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GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN


COVER IMAGE COURTESY: BANGLADESH’S NEW BAITUR ROUF MOSQUE, BY MARINA TABASSUM, WINNER OF THE AGA KHAN AWARD.

DECEMBER 30, 2016

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BUILDINGS TO BE IN CONTEXT WITH THEIR SURROUNDINGS

Marina Tabassum, winner of the Aga Khan Award, tells us that the architect’s responsibility should be beyond the building he or she designs. 16 GID – DECONSTRUCT

RICH IN REDS

Creamy whites with striking shades of red coloured in undertones of black, wood and gold, this living room arrangement from Habitat gives a hearty modern cabin vibe.

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THE BEST BUILDINGS OF 2016

From buildings that have inspired us through their brilliance not just in the architectural values they endorse but in the sheer poetry they seem to exude, GID weighs in on our design sensibilities to find the seven best building designs of 2016.

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LIGHTING THE ART OF CRAFTSMANSHIP

We focus on the design duo Prateek Jain and Gautam Seth, the men who brought the art of blown glass workmanship to India and celebrated the craft through mindblowing designs.

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THE LIGHT THAT INSPIRES

Not bound by material, place or medium, Zeinab Al Hashemi, a new-generation designer, recently collaborated with Swarovski to create an interactive, site-specific installation that celebrates the material and the people around it.


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DESIGNS FOR SUSTAINABLE CHANGE

Capturing the spirit and imagination of consumers throughout the world, GROHE once again strikes with impactful designs for the “Green Mosques” initiative.

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THE MAXIMAL MINIMALIST

Creative Director at the House of Christian Lacroix, Sacha Walckhoff ’s exuberance transcends not only fashion but also interiors.

THE ANGELIC HOME

Model and lifestyle blogger Angelique de Lange’s beach-facing Doha casa exudes serenity and sophistication.

CREATING SPIRITUAL HARMONIES IN CITIES

The man behind architectural fantasies, architect Ma Yansong is on a mission to create cities that are more organic, undulating and ultimately more liveable and human.

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PUBLISHER & EDITOR IN CHIEF

YOUSUF BIN JASSIM AL DARWISH

MANAGING DIRECTOR & CEO

JASSIM BIN YOUSUF AL DARWISH

MANAGER DR. FAISAL FOUAD

MANAGING EDITOR

DEPUTY EDITOR

SENIOR CORRESPONDENTS

SINDHU NAIR IZDIHAR IBRAHIM AYSWARYA MURTHY

UDAYAN NAG KARIM EMAM CORRESPONDENTS AARTHI MOHAN KEERTANA KODURU

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR

DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR

ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

VENKAT REDDY HANAN ABU SAIAM AYUSH INDRAJITH MAHESHWAR REDDY

PHOTOGRAPHER ROBERT F ALTAMIRANO

MARKETING & SALES

MANAGER SAKALA A DEBRASS TEAM

MATHEWS CHERIAN

SONY VELLATT

DENZITA SEQUIERA

ANIS MANSOURI

NISHAD N P

GHAZALA MOHAMMED

EVENTS OFFICER

ACCOUNTANT PRATAP CHANDRAN

DISTRIBUTION DEPARTMENT

ESLAM ELMAHALAWY

BIKRAM SHRESTHA

ARJUN TIMILSINA

BHIMAL RAI

BASANTA POKHREL

PRADEEP BHUSAL

GLAM INTERIORS & DESIGN IS PUBLISHED BY ORYX PUBLISHING & ADVERTISING CO. WLL. The contents of this publication are subject to copyright and cannot be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher and/or license holder. All rights reserved with Oryx Publishing & Advertising. The publisher does not accept responsibility for any advertising contents carried in this publication. Contact info@oryxpublishing.com www.issuu.com/oryxmags www.facebook.com/gidqatar Call us: +974 44550983, 44672139, 44671178, 44667584 Fax: +974 44550982

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FROM THE DRAWING BOARD It is that time of the year, when numerous lists make the round; from the best buildings, to the best products of the year, and some even recount the worst structures built this year. Building Design, a British architecture website, awards the Carbuncle Cup – an honour bestowed upon the worst-building of the year. This year, the site ridiculed Lincoln Plaza, a 31-storey luxury residential building in London, going so far as to say that this building is “a putrid, pugilistic horror show that should never have been built.” E D I TO R ’ S C H O I C E

Going with the majority, GlD also picks the best buildings that were revealed in 2016; most of them public buildings from around the world, all of them conforming to the topography of the space they are placed in and responding to and meeting the requirements that each needs to fulfill. What is significant is the social impact that a building leaves on the public, how the building has served the community by upholding the traditions of the environment. Marina Tabassum, winner of the Aga Khan Award, architect of Bangladesh’s new Baitur Rouf Mosque defines building in its context, explaining why she did not choose traditional minarets and domes instead opting for a single-storey terracotta brick structure: “We can design buildings like the ones designed by Frank Gehry. But I would question whether that would be the right thing to do in a country like Bangladesh, whose economy is still not developed.”

One of the worst architectural horrors in Doha on the Airport Road which is now rented out to Qatar Airways.

As we bid adieu to 2016, let us also contemplate on one of the most monstrous buildings in Doha and wonder what instigated the architects to create such a colourful oval piece of design horror… Wishing all our readers a design-infused 2017. Happy reading

SINDHU NAIR

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GID

GRAPEVINE

CELEBRATING EMOTIONS THROUGH COLOUR Berger Paints highlights the splendour of Arabia in a unique social awareness campaign called “Colours of Arabia”, which celebrates beauty as well as the unique culture and heritage of the region. At the same time it is also a CSR initiative with a touching social message. The newly launched initiative complements the UN’s declaration of 2016 as the year of “Travel for All - Improving Universal Accessibility”  through a series of nine short films. The web series is a set of two minute films woven around an intensely emotional and heartwarming narrative, in Arabic with English sub-titles. Featuring landmark structures and geographical landscapes, including deserts, wadis, creeks and beaches, the web-series highlights the journey of a visually impaired young girl with her grandfather, her  Jiddoo . Through the journey Jiddoo connects heritage, culture and landscape with colours through verbal narration, feel and touch. The films not only connect with the emotions of the viewers but also help to demystify that people with visual disability can also enjoy and experience physical and natural beauties present around them through their special sensory powers.

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FUNCTIONAL BATHROOM SOLUTIONS Ideal Standard revealed the designs for 2017 at a special showcase event. Inaugurating its Design Bathroom Centre in Dubai, this is a first-of-its-kind in the Middle East and North Africa region. The centre will be showing the company’s already successful complete bathroom solutions for all building types–Dea, Tonic II, Ventuno, Connect, Strada, to name a few– as well as its bathroom mixers, counter tops and vessel basins. The highlight of the event was the reveal of the 2017 launches: Connect Air and Tesi total bathroom solutions, and Ceraflex mixers. The Connect Air collection offers a comprehensive bathroom solution; it is all about lightness and provides a combination of practicality and affordable luxury. The Ceraflex collection of bathroom mixers is modern with clean-cut lines, and designed to complement different bathroom styles, while the Ideal Standard technology is an absolute warranty for a reliable fitting. The collection features a new ceramic-disk cartridge, an upgraded version of the original Ideal Standard invention which revolutionised the industry all those years ago.


TELL YOUR OWN HOME STORY Creating personal relaxing atmospheres with the exposure of new ideas and cultures form the world within the walls of your homes. Jotun has unveiled their new range of colours in three dreamy palettes, namely Nordic Living, Urban Living and Continental Living. Whether physical or virtual, travelling enriches our minds through a constant flow of impulses and inspiration. Jotun’s range explores living with and off nature which can be reflected in our homes in minimalistic, soft havens embraced by a cool Nordic touch. Tokyo, San Francisco and other big cities have become hotspots for creativity and design and the Urban Living range mixes playful mentality with cool energy to create unique sanctuaries. Adding a distinct signature to the surroundings, the colours in the Continental Living range reflects memories that you treasure from your travels where homes are filled with delicate tactility and warmth.

