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CONTENTS Biography

04

Thesis

09

Digital Fabrication

29

Urban Design

36

Comprehensive Studio

44


OSCAR GARCIA

Background

Visuals

I grew up on the Gulf Coast of Florida and recently graduated with a Master of Architecture from Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. My work is heavily influenced by lifestyle, culture, and sociology.

My focus in design is largely aesthetic. I have a meticulous eye for graphics, layout, and visualization. My goal for every project is to deliver stunning visuals and remarkable displays. I am well-versed in digital media as well as 2D and 3D representation.

Process

Presentation

As a highly conceptual thinker, I’m capable of successfully carrying out an idea from its original inception to final execution. Thorough research and careful analysis are vital parts of the design process, and I look forward to drawing inspiration for new schemes based on my findings.

With exceptional written and oral skills, I make full use of my ability to communicate precisely and effectively both on paper and in person. A lot of thought and care go into the final product, and I always make an effort to take great pride in everything I do.


CV Education Tulane School of Architecture New Orleans, LA 2007-2012 B. Arch + M.Arch Diploma : 5/19/12

Activities Architecture Student Government 5th Year Representative (2011-2012) 4th Year Representative (2010-2011) Tulane University Orchestra Member of First Violin Section (2007-2010)

Completed Courses Design Studio Architecture Studio I-V Media Visual Media I Digital Media I-III Structures Technological Systems I, II Integrated Technology I, II Professional Practice Professional Concerns I, II History/Philosophy: Architecture History: Ancient to Medieval Architecture History: 19th Century Architecture History: Modernity Issues of Contemporary Architecture Theories in Digital Media Thesis Research Urban Studies Design Urbanism Urban Sociology Advanced Modeling Digital Fabrication *Strong studio art background : Drawing, Printmaking, Glassblowing, Sculpture

Awards

Tulane University Founder’s Scholarship (2007-2012)

Skills Adobe Illustrator CS3+ InDesign CS3+ Photoshop CS3+ Computer Aided Design AutoCAD 2008+ Google Sketchup Pro Grasshopper Maya 3D Revit BIM Rhino 3D V-Ray Movie/Animation Adobe Premiere iMovie Rhino Render Foreign Language American Sign Language French (working knowledge) German (elementary proficiency)

Denotes senior proficiency


Specialization

Work Experience

Composition Editing Outlining Proofreading Research Writing

Tulane Architecture Library Student Employee New Orleans, LA Fall 2011-Spring 2012, Fall 2010, Summer 2008

Planning Concept Design Interiors Space Planning Print Book Design Diagrams Graphics Illustration Layout Technical Physical Model Building Sketching Visualization 3D Rendering Post Production

Travel Experience Beijing, China May 2011-July 2011 Study Abroad Shanghai, China July 2011 (2 weeks) Independent Travel Guangzhou, China July 2011 (1 week) Independent Travel Hong Kong August 2011 (2 weeks) Independent Travel

Beijing Architecture Studio Enterprise Research Assistant Beijing, China May 2011-July 2011 SMP Architecture Architectural Intern Pensacola, FL May 2010-August 2010

Teaching Experience Tulane School of Architecture Teaching Assistant / Intro to AutoCAD & Adobe August 2010-December 2010

Master’s Thesis Lifestyle as a ‘Total Work of Art’: A Season House for a Contemporary Dance Company May 2012 New Orleans, LA

Publications Objects Possessed: Inventory of Possessions in a Rural Village Household, Vol. 1 & 2 July 2011 Beijing, China Grey Box Artists: He Yunchang, Wang Qingsong, Xia Xing July 2011 Beijing, China


Contact Email : oscarvgarcia@mail.com ogarcia@tulane.edu Phone : (850) 346-2470 Web : http://www.oscarvgarcia.com Skype : oscarvicentegarcia


THESIS

2012


LIFESTYLE

as a ‘total work of art’ An individual’s habits, attitude, and values are influenced by their regimen of daily protocol. Thus, human ethnology is characterized by a set of behaviors belonging to a given time, place, and sequence. These factors have the power to control social relations, measure of consumption, dress, and quality of life. Through the infusion of habits, use of convention, and logistic reasoning, one’s distinct and defined lifestyle is realized, conceived, and generated. The proposed project aims to create a holistic environment in which the architecture is coded with symbolic meaning, contextualized by the user’s image, projection, and sense of self. Ultimately, this synthesis of activities, interaction, and conscious/subconscious decision-making formulate a fully integrated design strategy, which formulates a fully integrated design strategy, which embodies and comprehensively reflects the inhabitant(s) through the medium of space.


skill

craft technique

regimen

expression

aesthetic

communication

art

entertainment culture

movement

dance

performance culture

expression routine

physical

rhythm

social protocol

art

choreography

gesture

performance

reaction

social interaction

symbolic

performance body

entertainment creativity physical

lifestyle aesthetic

human

rituals

actions

metaphysical spiritual

action

doings

conduct customs manners

behavior

ethnology


The Premise First, a subject was chosen for which the architecture can serve as a direct link between the person and the space. Performing artists, specifically dancers, live their life under a double identity and assume certain rules at specific times.


