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COVER IMAGE BY ANGEL MALLARI THE HOUSE OF THE KARNIKS’.

APRIL 20, 2015

18 NEOTERIC

AN IDENTITY TAKES FORM

Architect Jean Nouvel shares his experiences while creating the new National Museum of Qatar.

30 THE FOCUS

ARCHITECTURE CHANGES THE WAY WE LIVE

With the spirit of innovation and a devotion to contribute to society through design, Yausif Albaker, the owner and principal architect of Albaker Architects, shares his views on how architecture helps us communicate and can change the way we live.

62 EXPAT HOME

THE STORY OF OUR LIVES

GID explores the artistic home of a modern couple in Doha, who share the story of their life through their beautifully accessoried interiors and eclectic collection of art.

70 GLAMOUR

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

Vice President of Global Buying, Theoutnet.com, Shira Suveyke, talks to us about her desire to merge the traditional with the contemporary and how she has blended them into the interiors of her elegantly designed Manhattan apartment.

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Shaleen and Deven Karnik’s Doha home. PAGE 62


CLOCKWISE FROM TOPLEFT: Albaker Architects designs for New Salata development; the National Museum of Qatar takes shape; colourful images from Tasmeem 3ajeeb; the interiors of Shira Suveyke’s Manhattan apartment.

38 THE DISCUSSION

INCREASING THE GREEN FOOTPRINT

Researchers from the Qatar Green Building Council have turned their attention to making buildings more sustainable, both environmentally and for human health. They are figuring out how to improve the design of buildings in order to save energy and to use materials with less negative impact to get closer to the elusive “sustainable” label.

44 DECONSTRUCT

STEP UP THE STYLE QUOTIENT

A living room should make a statement. We give you the perfect style to transform a neutral décor from dull and boring to fresh and exciting by accessorising it with colourful solutions from Bo Concept.

46 THE EXPERT

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TASMEEM 3AJEEB WAS ALL ABOUT SHIFTING PERSPECTIVES

Muneera Spence, the chair of the Department of Graphic Design at Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar, tells us about Tasmeem Doha’s unique theme, a platform for invention and creativity that enables participants to broaden the scope of design through play.

GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

REGIONAL FOCUS

52 PIECE OF NATURE

GID has an exclusive on the stunning collection of fun and thoughtprovoking statement pieces by global designers, which pushed the boundaries of functional design at this year’s Design Days Dubai.

56 INTERPLAY OF FORM, FUNCTION

AND AESTHETICS

Ivan Parati, winner of the Emergent Artist Prize 2015, talks to us about his innovative design TileTable, his love for designing, and how he wants to bring Islamic culture into the spotlight through his designs.

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MANAGING EDITOR FASHION EDITOR

SINDHU NAIR DEBRINA ALIYAH

DEPUTY EDITORS

EZDHAR IBRAHIM ALI

SRINIVASAN V L SENIOR CORRESPONDENTS

AYSWARYA MURTHY ABIGAIL MATHIAS

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT AARTHI MOHAN PHOTOGRAPHER ROBERT ALTAMIRANO

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR

VENKAT REDDY HANAN ABU SIAM

ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

MAHESHWAR REDDY B

SENIOR MANAGER – MARKETING

FREDRICK ALPHONSO

MANAGER – MARKETING

ASSISTANT MANAGER – MARKETING

AYUSH INDRAJITH

SAKALA A DEBRASS HASSAN REKKAB MATHEWS CHERIAN

SONY VELLATT

NAMRATA KAPOOR

SENIOR MEDIA CONSULTANT

DENZITA SEQUEIRA

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

PRATAP CHANDRAN

SENIOR DISTRIBUTION EXECUTIVE

DISTRIBUTION SUPPORT

BIKRAM SHRESTHA ARJUN TIMILSINA

BHIMAL RAI

PUBLISHER AND EDITOR–IN–CHIEF

CHIEF EXECUTIVE

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

BASANTHA P

YOUSUF JASSEM AL DARWISH SANDEEP SEHGAL ALPANA ROY

GLAM INTERIORS & DESIGN IS PUBLISHED BY ORYX ADVERTISING CO. WLL. The contents of this publication are subject to copyright and cannot be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher and/or license holder. All rights rest with Datalog media solutions. The publisher does not accept responsibility for any advertising contents carried in this publication. Contact info@omsqatar.com, info@omsqatar.com www.issuu.com/oryxmags www.facebook.com/glamqatar Call us: +974 44550983, 44672139, 44671178, 44667584 Fax: +974 44550982


FROM THE DRAWING BOARD AS I WRITE THIS EDITORIAL NOTE IN MY NOT-SO-EXCITING SURROUNDINGS, IN MILAN, THE DESIGN WORLD IS EXPERIENCING A WOW MOMENT IN DESIGN EXCELLENCE. ACTUALLY, NOT ONE BUT MYRIAD SUCH MOMENTS WHEN DESIGN TRANSCENDS ALL EXPECTATIONS OF FORM, MATERIAL AND TECHNOLOGY TO CREATE SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST INSPIRATIONAL DESIGNS AT THE SALONE DEL MOBILE FURNITURE SHOW IN MILAN.