NEW CONCEPTS IN PAINTING SOLUTIONS FROM HEMPEL Regional R&D Manager of Hempel Paints, Mr Johnson Puthangady, recently presented on the topic of “Environment Friendly Paint in Indoor Air Quality” at a session at the Qatar Green Building Conference. He introduced Hempel’s Contex Thermoguard and Topaz Zero to 30 international specialists working in the sustainability sector. Topaz Zero is a premium-quality environmentally friendly waterbased emulsion paint with excellent opacity, washability and colour retention features. Topaz Zero has zero VOC is free of hazardous material and its premium quality reduces the need for recoating and increases the service lifetime of the paint and therefore reduces the waste associated with manufacturing new paints to recoat the damaged surfaces. Contex Thermoguard is an exterior coating which reduces internal heat gain from walls and roofs to help keep the interior cool and reduce reliance on air conditioning. The technology is based on the ability of special raw materials which have the ability to reflect radiation from the near-infrared region especially when the exterior colours are medium to dark.

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GRAPEVINE

BE UNIQUE A trunk show of exceptional know-how and mastery, Tanagra takes you behind the scenes to experience first-hand, masterful artisans from worldrenowned brands with their expertise bringing bespoke collectibles to life. Be unique and design your very own timeless creation by customising a piece from your personal or newly acquired collection. This initiative by Tanagra exposes five different handicrafts, namely, insignia engraving on Moser crystal, handmade patina and embossing on S.T. Dupont leather, hand-painting on Richard Ginori porcelain, bespoke embroidery on D.Porthault fine linen and curated personality-based Mazlo masbahas. Moser Crystal The secret to the production of the inimitable Moser colours rests in combining the highest-quality raw materials which are melted with the admixture of precious soils and metal oxides. Moser colours follow from semi-precious mineral colours and are characterised by specific shades. Combining the abilities of the glass makers and the creativity of collaborating glass artists, unique products of various colour combinations and shades are created. Typical colours 1

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are overlay and underlay colours such as amethyst (violet), rose, blue, aurora (orange), reseda (yellow-brown) and green or popular six-colour sets.

with precious metal decorations. Some of it’s original patterns are still produced today.

S.T. Dupont Leather Fine engraving techniques such as guilloche are one of S.T. Dupont’s signature skills. Precision in techniques, micromechanics and diamond-tipped tools are used for the finishing of a product. With a passion for producing the finest in luxury materials, this design atelier dates back to 1872, where French artisans were chosen to revive unique crafts of the past to produce something exceptional.

D. Porthault Inspired by her love of Impressionist art and the gardens at Giverny, and by her association with the fashion designer Maggie Rouff, Madeleine Porthault’s colourful sheets, adorned with dressmaker details became an instant success. Table linens have become their signature and the house is synonymous with the artful mix of prints and embroideries, both classical and fanciful, and with a dedication to quality, craftsmanship and detail.

Richard Ginori The Richard Ginori factory has produced handcrafted and elegantly decorated porcelain tableware for more than 300 years. It’s pieces have graced museums and the tables of both the world’s wealthy and aspiring middle class. It’s range includes all-white to air brushed and hand-painted collections

Mazlo Remaining faithful to the rigorous and demanding framework of discipline and surprises when working with raw materials, Robert Mazlo pushes the boundaries of his creations by instilling the richness of his imagination and his infinite love for art in his timeless pieces.

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MASTERMIND

BUILDINGS TO BE

IN CONTEXT WITH

THEIR SURROUNDINGS MARINA TABASSUM, WINNER OF THE AGA KHAN AWARD, TELLS US THAT THE ARCHITECT’S RESPONSIBILITY SHOULD GO BEYOND THE BUILDING HE OR SHE DESIGNS.

As one of the only female architects in a country where women rarely even enter mosques, Marina Tabassum was an unconventional choice to design Bangladesh’s new BaitUr Rouf Mosque, which has just won a prestigious international prize. But there is little of the conventional about the 45-year-old Tabassum or her design, which eschews traditional minarets and domes in favour of a single14

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storey terracotta brick structure that is suffused with light and remains cool even in the scorching summer months. Like most women in deeply conservative Bangladesh, Tabassum had barely set foot in a mosque when she was commissioned to design the building in 2005 after her grandmother donated a piece of land. Few of Bangladesh’s mosques have dedicated sections for female


“The whole idea of spirituality as an element in design has always been something very intriguing and I like working with spiritual spaces.”

worshippers, and most women pray at home. But Tabassum visited over 100 before setting pen to paper for the BaitUr Rouf Mosque in north Dhaka, focusing on creating a haven of peace in a poor neighbourhood of one of the world’s most congested cities. “We may not have a tradition of women going into mosques to pray in the Indian subcontinent, but I have experienced some really beautiful spiritual spaces. That has always been a great inspiration to me,” she told AFP in a recent interview. “The whole idea of spirituality as an element in design has always been something very intriguing and I like working with spiritual spaces.” Tabassum, who emerged as one of Bangladesh’s top architects after designing Dhaka’s Museum of Independence, says her sex has not constrained her career. “I think of myself as a professional. This whole notion of me being a woman really does not exist in my mind. It just does not exist,” she said. The Aga Khan Award for Architecture is handed out every three years and rewards excellence in architecture serving Muslim communities. This year the $1 million prize was shared between six projects around the world. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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“Unlike other mosques in the country, it does not have a minaret, or a dome, or a platform to deliver Friday prayers. Yet to these visitors it is one of the most beautiful mosques in the country,” the 38-year-old imam told AFP on a recent visit. “The mild light that enters the mosque is very soothing. Even during a hot summer day, the temperature inside remains mild. You feel like you’re in natural air conditioning.” Dozens of tiny windows in the roof and walls create a soft light that changes through the day as the sun passes over the building, while the traditional terracotta bricks keep the interior cool. Tabassum also teaches architecture students and says she is highly selective about the projects she takes on, and every one must have some social value. “We are a very young nation and an architect’s responsibility goes beyond just designing beautiful buildings,” she said. “We can design buildings like the ones designed by Frank Gehry. But I would question whether that would be the right thing to do in a country like Bangladesh, whose economy is still not developed. “In the Bangladesh context, that would be an ugly thing to do.”

The jury said the Dhaka mosque “challenges the status quo”, praising its “robust simplicity that allows for deep reflection and contemplation in prayer”. Officially secular but mainly Muslim Bangladesh has a rich history of mosque building, dating back to the Turkish invasion of the 13th century. The earliest combined their own designs with elements found in local traditions, such as the use of brick and small domes that span the roof, creating a unique style. Tabassum said she tried to fuse those “glorious lost traditions” of mosque design with contemporary architectural practices. Since it was completed in 2012, the BaitUr Rouf Mosque has attracted visitors from around the country– to the obvious delight of the imam, Deen Islam. 16

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“We are a very young nation and an architect’s responsibility goes beyond just designing beautiful buildings,” she said.