Dec.

YEARLY

Nov.

Frequency: Yearly Intensity:

Dec.

Jan. Feb.

Oct.

Mar.

Sep.

Apr. May

Aug. Jul.

CONSUMPTION nutrition

Feb.

Mar.

Oct.

Mar.

Sep.

Apr.

Sep.

Apr.

May

Aug.

CONSUMPTION hydration

May

Aug.

Jun.

Jul.

Jun.

Jan.

Nov.

Oct.

CONTRACT LENGTH 40 wks.

HYGIENE cleanliness

Dec.

Jan.

Nov.

Feb.

Jul.

Jun.

Dec.

Jan.

Nov.

Feb.

Oct.

Mar.

Sep.

Apr. May

Aug. Jul.

Season

Jun.

Rehearsal Off Season

OFF SEASON 12 wks.

CONSUMPTION hydration

HYGIENE cleanliness

CON n


The Proposal Their bodies exist as a form of art and livelihood. The excess stress placed upon the body requires a strict regimen to maintain the mental and physical well-being of the performer. The role fo a dancer in a full-time dance company exhibits yearly and weekly patterns involving people, time,

and space - all of which contributes to the ultimate form of output: the performance. Playing with the idea of lifestyle (customs, culture, habits) and the performing arts (expression/entertainment), the project aims to merge the two under one roof. Henceforth, lifestyle as a ‘total work of art.’ The result is a contemporary Season Haus for this wolfpack of dancers.


Dec.

Dec.

Jan.

Frequency: Yearly Intensity:

Nov.

Feb.

Oct.

Mar.

Sep.

Apr.

Feb.

Mar.

Sep.

Apr.

Sep.

Apr.

May

Jul.

CONTRACT LENGTH 40 wks.

CONSUMPTION nutrition light meal

Frequency: Daily Intensity:

sleepwear

hot

athletic wear

8:00 A 8:15 A

8:15 A 8:45 A

8:45 A 9:00 A

WAKE

SHOWER

9:00 A 10:15 A

BREAKFAST WARM UP

1h

1h

1h

lounge hydrate socialize

Sep.

Apr. May Jul.

Jun.

Season

Jun.

Rehearsal Off Season

10:30 A 12:30 P

BREAK

REHEARSE

1h

CONSUMPTION nutrition heavy meal

HYGIENE cleanliness

hydrate snack

hydrate socialize hydrate

10:15 A 10:30 A

1h

Mar.

CONSUMPTION hydration

ENTERTAINMENT

pilates yoga core

cold

casual clothing

sleepwear

eat in / eat out

12:30 P 1:30 P

1:30 P 5:00 P

5:00 P 6:00 P

6:00 P 6:15 P

6:15 P 6:30 P

6:30 P 7:30 P

7:30 P 8:30 P

8:30 P 12:00 A

12:00 A 8:00 A

LUNCH

REHEARSE

CROSS TRAIN

WARM DOWN

SHOWER

FREE

DINNER

FREE

SLEEP

2h 1h

Oct.

OFF SEASON 12 wks.

CONSUMPTION hydration

WEEKLY

Feb.

Aug.

May

Aug.

Jun.

Jul.

HYGIENE cleanliness

Feb.

Oct.

Aug.

Jan.

Nov.

Mar.

Jun.

Jul.

Dec.

Jan.

Nov.

Oct.

May

Aug.

Dec.

Jan.

Nov.

1h

3h

3h

2h

2h

1h

1h

1h

1h

1h

1h

1h

8h 6h 4h 2h

RATIO


“Everything in the universe has rhythm. Everything dances.� - Maya Angelou


The Branded Lifestyle The focus of this project is human behavior as characterized by their immediate context. The design goal is to use architecture to reflect and contribute to the identity of an individual or group entity.

placing subjects in an environment carefully tailored and crafted to their way of life, the architecture enhances the user’s sense of self by utilizing space as a way to conform to their everyday life.

A person’s habits, attitude, and values are all formed and shaped by their specific lifestyle - an internal instinct that looks within and manifests itself externally in the form of interaction, expression, and self image. By

The site is located in the New Orleans Arts District, the premier neighborhood for cultural institutions (galleries, museums, etc.) as well as entertainment/nightlife and urban housing such as loft and studio apartments.