While furniture design always transcends expectations, it is how fashion has crossed over to include product design and material innovation that struck me most as I followed the innovations at the Salone. With the collaboration of five well-known architects and designers, footwear brand United Nude has created pairs of sculptural shoes made entirely on a 3D printer. United Nude founder Rem D Koolhaas enlisted architects Zaha Hadid, Ben van Berkel and Fernando Romero, and designers Ross Lovegrove and Michael Young, to create pairs of women’s shoes solely using 3D printing. And the end products are all sculptural, even architectural in form and while they are spectacular to the eye, comfort seems to be the only aspect that has been surrendered. The designers have defended their design, insisting that the creations are as functional as they are decorative. If that’s true, then the design celebrated form and function while remaining desirable for the market. And that’s truly commendable. While engaging signature architects has become more of a fad in Qatar, these architects seem to have invested more in understanding the culture and landscape of the country creating a unique architectural fabric of the city. Last month, when these famous architects, Rem Koolhas, Zaha Hadid and Jean Nouvel, flocked to Doha for the Art for Tomorrow conference organised by the International New York Times, I was confounded by the lack of local voices in architecture. If there were some present they seemed to be lost in the cacophony of international voices chorusing the local dialect. And then I met Yausif Albaker, young and raring to go, inspired by the architects whose buildings grace his country, but having a vision to create a narrative that will shape up to look at design in an all-encompassing manner. In this global world, we need all of these facets, experienced architects with a vision and local architects who want to bring in their regional vernacular and interpret it as designs that have an overarching ambit. SINDHU NAIR


GID

GRAPEVINE

DRAMATIC HIKE IN LAND PRICES A steep rise in land prices in Qatar has caught the attention of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In a recently released report, the agency termed the rise in real estate prices in Qatar as dramatic. “While the total number of real estate transactions has decreased since the 2013 peak, the total value of real estate transactions has dramatically increased, reflecting higher average prices and compositional changes,” the IMF noted in its country report on Qatar. Outer areas have taken the limelight in terms of price growth in real estate.

A DESIGN DISTRICT IN DUBAI

Dubai Design District, better known as d3, opened to the public in the first week of April, welcoming visitors from all over the country to experience the new city centre. The three-day event took place from 2-4 April, with a programme that consisted of local, regional and international designers, artists, musicians and concept retailers. d3, the newest of TECOM Investments’ Free Zone business parks, is meant to be a dedicated home for design in Dubai, aiming at bringing together established and emerging brands and concepts from creative sectors including interior design, fashion and food. It currently has 11 buildings under construction that, once complete, will be a purpose-built environment that caters to a world-class design community. 14

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QATAR GREEN BUILDING CONFERENCE ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP

One of the leading international organisations in the green building movement, the US Green Building Council (USGBC), has signed up as a partner to next month’s Qatar Green Building Conference. A number of other high-profile local and regional institutions will also be attending the conference which is set to take place on April 27 to 28 at the Qatar National Convention Centre (QNCC). The twoday conference is being organised by Qatar Green Building Council (QGBC), a member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development (QF) which is committed to achieving Qatar’s sustainability and green buildings aspirations through a collaborative and integrated approach with participation from leading national and global institutions.


New York City is no slouch when it comes to green space, but a temporary installation is now at work to bring nature right into the heart of New York’s urban jungle. Ecologist Marielle Anzelone is behind “PopUP Forest: Times Square”, a project to create an urban oasis. The plan is to install towering trees, native wildflowers, shrubs, mosses and ferns in a public plaza in Times Square, providing an immersive natural experience for people. AFP RELAX NEWS

GREEN SCENE

“Architecture starts when you carefully put two bricks together. There it begins.” Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

THE UN-FINISHED BUSINESS Israel’s Design Museum Holon will feature “Alessi In-Possible”, an exhibition curated in collaboration with the Alessi Museum that will present, for the first time, more than fifty design projects that never saw the light of day. Some of the most influential names in the business were responsible for these discarded projects which were scrapped either because of budgetary constraints or production difficulties. In addition to presenting these forgotten designs, the exhibition strives to explain the different stages of a project’s conception through sketches, simulations of the development stages and descriptions of the work process. A dozen conceptual pieces will also be presented. The event celebrates the fifth anniversary of the Museum Holon in Israel. AFP RELAX NEWS GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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GRAPEVINE

FOSTER’S NEW TERMINAL IN JORDAN Designed by Foster & Partners, the new Queen Alia International Airport terminal has now opened in Amman, Jordan. The terminal’s design includes references to local traditions and topography. Seen from the air, the terminal’s tessellated roof canopy comprises a series of shallow concrete domes which extend to shade the facades resembling the flowing fabric of a Bedouin tent.

REMEMBERING THE OTTOMAN ARCHITECT An exhibition on the life and works of Turkish architect Mimar Sinan, who helped to shape the Ottoman Empire more than 400 years ago, has opened in Istanbul. It is being staged by the Mimar Sinan Research Center at Tophane-i Amire Culture and Arts Center, and tells the story using 3-D animation techniques and digital maps. His creations can be found outside of Turkey, in cities like Sarajevo, Mecca and Medina. The exhibition showcases pictures of his works, building models and drawings with the focus on Sinan’s masterpieces and his architectural style. AFP RELAX NEWS

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TASHKEEL ANNOUNCES 2015 DESIGN PROGRAMME Tashkeel selected four UAE-based designers for its 2014-2015 design programme. The second edition of the programme is set to run until March 2015 with its culmination at Design Days Dubai. Khalid Mezaina, Tashkeel’s studio coordinator, says, “This second edition of the design programme is part of a longterm initiative that highlights Tashkeel’s commitment to fostering local designers and talents in the UAE”. The designers chosen by a panel of internationally established contemporary design experts include Talin Hazbar, Rand Abdul Jabbar, Saher Samman and Latifa Saeed.

IMAGES COURTESY- NIGEL YOUNG- FOSTERS+PARTNERS

GID


“We like to say we’re like an opensource brand. We love to collaborate. We really like the idea that Kanye West, a huge celebrity, wants to be creative, to do more than just make music. He is a creative force within himself.” Paul Gaudio is Adidas’ first creative director in 15 years, and a key player in the sportswear brand’s strateg y to use design as a weapon against arch-rival Nike.