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DECONSTRUCT

RICH IN REDS

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CREAMY WHITES CAN GO WELL WITH STRIKING SHADES OF RED - HERE THEY PROVIDE FOR A NEUTRAL BACKDROP WITH THE HIGHLIGHT COLOUR ADDED IN MANAGEABLE DOSES. COLOURED IN UNDERTONES OF BLACK, WOOD AND GOLD, THIS LIVING ROOM ARRANGEMENT FROM HABITAT GIVES A HEARTY MODERN CABIN VIBE. (ALL PRODUCTS ARE FROM HABITAT)

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WILBO ARMCHAIR– QR 2790 2 NEWMAN SOFA STONE LEATHER– Q R11990 3 ALLESSIO EXTENDING COFFEE/ DINING TABLE– QR 5190 4 EL SIDEBOARD–QR 4690 5 ELISABETH/TERRARIUM–QR 269 6 ELISABETH PYRAMID LANTERN–QR 459 7 ALDGATE/ LRG BLK PENDANT YELLOW INTERIOR- QR 859 8 REGARD PHOTO DESERT– QR 549 9 COLBY KNITTED THROW– QR 180 1

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GID

MIX

ETHNIC FLAIR WO R K M A D E F U N

This hand-painted bowl from Habitat is perfect for coffee tables but also adds a natural detail and it can be filled with anything.

Make study more fun for kids with this creative artifact from Gaultier.

P L AY F U L D E S I G N

Enriching a modern interior even with it’s vintage look this playing cards wall picture from Midas brings a classy touch to your space.

BE DIFFERENT! From accessories with design versatility which can be easily switched out to more specific design styles and possibilities, think outside the box with this mix of products to make your home cool and fun. P U P P Y LO V E

Wake up a boring bedroom with this adorable wall painting from Midas.

S H I F T FO C U S

C O M F O RT C A L L I N G

Adorn your home with style and comfort with this quirky throw cushion from Gaultier

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Whether traditional or contemporary, floor lamps can gel with any dĂŠcor.This piece from Roche Bobois is versatile and a sure standout.


BRIGHT AND SUNNY

Bring in the freshness of the summer season with this vibrant cushion from Habitat.

T H E G A L LO P I N G H O R S E

This majestic horse artifact from Tanagra makes for a great statement piece in any interior. STYLISH ADDITION

Used as a space divider or even a lighting effect, this multipurpose piece from Midas is a style statement.

T H E A R A B I A N LO O K

This piece from Antiques Corner is truly authentic and gives the space a truly dramatic, royal and inviting look.

S I M P L E A N D P R ACT I C A L

If you are looking for a really cool lamp for your desk or side table, this piece from Gaultier is the right fit.

D R A M AT I C F E E L

Gussy up with this mantel from Midas. A beautiful mirror hanging above and simple candles may be all you need to make the room feel dressed up.

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GID LIST

THE BEST BUILDINGS OF GID WEIGHS IN ON OUR DESIGN SENSIBILITIES TO FIND THE SEVEN BEST DESIGNS OF THE YEAR THAT HIGHLIGHT BUILDINGS WHICH HAVE INSPIRED US THROUGH THEIR BRILLIANCE NOT JUST IN THE ARCHITECTURAL VALUES THEY ENDORSE BUT IN THE SHEER POETRY THEY SEEM TO EXUDE.

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THE SQUARE WITH A HIDDEN MUSEUM Polish architect Robert Konieczny has many inspirational buildings to his credit and the latest to add to his list is the National Museum in Szczecin, which was crowned World Building of the Year 2016. The National Museum in Szczecin – The Dialogue Centre Upheavals is a largely subterranean building which features an open public space on its gently sloping roof. “Our project attempts to combine two contradictory traditions of the space: the pre-war townhouse quarter and the postwar square,” says Konieczny. “As a result, an urban hybrid was created, which is a townhouse and a square at the same time,” he says. Much of the building’s roof is at pavement level, but it gently raises at opposite corners to create space for the museum’s entrance at one end and a barrier to a busy road at the other. Its sunken form ensures it doesn’t block views of significant buildings around the square. “We wanted the entire concept to be uniform, so we used only one material – concrete,” Konieczny explains. “The entrances hide behind pivotal wall partitions, which give the impression of a monolith when closed.”

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GID LIST

A BUILDING WITH HISTORY The first public building to rise in the nation’s capital this year, the National Museum of African American History and Culture fills the last gap in the prime plot of land along the National Mall and along with it a gaping hole in the history of America. The museum was designed by a team of architects under the collaborative name Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup. The group won the competition to design the museum in 2009. “This is the kind of project that comes around every half century for an architect, if you’re lucky,” said lead designer David Adjaye. More than half of the museum is located below ground, stretching between Constitution Avenue and Madison Drive – close to the Washington Monument. The three-tier buildings feature bronzed aluminium skin, burnished and intricately contrasting with the white marble and glass, and tells another story in the narrative. For Adjaye, the skin of the building is the beginning of the narrative.

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THE WOOD THEATRE Jeanne Gang’s firm Studio Gang Architects has completed a theatre that features an elevated glass box wrapped in bands of cedar. Encompassing 36,000 square feet, the Writers Theatre is located in Glencoe, a suburb about 20 miles (32 kilometres) north of Chicago. The new two-storey building opened this year. The theatre company was founded in 1992 in the back room of a bookstore and later moved to a larger space within an ageing brick building owned by the Woman’s Library Club, a local civic group. With only 108 seats, the larger space eventually proved to be too small for the theatrical group, which was starting to draw audiences from across the Chicago metropolitan area. Plus, the building was in need of repair. “They were playing close to capacity night after night, but with very few seats to sell and production costs steadily rising, they were in need of a larger, more flexible space to allow for their growth,” said Chicago-based Gang. Ultimately, the Writers Theatre teamed up with the Woman’s Library Club and the Village of Glencoe to devise a plan to raze the existing building. In its place, they set out to construct an entirely new performing arts centre that would catalyse economic growth in the area and serve as an important cultural landmark. “The resulting design, with its transparency and flexibility, is intended to energise daily life in downtown Glencoe, creating an open, welcoming space where the potential of theatre to unite people across boundaries through shared experience is rendered visible,” said Gang.

Picture Credits: Steve Hall © Hedrich Blessing

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GID LIST

Picture Credits: Bart Van Vlijmen

THE FAÇADE OF A KIND MVRDV has used a pioneering glass technology to replace the brick faÇade of a former townhouse in Amsterdam called the Crystal Houses with a transparent replica, more suited to the building’s new use as a Chanel boutique. Described by the Rotterdam studio as the first of its kind, the innovative faÇade of Crystal Houses uses glass bricks, glass window frames and glass architraves to recreate the city’s traditional architectural style. The glass bricks are held in place with transparent high-strength glue. According to MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas, the construction is “in many ways stronger than concrete”, as was proven during the testing process. Towards the upper storeys, the glass elements merge with the original terracotta brickwork to create the illusion of a dissolving wall. “Crystal Houses makes space for a remarkable flagship store, respects the structure of the surroundings and brings a poetic innovation in glass construction,” he continued. “It enables global brands to combine the overwhelming desire of transparency with a couleur locale, and modernity with heritage. It can thus be applied everywhere in our historic centres.”

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THE TATE MODERN EXTENSION The 64.5-metre-high tower creates 60% more exhibition space for the London gallery, which has become one of the city’s most important cultural attractions since it opened in 2000. Called the Switch House, it features an exterior of latticed brickwork and folded surfaces, while its interior includes an assortment of over ground and underground galleries, as well as a new roof terrace offering panoramic views of the city. Swiss studio Herzog & de Meuron was invited back to design the extension, having been responsible for the original conversion of the former Bankside Power Station. The architects’ approach was to create the second set of galleries on the opposite side of the Turbine Hall – the vast public space that forms the entrance to Tate Modern. These new spaces are connected with the existing galleries – in the section of the building now referred to as the Boiler House – via new indoor bridges on the first and fourth floors. “An addition to an existing building is always very difficult, even problematic: some people will like the new part better, others will prefer the old part, some may say the extension was not necessary, others are convinced of the opposite,” said studio co-founder Jacques Herzog.