INTERIOR RENDERING | Performance Hall A sleek black color palette in the performance area maintains a level of theatrics on the ground floor as visitors wander in and out of the Season Haus during a New Orleans gallery night. The spectators become both an observer and participant in a production that is part masterpiece and part everyday life.


EXTERIOR RENDERING | Showers The wet changing area is portrayed in this scene using a skewed camera angle to dramatize the space. A mix of steam and clouds were rendered to generate the atmosphere of a spa or sauna. The dancers included in the illustration are wearing towels and flesh-colored costumes to indicate the time of day in their schedule as

well bring attention to additional opportunities to practice outside of rehearsal. Morning sun provides thermal energy and heats the showers, raising the body temperature of the performers for proper stretching. The holistic white interiors differentiate the living space from the dark, theatrical performing space on the ground floor.


Exterior Rendering


INTERIOR RENDERING | Kitchen/Dining Dancers develop a special relationship to the ground plane, and thus, sprung floors (specialized flooring that supports movement and absorbs shock) were installed throughout the Haus in unconventional spaces such as the kitchen and bathrooms in order to maximize opportunities for rehearsal and performance.


Physical Model Composed of laser cut acrylic and fastened onto a plywood base, this 1/16� scale model stands 4� tall just big enough to fit in the hand and rotate around for maximum viewing with the turn of the wrist. When the acrylic hits the light, the model appears multi-faceted and prismatic

resembling a precious stone. The exterior walls are left transparent with facade details etched in, while the horizontal surfaces lay translucent to register the spatial configuration of the ground plane. The model is held together through the use of hot melt adhesive.


CUT

ZU

2012


Digital Fabrication Cut-zu is an architectural design, installation, and piece of artwork built for the Tulane School of Architecture in New Orleans, LA. This project was done in collaboration with a team of eleven members. The design was a study of ergonomics, digital modeling, and fabrication techniques in the built form as well as a valuable

learning experience in working collectively as a group. Several weeks were spent on fine tuning the concept followed immediately by a series of tests done through prototypes and study models. During early May 2012, the installation was fully constructed in just under sixteen hours.


ADGM 6800 / Spring 2012 Project Team Ayo Alao Alyce Deshotels Oscar Garcia Lindsay Johnson Zach Kauffmann Sean McGuire Brad Rohman Julie Sanders Allison Schiller Kaci Taylor Guan Wang


FILLING THE

FABRIC PARKING CIRCULATION FILTER MEANDER FUNNEL

A Gateway to St. Louis Cemetery No. 2 New Orleans, LA


Culture of Remembrance In neighborhoods like these, what’s often practiced is a sort of “culture or remembrance.” When a loved one or respected member of the community passes away, surviving family members and close friends work to preserve the memory of this person and honor his or her life in the form of life-sized pictures, bumper stickers, or t-shirts airbrushed with the person’s name and portrait.

Statistics + History That being said, living in New Orleans, it is a given fact that violent crimes happen in a very large frequency compared to the rest of Louisiana and even to the United States as a whole. The reality is that the majority of them occur in and around these neighborhoods. While one can dream up a myriad of possible design solutions

CIRCULATION

ART

to slow down the crime rate, it is my intention to address the aftermath of such a situation when a violent crime is taken too far and thus becomes a damaging, irreversible event. The proposal is to install a burial ground within the neutral ground of Claiborne Avenue, situating it between St. Louis and Iberville Street directly adjacent to St. Louis Cemetery No. 2, which was consecrated in 1823.

Site Proximity This zone for plug-in then becomes a contemporary counterpart for the existing cemetery, which stands just across the street. The project acts as an extensions of this historic piece of land. As a form of urban infrastructure that is both a monument and public space, an updated version to the cemetery will continue to serve cultural significance to this neighborhood in New Orleans with support from voodoo practice and jazz funerals.

FLOWER BED

REFLECTION POND

INSCRIPTION

OAK TREE

MEMORIALIZATION

INDIVIDUAL

COLLECTIVE


Time and Projection It is also important to consider the lasting or long-term effects of this insertion into the urban fabric. A burial ground grows wih time. It is, more orless, permanent and can expand its footprint as it becomes more populated with age. In addition, it serves as a physical, tangible link that unites a family with multiple generations and, ultimately, many years from now, becomes a place where one can trace his or her lineage,

The Design The program supports a series of meditative areas and spiritual spaces, which play with the idea of the individual versus the collective. Also included are peaceful and tranquil elements such as reflection ponds and clusters of trees, which acts as a sound barrier to the traffic and can be used to take shelter from the sun. The forms in the field indicate the placement of tombs that are taken from the dimensions of the fixtures in the

historic St. Louis Cemetery No. 2. To create variation in section and emit a sculptural quality to the urban space, the heights of the volumes are offset, adding complexity to the composition by playing with perspective, light, and shadow. A closer look at the differences between the ornate, romanticized tombs of the past and the practical/beneficial potentials of updated tombs reveals the possibilities of what can be constructed today. In terms of materiality, rubble from the demolition of I-10 can be broken down and recycles to supply the materials necessary for these structures. The perimeter of the contemporary cemetery is left open as a porous entity to allow visitors to come and go as they please, creating an experiential dynamic that contrasts spontaneity with scheduled tours and events.