A SWEET SOLUTION For all the coffee lovers out there, Singaporean designer Eason Chow addresses the issue of waste produced by single-use coffee pods while infusing a little sweetness in every cup with the Droops coffee maker. It will use pods coated in a hard casing of sugar that could be tailored to the drinker’s taste using more or less sugar and infusing flavours as desired. Inside would be a layer of cream or milk, with the coffee powder in the centre like a traditional capsule. The design of the coffee maker is minimalist and nonintimidating. Three components include a heater, a three-liter water container and a pump all stacked together in a compact form. Chow’s design remains in the conceptual phase for now and he is looking at developing it in future. -AFP RELAX NEWS

SAND TOWER ON THE SAHARA

Designed by French architects OXO Architects and Nicolas Laisné Associates, this conceptual project is imagined as a vertical city towering above the vast wilderness of the Sahara Desert. The building contains a mixed-use programme, including a hotel, housing, dining facilities and a meteorological observatory. The tower first appears as a distant rock before the landscape widens, encompassing a maze of streets that recall eastern souks. At the ground floor, an internal pool serves as the project’s threshold, reflecting the vast vegetation-covered atrium above. There will also be various spaces to play, swim and pray on the tower’s upper storey, where sweeping panoramic views are offered. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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GRAPEVINE

A RT & F O O D S : RITUALS SINCE 1851 LA TRIENNALE- NOVEMBER 1

Exploring the cultural influences surrounding how we prepare, consume and artistically depict our food, the first Expo pavilion to open to the public got underway this week. Curated by Germano Celant, it covers 7,000 square meters and includes 15 installations dedicated to dining rooms, kitchens, bars and picnic areas, plus art works by Monet, Andy Warhol and more.

SNEAK PEEK- EXPO MILANO 2015 Officially opening on May 1, preparations for the Expo Milano are in full swing and art exhibitions and venues are beginning to open around the city. A few highlights... L E O N A R D O 1 452- 1 5 1 9

AFP RELAX NEWS

PA L A Z Z O R E A L E - A P R I L 1 5 T O J U LY 1 9

FO N DA Z I O N E P R A DA

The largest exhibition dedicated to the artist will run for three months, presenting paintings, drawing and manuscripts introduced by masterpieces by the artist’s predecessors. Highlights include a fullscale video reproduction of “The Last Supper” with descriptive panels and interactive stations and more than 100 original drawings by the artist.

Prada is opening doors to its art foundation, redesigned by Rem Koolhaas on May 9. Among the first programmes planned, Robert Gober and Thomas Demand will highlight specific onsite installations, Roman Polanski will explore his inspirations, and “Serial Classic”, which is from May 9 to August 24, will analyse the themes of seriality and copy in classical art.

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NEW IN TOWN Miu Miu recently celebrated the launch of their new flagship store in the heart of Tokyo’s Aoyama district. Prominent figures in art, architecture, fashion and show business attended the exclusive event. The Miu Miu store’s most iconic elements are selected and placed like art objects in an exhibition around which the event takes place. With the intention to emphasise their design at a glance, the elements were exaggerated like pop art: scaled up, overcoloured, produced of funny materials or simply used for a completely different purpose: A monumentally inflated chair was hanging from the ceiling above the runway; a plastic staircase became an unusable sculpture in the lobby; the vitrine furniture became a huge accessible bar distributing not bags but refreshments. Instead of just being made as cheap decor for one single event, the individual objects were seriously crafted and made to eventually be used in other occasions and contexts.

INNOVATION AT THE PEAK China is considering one of the most ambitious projects in history, a railway tunnel under Mount Everest. A line between China and Nepal is under consideration, according to Chinese state media. The Qinghai-Tibet railway already links the rest of China with the Tibetan capital Lhasa and an extension running as far as the international border is being planned. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi visited Kathmandu in December and, according to Nepalese reports, said the line could eventually be extended to the Nepalese capital and further.

THE

ANGRY

ARCHITECT

Jean Nouvel snubbed the opening of his new Philharmonie de Paris concert hall, saying that tests to ensure its viability as a venue for concerts have not been carried out. The architect said that he has been pushed aside and decisions about the hall are being made in secret without the necessary oversight. He also claimed Philharmonie leaders have made cuts and sacrificed details, which he believes have compromised the building. “Against all the advice of its architect since 2013, the building was opened in a schedule that does not meet the architectural and technical requirements. These charges are unfounded and highly prejudicial to me and to Ateliers Jean Nouvel. I will not tolerate the untruthful, defamatory and disparaging writings or comments which are made about me. The contempt these last two years have caused for architecture and for the architect’s craft prevents me from expressing my agreement and satisfaction with attending the opening ceremony” says Nouvel. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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NEOTERIC

T H E N AT I O N A L

MUSEUM

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OF QATAR

A N I D E N T I T Y TA K E S F O R M

ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST FAMOUS ARCHITECTS, JEAN NOUVEL GIVES HIS TAKE ON THE METAMORPHOSIS THAT IS TAKING PLACE IN THE COUNTRY, SPEARHEADED

BY THE MASSIVE CONSTRUCTION ON THE CORNICHE, WHERE STEEL FORMS ARE SLOWLY GIVING WAY TO REVEAL THE SAND-COLOURED STRUCTURE THAT WILL HOUSE THE COUNTRY’S NATIONAL MUSEUM. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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NEOTERIC