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GID LIST

Picture Credits: Hufton + Crow

THE ZAHA HADID TOUCH The Port House is one of a string of projects designed by the late architect Zaha Hadid that are due to be completed this year. Hadid’s firm converted a former fire station in Antwerp’s docks to create the Port’s headquarters, and added a glazed extension to its roof. The volume is covered in triangular facets that are angled to give it a rippling texture at one end and a smooth surface at the other. An integrated viewing platform is wedged between the old and new parts of the building. Port House is designed to host 500 port authority staff in open-plan offices who were previously working across separate sites in the Belgian city. It is one of the most ambitious designs proposed by the British-Iraqi architect, whose firm hopes to realise over 30 projects that were in the pipeline at the time of her death.

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A BUILDING OF HIGHER ASPIRATIONS The Issam Fares Institute – a research centre for public policy and international affairs – has a combined surface area of 3,000 m2 , divided into six floors. In terms of its form, the building is undeniably bold, yet it also displays a sensitivity towards time and place – towards the context, both built and topographical. The context in this case is the American University of Beirut’s upper campus, set on a hilltop with views of the Mediterranean. In the immediate vicinity are four historic buildings and some equally venerable – c 150-yearold – cypress and ficus trees, as well as one of the most important open areas on the campus, the Green Oval. Responding to the givens of the site, Zaha Hadid Architects significantly reduced the building’s footprint by cantilevering a large part of the structure over the entrance courtyard – a move that also draws the space of the adjacent Green Oval towards the base of the new building. The existing landscape is preserved, including all of the old trees, which form a kind of datum line determining the height of the institute, as is evident from a look at the south faÇade. Further connections with the landscape are established by the roof terrace, with its expansive views, and by the circulation ramp that snakes smoothly through the trees to the southern entrance on the second floor.

Picture Credits: Cemal Emden

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GID

WORKMANSHIP

LIGHTING

PUTTING THE FOCUS ON DESIGN DUO PRATEEK JAIN AND GAUTAM SETH, THE MEN WHO BROUGHT THE ART OF BLOWN GLASS WORKMANSHIP TO INDIA AND CELEBRATED THE CRAFT THROUGH MIND-BLOWING DESIGNS. BY SINDHU NAIR

THE ART OF

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The art of detailed workmanship is generally associated with the fine handmade ateliers in and around Milan or Venice. The art of blown glass is one such craft that is never associated with India, even if the textile industry here is one of the most sought–after for its intricate patternmaking embroidery which requires the best of skills. Debunking all such myths of lack of workmanship, is a boutique in India, which specialises in custom lighting solutions in the form of sculptures, installations, chandeliers, pendant lamps, floor lamps, ceiling lights, table lamps, and accessories. The brainchild of Prateek Jain and Gautam Seth, the klove studio originated in 2006 with the goal of making light products that “merged fantasy, reality, functionality and design”. Bent on experimentation and inspired by the skills they learnt from working with traditional Indian craftsmen, the duo have been making leaps and bounds in the design industry through their fantasy lighting solutions. The duo began to hone their dream of creating a hands-on, locally grounded brand that was synonymous with the highest quality of handblown glass possible. Now, klove has become a globally applauded brand, employing over 60 highly skilled workers, and each refined design borrows equally from Prateek and Gautam’s Indian roots and their love for global travel and adventure. The striking commonality between Prateek and Gautam– wherein lies the core of the klove philosophy– is their dedication to local craftsmen, commitment to experimentation and interest in research. Furthermore, the duo always prioritise local, hands-on practical


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WORK OF ART: Clockwise from left: The Alchemic’s Paraphernalia; birch tree chandlier; grasshopper chandlier; artichoke; aesteroids.

experience above any other form of learning; getting their hands dirty while working with fragile materials is a particular experience they thrive on. Here they speak to GID about their work ethic and design ethos. Tell us about your design process. Our design process is very simple. We start with a feeling or an idea, work on a mood board. Start creating a design form. Add function and utility to each form and then go for prototyping. Who are your contemporaries in this business of art and lighting? There are many lighting brands that have made a mark in the business, but we are 32

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“This colossal installation has over 44,000 Swarovski crystals with brass laser cut panels and Klove’s signature form of expression of blown glass to create a 16 feet in diameter and 18 feet high.”

be the birthplace of this technique? We have a strong team of master blowers and blowers in our production unit who have come from generations of glass blowers, but they did glass blowing for non-decorative purposes. We worked very hard to change their aesthetics and outlook. We train them to look at glass as an art form.

uniquely positioned in this field as we are the only lighting brand in India. Our designs are very deeply rooted in our culture, yet have a modern look and an international appeal.

Tell us about one of your commissions which has been very popular. The Alchemic’s Paraphernalia, invoking a mad scientist’s lab. This installation for Hendrick’s Gin represented the idea of organized chaos. The inspiration behind this installation was the actual gin distillation process concept for a

How difficult is getting the blown glass work done in India? Isn’t Venice said to


MANDAPAM: Klove’s 7 m-high wedding canopy, in collaboration with Swarovski, handcrafted in glass and brass commissioned for luxury weddings.

distillery unit designed and handcrafted in glass. Another is Mandapam, a 7 m-high wedding canopy, in collaboration with Swarovski, handcrafted in glass and brass commissioned for luxury weddings. This colossal installation has over 44,000 Swarovski crystals with brass laser-cut panels and klove’s signature expression of blown glass to create a work 16 feet in diameter and 18 feet high. For the uninitiated, a Mandapam wedding canopy is the focal point of energy in every Hindu wedding ceremony. An altar supported by pillars, it is within this revered edifice that the auspicious wedding ceremony takes place by the sacred fire. We collaborated with

Swarovski to create this magnificent contemporary yet traditional piece incorporating Swarovski crystal pendeloques, beads, octagons, pear drops, flat backs and strands in a variety of traditional colours including Bordeaux and Blue Violet. Once dismantled, the Mandapam can be transformed into six different lighting installations making it versatile to use for different occasions. Do you think there is a growing clientele who understand the value of exclusivity and are willing to pay for design exclusivity? Yes, the awareness for good design and eye for detail is growing enormously around the globe. People are willing

to pay any price to own an exclusive/ limited edition masterpiece. Do you think that in the design world, Indian designers have to make that foray, as they are lagging behind when compared to the European designers? We feel that Indian designers have such a strong sense of culture and aesthetics that it is highly celebrated in the design world. And since there is so much diversity in the country, the potential is huge. Architects that you would love to work with? The late Geoffrey Bawa, Tadao Ando, Shigeru Ban. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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THE LIGHT THAT INSPIRES ZEINAB AL HASHEMI IS FROM THE NEW GENERATION OF DESIGNERS WHO ARE NOT BOUND BY MATERIAL, PLACE OR MEDIUM. SHE HAS RECENTLY COLLABORATED WITH SWAROVSKI TO CREATE AN INTERACTIVE, SITE-SPECIFIC INSTALLATION THAT CELEBRATES THE MATERIAL AND THE PEOPLE AROUND IT. BY SINDHU NAIR

Design Days Dubai and Dubai Design Week have always put the spotlight on designers of the region and worked on collaborations to bring out the best of all talents involved. This edition of DDW had another interesting collaboration: Emirati designer Zeinab Al Hashemi and Austrian brand Swarovski, to showcase the brand’s growing support for art and design innovation in the UAE. Dubai-based Zeinab is a conceptual artist and designer specialising in sitespecific installations, spatial art and modern public sculpture. Inspired by the traditions of her Emirati culture and local artisans, she creates intriguing designs that experiment with materials and techniques. Much like Swarovski, Zeinab’s work unites craftsmanship with

innovation. Expanding on the work involved with Swarovski, Zeinab says, “It was an interactive work which also involved a lot of collaborations from different countries and places.” Zeinab was involved with the officials of Swarovski from Singapore, with the manufacturers based in London and the design lab based in Austria; a true sense of global collaboration for design was in process here. The concept of the installation came from geometric shapes created from different forms.“The fact that the crystals came in a particular geometric design added to the design factor as it created an edginess while it made one understand the material and its physical attributes,” says Zeinab.

