“I was approached by Carrie Kim, curator of education and public programming at the museum, to create a nomadic and transmuting art-making studio that ingeniously supports the objectives of the museum’s education program,” says Paolo Sanza, registered architect and associate professor of architecture. “The spatial constraints of the museum are such that the education program is void of a dedicated space. The idea, therefore, was to create a structure able to adapt to the constant change in setting as well as able to be easily transported outside of the museum, into the community, so that people of different ages would have a place to interact and create.” Sanza tasked his third-year architecture students to take on the challenge. Seventeen students in his architectural design studio class were divided into six teams, where they crafted designs of multi-purpose structures.

34

“The students had to create a structure that was light and transportable, and also had to accommodate different audiences and different activities,” says Sanza. “For example, one structure that both adults and children could interact

with both horizontally and vertically in activities such as drawing, sculpting or weaving.”

structure be more than just a plain table. It was a challenge that drove our design, set it apart and made it unique and exciting for us.”

Once the designs were finished, each team presented their ideas to the museum staff. The staff then voted on a winning design to be constructed and housed semi-permanently inside the museum.

The museLAB exhibit offers multiple two 38x84-inch frames connected by wood hinges and accommodates either a rotating table or two rotating table supports and a slotted wall. The table can be placed at three different heights to cater to multiple audiences. Each rotating table has two distinctive surfaces dedicated to a particular activity: One face accommodates multiple containers for hands-on creative undertakings, while the other is a Lego surface. The rotation of the table also allows for further transformation; when the table is locked vertically, it becomes a wall surface that promotes new activities.

The team of Cameron Roesler, Anna Eastridge and Evelyn Junco de la Puente had the winning design. “It was different than anything we’ve ever done before, and it gave us a lot of freedom to do whatever we wanted,” says Eastridge. The students paid utmost attention to details, such as the space for the structure, the needs of their client and the interests of their audiences. “We spent a lot of time thinking about kids’ activities, unconventional ways to do activities and ways to interact and play with surfaces and architecture in general,” says de la Puente. “We were also trying to keep all of Professor Sanza’s requirements in mind, as well as the museum’s aspirations, and we had to keep it functional.” The multi-purpose aspect of the project challenged the team to think outside of the box. “If you think about it, even if it’s extremely functional, it may not be very exciting for a museum to simply provide a table for art-making activities,” says Roesler. “We had to think about how to actually make a

The students worked with Sanza to bring their design to life. They 3D-printed many of the pieces in the architecture labs, finishing the first full module in early March. The whole process took about six months. “I learned that attention to detail matters, and it’s the little details that make the whole project better,” says de la Puente. “If you work with the right people, you can accomplish so much.” While the museLAB exhibit mainly resides at the museum, it also has a nomadic aspect. “There are plans to lend out the museLAB and its components to different departments at the university, the arts school and other extension programs and activities around the state,” says Sanza. “Because of its nomadic nature, it will find a home where it needs to find a home.”

FA L L 2 0 16

p34-35_MUSE.indd 34

9/20/16 12:30 AM


35

T WO FRAMES ARE CONNECTED BY WOOD HINGES AND ACCOMMODATE EITHER A ROTATING TABLE OR T WO ROTATING TABLE SUPPORTS AND A SLOT TED WALL.

p34-35_MUSE.indd 35

9/20/16 12:30 AM


JOSHUA RAMSEY

Working on a Medical Miracle BY MARKETA SOUCKOVA

OSU team striving to create new drug delivery system

A

team with OSU faculty members could end up revolutionizing the treatment of many diseases.

Joshua D. Ramsey, Ph.D., associate professor in the school of Chemical Engineering at OSU, is part of the team doing research for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to develop a new drug delivery system. “It is very exciting,” says Rob Whiteley, school head and Bartlett Chair of chemical engineering. “The fact that they are the first to achieve nanoparticle delivery internal to a blood cell is exciting and will have enormous impact on the field and on the School of Chemical Engineering.”

36

Drugs that treat diseases or add protection from chemical warfare, tend to be cleared quickly from the body. OSU researchers recently designed a drugencapsulating nanoparticle capable of entering red blood cells. “We started looking at ways to design a nanoparticle vehicle that could transport a bioscavenger protein to the body,” says Ramsey. “And can keep it there for around 100 days.” Current efforts are focused on using this innovative delivery approach to protect soldiers and first responders from

chemical weapons like sarin, a nerve agent that’s among the most toxic chemical warfare agents. “This project has been a great opportunity for me to learn from excellent researchers across multiple disciplines,” says Nicholas Flynn, a doctoral student in chemical engineering. “I am excited to be part of a team that is working toward applying our research to solve a complex biomedical problem.” “We are proud to join forces with OSU and its imaginative investigators for the good of our country, our military service members and our fellow citizens,” says Brimijoin.

Ramsey is working with Carey Pope, Regents professor and Sitlington Chair in the Toxicology Center for Veterinary Health Sciences; Jing Pope, research associate professor of physiological sciences; Ashish Ranjan, assistant professor in physiological sciences; Steve Hartson, associate research scientist in biochemistry and molecular biology; and Stephen Brimijoin, professor and chair in pharmacology at the Mayo Clinic. CAREY POPE (FROM LEFT), JOSHUA RAMSEY,

“It’s been a great project because of the expertise that all of the different people bring to the table,” says Ramsey.

ASHISH RANJAN AND STEVE HARTSON AT TEND AN ANNUAL DTRA PROJECT MEETING WITH JING POPE (NOT PICTURED).

FA L L 2 0 16

p36-37_DTRA.indd 36

9/20/16 12:37 AM


The DTRA funded this research with a $3.3 million grant in August 2013, to cover the five OSU faculty members together with Brimijoin from the Mayo Clinic, and to cover all related expenses to the research. The OSU team has recently begun testing on mice. The DTRA’s grant has provided funding for four years. “My hopes are that, in the end, we will show something that works well in the animals and is very safe,” says Ramsey. Experiments done on mice are executed in the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, mostly done and led by Jing Pope and Ranjan. All animal-related procedures were approved and carried out under the guidelines of the OSU Animal Care and Use Committee. Ramsey and his team in chemical engineering labs work with blood collected and provided by researchers from CVHS. They run in vitro tests to determine whether the nanoparticles attach to red blood cells and if they internalize within the cells. “I am very excited about bringing my experience with material chemistry into this research project,” says Rangika Hikkaduwa Koralege, a post-doctoral student in chemical engineering. “And the great opportunity to learn more in-depth skills in biomedical research.” Researchers are using a bioscavenger protein butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, a circulating protein that can bind to toxicants before they distribute to target issues) within a polymer (a large molecule composed of many repeated subunits) nanoparticle that is designed to target and internalize within red blood cells. The BChE protein is produced and supplied by Brimijoin and the Mayo Clinic.

p36-37_DTRA.indd 37

37 NICHOL AS FLYNN AND RANGIK A HIKK ADUWA KORALEGE IN THE L AB.

Intravenous administration of BChE has been used in humans since the 1950s to treat organophosphorus intoxications and has been shown to be a stable, effective and safe bioscavenger against the most toxic organophosphorus-based nerve agents. A drug-encapsulating nanoparticle system capable of entering red blood cells and extending the circulation time to approximately 100 days has great

potential. In the future, treatment of blood-specific diseases, such as malaria, as well as many other diseases could be vastly improved. The potential of this research is enormous and will have a great impact not only on chemical engineering and other OSU areas involved in this research, but on the United States as a whole.

9/20/16 12:37 AM


Tiny Tech Leads to Big Results Computer engineering program makes a large impact from small components

F 38

“However, it’s a very popular ive electrical and computer engineering program; about a third of the students in our department faculty members are choose computer engineering.” making huge technological advancements with very small The program started with 42 students in 2006 and now components. enrolls close to 150 each year. Drs. James Stine, Jingtong Hu, The computer engineering Weihua Sheng, Carl Latino program offers an underand Yanmin Gong make up graduate degree accredited by the powerhouse team behind the Accreditation Board for the Computer Engineering Engineering and Technology Research Program at Inc. A graduate program that Oklahoma State University. includes master’s and doctorate options is planned for “Computer engineering is a relatively new major within the the future. ECE department,” says James Stine, Ph.D. and ECE professor.

BY BRITTANY BELLI

Yanmin Gong, Ph.D. and ECE “My hope is that it becomes a professor, focuses on computer top-tier engineering program networks and security. within the United States and the world, and that we receive “Students can get a lot of experecognition in promoting a rience in embedded systems great degree program for the and software engineering, state of Oklahoma,” says and since there are a lot of Stine. “It all starts with our students, making sure that they security and privacy issues in such systems, my research understand engineering and fits in well with the program,” computer engineering concepts says Gong. “My research and and making sure that they courses will better prepare our become successful.” students for the job market.” Computer engineering is simiWeihua Sheng, associate ECE lar to electrical engineering, but it includes in-depth instruc- professor, also combines his research with the computer tion in large-scale integration, engineering curriculum. embedded systems, software engineering and computer architecture.