Qatar is a young nation in the Persian Gulf, a peninsula, a tongue surrounded by water where the desert reaches into the sea. The Qataris are descended from nomadic Arabian people who have settled in this maritime desert. Some became fishermen, others hunted for pearls. Some looked to the nation’s hidden treasures, the resources that lay beneath the sand or under the sea. Others, inspired by their country’s

The National Museum of Qatar is proof of how intense this energy is. Of course it will be home to the traditional geological and archaeological artefacts; tents, saddles and the dishes will bear witness to nomadic life; and there will be fishermen’s utensils, boats and nets. central location in the Gulf, began to talk, to communicate, to reach out. The impulse for this metamorphosis came from Doha. A glance at photographs of Doha in the 1950s and 1960s, compared with today, is sufficient to understand how much this part of the world has changed. From a little village, it has become a capital. What could be more natural, then, than the desire to testify, to talk about identification, about the evolving identity of this country as it 22

GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

reveals itself on the sensitive paper of history? And what could be more logical than to give concrete expression to this identification process in a national museum of Qatar that will relate the physical, human and economic geography of the country, together with its history? One place was symbolically destined to fulfill this role: the cradle of the Al Thani family in Doha; a modest, noble, simple palace from where this twentieth-century adventure began. It stands at the city’s southern entrance, the busiest urban gateway as it also welcomes visitors arriving from the airport. The architectural study, which initially was coupled with the programmatic study, brought to light the underlying paradox of this project: to show what is hidden, to reveal a fading image, to anchor the ephemeral, to put the unspoken into words, to reveal a history which has not had the time to leave a mental imprint; a history that is a present in flight, an energy in action. The National Museum of Qatar is proof patent of how intense this energy is. Of course it will be home to the traditional geological and archaeological artefacts; of course tents, saddles and the dishes will bear witness to nomadic life; of course there will be fishermen’s utensils, boats and nets. Most importantly, though, it will spark an awareness that


THE CREATOR ARCHITECT JEAN NOUVEL.

GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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NEOTERIC

This museum is a modern-day caravanserai. From there you leave for the desert and you return from it bringing back treasures: images that remain forever engraved on your memory. could only otherwise be encountered, experienced, after months spent in the desert, in pursuit of the particularities that elude our grasp except when the whims of Time and Nature allow. Or by taking a helicopter or 4WD to discover the contrasts and stretches of beach of the Qatari peninsula. Everything in this museum works to make the visitor feel

the desert and the sea. The museum’s architecture and structure symbolise the mysteries of the desert’s concretions and crystallizations, suggesting the interlocking pattern of the blade-like petals of the desert rose. Nomadic people build their capital city and talk about it through this emblematic monument built with the most contemporary construction tools (steel, glass and fibre concrete), and will communicate through highdefinition cinema, incorporating visitors’ movements into its museography : this museum is a modern-day caravanserai. From there you leave for the desert and you return from it bringing back treasures: images that remain forever engraved on your memory. This is more than just a metaphor. The National Museum of Qatar will have 4WDs, helicopters and the fastest boats for visiting the unvisitable. Just as Al Jazeera emits a voice which has become that of the Gulf, so the National Museum of Qatar will become Qatar’s voice of culture, delivering a message about the metamorphosis of modernity and the beauty that happens when the desert meets the sea.”

JEAN NOUVEL

Doha, Qatar National Museum 24

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THE

LIST

S T Y L E Y O U R B E D S I D E TA B L E

BA N K O N BAS K E TS

The sturdy, light-weight, orangeshaped basket from Zara Homes not only adds warmth and style to your home décor but is also very multifunctional.

This cheerful and perky neoncoloured versailles pop table clock from Kare reduces the shock of the wake-up call and adds some extra oomph. QR155 BE QUIRKY

Kare’s vintage-inspired Barock vertical wall cabinet frame has a retro feel and adds effortless style to your space. QR1020

WHEN IT COMES TO HOME DÈCOR, YOU CAN BRING IN THE ELEMENTS OF SPRING AND SEE THEIR DIRECT EFFECT ON YOUR PERSONAL SURROUNDINGS. THIS SPRING, IT’S ALL ABOUT RE-ACCESSORISING WITH TRENDY COLOURS, ACCENT PIECES, ARTWORKS AND MORE. SO ADD SOME ZING TO YOUR HOME WITH THESE VIBRANT ACCESSORIES. A BIT OF SPRING

Capture your special moments with this floral photo frame from Zara Homes P O P O F PAT C H W O R K

Add a bit of colour and brightness to your home with this velvety peacock patchwork bench from Kare at the Lagoona Mall. QR4400

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THE

LIST PA I R I T U P

Spring is here, so throw in a couple of colourful toss cushions from Kas

BRIGHT AND SUNNY

Perfect for displaying some seasonal blooms, uplift, energise and get happy with the yellow vase from Zara Homes.

C O LO U R M A S H - U P

I N T R I C AT E A N D D I S T I N C T I V E

Inspired by the liveliness of New York City, the painting by John Crash Matos (USA) from the street art collection from IKEA is a colourful collage of letters and objects and definitely a value-add to your space.

Either as a dĂŠcor piece on any corner table next to a stack of books, this pretty wooden handpainted box from Artifacts of Arabia is an attractive accessory to your home.

E T H N I C F L AV O U R

Aesthetic as well as functional, carefully crafted with antique fabric and then hand painted on wood, the set of three tables from Artifacts of Arabia brings in a cultural ethic to your home.