Zeinab set 33 hexagonal mirroredsteel structures with 1,145 Swarovski crystals and mirrored prisms. Mounted horizontally, and standing 1.5 m high and 3 m wide, the structures reveal an infinite series of kaleidoscopic views as the crystals reflect and refract the multicoloured light. Faced with a shimmering, geometric mirage, visitors are challenged to interact with the reflections, exploring the connections between each other and the world around them. The installation is a reflection of the artist, as she perceives her work: edgy and modern. It is also a reflection of the place it is set in and the myriad connections Dubai has with the rest of the world, through the works of artists like Zeinab. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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With a Bachelor of Arts from Zayed University in Dubai, majoring in Graphic Design, Zeinab likes to tell a story visually and enjoys the challenge of experimenting with new materials and techniques with every new project. She uses contemporary techniques but often takes her subject matter from the cultural traditions of her native UAE. In previous projects she has created mixed media works with design elements from popular culture, commercially available Emirati products and traditional material. In her work, she is interested in reaching

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beyond the art audience to the wider public. “I am inspired by the things around me, things that are forgotten or will soon be wiped from the face of the earth with the advent of technological advancements,” she says. Zeinab focuses on design solutions rather than speaking only of concerns–she tries to find realistic solutions through design. “I deconstruct and then reconstruct,” she says of her design solutions, which are all a takeoff of ordinary, everyday objects found around us to a new solution


ZEINAB AND HER CREATION Clockwise from top: The Swarovski installaion with 33 hexagonal mirrored-steel structures and 1,145 Swarovski crystals and mirrored prisms; Zeinab uses concrete block from construction sites for the Monolith Pillar

that makes us relook at the object with of the area. People are part of their speculation and wonder. surroundings and part of their space,” Like the instance when Zeinab created she says. Urban Reflections, a set of composite Zeinab also loves to work with images using satellite shots of Abu Dhabi craftsmen, recreating what they have and Dubai. Landscapes intermingle in originally created but in a new and more kaleidoscopic abstractions to reveal the challenging version, “ putting to use complex structures underlying these their skills and my design sensibilities.” cities. The hypnotic yet highly ordered Zeinab is also very enthusiastic to patterns follow strict guidelines of work on collaborations as they open geometry, echoing constructions in more vistas for design innovation. Islamic art and architecture. While she describes her work as “edgy, Zeinab is part of a new generation of minimal and modern”, she is open to artists who not only bring novel subjects design solutions that involve more than into focus; they one participant, also present when the a multitude outcome is of innovative always much “I am inspired by the things options. In this more than around me, things that are work of hers she what each one forgotten or will soon be wiped gives viewers a has initially from the face of the earth with perspective on envisioned. the advent of technological developments “Some in the history of collaborations advancements,” she says. photography, come very using techniques naturally; like which would have when I worked been painstakingly difficult to produce with the fishing net weavers, with the before the advent of digital technology. boat repairers, etc.,” she says. The artist challenges her constantly Zeinab also does not typically work shifting landscape, paradoxically from a studio, she moves from one questioning through the medium of place to another as and when the work photography not what is, but rather what demands. could be. “I am interested in site-specific work “I touch on iconic materials used in because I want to grab an audience that everyday life, like the concrete blocks might not be interested in a painting or a from the construction site for the drawing and present other things as art.” Monolith Pillar. I recreated a threeFor someone who is as forwardmetre-high block which is stark and thinking and passionate as Zeinab is, the solid along with a minimised version of a Swarovski installation is a true reflection cement mixer titled Urban Morphology of what we can expect from Dubai and which is intended as a representation the art world there. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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FOCUS Micheal Seum Vice President of Design- GROHE.

DESIGNS FOR CAPTURING THE SPIRIT AND IMAGINATION OF CONSUMERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD, WITH A PLETHORA OF PRESTIGIOUS INTERNATIONAL AWARDS INCLUDING FIVE RED DOT AWARDS FOR INNOVATIVE PRODUCT DESIGN, GROHE ONCE AGAIN STRIKES WITH IMPACTFUL DESIGNS IN THE CONTEXT OF AN INTERNATIONAL PROJECT, THE “GREEN MOSQUES” INITIATIVE. BY AARTHI MOHAN

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Quality, technology and sustainability are the fundamental pillars of GROHE. With a creative and experienced think tank, design is more than just an aesthetic for the brand. They create experiences which go beyond the product, as a result creating an emotional bond of love for design with their customers. No matter whether they are clear and dynamic, edgy or multifaceted, the designs are always well thought-out. Saving water is one of the key aspects of sustainability around the world. This is important as not all regions have a positive water balance. In many places, evaporation exceeds precipitation, forcing people to manage their water consumption as efficiently as possible. The “Green Mosques” initiative installs water-efficient products in the ablution rooms of mosques to help the respective regions achieve a sustainable reduction in water consumption. It was created as part of GROHE’s global WaterCare campaign and has been rolled out across the region including the United Arab Emirates, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Turkey. Water is essential to life. It is also scarce and expensive in the Middle East, particularly the Gulf States. Saudi Arabia is the world’s largest producer of desalinated water, making up 17% of total world output, and the Kingdom’s 250-litre water per capita consumption is 91% higher than the international average. Other countries in the Gulf and the Middle East are not far behind. Therefore, increasing water efficiency and reducing waste is critical to sustainability and development, says a spokesperson from GROHE. Throughout history, mosques have


“Qatar’s consumption is among the highest in the world and the government has been trying to rationalise water consumption and is aiming at promoting sustainability. Raising awareness on this matter will help protect the country’s natural resources. ”

served as a place of education and learning where people are taught to observe moderation and avoid excess in all things. Five times a day, Muslims from around the world attend mosque to perform their prayers. But in doing so, every worshiper uses about 10 to 15 litres to perform ablutions. This therefore presented a perfect platform for GROHE to educate worshippers in a relevant context, as well as create water savings. However, this does not mean that mosques are the only prospective buildings to raise awareness on water conservation. The brand is also currently planning to collaborate with schools. Mosques were chosen based on their high rates of water consumption and high footfalls of visitors. As for the design, to implement water conservation, GROHE switched the faucets in the ablution rooms and used Euroeco Cosmopolitan S self-closing faucets. Product innovation highlights the unerring focus on good design which remains one of the most important values underpinning the brand. This philosophy is instrumental in creating unique products which bring a distinct sense of style. GROHE offers a full range of products featuring the EcoJoy technology. These products were mainly used along with the Euroeco Cosmopolitan S self-closing faucets to equip the mosques and turn them into “Green Mosques”. The EcoJoy technology is integrated into the brand’s sustainable product range to reduce energy and water consumption without affecting performance, and ensuring water flow is just as effective. All EcoJoy products are systematically designed to save water and energy so that precious

resources are conserved. Shifting focus to the present, Qatar’s consumption is among the highest in the world and the government has been trying to rationalise water consumption and is aiming at promoting sustainability. Raising awareness on this matter will help protect the country’s natural resources. In line with that vision, GROHE will be implementing this initiative in Qatar. It is currently in the planning phase. “What usually happens is that we collaborate with an NGO in line with our initiative, choose a location that is prominent to help us raise awareness on water sustainability and change the faucets to save up to 50% of water consumption. The amount of water saved is then turned into food packs for families in need”, comments a representative. The concept of water conservation has been well received. A documentary was filmed and broadcast to raise awareness. Interactive conversations were also initiated on social media portals using the documentary to create direct engagement with bloggers and the overall target reaching over 550,000 people. To take this further, the brand simultaneously engaged with influencers and opinion leaders in all regional markets to help increase awareness by reaching a wider audience through special reports and features via TV, print, radio and online. GROHE takes sustainability very seriously, and the WaterCare programme not only increases water conservation awareness in the region but also enables to finance sustainable food resources for families in need and to improve their standard of living. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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THE MA XIMAL MINIMALIST THE NEW CREATIVE DIRECTOR AT CHRISTIAN LACROIX, SACHA WALCKHOFF’S EXUBERANCE AND ECLECTIC STYLE TRANSCEND NOT ONLY FASHION BUT ALSO MOVE TO INTERIORS. BY AARTHI MOHAN