Serial Sections


“Our dead are never dead to us, until we have forgotten them.� - George Eliot


(DIS)SOLVING DIFFERENCES A Civil Rights Museum

This project sets out to focus on what happened in the past, portray it realistically and interestingly, and to understand it in relationship to the present and future developments of human relations in Louisiana, the United States, and perhaps the world. The LCRM recognizes the redemptive importance of memory. It is both a time capsule and a modern day think-tank focused on seeking equitable solutions to common problems.


AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM


EXTERIOR RENDERING | Entrance This image illustrates the front entrance of the museum looking from across the street. The rendering, acquiring several different styles of media, was produced as a blend between hand sketching and vector work. In post production, Photoshop was used to fill in the color, add text, and generate the shadows.ills.


“The only tired I was, was tired of giving in.”

- Rosa Parks

SITE The site is located on Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard in New Orleans, LA Haley was is famous for her active involvement with the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), which started in 1960. This organization would go on to take a direct lead during the 1960’s civil rights movement in the city. Thus, this area of New Orleans holds a great amount of sentimental value for the occurrences of the past and the potential it holds for the future.


kaufman’s

CONCEPTkills.

handelman’s

Memory and recollection were the driving ideas behind the conceptual design of the project. The idea was to give the user a sense of walking amongst the past while still coexisting in the present. The connections they place between themselves and the rich history are smooth, while the quality of the space can be quite boisterous with the changes in plane.

COMMUNITY GARDEN growing awareness visual connection to temp. gallery

historic dryades st.

m. l. king

o.c. haley

COMMUNITY GARDEN growing awareness spillout from small gallery

LIVE TIMELINE PROGRESSION

CONNECT THE DOTS navigation circulation

LIV

change sustainability

SPATIAL QUALITYls. PROGRESSION change

sustainability throughout the main exhibition A ramping system was designed space to reflect on the struggles felt during the Civil Rights Movement. The movement transcends the first two floors until resolving on the third and final floor, where the temporary exhibition is situated.

kaufman’s

SPIRALING OF SPACE handelman’s tumult conflict

VERTIGO

historic dryades st.

m. l. king

o.c. haley

PROXIMITY With a site on a historic main street in the city, the location of the LCRM stands directly beside a community garden. Given the historic connotations of the site, this presents an excellent opportunity to engage the past, the present, and the future. In addition to the garden, the museum will house a community meeting space, which is open to use during special events in the city.

COMMUNITY GARDEN growing awareness spillout from small gallery

PROGRESSION change sustainability


1. Lobby/Reception 2. Loading Dock 3. Permanent Exhibition 4. Auditorium 5. Cafe 6. Temporary Exhibition 7. Library 8. Community Room


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BYAN AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

7

7

4 6

3

3

3

3

3

5 2

1 8

02

01

PRODUCED BY ANAUTODESK AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1

03


INTERIOR RENDERING | Lobby The image was created through a special blend of analog and digital representation. The space was modeled in virtual space before being printed and traced in order to get the pencil lines. Color was dded with Photoshop in addition to special lighting effects.


WALL SECTION MODEL | Facade Study This physical model (1/2”=1’-0”) displays the character of the facade and the various components that make up its surface. MDF board was cut down in the shop to designate the floor slabs, and basswood panels were inserted between vertical members to construct the overlapping quality of the exterior.


Acknowledgements Lifestyle as a ‘Total Work of Art’ [2012]

Filling the Fabric [2011]

John B. Allen Doug Harmon Irene Keil Wendy Redfield

Julia Czerniak Judith A. Kinnard Jon Tate

Cut-zu [2012]

(Dis)solving Differences [2010]

Kickstarter.com Bill Racek (donor) Allison Schiller (donor) Sean McGuire (donor) Bryan Harden (donor) Jeffrey Pomerantz (donor) Gretchen Erlingson (donor) Jeff Kobacker (donor) Jake Lazere (donor) “Mark” (donor) Larry Palestina (donor) Robert Johnson (donor) Amy Richards (donor) Michelle McCormick (donor) Harvey Wier (donor) Sean Fisher (donor)

Doug Harmon John Klingman Tiffany Lin

Construct NOLA Piedmont Plastics TSA Digital Output Lab Ammar Eloueini Kenneth Schwartz


“For the love of design, composition, and all things visual, thank you for taking the time to view my work.�

o


O Portfolio  

The academic work of Oscar Garcia

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