THE

LIST

P L AY I N G W I T H P O U F S B E A U T I F U L LY C O M F O RTA B L E

It is practical, cosy and at the same time decorative and adds a playful spirit to your space. The Pouf Oase Green from Kare adds character to your home. QR655

TA K E A S E AT

Playful designs woven with vibrant coloured chords make this tubular chair by Patricia Urquiola, bought to Doha by Belle Harvey, the perfect choice for both indoors and outdoors.

Designed by Ron Arad, the ripple chair is a stackable design which beautifully suggests ripples left in the sand by the soft ebb and flow of the sea, with continuous lines that bend to create a comfortable and welcoming addition to your space.

FROM UNIQUE CHAISES AND QUIRKY POUFS TO COLOURFUL OTTOMANS, AND TRENDY STOOLS THERE IS NO LIMIT TO MAKING YOUR HOME FUN AND VIBRANT WITH THESE REAL ATTENTION-GRABBING ACCESSORIES.

PAT T E R N P L AY

Add a simple and modern touch to your home décor with this coloufully patterned bazar foot stool from Kare. QR450

PURE MODERN

Available in four colours- pearl grey, red, turquoise and black- this new La Coupe des Dieux Chair with leather finishing created by Donatella Versace echoes the elegance of art nouveau and brings modernity and innovation into your home.

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THE FOCUS

FINDING THE RIGHT BALANCE Architect Yausif Al Baker. 32

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“ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTS HAVE A UNIQUE WAY OF LOOKING AT PROBLEMS, SAYS YAUSIF ALBAKER, WHO USES THIS

CHANGES THE WAY

INIMITABLE CHARACTERISTIC TO LOOK OUTSIDE THE PROJECT AND FIND INGENIOUS SOLUTIONS TO

WE LIVE CONCERNS SUCH AS AS THE IMPACT OF URBANISATION ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN DOHA.

IMPROVES IN CONVERSATION WITH SINDHU NAIR.

THE QUALITY OF LIFE”


THE FOCUS

E G Y P T R E S O RT

Luxury Resort in Marsa Alam. The building accommodates the resort’s main food and beverage outlets, front and back-of-house areas, and public and leisure facilities. The building attempts to tackle the resort industry’s largest obstacle, “how can programmes adapt to seasonality?”

Yausif Albaker, owner and principal architect of Albaker Architects, is in his early 30s but he has already ticked off most of what he has aspired to do. Not that there is much that he doesn’t desire to be involved in when it comes to design. “We don’t only practice design, we want to contribute to the education sector too - helping with feedback, technical or cross-disciplinary discourses,” says Albaker who also heads the advisory board of the design college at the Virginia Commonwealth

“I worked in the building industry and then as an in-house architect for Qatar 2022. That was a unique experience, something that can be called a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.” University of Qatar. What excites this architect most is to explore the industry and to understand the different disciplines involved; a 360-degree approach to design. That, in part, explains the detour Albaker took after his degree in architecture, turning towards construction and then project management, to expand his capabilities and understanding in each of these sectors. “I worked in the building industry and then as an inhouse architect for Qatar 2022. That was a unique experience, something that can be called a once-in-a-lifetime 34

GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

opportunity,” he says. And then at the peak of what many would call a career high, after Qatar won the 2022 World Cup bid, Albaker decided to start his own multidisciplinary design practice. “Earlier I had worked with a few world-renowned architects for the Qatar 2022 project - Rem Koolhas, Zaha Hadid and Norman Foster, to name a few. It was very difficult for me, being an architect, to be involved in an architectural project and not have any control over it. Working with these architects gave me the passion and confidence to start my own firm, to create my own designs,” he says. Four years down the lane he has no regrets and relishes being the master of his own designs. While work has been exciting for Albaker and his team with one huge multi-use retail project and one large resort in Egypt almost finalised on the drawing board, a multitude of products, and even interior projects completed, the architectural works are


DOHALIVE

Mixed Use Development, Boutique Hotel and Retail, Doha DohAlive is a focused hotel and retail development located close to the airport. It is characteristic in the way it connects public retail spaces with hotel functions.

still in the close-to-launch and approval stages as of now. “Architecture as you know is very slow. The DohAlive project (the multi-use retail project next to Crowne Plaza) is finally going live and the details of this multi-use commercial project will be revealed soon to the media.” This slow yet prolific practice is in stark contrast to the fast pace of the Qatar 2022 project and the one experience that Albaker can never ever forget. “The showcase stadium was completed within two years, from designing to building.”

But after this adrenaline rush, Albaker was also involved in the development management side of five projects, exposing him to the finer aspects of feasibility planning before getting onboard a project. “My only condition was that I be involved in the designing of the projects that were being finalised,” he says, paving the way for the design firm that he had already planned to begin (one particular project he was working on, however, is still in the approval stage at the Urban Planning Ministry.) “Qatar is going through rapid development. There is undeniable change in the urban fabric of the city,” says Albaker. “Architecture is dependent on urbanism and urbanism is equally dependent on the architecture of the place.” Albaker is interested in the change that is happening around him and is waiting to comprehend the relationship these developments have to the quality of life. “I am interested to know how architecture has a say in the quality of life,” he says. “There is no precedent like Qatar in terms of cities that have gone through so much change in such a short time; it is a learning opportunity for all cities,” he says. “There might be mistakes because of this, but I like to believe that all the wisdom will improve the quality of life here.” Interlaying features are analysed and used within Albaker projects, exploring

THE BEAD BOX: The Bead Box is designed to store up to 66 traditional Qatari prayer beads. The design of the bead box draws its inspiration from the Middle Eastern landscape, specifically the sand dune formations.

GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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THE FOCUS

NEW SALATA: MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT(CONCEPT DESIGN) IN DOHA The New Salata project offers a new approach to mixed-use buildings in the Middle East where multiple uses come together to complement each other and the surrounding community. The building houses eight different uses of commercial and community programmes.

the effect of open spaces, identifying the lack of such spaces and finally using the answers to understand and solve the architectural projects at hand. “It is an ongoing process, our studies for one project might be used in all what we do,” he says. An interesting question Albaker poses is the relatioshipn a wall has to people. He says, “I have realised that the wall has an isolating effecton the public walking around the city, and nowhere is this more prominent than in Qatar, where the walls are undeniably higher. In London or Paris, there is a connection that exists between a building and the public, a sense of attachment or a longing that that makes you feel like part of the city’s fabric. That is something we lack here and this sense of isolation and disconnect is not just a physical one but something beyond.” This is also how Albaker Architects approaches design, working around questions that indirectly and directly affect the structure: understanding complex interlays in design, thinking beyond the building while involving every facet of life, being empathetic to the implications of architecture on all

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of this, and using all this to present that unique building that has answers to most of the questions posed. Musing on design and architecture as two facets of the same concept, Albaker believes that architecture is a bit different than art: it mediates between art and function. “There is an architectural thought process, and it varies from architect to architect, that seeks to address every product or plan with that mindset. Architects have a unique way of solving problems. We produce tables, even baby bassinets, within an architectural paradigm, and the way architects approach any issue is unique.”

COMPETITION: Private Developer In this competition, Albaker have challenged themselves to ask how architecture can best promote the client’s vision, while disseminating their core values.


QUICK BITES Favourite Building in Doha Qatar University by Egyptian architect Kamal el Kafrawi. More signature architect buildings? “Yes, we cannot have enough. Qatar has more signature architects working here than any other country in the region.” Architects who have influenced you “All of the great architects have influenced me in one way or the other. I am interested in all the architects who are working in Doha, to understand how they handle unique challenges – OMA designing the Airport City; UNStudio who are building the Doha Metro; Zaha Hadid’s stadium design and so on.” “While all of the signature architect’s buildings are great, each of them has left an imprint on the country. What they represent, to me personally, is a laboratory to look at. It is a special feeling to understand the challenges and then look at how they (signature architects) have handled it.” A building you want to design “I would like to design the Corniche. I am interested in how a huge influx of people are affected by that physical structure, whether you are interacting with people on the Corniche, or just interacting with the area while you are driving through. It has a huge impact on the country and I would like to understand this impact and address this relationship one day.” Sustainable buildings “I am interested in sustainability in Qatar. That has a huge part in improving the quality of life. We should not look at sustainability as a certificate but as an important element when we design the building. Like the panels in the DohAlive

“I am interested in sustainability in Qatar. That has a huge part in improving the quality of life. We should not look at sustainability as a certificate but as an important element when we design the building. Like the panels in the DohAlive project.” project. The design of the façade changes according to the intensity of the sun. The arbiters that expand and contract depending on the sun’s intensity act as a passive system within the design of the building. The showcase stadium by the Qatar 2022 project was one of the buildings that looked at sustainable issues and answered most of the challenges thrown at it.” Work under masters “I would love to go back to my alma mater, SCI-Arc, because there is something unique happening there. I would also like to work with Jeff Kipnis, a critic and theorist in architecture who has a unique way of looking and understanding architectural

problems. I would like to have his eye for looking at a unique problem.” Favourite city “I like what is happening in cities around how they interact with the public. Los Angeles, Manhattan, London, Amsterdam, Paris; I would like to understand what makes them unique.” The architectural period you love The 90s was a very interesting period, when the computers had just arrived and everyone was trying to adapt to that tool. I like historical structures for what they are but not for reproduction; they were meant to be in the era they were in. You can make your interpretations but never a reproduction. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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Advertorial

Hempel Paints upgrades the TOPAZ range of decorative coatings Global coating supplier, Hempel has launched an upgraded version of the premium “TOPAZ” range of paints. This improved product family now includes a range of environmentally friendly zero emission products and best in class application and performance characteristics. Chris Sharkey, Sales Manager; Decorative Coatings speaks to Glam Interiors and Design on the latest developments. Could you elaborate on the new Topaz range? TOPAZ is a selected range of premium decorative paints, which offer superior performance. There are a variety of product types, providing both smooth and textured finishes. Included are a range of emulsions, enamels and textures which come in a broad spectrum of colours and finishes. The emulsion and enamel products are available in a full range of colours including light and dark shades to suit everyone’s taste. We also offer decorative coating solutions for interior and exterior surfaces of a building. TOPAZ aims to create a healthy indoor environment and is the perfect choice for those who want the best. How can we choose from the different ranges of decorative coatings? The TOPAZ emulsions are of superior quality and possess high scrub resistance; low VOC and help to prevent spread of flame in the event of fire. The TOPAZ upgraded emulsions have best in class opacity, whiteness and colour retention properties. The texture range maybe used inside or outside and is available in four variants: Multi, fine, medium and coarse. The enamel range is available in matt, gloss and semi-gloss 38

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“Hempel has a policy of continuous improvement. We are constantly looking for new ways to improve our established range of coatings.” finishes which require little maintenance and have superior whiteness. “Hempel has a policy of continuous improvement. We are constantly looking for new ways to improve our established range of coatings.” and colour retention properties. All products within the TOPAZ range can be applied through normal application techniques using widely available application tools. Tell us about TOPAZ Zero? Hempel supports the cause of sustainable development and offers zero VOC green coatings within the TOPAZ range. Combining highperformance coatings with VOC free and Formaldehyde free technology, TOPAZ Zero is the new green generation of paints, which redefines environmental

friendliness. It offers anti-mould and anti-bacterial properties making it the ideal product for kitchens, hospitals, schools and any other environment where there are strict hygiene regulations. Do you feel your customers are going to like the upgraded version? The performance level of the upgraded TOPAZ range has improved considerably with extensive research, development, and product testing. Hempel continues to work hard to provide better coating solutions to its customers. The customers who have tried the upgraded materials are delighted with the improvements we have made. We are expecting this improved range of coatings to take the market by storm.