“I teach the embedded computer system course, and I am introducing topics such as mobile computing, cloud computing,

FA L L 2 0 16

p38-39_CmptrEngnr.indd 38

9/20/16 1:00 AM


Hu uses turning on the air make driving these robots a conditioning in his house real challenge. These competifrom a remote location, such tions have, and continue to Sheng also developed lab exerencourage, the creation of new as his office on campus, as cises using an “educational an example. designs, strategies and algoRoomba” vacuum. rithms, and open up exciting “We need to keep tabs on new areas of research.” “It doesn’t have the vacuum information and the physical or suction part, but the In addition to robotics, embed- property of things,” says Hu. design is very similar to the “We can connect everything to “There are numerous mechani- ded systems and VLSI are real Roomba robot,” says sensors and small computers, also key components to the cal and computer engineering Sheng. “We use it as a mobile computer-engineering program. connect the smaller computers aspects involved in the robot platform to teach students to a central computer through challenge, making it an excelhow to develop a smart robot Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and lent interdisciplinary exercise,” Jingtong Hu, ECE assistant professor, received one and teach concepts such as then we can control humidity, says Latino. “These robot grant from the NSF totalinterfacing, control and C temperature, motion and many systems consist of motion plating $190,835 and one grant programming.” other things.” forms capable of performing from OSU totaling $10,000 missions, avoiding or overSheng also received a $725,000 coming obstacles while being The possibilities and opporto research how embedgrant from the National tunities in the computer ded systems inside weardriven from a great distance.” Science Foundation for his engineering research program able devices, such as Fitbits, research combining robots and OSU hosted the seventh annual can be powered through are endless. smart homes. energy harvesting from the Mercury Robot Competition “We always need more and environment. in April. The competition “I’m trying to develop a robot want more information to has become an international in a smart home to take care Hu also received an NSF grant make sense of the data we sensation, with universities in of the elderly who live alone in Mexico, Brazil and Columbia have, and we want to predict totaling $249,999 to research their homes,” explains Sheng. things,” says Hu. reconfigurable computing. hosting competitions as well. “Since they live alone, the goal is to monitor their vital “The Mercury Robot Challenge “Sometimes, when we’re doing “That’s what drives our research. As long as we have one task, you want to adapt signs and their behavior using is important because it opens the desire to find out more, or change the functionality of wearable and environmental up areas of research,” says there will always be opportunithe hardware according to the sensors. Then, if something Latino. “The drivers of these ties for research.” change of the environment,” urgent happens, the robot can robots must be located over 50 he says. intervene, come to the rescue miles away, so data commuand contact the caregivers.” nication and video lag times mobile health and big data,” says Sheng.

Carl Latino, Ph.D. and associate ECE professor, is also familiar with the robotics aspect of computer engineering. He created the Mercury Robot Challenge in 2010, which has been gaining popularity ever since.

39

p38-39_CmptrEngnr.indd 39

9/20/16 1:00 AM


Deep Roots

BY CHELSEA ROBINSON

OSU’s Fire Council builds off rich history

E

XCELLENCE IN FIRE SERVICE AND TRAINING HAS BEEN SYNONYMOUS WITH OSU SINCE THE 1930S. OVER THE COURSE OF NEARLY A CENTURY, THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY HAS BEEN A KEY COMPONENT OF THAT RICH HISTORY. TODAY, THE COLLEGE IS PROPELLING THE FIRE INDUSTRY INTO THE 21ST CENTURY THROUGH A NEW, COLL ABORATIVE GROUP OF LEADING FIRE EXPERTS FROM THROUGHOUT THE OSU SYSTEM — THE OSU FIRE COUNCIL.

Assistant Dean of Outreach and Extension for CEAT Ed Kirtley led the initiative and served as chairman for the council’s inaugural year of 2015-2016. He currently plays a key role in developing and implementing the group’s goals to fulfill the university’s land-grant mission. Kirtley says the council has a unified approach to leverage the reputation and research capacity of OSU in a magnitude not seen since the early years of the university’s first fire programs. The council’s goals are structured into three pillars — education, research and outreach. The OSU Fire Council focuses on how to strengthen the existing fire education opportunities through a combined curriculum and a “Start Orange, Finish Orange” strategy.

40

“We’re promoting the ‘Start Orange, Finish Orange’ concept that allows a student to progress from a firefighter certificate to a Ph.D., all within the OSU system,” says Lynn Wojcik, OSU-OKC Public Safety department head and OSU Fire Council marketing committee chair. “No other university can offer a student the opportunity to go from a Firefighter 1 certificate to a doctorate in a firerelated field. That is unique to OSU.”

The council also participates in collaborative research projects, which include a broad range of subject matter. For example, civil engineers from CEAT are developing a tool that fire ground commanders can use to access the structural integrity of steel buildings. This project will enhance the safety and efficiency of firefighting tactics by allowing firefighters to determine when and for how long they can be in a steel structure before the risk of it collapsing is too high. Another ongoing project involves OSU faculty from the College of Human Sciences’ Apparel Design department working with CEAT’s outreach Fire

Service Training and academic Fire Protection and Safety Engineering Technology program. The team is working on bulletproof turnout gear and other materials for firefighters who find themselves in hostile situations. They have presented the idea to stakeholders in the manufacturing industry and are awaiting a response to put their designs into action. The impact of these research projects ties directly into the council’s third pillar — outreach. OSU is home to several leading fire service entities, including Fire Protection Publications, the world’s leading producer of firefighting education materials; the International Fire Service

FA L L 2 0 16

p40-41_Fire.indd 40

9/20/16 1:01 AM


Accreditation Congress, the sole accrediting organization for fire curriculum, and Fire Service Training, the most prominent training organization in the state. All of these units are part of CEAT’s Outreach and Extension programs. Kirtley says the council is ultimately a group of problem solvers. The industry comes directly to OSU seeking solutions to real-world issues, and the council is dedicated to working with those industry partners to find well-rounded answers. “The nice thing about the council is that we are able to work with synergy without giving up our individual program’s identity,” says Kirtley. “We can take a problem presented to us, determine the players we need to address it and put them together under a single project to find the best solution.”

OSU’s fire service programs Fire service education is steadily growing across three OSU campuses. The following programs are currently enrolling: OSU-STILLWATER Fire Protection and Safety Engineering Technology — Bachelor of Science Fire and Emergency Management Administration — Master of Science Fire and Emergency Management Administration — Doctorate of Philosophy Fire Ecology and Management — Bachelor of Science OSU-OKC Municipal Fire Protection — Associate of Applied Science Emergency Responder Administration — Bachelor of Technology OSU-TULSA Forensic Sciences — Master of Science Forensic Sciences, Arson and Explosives Investigation — Master of Science

The group operates as a whole with experts adding their expertise and perspective to every topic. However, many say Kirtley’s leadership has been imperative to the group’s success. “Dean Kirtley’s vision is what brought the group together,” says Wojcik. “His motivation is infectious, and it’s easy to pick up on his vision, adopt it and implement it because it’s positive and forward-thinking.” “It’s humbling to be part of the fire heritage at OSU,” says Kirtley. “I never thought we would be where we are today when we started, and I never thought we would have the excitement that we have about it.”

41 “No

other university can offer a student

the opportunity to go from a Firefighter 1 certificate to a doctorate in a fire-related field. That is unique to OSU.” — LYNN WOJCIK, OSU-OKC PUBLIC SAFET Y DEPARTMENT HEAD

Each member of the council plays a critical part in the success of the group and, as a whole, it continues its momentum into the future of the fire service industry. For more information, visit ceat.okstate.edu/osufirecouncil.

p40-41_Fire.indd 41

9/20/16 1:01 AM


Tulsa’s True Green Space

BY JANET F. REEDER

There’s more than meets the eye to urban center

O

VER THE LAST DECADE, TULSA’S GUTHRIE GREEN HAS BEEN TRANSFORMED FROM A PARKING LOT INTO A CROWN JEWEL OF AN URBAN GARDEN AND PERFORMANCE SPACE IN THE BRADY ARTS DISTRICT.

The park has been nationally recognized for its rejuvenation with the 2013 Henry Bellmon Sustainability award and the Brownfields for Energy award from Brownfield Renewal magazine. However, it’s not the awards on the shelf but what lies under the green space that makes Guthrie Green truly special.

42

A Rygan High Performance Geo-Xchange (HPGX) system provides 600 tons of low-cost, low-emission heating and cooling for more than 80,000 square feet that formerly housed the Tulsa Paper Co. warehouse and is now home to various art installations including the Zarrow Center for Art and Education and the Woody Guthrie Center. The system utilizes 120 geothermal boreholes deep beneath the park that

circulate fluid through Climatemaster and WaterFurnace manufactured heat pumps. OSU alumnus Lane Lawless is the co-founder of Broken Arrow-based Rygan Corp., whose HPGX pipe utilizes proprietary high-strength, low-weight and low-thermal resistance composite materials that yield unsurpassed performance. HPGX heat exchange fields require less than half the land space and drilling of older generation u-tube fields while delivering superior efficiency. “Rygan uses specifically engineered piping that is stronger with a thinner wall that lowers thermal resistance and lowers thermal mass,” says Lawless. Special resins incorporated into the body

of the pipe create better heat exchange than anything else currently used, he says. “It is also a bigger vessel, so we can go deeper without the penalty of pressure drop,” says Lawless. “We give the end user the ability to change design and reduce the footprint of the geo-exchange field.” The downtown location of Guthrie Green came with extreme space restrictions for a geo-exchange borefield. The HPGX system was selected for its ability to work in a limited space. A traditional system would have required more than double the drilling, land space and pumping watts for comparable thermal performance. “The real story is about the highperformance heat exchangers used by Rygan,” says John Turley, president of the IGSHPA board of directors.

FA L L 2 0 16

p42-43_IGSHPA.indd 42

9/20/16 12:36 AM


temperatures in the 70s and 80s in August without a cooling tower?” In addition to an $8 million investment from the George Kaiser Family Foundation, a $2.5 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Demand Reduction grant and a $200,000 Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality Brownfield Development grant helped fund the project. “We wanted to establish the historical Brady Village as a model for the effective use of sustainable energy alternatives in Tulsa, and this was undoubtedly achieved through the installation of the geothermal field,” says Stanton Doyle, a senior program officer with the foundation.

as it can substantially reduce costs for local residents and business owners,” says Doyle. “There are a lot of positives about this project,” says Lawless. “The technology enabled a geo-based solution for a metropolitan venue which would have otherwise been off limits due to space constraints. “We are now taking the geo solution where it has never gone before, into the condensed metropolitan and urban areas. We are giving more people the ability to choose geothermal.” This content was originally published in the December 2015 issue of Geo Outlook magazine. It has been adapted by Drew Slattery to fit this publication.