A lover of beauty in all its forms, Walckhoff enjoys designing across different disciplines. Starting out as a knitwear designer for the House of Christian Lacroix in 1992, he then eventually moved on to designing menswear. In 2010, he was named the Creative Director of the Maison and is now foraying into lifestyle with a department which produces tableware, stationery and scented candles. He has also spearheaded varied collaborations with a number of international brands. When asked about how different it is designing for fashion and interiors he said, “I still love fashion when it is creative and innovative; the work by designers Jacquemus and Demna Gvasalia is thrilling and gives me hope for a better future. Nowadays, interior design and

décor is an appealing universe because it is based on a timeline which gives space for creation but also to enjoy the product afterwards. A collection or a new project takes from six months to two years to be achieved and might stay for several years in the market. This is a totally different time frame from the fashion world where creations are done in a few weeks to remain a few weeks more in the shops before it is forgotten”. Inspiration for this creator comes from all around, from seeing people in the street, exhibitions and galleries to artists and antique books as they go out of print. He closely follows the works of Canadian artist, David Altmejd, who has a strong, almost disturbing way of expression. In fashion, it is Gabrielle Chanel and a young guy called Simon Jacquemus. He also loves the davidnicolas team. “Working in

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fashion and lifestyle at the same time is very inspiring; sometimes a bad idea in fashion might give you a great idea for your lifestyle collection. Today was a big day for me as I presented to my team at Lacroix all my ideas for the Fashion and Home Decor collections for the summer 2018. I worked on it for the last two months and it has been quite intense,” says Walckhoff speaking to GID on his collaborations, lifestyle launches and everything from fashion to interiors. Most quirky accessory that you have used as decoration? I am a big fan of contemporary art as it is a way to see the world in an unrealistic way and to build a decor which allows me to extract myself from the real world. Lately I bought this amazing human head with crystals inside by artist David Altmejd and an embroidered piece of a real car by artist Severija Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė   Bold or neutral colours for your home? White walls, a lot of black and white and bold colours here and there. Balance is the key. Your favourite work so far and why? I love the work we did for Evian, as transforming an ordinary bottle of water into an object of desire entirely changes the way you look at a bottle of water and this is captivating for a creative spirit. 

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FASHION AND INTERIORS Clockwise from left: The Madones collection, carpet designs for MOOOI and the LWYW collection.

“I am a big fan of contemporary art as it is a way to see the world in an unrealistic way and to build a decor which allows me to extract myself from the real world.”

Most used décor in interior styling? Black and white stripes.   What’s your favourite room in your house? I spend a lot of time in my bedroom and I designed our bespoke bed. Savoir Beds in London made it beautifully and it is named the “PS Bed”, the Pascal & Sacha bed. Most challenging project you’ve ever taken on? Still to come I hope! I enjoyed designing the Lacroix furniture collection in collaboration with Roche Bobois which just arrived on the market this fall.


Your latest obsession in interiors? I would love to design the interiors of a hotel. Your go-to colour combination? Neutrals mixed with black and white with a combination of sophisticated colours.   What colours and prints are “ontrend” at the moment? Dark greens and turquoises, metallicssomething that says I am sophisticated, singular and humourous. Your top tips for styling interiors? This is a training which takes time, depending on your education and taste; learning it through books, visiting exhibitions, talking with dealers helps. A decorative object for your home should be of high quality, decorative but useful also and designed by an artist or designer whose work you like of course. You should not be afraid of the price.   A design motto you follow? As they say in Beirut: “Price will vanish from your mind but quality will stay in your hands!” Modern or traditional for home interiors? A mix of both! History and modernity are always a good choice. Of the many collaborations you

“Price will vanish from your mind but quality will stay in your hands!”

have done, could you speak about something that has been very close to you and are there any to look forward to in the near future? Working with amazing companies like Verreum, Taiping, Savoir Beds, Kartell, MOOOI and many others is always thrilling. I need to be close to the craftsmanship ...that is all what matters to me. A day in the life of Sacha Walckhoff ? My day goes from staying in bed all day to meeting with press editors during crazy press days in New York or Shanghai!

LACROIX COLLABORATIONS: Top: The Edition 5 ans collection celebrating the maison’s 5th anniversary. Right: Furniture collection with Roche Bobois. Left: The Caribe collection. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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Advertorial

Bringing in the WAW factor!

Driven by the philosophy of practicality, quality and style, WAW is home to some iconic international brands right here in Qatar.

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Founded in 2005, the WAW showroom features high-quality German products exclusively through its qualified registered dealers. The company has grown steadily and successfully, establishing itself as a professional module system that can cater to your requirements. All products are ISO 9001-certified and the company operates to international standards ensuring quality service to customers with continuous follow-up’s, expert advice and competent kitchen planning which includes professional assembly as well. A team of experienced architects and technical sales personnel supported by an accounting network and procurement department help in the smooth and efficient operation. Offering an international flavour of design experience, while providing services and professional advice in planning interior spaces, WAW introduces concepts to designers through its use of new technology by creating 3D images of design spaces such as kitchens or living areas. The showroom features German and Italian products by international brands like Miele and Häcker and is the sole distributor. These brands combine contemporary interior design ideas with practicality. Products range from kitchens to domestic professional appliances and lighting, which include crystals and Murano chandeliers. Miele Miele is a family-owned business specialising in kitchen appliances and machines for commercial applications. The company was founded in 1899 by Carl Miele and Reinhard Zinkann and it aims at manufacturing high-quality domestic appliances and being seen by markets worldwide as a provider of a top-class household product. In the words of the founding fathers, “Success is only possible in the longterm if one is totally convinced of the quality of one’s product”.

Therefore innovation is the foundation of Miele’s success. The customer is the centre of attraction and the brand focuses on the dynamic development of quality and technology along with product innovation. Häcker Synonymous with the world’s finest kitchens for over seven decades, since 1898, Hacker has centralised its entire production. Hacker produces modern fitted kitchens that fullfill the highest claims in terms of quality, functionality, durability and design. The name is wellknown in the sector as a guarantee of good design, reliability and commitment. From humble beginnings as a small carpenters workshop in 1938, Hacker has accelerated to become the largest independently owned kitchen manufacturer in Germany with over fifty dealers worldwide. The brand has won several accolades for product innovations. In 2007, it received a prize in the kitchen furniture segment for its “silent-move” product; in 2010, for its emotionNOVA line; in 2011, for the ‘Climber’ wall unit and in 2013, for the Flying Bridge. “What make us unique are the international brands that we deal with. We are the exclusive agents here in Qatar, it is something different. The customers cannot get these brands anywhere else. We have our own service, workshop and installation teams all certified by the brand. The customers feel that they are buying the brand from the main showroom in Germany”, says Sara Khalid, interior designer and showroom manager at WAW. WAW likes to surround themselves with the highest possible standards of contemporary design. They not only offer the ultimate design experience but also guide customers through the many exciting possibilities offered by these unique collections. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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EXPAT HOME

THE ANGELIC HOME PERSONIFIED BY HER LOVE FOR THE BEACH AND SAND, MODEL AND LIFESTYLE BLOGGER ANGELIQUE DE LANGE OPENS DOORS TO HER DOHA CASA WHICH EXUDES SERENITY AND SOPHISTICATION.