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THE DISCUSSION

INCREASING THE GREEN FOOTPRINT QATAR’S GREEN WARRIORS ARE AT WORK AND TAKING EXAMPLES FROM THE PAST TO BUILD SUSTAINABLY. BY MARGARET KADIFA

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PASSIVE HOUSE The passivhaus interiors (left) and exteriors (right), an experimentation of green housing principles at Barwa City.

The Qatar Green Building Council (QGBC) is experimenting on two houses located in Barwa City. They look identical: white, single-storey and square, with an atrium in the centre and an open living room and kitchen area connected to a patio through French double windows. But while one of the houses was built with today’s typical building standards, the other is a passivhaus, a German building protocol that minimises the heat gained or lost within a house. In Qatar, this means that the house could stay cool while spending minimal energy on air conditioning, says Alexandre Amato, Head of Sustainability at the QGBC. What their passivhaus will help to demonstrate,

Amato says, is that it is possible to build “cost-effective, sustainable” communities in Qatar, and it may happen sooner than we think. Amid record numbers of car accidents, Qatar’s high carbon footprint per capita and the looming task of transporting people during the Games, it is clear why environmental sustainability is one of the key pillars of the National Vision 2030. Across Doha, developers are engaging in smarter urban planning to build not just green buildings but entire sustainable neighbourhoods, which is the scale that needs to be built to really cut down on Qatar’s carbon footprint, says Rami el Samahy, an Associate Teaching Professor of Architecture and Urban

Design at Carnegie Mellon University and a founding principal of the multidisciplinary firm over,under. Though it’s hard to implement environmental sustainability in a country where cheap or free energy and water give no incentive for people to build and live green, heritage is a very important factor in promoting these ideas in Qatar, says Trinidad Rico, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Texas A&M at Qatar. Take, for example, what will likely be Qatar’s first sustainable urban design project to be finished, the Msheireb Downtown Doha. With four of its five phases under construction, Msheireb Downtown Doha, a 35-hectare, mixed-use downtown GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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THE DISCUSSION

WALKING THE TALK Left: Alexandre Amato, Head of Sustainability at the QGBC is spearheading the Passivhaus concept. Below: Ameena Ahmadi, Technical Director at Qatar Foundation’s Capital Projects Directorate.

revitalisation project that encompasses 226 new buildings, is all about “just sensibly building with the environment,” el Samahy says. Since the advent of glass, air conditioning and concrete in Doha, this hasn’t been happening. Sustainably designed areas efficiently use resources like energy and water, especially with regards to transportation and mobility, says el Samahy. “We have a strong Qatari heritage of traditional architecture, and research undertaken on behalf When you build such quality of Msheireb Properties environmental microclimates, in a discovered that our ancestors sense that shows that it can be done, had the right idea when it came that it’s good urbanism, that it’s good to urban planning,” says Eng. environmentally. Abdulla Hassan Al Mehshadi, CEO of Msheireb Properties. “They utilised the natural climate for their own benefit.” The Msheireb development, with its emphasis on a walkable city and the strategic use of public spaces to enjoy the outdoors, showcases a sustainable future that is largely informed by past lifestyles and uses of space in Qatar. For example, though it and other sustainable urban developments will use modern technology like solar panels and rail systems, its urban planning is based in traditional, passive techniques, such as building to maximise breezes and airflow and developing a shading strategy. The entire Msheireb development will have narrow roads that can stay shaded all day 42

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from the shadows of buildings on either side, native plants to keep the dust and heat down, and lightweight canopies reminiscent of traditional tarps that cover a pedestrian shopping area. All of this is intended to make the development a place in which it is comfortable to walk outside during most of the year. This was the pattern used in Qatar’s past, small alleyways between buildings, shading the pedestrian as he moves across lanes. “The idea of mobilising the past is very active here,” Rico says. “When Msheireb is saying it’s going to be a walkable city, they’re saying, we used to walk in the city. We used to have public spaces where you could sit outside. So let’s bring it back to how it used to be.” Rico is one of the researchers on a three-year project that will look at, among other things, how heritage is used to explore ways of keeping buildings cool instead of the mass air conditioning that is characteristic


GREEN EFFORTS Left:Trinidad Rico, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Texas A&M at Qatar; Below: Eng. Abdulla Hassan Al Mehshadi, CEO of Msheireb Properties; Bottom Left: Wind turbines infront of the Student Housing at Qatar Foundation.

“We have a strong Qatari heritage of traditional architecture, and research undertaken on behalf of Msheireb Properties discovered that our ancestors had the right idea when it came to urban planning.”

of the Gulf today. Funded by the Qatar National Research Fund under the National Priorities Research Program, the project will begin in May and is called “Cool living heritage in Qatar: sustainable alternatives to airconditioned urban development.” The QGBC’s focus isn’t whether a good building practice is inspired by heritage but whether it uses good physics, Amato says, but many of the methods employed in the passivhaus are similar to those in the Msheireb development. The passivhaus, for example, is designed with a central atrium with shading to provide adequate daylight and thus reduce the need for artificial lighting without much

external heat gain. For now, there are no urban communities planned with the passivhaus as a model. First, the QGBC must test how much energy a family uses in each house. After a year and a half delay, it is currently installing the metering and monitoring systems for this research. However, the QGBC’s ultimate goal with this project is to develop an affordable but sustainable prototype for a house or apartment building for the expat community that one of its key partners, Barwa Real Estate Group, can mass-produce. The theoretically carbon-negative passivhaus is an extreme, Amato says. Somewhere between today’s standards GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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THE DISCUSSION

SUSTAINABLE EFFORTS Rami el Samahy, an Associate Teaching Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at Carnegie Mellon University; the Msheireb development, with its emphasis on a walkable city

“Our project is interested in how heritage gets mobilised to create this culture.”