THE TULSA SKYLINE FRAMES GUTHRIE GREEN FROM EVERY ANGLE.

Turley, who worked with Jackson Geothermal at the time, handled the trench, manifolding and vault connections on the Guthrie Green project. Now with Middleton Geothermal Services, LLC, he says the project could not feasibly have been done on such a small footprint with HDPE loops.

Doyle says the project is meant to foster ground-source heat pump system installation at large in Oklahoma and to support businesses in the state that provide expertise in the design, installation and manufacturing of this equipment. “Geothermal is a cost-effective way to heat and cool a space, and it makes sense, particularly in this urban district,

The International Ground Source Heat Pump Association is a non-profit, member-driven organization established in 1987 as an outreach unit of CEAT to advance ground source heat pump technology on local, state, national and international levels. Its members include companies, professionals and end users. Its headquarters are on the OSU campus in Stillwater.

43

Rygan products claim to provide the most efficient heat transfer of any closed system available. Pipe and chemically fused joints are three times stronger than traditional HDPE pipe, have less flow restriction and pressure drop that equates to lower pump energy use. The smaller ground exchange field requirement and less site disruption also reduce installation time. “Even in the heat wave of 2012 the cooling tower didn’t come online to assist the system,” says Lawless. “How many commercial projects in Oklahoma can say they deliver entering water

p42-43_IGSHPA.indd 43

RYAN BRENNY, A SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER WITH FISCHER CONTRACTORS LLC (LEFT) AND L ANE L AWLESS OF RYGAN WORK WITH RYGAN’S HIGH PERFORMANCE GEO XCHANGE PIPE.

9/20/16 12:36 AM


Extracting Oil NPDC helps project to enhance the value of nuisance eastern redcedar trees Over the decades, the invasive eastern redcedar tree has taken over more and more land in Oklahoma. Much of the managed eastern redcedar is burned, turned into mulch or fashioned into posts, but researchers are still looking for any value-added products that can be made from it.

44

The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry (ODAFF) and the New Product Development Center (NPDC) at OSU collaborated on a possible solution: to continuously extract oil from eastern redcedar.

annual control of eastern redcedar is a $15 million investment, with $7.5 million from landowners and $7.5 million from the USDA Environmental Quality Incentives Program.

“The NPDC aims to assist Oklahoma communities by providing value-added engi“The goal of the project with neering and business services,” the NPDC was to create a says Robert Taylor, NPDC unique continuous extraction director. “We employ a team process that would make it of engineering and business more viable to get oil out of professionals, coupled with the eastern redcedar tree and undergraduate and graduate still have byproducts availstudent interns, to identify able to produce energy from and solve challenges that the remaining fiber,” says Jim improve the economic, and Reese, Oklahoma secretary sometimes societal, well-being of agriculture. “We wanted of Oklahoma.” to make an existing process more valuable and effective Approximately 12.6 million for Oklahoma.” acres in Oklahoma are considered forested. Eastern With support from ODAFF, redcedar makes up 600,000 NPDC design engineers acres with an estimated total developed a model for of 462 million trees. The

BY ERIN LARSON

extracting oil from eastern redcedar. Terri Ventress, NPDC-Stillwater senior design engineer, analyzed an oil extraction process using redcedar shavings to produce a value-added product. Ventress began the process by producing a batch experiment to test the temperature and residence times. She found that up to 2 percent of a cedar tree’s weight can be extracted for oil. The batch of cedar shavings was bathed in steam. From the steam, the oil rose to the surface and was collected. The process was adjusted by the dependent variables such as temperature profile and residence time. Each batch and test run provided a comparison of chemical analysis to improve the concept.

FA L L 2 0 16

p44-45_NPDC.indd 44

9/26/16 4:05 PM


To complete the project, Ventress teamed with Tyler Worden, design engineer at NPDC-Tulsa. Worden provided mechanical engineering guidance, additional student support and the facilities for this project with his team of NPDC undergraduate interns. “The facilities at the Helmerich Research Center at OSU-Tulsa offer diverse resources for the NPDC,” says Ventress. “With wet lab capabilities including reverse osmosis water, NPDC-Tulsa saw the opportunity to move forward with this project.”

Throughout the project, NPDC interns were heavily involved in the development and experimentation processes. Sean Freeman, a mechanical engineer senior at OSU-Tulsa, was instrumental in designing the support and holders for the project with a 3D printer, producing the exact size and shape specifications needed. Freeman says he has found value in working with projects that provide diverse skill development and design. “Taking a conceptual idea and going through the hurdles provided me with software and mechanical experience,” he says. “I have a better feel

for what working as a professional engineer will be like.” For the eastern redcedar oil extraction project, Freeman and other NPDC interns analyzed and modified the speed, power and size of the process to determine the best result. “Continuous learning is always the objective,” says Ventress, who has worked with many student interns and has seen vast improvement of their personal and technical skills. The students working on the oil extraction process, and other projects at the NPDC, are exposed to realworld challenges. Through

NPDC DESIGN ENGINEERS DEVELOPED A SIMPLISTIC MODEL OF A CONCEPT FOR EX TRACTING OIL FROM EASTERN REDCEDAR.

client projects and design experimentation, each student gains hands-on learning experiences that go beyond the classroom. “No student at the NPDC is a specialist in all areas of engineering,” says Worden. “As new clients come through, students become familiar with different processes and designs. They turn themselves into specialists with the help of our design engineers and the client, who are their mentors.” The experience prepares students for future employment and exposes them to the professional engineering atmosphere. “The student value behind the connection with the client and the project is fueled by their drive, interest and passion,” says Worden. The eastern redcedar oil extraction project exemplifies how the NPDC can tackle challenges that affect Oklahoma, and it showcases the collaboration between ODAFF and the NPDC.

45

“The work performed at the NPDC was valuable and costeffective,” says Reese. “The intellectual investment adds to the future of the project. The next step is to refine the process to advance it further.”

p44-45_NPDC.indd 45

9/20/16 1:02 AM


Fire Service Training begins swift-water rescue program

46

Protecting the First Responders BY JASON LOUTHAN

FA L L 2 0 16

p46-47_FST.indd 46

9/26/16 4:08 PM


TRAINING AT OKLAHOMA CITY’S NEW $45.2 MILLION WHITEWATER RAFTING AND KAYAKING CENTER, RIVERSPORT RAPIDS.

W

ATER HAS ALWAYS BEEN A CRUCIAL FRIEND IN DEALING WITH FIREFIGHTING OPERATIONS, BUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THAT WATER

TURNS AGAINST YOU? AS EMERGENCY RESPONDERS, FIREFIGHTERS RESPOND TO MEDICAL, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND TECHNICAL

JASON ERIC FARLEY Capt. Jason Farley was a 20-year

RESCUE INCIDENTS AS WELL AS FIRES. SWIFT-WATER RESCUE INCIDENTS HAVE

veteran of the Claremore, Okla., fire

BECOME AN EVER-PRESSING ISSUE, AS EXEMPLIFIED BY THE EVENTS THAT CAUSED

department.

THE DEATH OF CLAREMORE, OKLA., FIREFIGHTER JASON FARLEY IN MAY 2015. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY’S FIRE SERVICE TRAINING IS BEGINNING A NEW PROGRAM TO TRAIN FIRST RESPONDERS TO HELP IN THESE DIFFICULT SITUATIONS.

FST is joining forces with the Oklahoma City Fire Department and Riversport Rapids began hosting swift-water rescue training for first responders in the summer of 2016. The new courses meet the rigorous job performance requirements of the National Fire Protection Association 1006 and 1670 training and response standards. The training will take place at the new Riversport Rapid facility in Oklahoma City. “This facility is remarkable,” says Erick Reynolds, FST director. “Oklahoma fire responders are finally able to train in an environment that closely simulates what

p46-47_FST.indd 47

can be faced in the real world, but with safety measures in place, to allow for safe and effective training.” FST began instructor training in May with the Riversport staff. The Swiftwater Technician Level I and II courses will teach participants how to assemble as a team during incidents, assess moving water conditions, and efficiently and effectively perform a swift-water rescue of a victim trapped in a moving current. FST looks to draw regional responders as well as those from Oklahoma to thi training.

His career and passion for the fire

47

service industry began when he was a teenager and worked as a volunteer firefighter at the Jollyville department near Austin, Texas. After that, he pursed his dream and graduated from Oklahoma State University with a bachelor’s degree in fire protection and safety engineering technology. Farley was a member of the Local 1077 of the International Association of Fire Fighters in association with the AFL-CIO. He was swept away by floodwaters while working a rescue operation on May 24, 2015. With the proper training available for firefighters, incidents like the one that took Farley’s life may be reduced.

9/20/16 12:35 AM


Outreach & Extension Outreach & Extension units of the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology bring Oklahoma State University to the community and make a difference in people’s lives with education, support and quality of life advancements.

Annually providing services to more than 60,000 people worldwide through the services of • Applications Engineering Program • Center for Local Government Technology • Fire Protection Publications • Fire Service Training • International Fire Service Accreditation Congress • International Ground Source Heat Pump Association • New Product Development Center • Professional Development • Web Handling Research Center

ceat.okstate.edu

48 FA L L 2 0 16

p48-49_Scholars.indd 48

9/20/16 10:44 AM


CEAT Scholars Program opens doors for students

T

HE CE AT S CH OL AR S PR OGR A M I S A M AJOR CO NTR IBU TO R TO T H E O S U’S CO LLEGE’S ABILIT Y TO RECRUIT OUTSTANDING STUDENTS.