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Inspired by the sea, which is just a minute away from her front door, Angelique’s beachy vibe is the common thread which runs throughout her home. Describing her sense of style as clean, simple and organic, her interiors have an open-plan, natural light-filled living room, artistic accents, glassadorned bookshelves, crisp walls, large windows and a white colour palette. Located in a quaint corner of the Qanat Quartier at The Pearl-Qatar, Angie’s cool-girl approach to fashion exudes at home. “When it comes to decorating my home it’s very similar to my personal style, which is minimalistic, monochromatic, and airy with a dash of glam. I am a calm person by nature and have grown up next to the beach; swimming, surfing and enjoying all that the ocean has to offer, I think that definitely shines through in the aesthetic of this house”, she says. Much like the luxurious yet laid-back designs she’s known for, this blogger’s home adheres to a warm neutral colour palette with white walls and woven accents. “I love the colours white and blue, so it was natural for me to use them throughout the home. Being a model, my work life is so crazy, so when I come home I want to feel relaxed and at peace. I think that is why I love sticking to neutral tones because it clears my mind and allows me to breathe, but I do like adding fun, colourful elements with the accessories”, she says. To combine the traditional home with her modern style, Angie chose furniture with clean, architectural lines. Just like styling an outfit, she was careful not to overdo it. In her living room, a classic whitewashed couch is paired with a silver-lined centre table. “The dining room and living room are connected and I didn’ t want to overpower the house with only one specific colour or element. With white as a constant, I have chosen coloured accessories, paintings and pieces that create a huge impact”, says the model. One of Angie’s favourite elements of the house is the natural light which

pours in at all hours of the day from one go very well with the painting as well”, angle or another. “In the afternoon when she says. the sun sets, the entire house goes from Her house is definitely a hang-out for blue to purple down to yellow which her friends. “I have a lot of dinner parties is just magical to see. Natural light is and everyone always comments on how really important to me, so we searched warm and at ease the space is and they for a long time to find a place where the end up spending many hours around. I bedroom was filled with soft, beautiful love to entertain and have friends over, light during the day. The house is filled so for me it is important for people to feel with only soft lighting as that is how I relaxed and comfortable”, she says. like it. Small lights and the ones which According to Angie, mirrors are a surround the TV create the mood at night must-have and a great way to make a time”, says this design enthusiast. space look bigger as they add depth. When Angie had to decide on the She says, “It’s not just because I am a furniture for the house, she was model, I just love how something as convinced that she wanted to use wood, simple as a mirror can instantly make which is very rustic, and whites. So, she your space look twice as big and elegant”. spent about two months before moving Known for her mirror selfies, she has in to set up the house, going from shop transformed a random piece of plain wall to shop, clicking pictures on her phone, into a glamorous standout with mirrors creating excel spreadsheets–the process she had purchased from IKEA, Doha. was extensive. “Every single piece in the house was chosen for a reason. “I love to treasure memories, so I have A few are gifts, but people used a few DIY pieces as well; it takes me know me so well that back to the good times”, she says. they know what goes well with the house. As it is my personal space, I love to treasure memories, so I have used a Pillows are this model’s obsession and few DIY pieces as well; it takes me back the house is strewn with comfortable to the good times”, she says. The only throws and cushions. “I am a home-bird. pops of colour she has added are the two At any given opportunity, I would love chairs and the paintings. The painting is a to stay in and unwind. I enjoy watching limited-edition piece from Bahrain–only movies, cooking and relaxing so I wanted eight pieces are available world-wide, to create that feel in my home. There and it comes with a message: with bad are still a lot of things that I would like times come good times. For Angie, her to change around, but for now it is my home has to exude positive energy and it calming cocoon”, she says. should not be too cluttered. If Angie could have a dream home, she This model’s personal style is all about would love to have one which is inspired simplicity and comfort. Nudes, white, with wood and whites. Her make-up blue are some of the colours she loves studio is still in the process of design to wear as well. Everything around the and she has used a lot of blues. With a house is symmetric, squared with clean huge number of Instagram followers, her lines and organised. Her initial plan was fan base is more interested in fashion, to design the home in black and white. in particular her #OOTD (hashtag But when she saw the chairs, it was translation: outfit of the day). Her home something about the colours that drew is her sanctuary, which she uses to her into purchasing them. “I have those rediscover herself. “My space is clean, days where I am super out there and I can classic, modern, and peaceful which will go a little crazy on what I am buying and make you want to take your shoes off and to me these chairs resonate that and they stay in all day”, says Angie. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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Advertorial

Sustainable Coatings from Hempel Part of Hempel’s Purearth greener living range, Topaz Zero, has been designed to meet the needs of today’s specification of sustainable solutions for a better tomorrow.

Since 1915, Hempel has been a leading coating specialist providing protection and inspiration to the world. Today it has over 5,500 people in 80 countries delivering trusted solutions in the protective, decorative, marine, container, industrial and yacht markets. Hempel works as a guardian to customers and to their most valuable assets. From ships and bridges to wind turbines and homes, Hempel coatings can be found around the world, protecting manmade structures from corrosion and helping them be more beautiful. Hempel puts environmental sustainability at the heart of everything it does and strives to provide customers with solutions that help them reduce emissions, energy consumption and waste. Safe products for home and family Hempel understands that the choices they make directly affects the health of

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the people and communities living in and around the buildings. Traditional coating materials and processes can have harmful effects on the environment. Conventional painting materials consists of VOC, lead and other hazardous materials which can contribute to health risk when inhaled like eye, skin, nose and throat irritation, headaches, loss of coordination, nausea, dizziness, breathing difficulties and asthma attack. Causing poor outdoor and indoor air quality further contributes to global warming. Hempel’s Purearth is a 5-point strategy aimed at developing sustainable and eco-friendly products that are free of hazardous chemicals. It helps in reducing VOC emissions, energy consumption, waste and health hazards. Topaz Zero Emulsions Topaz Zero Emulsion is an environmentally friendly, superior waterbased topcoat designed under Purearth Umbrella which gives a luxurious finish with good opacity, washability and colour retention properties. It contains zero VOC and is free of hazardous materials with anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties. For enhanced anti-fungal and antibacterial properties, Hempel also features the Topaz Zero emulsions with Silver Ion technology, ideal for areas with strict hygiene control measures. Silver has been used for centuries as an antibacterial agent. It has natural germicidal properties that help inhibit the growth of harmful bacteria. Strong steps are being taken by Qatar

to ensure sustainable development and the specifications often require solutions for a better environment. Topaz Zero was developed by Hempel with a vision to support customers by making every layer of paint contribute to a greener world and in support of the Qatar National Vision 2030. Hempel has provided coating solutions for Hamad Medical City, Qatar National Museum, the Jaber Al Ahmad Al Jaber Al Sabah Hospital in Kuwait with Topaz Zero emulsions. Hempel has been appointed as a trusted supplier for these iconic projects not only for the advanced Topaz Zero solutions that met their stringent criteria, but also for Hempel s renewed service throughout projects and completion Colours developed for the Education and Healthcare sector The availability of synthetic pigments in

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ARCHITECTURE

CREATING SPIRITUAL HARMONY IN CITIES MA YANSONG IS THE MAN BEHIND ARCHITECTURAL FANTASIES LIKE THE HARBIN OPERA HOUSE AND FAKE HILLS APARTMENT COMPLEX IN CHINA, BUILDINGS WHOSE SENSUAL, SCULPTURAL AND OUTLANDISH FORMS EVOKE THE NATURAL WORLD QUITE LITERALLY – THINK MOUNTAINS, VALLEYS OR GLACIERS. FORGET BOXY, GEOMETRICAL AND RECTILINEAR DESIGNS – MA IS ON A MISSION TO CREATE CITIES THAT ARE MORE ORGANIC, UNDULATING AND ULTIMATELY MORE LIVEABLE AND MORE HUMAN. BY NINA STARR 52

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01

While in the past it has primarily been the West exporting its expertise to the East, Ma Yansong has been moving in the opposite direction. America is today his new El Dorado, a land of golden opportunity, as he’s working concurrently on numerous projects. Intent on reinventing housing in Los Angeles by instilling it with a strong sense of community, his first project in the US in Beverly Hills showcases a central courtyard housing trees, native plants and a water feature reminiscent of Beijing’s traditional courtyard homes. Mimicking the adjacent foothills, the 18-unit residential village atop commercial space enveloped in a green wall resembles a small hill that contours, thus bringing nature and a feeling of community into the heart of the concrete jungle. “The concept was to make this five-floor, mid-size and mixed-use building look like a small village, to break down the scale, to have a sense of community. Then we build a hill, and a house on the hill. The courtyard is a space for community, and we have other open spaces like the kitchen, dining and living room facing each other so residents can say hello to their neighbours from their balconies. Privacy is so important, but I think in Beverly Hills specifically, people need to talk to one another.”