The program admits 30 scholars each year who meet the minimum qualifications of a 31 ACT or 2060 SAT score and a 3.75 GPA. They receive $2,000 in scholarship money each year they remain in the program. The CEAT Scholars Program also engages mentors, creates global awareness and develops leaders through unique enrichment activities in culture, professional development, industry tours and community service. CEAT Scholars also receive travel opportunities. The CEAT Scholars Program is made possible by several scholarship funds and generous donors, such as the CEAT

p48-49_Scholars.indd 49

Fund, the Sherman E. Smith Family Endowed Scholarship and the I. Edward Lynch Endowed Scholarship. The I. Edward Lynch Endowed Scholarship supports CEAT Scholars who are studying electrical and computer engineering. A recent contribution to this fund has increased the number of CEAT Scholars for the upcoming academic year from 25 to 30. The past year started with a freshman CEAT Scholar retreat, where students assembled bicycles that were later donated to a local nonprofit. The CEAT Scholars participated in cultural events such as Rent at the Tulsa PAC

and Diwali Night at the Student Union. The CEAT Scholars also participate in an “Adulting 101” class about retirement plans and investments as well as an event called “Mocktails” that focuses on cocktail-hour business etiquette. CEAT Scholars took industry tours at Zeeco in Tulsa and Kicker in Stillwater. They served their community by helping build Habitat for Humanity homes in Stillwater. Sophomore CEAT Scholars visited Washington, D.C., touring the FBI education center, visiting the U.S. Naval Academy and meeting with Oklahoma Sens. James Inhofe and James Lankford. Junior CEAT Scholars visited China and Vietnam where they toured Google, received lectures from professors at

Southwest Jiatong University prior to visiting the National Laboratory for Rail Transit, visited the Duijangyan Irrigation Project, stopped at seven UNESCO sites and experienced an abundance of culture. To support the CEAT Scholars Program activities, direct your contribution to the CEAT Fund 26-65000. Also included in the CEAT Scholars Program activities are the W.W. Allen Scholars and W.W. Allen Boys and Girls Club Scholars Programs supported by Wayne Allen.

49

9/20/16 10:44 AM


W.W. Allen Scholars Program Elite award gives top students unique opportunities The W.W. Allen Scholars Program develops some of the nation’s top engineering graduates. This elite award includes more than $135,000 in scholarship, enrichment activities, professional development and national and international travel, followed by full tuition and housing for one year to pursue a Master of Philosophy degree at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. This unique opportunity truly distinguishes the program and is made possible from a generous donation by W. Wayne Allen, former chairman and CEO of Phillips Petroleum Co. Also developed by Mr. Allen, the W.W. Allen Boys and Girls Club National Scholars program was designed to benefit a person who was an active member of a Boys & Girls Club in high school. This

is an exclusive OSU scholarship program, awarded to one incoming freshman per year, with more than $75,000 in scholarship, enrichment activities, professional development and national and international travel. Allen was once a member of the Boys & Girls Club of Fort Smith, Ark. He also served as a member of its National Advisory Board, and he credits the Boys & Girls Club with providing him an unusual opportunity for personal growth. Both programs accelerate leadership and professional development, stimulate intellectual growth, develop interpersonal skills, develop career and cultural perspectives, and prepare graduates for a full awareness of global forces and opportunities.

Global competition is a reality for the nation’s leading industrial firms and a way of life for the intellectual leaders of those firms. Allen Scholars and Boys & Girls Club Scholars graduate fully prepared to walk into any organization with an understanding of the global marketplace and its impact on that industry and this country. Through these scholarship programs and annual meetings with these scholars, Mr. Allen has had an enormous impact on the students’ perspective and professional development and has brought great prestige and honor to himself, his family and to Oklahoma State University.

The members of these prestigious programs for the 2016-17 academic year include:

MADDIE HAWKINS Carrollton, Texas Sophomore Allen Scholar, Industrial ALEXIS VANCE

50

SAVANNAH ROBISCH

SEAN HALL

Engineering and Management with a

Fulshear, Texas

Wichita Falls, Texas

minor in Computer Science at OSU

Leawood, Kan.

Freshman Allen Scholar, Chemical

Freshman Boys & Girls Club Scholar,

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: CEAT Freshman

Freshman Allen Scholar, Chemical

engineering at OSU

Aerospace Engineering at OSU

Council, Freshman Representative

engineering at OSU

HS ACTIVITIES: Future Business

HS ACTIVITIES: 4-H LEGO robotics, studied

HS ACTIVITIES: Varsity girl’s golf team,

Leaders of America regional competition

aerospace engineering online through NASA

varsity speech and debate team and

and National Honor Society.

his junior year, member of the BGCA, and

equestrian club. National Honor Society

named the Citywide Youth of the Month

and Mu Alpha Theta Math Honor Society.

and the Southeast BGC Youth of the Year.

Council, SWE, Secretary and Historian for her residence hall Community Council, CEVA logistics as a student intern. She is also a National AP Scholar and a National Merit Commended Scholar.

FA L L 2 0 16

p50-51_AllnSchlrs.indd 50

9/20/16 12:32 AM


COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: in CEAT Student Council as the vice president of committees, Student Government as the treasurer, and FarmHouse Fraternity as the treasurer. This summer, he worked for Phillips66 as an environmental engineer. He is also a Wentz Research Scholar, working on mitigation of clathrate hydrates for a midstream petroleum application and PATRICK STEICHEN

was named a Top 10 Freshman at OSU.

Tulsa, Okla.

PHILIP HALPERN

SETH CLEARY

Tahlequah, Okla.

Lindsay, Okla.

Sophomore Allen Scholar, Mechanical

Senior Boys & Girls Club Scholar,

MS Allen Scholar, Master’s of Philosophy in

Engineering at OSU

Chemical Engineering with a minor in

Technology Policy at Cambridge University

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: CEAT Student

Petroleum Engineering at OSU

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: In the fall, he will

Council, Student Government Association,

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: He is an active

attend the University of Cambridge. He

CowboyThon philanthropy, and he served

member in the Greek community and

served in multiple capacities in his four

as a coach for the YMCA in the Stillwater

in several organizations on campus

years at OSU including with Student

community. He also directed and wrote for

including the American Institute of Chemical

Government Association, CEAT Student

several musical philanthropy shows at OSU.

Engineers and Society of Petroleum

Council, Student Alumni Board and ASABE.

RACHEL DAVIS Fort Smith, Ark. Senior Allen Scholar, Chemical

Engineers. He has had two internships in

He was named a Senior of Significance,

the oil and gas field and plans on pursuing

2016 Dean’s Most Outstanding Student,

a career in this field after graduation.

and ASABE Member of the Year.

MALLORY HOSEY

CLAY NEWTON

Heath, Texas

Choctaw, Okla.

Engineering with an emphasis in Pre-Medical Studies at OSU COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: SGA, CEAT Student Council, Mortar Board and Alpha Epsilon Delta. She serves as the national vice president of finance for NAESC, a national nonprofit dedicated to connecting engineer-

TYLER GOLDSMITH

ing student councils across the country. She

Texarkana, Texas

also works as an undergraduate research

Junior Allen Scholar, Chemical

assistant and has received multiple Niblack

Engineering at OSU

and Wentz grants and awards for her work.

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: Engineering intern at

Senior Boys & Girls Club Scholar,

MS Allen Scholar, Master’s of

Architectural Engineering with an

Philosophy in Advanced Chemical

group, received a Wentz research grant,

Entrepreneurship minor at OSU

Engineering at Cambridge University COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: He was involved

Trinity River Energy, undergraduate research as a member of the Aichele Research serves on the executive team of FarmHouse

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: CEAT Scholars

Fraternity as secretary and is an active

Executive Board, Student Council Executive

in the Navigators, CEAT Student Council,

member in CEAT Student Council. He was

Board and helping recruit incoming

CEAT Scholars and Student Foundation. He

freshman as a CEAT Ambassador. She

was also a member of Phi Kappa Phi, the

also named one of OSU’s Top 10 Freshmen.

JACQUELYN LANE Beulah, Col.

was involved in her sorority throughout the

National Society of Collegiate Scholars, the

past four years and has spent the last year

American Institute of Chemical Engineers

teaching as a statics teaching assistant

and was a National Merit Scholar.

51

under professor Carissa Ramming.

Senior Allen Scholar, Chemical Engineering at OSU COLLEGE ACTIVITIES: Student Government Association serving as the budget chairwoman and senate vice chairwoman. She also enjoys supporting the Alumni

TYLER MARTIN

Association and promoting OSU traditions

Omaha, Neb.

through the Student Alumni Board, where

Junior Allen Scholar, Chemical Engineering with a minor in Petroleum Engineering at OSU

p50-51_AllnSchlrs.indd 51

she serves as the alumni relations executive. She was named “Student Philanthropist of the Year” by Women for OSU.

9/20/16 12:33 AM


CEAT Leadership

D R . PAU L J. T I K A L S K Y,

DR. CHUCK BUNTING

R A N DY S E I T S I N G E R , FA I A

F. AC I , F. A S C E , E AC R

A S S O C I AT E D E A N O F

DEAN

RESEARCH AND SPONSORED

A S S O C I AT E D E A N O F

PROGR AMS

AC A D E M I C A F FA I R S

HUMPHRE YS CHAIR OF

HALLIBURTON PROFESSOR IN

AT&T P R O F E S S O R S H I P I N

ENGINEERING

ENGINEERING

ENGINEERING

PROFESSOR OF CIVIL

PROFESSOR OF ELECTRICAL

A N D E N V I R O N M E N TA L

ENGINEERING

D O N A L D A N D C AT H E Y

E D K I R T L E Y, M . A . A S S I S TA N T D E A N O F O U T R E AC H A N D E X T E N S I O N

ENGINEERING

COLLEGE HEADS HONORS:

Outstanding Faculty at OSU;

Sterling L. Burks award for Outstanding Environmental Research; and the Halliburton Outstanding Young Faculty Award at OSU, among others. ALSO:

Registered professional engineer in

Oklahoma. A R E A S O F I N T E R E S T:

Studying

increasing the participation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering with the National Science Foundation.

SUZ ANNE BILBEISI,

DR. JOHN VEENSTRA,

A I A , L E E D, G A

P. E .

W H I T E L E Y, P. E .