02

The UNIC residential project in Paris features a simple double core structure and bare concrete façade, blurring the lines between architecture and nature through stepped terraces, which extend the park’s green spaces to the building’s verticality. While the upper floors showcase panoramic views of the capital and its monuments, UNIC’s podium is connected to a public housing project with direct access to the metro and community resources such as a kindergarten, shops and restaurants to encourage everyday human interaction among a diverse socio-economic neighbourhood. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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03

Ma’s Boncompagni luxury residences in Rome is an adaptive reuse project introducing vibrant contemporary urban living to Rome’s closed-off historical buildings and traditional neighbourhoods. Built in the 1970s, the existing modern edifice was a commercial courtyard building attached to an early 20th-century chapel. Ma removed all of the original structure’s walls, keeping only the floors and columns, choosing to open the old bulky façades instead of demolishing and reconstructing the entire abandoned building. He inserted new metaland-glass living units, balconies and gardens, proposing a more transparent scheme resembling a “bookshelf”.

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Clover House in Okazaki, MAD’s first project in Japan, inserts remnants of an old house inside a new building. Recently completed, it was created when the owner decided to transform his own family house into a local kindergarten. By day, the children and teachers study, communicate, eat, rest and play. By night, the house reverts to a living space for the owner’s family and the school teachers. Rather than destroying the existing 105-sqm, two-storey house, the original wood structure was incorporated into the new building’s design – such as the pitched roof that creates a dynamic interior space and introduces the owner’s memories of the building – and wrapped with a new house skin and organic structure.


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Born in Beijing in 1975, Ma originally aspired to be an artist then a film-maker, but turned to architecture when his application to film school was rejected. After graduating with a master’s degree in architecture from Yale in 2002, he worked as a project designer for the late British architect, Zaha Hadid, in London for a year, and founded the Beijing-based MAD architectural firm in 2004. He was the first Chinese architect to win an international competition for a foreign landmark project: the Absolute Towers in Mississauga, Canada. Before Absolute Towers, Ma had never built a tower before. As it turns out, he had no opportunities to build skyscrapers in China before the Canadian project because nobody believed his studio could deal with such a colossal job. But all that changed thanks to the breakthrough commission.

China in particular has given Ma countless opportunities, providing him with his first base as an architect because “everywhere you look, you see problems. You think you will do better than this, but you just need the opportunity to do it,” he says. A nation still full of potential, some of his projects could not be built anywhere else but in China, which offers creative licence to its architects, who are encouraged to think big and experiment with cutting-edge designs on high-visibility, large-scale projects, which can be designed and constructed at lightning speed thanks to a top-down system with little transparency and regulatory oversight. This is changing now though, Ma divulges, as architects are taking on more responsibility and consulting with the community – also becoming master planners and policymakers – when before they just followed orders. They no longer act as simple middlemen between the government and the developer, but participate in the decision-making process as well. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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In the last few years, Ma’s projects have reflected his vision of the “shanshui city”, which aims at creating a new balance among society, the city and the environment through architecture. He relates, “Shanshui means ‘mountainwater’, two characters, but in China, it’s part of the culture. You can also make a shanshui painting or a shanshui garden”. Being the size of a city, the 560,000-sqm, 120-m high Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre – composed of office, commercial, residential and hotel spaces – allows Ma to realise a fullscale shanshui city. It’s the idea of bringing inspiration from nature into the architectural world, making nature and humans more emotionally connected in modern cities. “Once you have this philosophy, you just need to react to different conditions, the size, the location, but that’s more about instinct. I’m sensitive to my own instinct, and I can come very quickly to the concept. I don’t compare; I don’t hesitate. Before, I looked at what other people were doing and how my work was different from theirs. Now I’m more into my own past and my history, and I want to dig this out and see how to develop myself. It’s more about myself; it’s a lonelier process.”

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Another project that rethinks the traditional model of buildings in a modern city, injecting nature into modern urban architecture so people can share emotions and a sense of belonging, is the 220,000-sqm, 120-m high Chaoyang Park Plaza on the edge of one of the largest public parks in Beijing. Staggered shaped garden terraces at the top of two ridged, asymmetrical dark glass towers offer breathtaking views of the city and the valley created by the site’s shorter buildings, thereby recalling China’s tall mountain cliffs and river landscapes. As if the result of water cascading down the façade, the grooves feature an internal ventilation and filtration system that brings a natural breeze indoors. Further bringing nature inside, flowing water in the interconnecting courtyard lobby recreates a mountain valley scene. Four office buildings shaped like long-eroded river stones are accompanied by two multilevel residential buildings with a “mid-air courtyard” concept that immerses visitors into what would be best described as a mountain forest. 56

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Ma is building high-density, affordable housing that is also architecturally innovative and hopes to be a new landmark for the city. “In China, because of the large population, we have to answer the question of how to make high-density housing. Big buildings are a condition that we have to work with – there’s no choice. If everyone has a courtyard, there would be no Beijing. To design in high-density cities, first you have to have a sense of community, and nature and human scale are important. In Fake Hills, since it’s oceanfront, I decided to bring the mountain there because nothing is big in front of the ocean, and this region has a lot of mountains, very similar in shape. So although we’re making a large community – 4,000 families in one building – we’re also making a new cityscape and people feel like they’re living in a mountain because they have terraces on the roof and open spaces.”

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“Luxury now is nature. When you have a balcony or small garden, that’s beautiful. Nature is also a social device because in front of nature, everyone is more equal and it brings people together. Everyone is talking about sustainability, green architecture. But not many people realise this is actually about humans themselves and how they will live in the future world. In the movies where you see the future, the city is very dark and not very beautiful because technology takes over the sensibility, emotions and spirits of human beings. So when people talk about the environment, it’s a starting point of this transformation from modern times to more nature and humanity. In the modern city, a lot of things were controlled by other priorities, like the economy and politics. Sometimes I imagine if aliens come to attack earth, they will destroy all this. They may leave some pieces, such as Frank Gehry’s buildings or the Forbidden City. But when humanity and spiritual demands become more the priority, the whole world will change.” GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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Set against a man-made lagoon and landscaping and complementing the airport’s natural bay and coastal setting, the Hamad International Airport mosque sits like a jewel on water. Offering spectacular views of the lagoon and the Emiri Terminal, this aquatic-themed mosque was designed by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabum. The mosque is the heart of the airport and can accommodate up to five hundred worshippers at prayer time. It takes the shape of a water droplet with intricate and beautiful silhouettes. Yielding a majestic 50m-diameter glass shell and a gently domed roof which houses a 36m-high minaret, the mosque is adorned with hundreds of thousands of LED lights. The structures are set within a stone-paved plaza dotted with fountain jets representing the purifying role of water.

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GID December 2016