Interim Head, School of Biosystems and

Professor and Head, School of Chemical

Agricultural Engineering

Engineering

Centennial Professor and Interim Head School of Architecture

52

E D U C AT I O N :

Bachelor’s degree in

biology, Iowa State University; master’s in environmental engineering and doctorate in civil and environmental engineering, both University of Iowa.

D R . JA M E S (R O B)

Bartlett Chair in Chemical Engineering E D U C AT I O N :

Bachelor’s degree in

chemical engineering, Oklahoma State; master’s and doctorate in chemical engineering, both Ohio State University.

FA L L 2 0 16

p52-55_Leaders.indd 52

9/26/16 10:43 AM


ALSO:

experience as past president and board

Currently involved in three area

chair of several community and non-profit

projects. A R E A S O F I N T E R E S T:

organizations around greater Atlanta.

Distillation,

ethanol separation for biofuels and process monitoring, control and optimization.

DR. SUNDERESH

D R . DA N I E L F I S H E R

H E R AG U

Head, School of Mechnical and Aerospace

Regents Professor and Head, School of Industrial Engineering and Management Donald and Cathey Humphreys Chair of Engineering

Engineering Albert H. Nelson Jr. Chair E D U C AT I O N :

Bachelor’s degree,

international business, Carthage College;

D R . N O R B D E L AT T E ,

E D U C AT I O N :

Bachelor’s in mechanical

second bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate

P. E ., F. AC I , F. A S C E

engineering, Malnad College of Engineering

in mechanical engineering, all University of

Professor and Head

in India; MBA, University of Saskatchewan,

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Canada; doctorate in industrial engineering, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

University of Manitoba, Canada. A R E A S O F I N T E R E S T:

A R E A S O F I N T E R E S T:

Building and

thermal systems research group, numerical Real-time

decision support systems for emergency

head transfer and fluid flow, thermal system simulation and design, displacement ventila-

service sector operations, design of

tion and chilled ceiling systems and simulation

next-generation factory layouts, automated

of building systems.

warehouse systems and integration of design and planning activities in advanced logistical systems.

53

D R . J E F F R E Y L . YO U N G , P. E ., I E E E F E L LOW Professor and Head, School of Computer and Electrical Engineering OSURF Endowed Chair of Engineering E D U C AT I O N :

D R . G O U R A N G A BA N I K , P. E ., PM P, F. A S C E

Bachelor’s degree in

electrical engineering from Ohio Northern

Professor and Head, Division of Engineering

University, 1981; master’s degree, 1984,

DR. RAMAN SINGH

doctorate in electrical engineering, 1989, both

Associate Dean for CEAT at OSU-Tulsa

University of Arizona. A R E A S O F I N T E R E S T:

Antenna

theory and design, microwave ferrite materials and devices, electromagnetic field theory,

Technology H I S T O R Y:

Previously department chair,

Director, Helmerich Research Center

Tennessee State University.

Helmerich Family Endowed Chair Professor of

Also: Chair of continuing education committee,

Engineering

American Society of Civil Engineers. While

computational electromagnetics and EM

Professor and Head, School of Materials

waves in complex media.

Science and Engineering Professor, School of Mechanical and

in industty, managed a $100 million project, including supervising more than 50 professionals, contract negotiation, budget control and execution. Community development

Aerospace Engineering

p52-55_Leaders.indd 53

9/20/16 1:13 AM


New Hires The OSU/A&M Board of Regents has

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND

approved the following new faculty

M A N AG E M E N T — A S S I S TA N T

members for the College of Engineering,

PR O F E S S O R

Architecture and Technology for the 2016-17

Kalyani Nagaraj

school year.

E L E C T R I CA L A N D C O M P U T E R

C H E M I CA L E N G I N E E R I N G — A S S I S TA N T PR O F E S S O R S Marimuthu Andiappan Yu Feng

Craig Bradshaw Jerome Hausselle Rushikesh Kamalapurkar Kurt Rouser

E N G I N E E R I N G — A S S I S TA N T

D I V I S I O N O F T E C H N O LO GY —

PR O F E S S O R S

A S S I S TA N T PR O F E S S O R S

Sabit Ekin

Jonghoon Kim

Yanmin Gong

Haejun Park

M E C H A N I CA L A N D A E R O S PAC E

Avimanyu Sahoo

E N G I N E E R I N G — A S S I S TA N T

CIVIL ENGINEERING

PR O F E S S O R S Aurelie Azoug

M.R. Lohmann Endowed Professor and School Head Norbett J. Delatte Jr.

CEAT Strategic Advisory Council Members of the OSU College of

Jeff Fisher

Ty Ropp

Engineering, Architecture and Technology’s

Ascent Resources

OSU Foundation

Strategic Advisory Council and their profes-

Joe Hall

Ed Stokes

sional affiliations are:

General Contractors LLC

ConocoPhillips

Debbie Adams Phillips 66 Stephen Allen Anadarko Petroleum Gregg Bradshaw Lambert Construction Co. Shay Braun Mark Brewer Seagate Technology LLC Mike Carolina Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology John Doerner

54

XTO Energy Garen Ewbank Ewbank Geo Testing LLC

Jim Hassenbeck

Paul Tikalsky

Studio Architecture

College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology

Steve Huckaby

Rick Webb

Meritage Midstream

Webb Consulting Group

Jeff Hume Continental Resources Inc. Mitch Johnson SpeedPro Imaging Jack Lee Jamco Aerospace Inc. Stan Lingo Lingo Construction Services Jamie McAlpine Chermac Energy Corp. Bill Remy TBM Consulting Group

FA L L 2 0 16

p52-55_Leaders.indd 54

9/20/16 1:13 AM

Dista


Advance Your Skills with Engineering Distance Education Engineering Distance Education provides quality education outside the classroom. Students utilize technology to communicate and complete their course work online. Engineering Distance Education is an option for those who wish to continue their education but can’t attend classes at specific times due to employment, schedule conflicts and constraints, location or family commitments.

COMPLETE ONLINE GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN: Engineering and Technology Management Electrical and Computer Engineering Industrial Engineering and Management UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE LEVEL ONLINE COURSES IN: Architecture Civil and Environmental Construction Management Technology

a number of complete online graduate degree programs as well as undergraduate and graduate level courses designed for students and personnel around the world.

Electrical Engineering Technology Electrical and Computer Engineering and Technology Management Engineering Science Fire Protection and Safety Technology Industrial Engineering and Management

• Internationally distinguished faculty

Materials Science Mechanical and Aerospace

• In-state tuition rate for military personnel

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Advance your education today, visit ceatde.okstate.edu

DistanceAd.indd 1 p52-55_Leaders.indd 55

9/1/16 8:38 9/20/16 1:13 PM AM


Oklahoma State University’s

Master of Science in Engineering and Technology Management

Unlock your potential MSETM = the KEY to advancement • • • • • •

100% online — no on-campus requirement Learn on your schedule No GRE/GMAT required Flexible curriculum Applications accepted year-round Large alumni network

MSETM Program etm.okstate.edu 101 Engineering North | Stillwater, OK 74078 | 405-744-2337 | msetm@okstate.edu

p56-57_NEF.indd 56

9/20/16 1:23 AM


DEAN PAUL TIK ALSKY (LEFT), OSU COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY AND OSU PRESIDENT BURNS HARGIS (RIGHT) WELCOME KEYNOTE SPEAKER AND DEVON ENERGY CEO DAVID HAGER TO OSU FOR THE NATIONAL ENGINEERING FORUM’S REGIONAL DIALOGUE.

OSU hosts National Engineering Forum discussion engineers, business leaders,

57

solutions for the challenges

Industry, government and

natural gas exploration and

academic leaders from the

production company employing

academicians and government

facing the U.S. engineering

greater Stillwater region gath-

hundreds of engineers in

officials who contributed to the

enterprise — capacity, capability

ered in February for a National

Oklahoma and nationwide.

discussions.

and competitiveness, also

dialogue marking Stillwater’s

The NEF regional dialogue series

In 2012, Lockheed Martin

place in American engineering.

has concluded, and the move-

launched the National

For more information on NEF,

ment is currently distilling down

Engineering Forum in

visit www.national engineeringforum.com.

known as the 3Cs.

Engineering Forum regional

Oklahoma State University and

outcomes from the discussions

partnership with the Council

President Burns Hargis hosted

in engineering hubs across

on Competitiveness and the National Academy of

the event on OSU’s campus,

the nation to reveal common

with Devon Energy CEO David

themes and actionable, practical

Engineering, which share a

Hager delivering the keynote

ideas. Later this year, the NEF

common vision for transforming

address. Headquartered in

will publish a report summing

the way we perceive, experi-

Oklahoma City, Devon Energy

up the entire dialogue series

ence and prioritize American

is a leading independent oil and

and issue a call to action for the

engineering. NEF is creating

p56-57_NEF.indd 57

9/20/16 1:23 AM


Supporting C It has never been a more exciting time for the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology.

trajectory of success it will require the continued support of our loyal alumni and friends. Your gifts help the college reach new heights.

With record-setting enrollment, a mission to

They help our state’s most promising students

hire 50 new faculty members by 2020 and

— tomorrow’s leaders — receive a world-class

plans to begin construction for a new under-

OSU education. They help build ideal learn-

graduate laboratory building, the college

ing environments for research, discovery and

is well-positioned to continue its rise as a

innovation in every department.

national leader in educating and preparing engineers, architects and technologists.

As you consider supporting the college, please know that the CEAT Development

This success does not happen in a vacuum.

team is here to help. Regardless of the

It takes resources that go beyond the state

amount, we can help you tailor a gift that

of Oklahoma. For us to continue on this

fulfills your long-term charitable and financial

58 FA L L 2 0 16

p58-59_Dvlpmnt.indd 58

9/20/16 10:46 AM


CEAT goals. Whether it be outright support or through your estate, we would be happy to discuss these and any other charitable giving options with you and your advisers. Visit us at osugiving.com/yourpassion/

TYLERR ROPP

LISA SMITH

Senior Director of Development

Senior Director of Development, CEAT

Team Lead, University Programs and CEAT

Phone: 405-385-5170 Email: lsmith@OSUgiving.com

Phone: 405-385-5664 Email: tropp@OSUgiving.com

college-of-engineering-architecture-and-

59

technology or contact one of our development team members. We look forward to working with you.

BRYCE KILLINGSWORTH

JILL BLAKE

Assistant Director of Development, CEAT

Constituent Relations Associate, CEAT

Phone: 405-385-5623

Phone: 405-385-5156 Email: jblake@OSUgiving.com

Email: bkillingsworth@OSUgiving.com

p58-59_Dvlpmnt.indd 59

9/20/16 10:46 AM


College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology

2015 Donors $10 0,0 0 0+ Airbus

ExxonMobil

Kurt Nelson ONEOK Foundation Bard Peevy Steven Wegener, ECEN ’79, and Linda Wegener

Darton and Jamie Zink

Gordon White, CHE ’63, and Carol White Richard White, ECEN ’71, and Bettyjune White

$10,0 0 0 – $24,999

Jim Williams, MAE ’80, and Lynne Williams

Ali Fazel, CIVE ’83, and Jeni Fazel ’83

AEP/Public Service Co. of Oklahoma/Tulsa

John Hatheway, MAE ’53, and Betty Hatheway

Gary Allen, ENGR TECH ’82, and Judy Allen

Phillips 66

Thomas and Lenore Barber

XTO Energy

Ken Barrett, MAE ’64, and Loretta Barrett

$5,0 0 0 – $9,999

$50,0 0 0 – $99,999

Jack Bobek, CHE ’49

Abbott Laboratories

Boeing Co.

AGCO Corp.

3M Co.

Mark Brewer, ECEN ’83, and Beth Brewer

Stephen Allen, ENGR TECH ’79, and Linda Allen

Deborah Adams, CHE ’83

Chevron

Anadarko Petroleum Corp.

CS Cho, CVE ’59, and Boksoo Cho

Michael Damore, ARCH ’73, and Sharon Damore

Larry Blake, CHE ’71, and Kathy Cowan

ConocoPhillips

Gerard Desormeau, ECEN ’71, and Patricia Desormeau

BP America Inc.

Martin Family Foundation Procter & Gamble Co. Sunderland Foundation

Dolese Bros. Co. Scott Edwards, MAE ’86, and LouAnn Edwards

Brent Wooten, CIVE ’74, and Mary Jane Wooten Derek Wrobbel, ECEN ’91, and Stacie Wrobbel

Paul L. Caldwell, MAE ’70, and Mabel Caldwell Chesapeake Energy Inc.

EnCana Oil & Gas USA Inc.

James Cobb, CIVE ’79, and LaVerna Cobb

Gary and Joan Pope Edward and Claudia Stokes Texas Instruments Inc. James D. Waggoner Williams

$1,0 0 0 – $4,999 ACP Sheet Metal Co. Adolfson & Peterson Construction AIA Oklahoma Allen Contracting Inc. John and Nancy Allford Andres Construction Services LLC Charles Bacon, ECEN ’61, and Jeanne Bacon David and Sherrlyn Bardwell Kenneth and Karen Bell Benson Lumber Co. Frank Berry, ENGR TECH ’62, and Diana Berry Danny Blaakely, ENGR TECH, ’81, and Melanie Blakely

$25,0 0 0 – $49,999

Fife Corp.

Marjorie Cooke

Anthony Blatt, ARCH ’93, and Julie Blatt

Gregory Geiser, CIVE ’80, and Nancy Geiser

Cooley Construction LLC

Edward and Lauren Bond

Avery Dennison Corp.

John Doerner, CHE ’83, and Cristy Doerner

Lorraine and David Bouchard

Halliburton Foundation Inc.

John Brown, CIVE ’66, and Judy Brown

Kerry Havner, CIVE ’55

Dow Chemical Foundation

Brueckner Group USA Inc.

Randy Kreie, ARCH ’76, and Valda Kreie

Jacque Fowler, CHE ’83

Russal Brawley, CIVE ’63, and Phyllis Brawley

Chevron Phillips Chemical Co. LP

Donald Lippert, ENGR TECH, ’78

Guy Engineering Services Inc.

Bruce W. Russell, Ph.D. P.E., & Associates PLLC

Matthew Nelson, MAE ’11

David Hieronymus, CHE ’77

Richard Bush, IEM ’63

OG&E Energy Corp.

Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa

Trust of Donald C. & Mary M. Cameron

Honeywell International

Cantera Concrete Co.

James Penn, CIVE, ’79

Kay Keithline

CapSpire

Ashley Price, CHE ’04

Koch Industries Inc.

K. Kamalakar Rao, MAE ’61

Jay and Jeryn Laengrich

Donald Carpenter, ARCH ’79, and Gina Carpenter

Arthur Rigg, ECEN ’49

Larry Laengrich

Federico and Elvia Faggin Foundation Inc.

John Carment, CHE ’98, and Carrie Carment

Martha Seabolt

Kimberly–Clark Co.

Spirit Aerosystems Inc.

John Lawrence, CHE ’81, and Carolyn Lawrence

Center for Life Safety Education

Kevin Stephney, ECEN ’79, and Tangye Stephney

Lockheed Martin

Kent Powers, IEM ’76, and Sheryl Powers

Central OK Section Illuminating Engineering Society

Gene and Lynne Smith

Thai Nguyen University of Technology

Credit Suisse AG John Cusick, CEAT ’62, and Kathy Cusick Mark Dickerson, CHE ’74, and Lee Ann Dickerson Kenneth Dickson, CHE ’87, and Teresa Melendez EI DuPont de Nemours & Co.

60

National Fire Protection Association

Gary Wilson, CHE ’89, and Kerri Wilson

Wayne Allen, MAE ’59 and IEM ’69, and Judith Allen CEAT Student Council

Frank Narcomey, ENGR ’79, and Cindy Narcomey

Ann Oglesby, CHE ’87, and Bill Oglesby

Mark Marston, CHE ’74 Keith Montgomery, CHE ’81, and Charlotte Muniz–Montgomery

Johnnie Boyle, MAE ’72

Cimmaron Technology Inc.

FA L L 2 0 16

p60-61_Donors.indd 60

9/20/16 1:25 AM


Brad Clowe, ECEN ’94, and Ronnie Clowe

Steven Grundmann, MAE ’76, and Jonith Grundmann

Teresa Cooper

Lisa Hamil

Krista and Kirk Courson

Syed Hamid, MAE ’76, and Zeba Hamid

Jimmy Cox, MAE ’63 Crossland Construction Co. Inc.

John Harder, MAE ’67, and Mildred Harder

Maurice McClain, ENGR TECH ’79, and Rita McClain David McCaslin, CHE ’89, and Elizabeth McCaslin Susan McKenzie, MAE ’80 Albert McWatters, ENGR TECH ’81, and Ann McWatters

Timothy and Zella Simmons Alan Smith, MAE ’73, and Carol Smith Stuart Smith, MAE ’76, and Linda Smith Traci and James Smith James Snyder

Michael Harris, MAE ’66, and Patricia Harris

Kurt Metzinger, MAE ’86, and Bernadine Metzinger

Raymond Davis

Myron Hayden, CIVE ’75, and Judith Hayden

Albert Meyer, ECEN ’49, and Ruth Meyer

Southern Company Services

Cary DeHart, ENGR TECH ’74, and Bobbie DeHart

Charles Heller, CIVE ’59

Michelin North America Inc.

SpawGlass Contractors Inc.

David Heller, ENGR TECH ’80, and Paula Heller

John Middleton, CHE ’77

Terry Stewart, CHE ’72, and Karen Stewart

Kenneth Davey, ARCH ’73, and Mary Davey

Kenneth Donaghey, ENGR TECH ’81 Mike Dossey, CIVE ’65, and Anita Dossey

William Henry, ECEN ’79, and Cindy Schultz

Leslie Doty

Lee J. Henderson, MAE ’82, and Marta Henderson

Dunhill Homes DFW LLC

Henson Construction

Jodie Millemon, CHE ’11 Motiva Enterprises Nabholz Construction Corp. James Nevels, CIVE ’89, and Sherry Nevels

Ray Earley, ECEN ’80, and Sharon Earley

Hensel Phelps Construction Co.

Billy Eddleman, IEM ’66, and Angeline Eddleman

Sunderesh and Rita Heragu

Kevin O’Brien, MAE ’76, and Judith O’Brien

Glen Hicks, MAE ’68, and Diane Hicks

OK Structural Engineer Association

Steve Huff, BAE ’11

Oklahoma State Firefighters Association

Thomas Engle, ENGR TECH ’61, and Martha Engle

John and Jeanne Norman

Society of American Military Engineers/OKC Post

Laura Sugg, CHE ’83, and Charles Sugg TEXO Education and Research Foundation Textron Matching Gift Program Sally Thomas, CHE ’77 Richard Thompson, IEM ’63 Paul and Julie Tikalsky Leroy Tomlinson, MAE ’54, and Jacqueline Tomlinson

Gordon Eubanks, ECEN ’68, and Ronda Eubanks

IBM Corp.

David and Laura Eudey, MAE ’04

William Johnson, ENGR TECH ’76, and Barbara Johnson

Ronald Orr, IEM ’79, and Diana Orr

Susan and Robert Evans

James Jones, MAE ’84

Raymond Pappe, MAE ’58, and Shirley Pappe

U.S. Stone Industries LLC

FCI Constructors Inc.

Karly Jurgensmeier, CHE ’10, and Brad Jurgensmeier

William Phelps, MAE ’60, and Dorotha Phelps

Utopia Compression Corporation

Brian Price, CHE ’72, and Brenda Price

Donald Vanlandingham, ECEN ’63, and Mary Vanlandingham

Andrew Fickett, IEM ’10, and Tracy Fickett Flintco LLC Fluor Foundation

Montgomery Karns, CIVE ’77, and Vickie Karns William Kelton, ENGR TECH ’60, and Barbara Kelton

Food Source Solutions LLC

Robert Kersten, CIVE ’56

Sandra and Darrel Fry

Larry Kester, ARCH ’68, and Linda Kester

GE Johnson Construction Co. Barney Ghiglieri, CHE ’72 Michael Gilbert, CHE ’78, and Verna Gilbert Earl Glimp, ECEN ’66, and Carolyn Glimp Global Production Solutions Jack Goertz, IEM ’73, and Susan Goertz Graham Architects Inc.

Jordan Kidd, CHE ’07, and Kristeen Kidd Lambert Construction Co. Samir Lawrence, CIVE ’63, and Lucille Lawrence Donald Lehman, CHE ’69, and Laura Lehman Stan Lingo, ARCH ’87, and Renee Lingo

ONE Gas Inc.

Donald Pruitt, MAE ’62, and Mary Pruitt Donald Purvis, ECEN ’78, and Janet Purvis Ramachandra and Gokula Ramakumar Gilbert Randall, ECEN ’73 Dhananjaya Rao, IEM ’73, and Kathleen Rao Thomas Ratzki, CIVE ’79, and Amy Ratzki Raytheon Co. Karl Reid, MAE ’56, and Verna Lou Reid

Alan and Rae Tree Marcia Tuttle University of Tulsa

W&W AFCO Steel Joe and Cynthia Wade Walvoil Fluid Power Corp. Thomas Wallace, ARCH ’75, and Susan Wallace Alyssa Warner, CHE ’02, and Jeffery Warner Steven Wear, ECEN ’85, and Judy Wear Richard Weidner, ECEN ’78, and Mee Mong Lee Barry West, IEM ’72, and Barbara West WILLCO PAC

John and Dolores Granito

Thomas Lippert, ENGR TECH ’84, and Mary Lippert

Jack Graham, ECEN ’59

Lithko Contracting Inc.

Thomas Graham, CIVE ’95, and Kimberly Graham

Xiaobing Liu, MAE ’05, and Dongyi Xiao

Yvonne Roberts

Michael Wilcox, ECEN ’89, and Mary Wilcox

Richard Gray, ECEN ’61, and Rosemary Gray

Jill Long, CHE ’03

Francis Rooney

Womble Co.

Shane Lupi, ENGR TECH ’14

Neil Ryan, ENGR TECH ’78, and Katherine Ryan

Nathaniel Woody, MAE ’13

Daniel Grischkowsky John Groh, MAE ’60, and Nancy Groh

Philip Maltby, ECEN ’73 Marathon Oil Co. Melissa Martin, ENGR TECH ’71, and Donald Martin

p60-61_Donors.indd 61

David Reser, CIVE ’87, and Corine Reser Rick Scott Construction Inc.

61

Charles Williams, ECEN ’81, and Yvonne Williams

William Seider, ARCH ’74, and Amanda Miller Richard Sievert, CHE ’77

9/20/16 1:25 AM


CEAT Hall of Fame inducts 3

BY BRITTANY BELLI

Jack Corgan, Ed Stokes and Rao Surampalli were inducted into the CEAT Hall of Fame on Oct. 17, 2015.

JACK C. CO RG A N Jack C. Corgan can trace his family ties with Oklahoma State University back two generations. His parents, Jack M. and Perk, both attended Oklahoma A&M, now Oklahoma State University. Elnore Gassaway, his grandmother, spent her life in Stillwater and was the varsity athletes dorm mother at Hanner Hall. By the time Jack was three months old, he had already spent the night on campus at Hanner Hall! Corgan wanted to be an architect like his dad, so he went to OSU, where he met the love of his life, Carol, in freshman

The firm was failing when he joined. After four years, Corgan became president and led the firm for 25 years, taking it from a local firm of eight employees to a national firm of more than 250 when he retired in 2000. Corgan’s leadership began early: He was president of his junior high student council, Key Club, fraternity pledge class, fraternity chapter, MIT Club of Dallas, Corgan, American Institute of Architects

ED STO K ES Edward “Ed” G. Stokes was born in Checotah, Okla., and grew up in Okemah. He earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from OSU in 1975 after earning an associate degree in pre-engineering from Eastern Oklahoma State College in 1972. He earned an MBA from Houston Baptist University in 1998, graduating summa cum laude. Stokes is a seasoned professional with a broad range of supervisory and managerial experience in the upstream and marine segments of the oil and gas

H O N O R A RY H A LL O F FA M E I N D U CT EES 1954 –2014

1983 Bill N. Lacy

1954 Laurence L. Dresser

1962 Don McBride

1971 Ralph M. Ball

1977 John S. Zink

1984 Edward C. Joullian III

1955 Gerald W. McCullough

1963 B. Harris Bateman

1972 Richard O. Newman

1978 Sidney E. Scisson

1984 Glenn E. Penisten

1964 William W. Caudill

1973 David B. Benham

1979 John L. Hatheway

1985 Frank A. McPherson

1965 Myron A. Wright

1974 Carl G. Herrington

1979 Eason H. Leonard

1986 James E. Barnes

1966 Charles Edwin Malzahn

1975 James J. Kelly

1979 Nicholas B. Mavris

1986 Martin E. Fate

1958 Guy H. James

1975 Gus L. Maciula

1980 John B. Jones Jr.

1987 Raymond A. Porter

1959 Francis J. Wilson

1967 Eugene L. Miller

1976 Donald E. Adams

1981 William J. Collins Jr.

1987 James D. Cobb

1960 Morrison B. Cunningham

1968 David G. Murray

1976 James C. Phelps

1982 Floyd M. Bartlett

1988 Choong-Shik Cho

1976 Fred H. Ramseur Jr.

1982 H.H. McClure

1988 Robert M. Penn

1956 Richard K. Lane 1957 Thomas M. Lumly Jr.

62

English. After dating four years, he and Carol married, and he transferred to MIT, where he earned both undergraduate and master’s degrees. Corgan taught at the OSU School of Architecture before he joined his family’s firm in Dallas.

Dallas, chairman of The Dallas Plan organization and the CEAT “Branding Success” campaign committee. The Corgans have made significant contributions to Oklahoma State, and Jack is well known for his entrepreneurship, leadership and CEAT engagement.

1961 Lloyd E. Elkins

1969 Melvin A. Ellsworth

1983 George H. Lawrence

1970 Veldo H. Brewer FA L L 2 0 16

p62-63_HOF.indd 62

9/20/16 1:24 AM


JACK C. CORGAN

ED STOKES

RAO SURAMPALLI

industry. He has visited or worked in 46 countries. His experience includes leadership roles in technical and business disciplines.

R AO Y. S U R A M PA LLI

He serves on 70 national committees, review panels or advisory boards, has chaired or co-chaired numerous conferences for ASCE and the National Science Foundation, and is a distinguished, honorary and adjunct professor of environmental engineering at 12 leading universities.

Stokes served as the Offshore Technology Conference program chairman in 2002, was elected to the board of directors in 2008 and served as board vice chairman in 2012 and 2013 and chairman in 2014 and 2015. He is the chairman of the Board of Visitors of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Oklahoma State University. He also serves as a member of ConocoPhillips’ Global Marine Talent Management Team.

Rao Y. Surampalli, Ph.D., is a professional engineer, board certified environmental engineer, diplomate of the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers, fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and distinguished member of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He has contributed to addressing key environmental issues facing society today, from the occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals, antibiotics and endocrine-disrupting chemicals in water and wastewater treatment plants to climate change, biodiesel production from sewage sludge and the environmental risk posed by increasingly prevalent nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

1989 W. P. “Bill” Schmoe

1996 Marvin M. Johnson

1989 Neal A. McCaleb

1997 H.E. Cobb Jr.

1991 Jim E. Shamas

1997 Donald L. Wickens

1991 David J. Tippeconnic

1998 Ronald D. Wickens

1992 W. Wayne Allen

1999 Ronald L. Calsing

1992 Robert M. Lawrence

1999 John C. Mihm

1993 Keith E. Bailey

2000 Jim W. Bruza

1993 Kenneth J. Richards

2000 Sherman E. Smith

1994 Donald R. Lehman

2000 Thomas W. Wallace

1995 Ted E. Davis

2001 B.N. Murali

1995 Charles L. Hardt

2001 Duane Wilson

1996 R. Gerald Bennett

p62-63_HOF.indd 63

2002 Donald W. Vanlandingham 2002 Frank W. Chitwood 2003 James R. Holland Jr. 2003 Kent E. Patterson 2004 J.D. “Denny” Carreker Jr. 2004 Steven D. Hofener 2004 David Kyle

In addition, Surampalli volunteers on international humanitarian efforts for environmental protection. He has provided technical assistance, facilitated technology transfer and lent to capacity building efforts for 22 countries on four continents. He is also providing technical assistance to two villages in India for sustainable development.

2006 Sanjiv Sidhu

2011 Lakshmaiah Ponnala

2006 James L. Vining

2012 Wilson Shoffner

2007 Rand Elliott

2012 Calvin Vogt

2007 Michael Damore

2012 Jerry Winchester

2008 Ronald L. Hoffman

2013 Rixio Medina

2008 Donald D. Humphreys

2013 Robert Schaefer

2009 Charles Kridler 2009 A. Joe Mitchell Jr.

2005 James Brooks Cummins

2009 Sridhar Mitta

2005 Gordon E. Eubanks Jr.

2011 Jeffery Fisher

2010 Ray O. Johnson

63

2013 Rick Webb 2014 Debbie Adams 2014 Harold Courson 2014 Jeff Hume 2014 David Timberlake 2014 Janet Weiss

9/20/16 1:24 AM


Joshi named Lohmann winner BY BRITTANY BELLI

Shrikant Joshi received the Melvin R. Lohmann Medal on Oct. 17, 2015. Joshi had a distinguished career for the past 30 years with General Motors Corp. (16 years) and Delphi Corp. (14 years). Delphi is a $15 billion U.S. company that split from General Motors in 1999 and is engaged in the design and manufacturing of automotive systems and components. Joshi holds 48 U.S. and international patents for his inventions and was a three-time recipient of the Kettering Award, the highest annual award for new product innovation in GM and Delphi. He is also the winner of the Delphi President’s Award and has been inducted into the Delphi Innovation Hall of Fame.

He received a GM corporate fellowship and pursued his MBA at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan School of Management) in 1992. He is a life member of the OSU Alumni Association and has been supporting and guiding OSU alumni who are interested in careers in the automotive industry. He also served as a member of the board of directors for the Niagara County Community College Foundation (Sanborn, N.Y.) for five years and helped students who could not afford a university education attend community college.

SHRIK ANT JOSHI

64 FA L L 2 0 16

p64-65_Lohman.indd 64

9/20/16 10:47 AM


IF S TA .OR G

Firefighter Training is Our ONLY Business. IFSTA is the leading fire service training publisher since 1934. Our training content is validated by firefighters for firefighters.

IFSTA — Making good firefighters GREAT! IFSTA is the worldwide leader publishing fire and emergency responder training materials, meeting the ever-increasing demanding needs of first responders in North America and the world.

p64-65_Lohman.indd 65

9/20/16 10:47 AM


Outstanding CEAT Seniors

T

HREE SENIORS HAVE BEEN NAMED OUTSTANDING SENIORS FOR THE CLASS OF 2016 IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY: JOHN HIETT, CONNOR MOJO AND EMMA ORTH.

JOHN HIET T Class of 2016 Outstanding Senior John Hiett graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering and pre-medical studies. At OSU, Hiett was a Senior of Significance, served as the CEAT Student Council president and freshman council coordinator and as a member of the OSU Student Foundation and OSU Mortarboard. He also volunteered in the emergency room, surgery center and information center at Stillwater Medical Center, and on multiple philanthropic community events such as the polar plunge and Big Event. His academic honors include being named an Oklahoma State Higher Education Regents Scholar, Mark and Lee Ann Dickerson Engineering Scholar and Dr. Esber Shaheen Scholar. He is an inductee of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society and Alpha Epsilon Delta Honor Society.

66

“The friendships that I have made and the relationships that have been formed at Oklahoma State University are the things I cherish the most; I owe a deep gratitude to all of my friends, family, professors and mentors who have allowed me to become who I am today,” says Heitt. “There is no success without support, and this university continually astounds me with how well it supports its students. Go Pokes!” Hiett plans to attend medical school at the Texas A&M College of Medicine and enter the field of dermatology.

CO N N O R M OJ O Connor Mojo is an industrial engineering and management major from Bakersfield, Calif. At OSU, Mojo served as the Institute of Industrial Engineers president and vice president, Blue Key Honor society vice president, OSU Student Foundation vice president and stewardship chair,

JOHN HIET T

Rooted Conferences finance chair and CEAT senator for SGA Senate.

CEAT scholars program. He frequently attended Overflow at LifeChurch, was a part of multiple Bible studies and mentorship programs and regularly attended Eagle Heights Baptist Church in Stillwater.

He has received the 2015 IEM Undergraduate Student award, the General Honors College award and was named a Top 20 Freshman Man, CEAT “I have been very fortunate Scholar, Phillips 66 Shield with the amazing opportunischolar and an OSU Senior of ties OSU and the IEM departSignificance. ment have given me,” says Mojo went to Italy on a Mojo. “Growing up, I was spring break study-abroad always confused by my dad’s trip with CEAT, did passion for OSU, but I am mission work in Addis glad to say I now completely Ababa, Ethiopia and travunderstand how someone can eled to Japan with the be so passionate about this

FA L L 2 0 16

p66-67_Seniors.indd 66

9/20/16 1:09 AM


CONOR MOJO

school. I love OSU and will cherish the memories I made here for the rest of my life.” He is now a buyer for Phillips 66 in Bartlesville, Okla., as part of the Procurement New Hire Rotation Program.

EM M A O RT H Emma Orth, a chemical engineering senior, is the daughter of Ted and Jamie Orth of Andale, Kan. At OSU, Orth played a leading role in the reorganization and expansion of the

p66-67_Seniors.indd 67

67

EMMA ORTH

CEAT Ambassadors Program, which promotes both CEAT and STEM education to prospective students. She also served two terms as the vice president of finance for CEAT Student Council and allocated funding for the creation of a new student scholarship.

In her sophomore year, Orth studied in Montpellier, France, as part of the CEAT study-abroad program. She also traveled to Japan with the CEAT Scholars. Orth completed summer internships with Zeeco Inc. and ExxonMobil.

The Senior of Significance was a CEAT Scholar, served as chief administrative officer for the Beta Zeta chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta and worked as a teaching assistant for the biosystems and agricultural engineering and chemical engineering departments.

She is a member of the Order of Omega Honor Society and Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society. She placed second in the R.N. Maddox Chemical Engineering Design contest and th first in the Phillips 66 Design Contest.

“My experience at OSU would not have been possible without financial assistance from the university, college and department of chemical engineering,” says Orth. “I would like to express my sincerest gratitude to the alumni who have so generously supported Oklahoma State University, and I look forward to continuing their legacy of service and leadership for the rest of my career.” Orth is now working for ExxonMobil in Baytown, Texas.

9/20/16 1:09 AM


3 represent CEAT in 3MT contest

  ZEEL MAHESHWARI

ZEEL MAHESHWARI

won first place in the 3MT Competition for the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology with her thesis concentrated on smart integrated renewable energy systems (SIRES) for rural communities. Her goal is to “energize” rural areas, not just “electrify” them. Smart integrated renewable energy systems provide basic needs such as biogas for cooking, water for domestic use and irrigation, and electricity for lighting, communication, cold storage, educational and smallscale industrial purposes by smartly matching the needs with available resources. The low-cost, renewable technologies and intelligent energy management systems would promote sustainable socio-economic development and improve the living environment.

68

Maheshwari is a doctoral student studying electrical and computer engineering. She received her bachelor’s

  SAEED PIRI

degree in electrical and electronics engineering from B.V. Bhoomaraddi College of Engineering and Technology (affiliated with Vishveshwaraya Technological University), India, in 2011, and completed her master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering at OSU in December 2013. won second place for his research in health care analytics. SAEED PIRI

His dissertation involves developing a clinical decision support system for diabetic patients. His research group has access to Cerner Health Facts®, one of the largest health databases in the United States. Analyzing the data of more than 2 million diabetic patients using statistical and data mining techniques has allowed them to develop several predictive models that could detect and diagnose diabetic retinopathy. The next stage of his research involves suggesting the best course to manage the disease, which will be the result of

  KEVIN ROEHM

the decision support system he is developing. He plans to utilize optimization and simulation techniques to help physicians and clinicians apply optimal interventions for their patients. Piri is a third-year doctoral student studying industrial engineering and management. He received both his undergraduate and master’s degrees in industrial and system engineering from universities in his native Iran. His bachelor’s degree is from the Amirkabir University of Technology, and his master’s is from the Sharif University of Technology. won third place for his research on 3D printing nerves. KEVIN ROEHM

His thesis focused on the creation of a three-dimensional printer that could print living cells contained in unique ink he has developed in his laboratory. He is focused on increasing the number of cells that survive the printing process undamaged and investigating the interactions between the different cells printed in adjacent fibers. Roehm is a second-year doctoral student studying chemical engineering. He received in his bachelor’s in biosystems engineering with a biomedical option and master’s in chemical engineering from OSU.

THREE MINUTE THESIS (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by the University of Queensland. The exercise challenges research degree students to present a compelling oration on their thesis/dissertation topic and its significance in just three minutes using just one static slide. 3MT® develops academic, presentation and research communication skills and supports the development of research students’ capacity to explain their research effectively in language appropriate to a nonspecialist audience. A panel of judges representing industry, education, government and community selected the winners.

FA L L 2 0 16

p68-3MT.indd 68

9/20/16 1:26 AM


JOIN THE GET ALL THE UP-TO-DATE NEWS ON THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE AND TECHNOLOGY

CEAT Dean Paul Tikalsky is on Twitter! STAY IN TOUCH WITH THE COLLEGE BYÂ FOLLOWING @PJ_TIKALSKY

TWITTER.COM/OSU_CEAT

FACEBOOK.COM/OSUCEAT

INSTAGRAM/OSU_CEAT


Office of the Dean

NON-PROFIT

CO LLEG E O F EN G I N EER I N G , AR CH I T EC T U R E AN D T ECH N O LO GY

O R G A N I Z AT I O N

Oklahoma State University

P A I D

2 0 1 A d v a n c e d Te c h n o l o g y R e s e a r c h C e n t e r

S T I L LWAT E R , O K

S t i l l w a t e r, O k l a h o m a 7 4 0 7 8 - 5 0 1 3

P E R M I T N O. 191

JOIN US! CEAT Dean Paul Tikalsky invites you to become an exclusive member of the Dean’s Club, a distinguished group whose annual gifts of $5,000 or more to either the CEAT Fund or Engineering Building Fund support our college’s top priorities and ensure a bright future for CEAT students. Please consider making your gift today by returning the enclosed pledge form or visiting osugiving. com/ceatdeansclub. On behalf of our engineering community, you have our deepest appreciation for all you do for OSU and for the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology.

Go Pokes! ce a t . o k s t a t e . e d u /d e a n s _ c l u b

U. S . P O S TA G E

IMPACT Magazine 2016  

Latest issue of Impact magazine from 2016

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you