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and the passivhaus is a cost-effective, green model for Barwa that could make up a sustainable alternative to most current residential developments. Rico and the fellow researchers on her project have started a conversation with Qatar Green Building Council about potentially using the passivhaus as a case study. They would study how heritage alters the norms and behaviour of the passivhaus’ future occupants. “What we’re saying is that it’s not just enough to put the right windows and doors in, but that [living sustainably] requires an actual cultural shift,” Rico says. “Our project is interested in how heritage gets mobilised to create this culture.” Just across the road from the QGBC offices, Qatar Foundation is considering employing similar passive techniques with the goal of creating what Ameena Ahmadi, Technical Director at Qatar Foundation’s Capital Projects Directorate, calls “a flexible urban environment.” Capital Projects is the directorate responsible for the planning and overall design and product management of all Qatar Foundation buildings and supporting infrastructure in the foundation’s 15 million square metre campus. This flexible urban environment would be user-friendly, with a shading strategy that allows people to walk outside comfortably for much of the year, and green spaces, many with local plant species, that are accessible in different ways depending on the season, Ahmadi says. “If you look at the national discourse

that is being trickled down through Qatar Foundation, they’re clearly investing in [sustainable communities],” Rico says. Education City is already host to one of the largest groupings of LEED platinum buildings in the world, the student housing. Since 2011, Qatar Foundation has been considering obtaining a LEED Neighbourhood certification, which looks beyond a single building to the sustainability of the community as a whole, as the systematic framework for assessing new initiatives like a shading strategy. Capital Projects is currently reassessing Education City’s master plan, a project that started in January and will take about a year and a half. By the end of this reassessment, Capital Projects will present ways to integrate the LEED Neighbourhood rating, likely by splitting the campus into zones and applying for certification for each zone. “When you build such quality environmental microclimates, in a sense that shows that it can be done, that it is pleasant, that it’s good urbanism, that it’s good environmentally, and that it’s doable,” Ahmadi says. Amato predicts that sustainable urban design in Qatar will grow in the future. “Qatar wants to be seen doing the right thing,” Amato says. “I think that is certainly one of the key prime movers towards sustainability: the feeling that this country wants to excel and be seen to excel and be a standard-bearer certainly for the Gulf, certainly for the Arab world, and certainly for the world at large.”


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DECONSTRUCT

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT A


STEP UP THE STYLE QUOTIENT

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STYLE IT, MATCH IT AND MAKE IT FUNCTIONAL AND PERSONAL. ADD THAT DASH OF COLOUR TO CREATE A NEW AND REFRESHING LOOK TO YOUR LIVING SPACE. COMBINING A NEUTRAL DÉCOR WITH OFF-BEAT PATTERNS, EYE-CATCHING ACCESSORIES AND COLOURFUL ARTWORKS, YOU CAN MAKE YOUR LIVING ROOM A STYLE STATEMENT. HERE IS HOW YOU DO IT.

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1. VILLA CANDLESTICK QR249 2. CUBAN LADY CANVAS PRINT QR1329 3. OGI CHAIR WITH SWIVEL FUNCTION, FUCHSIA ROMA PINK QR4098 4. CUBA VASE YELLOW GLASS QR759 5. AFRICA VASE QR439 6. OWL SCULPTURE QR129 7. BULL DOG ARTEFACT QR329 8. TEXT ARTEFACT- URBAN QR199 9. CANDLESTICK GORILLA QR99 10. TRAP PENDANT LIGHT QR2499 11. BUTTERFLY CUSHION QR279 (ALL PRODUCTS ARE FROM BO CONCEPT, THE LOOK IS CREATED BY BO CONCEPT INTERIOR DESIGNER MAHALA LAO)

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EXPERT

3AJEEB! (AHH-JHEE-B) IS “STRANGE IN A STRANGE WAY, COOL IN A COOL WAY, AND SLIGHTLY WEIRD IN A SLIGHTLY WEIRD WAY.” BY MUNEERA UMEDALY SPENCE

TASMEEM 3AJEEB WAS ALL ABOUT

Muneera Umedaly Spence MFA Yale University Graphic Design is currently the Chair of the Department of Graphic Design at Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar and has been for the past seven years. She leads a Graphic Design team of ten faculty in a contextualised BFA degree programme. She has participated in and led conference development and presentations, including Tasmeem Doha 2011. Her interest lies in team generative methodologies, collaborative teaching and learning dynamics, especially pertaining to design education in the international context. Her interest in international development/design projects has manifested in Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine and now in Qatar. 48

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SHIFTING PERSPECTIVES

Tasmeem Doha is a biennial international conference focusing on unique and contemporary themes in art and design. The first Tasmeem Conference was held in 2005 primarily for VCUQatar students and faculty, and the creative community in Qatar. In its eighth year, Tasmeem Doha took a different theme, 3ajeeb, to create a platform full of inventiveness and creativity, seriously designing a five-day conference that enabled participants to focus on the playfulness theme. The designers of the conference, the faculty at VCUQatar, Michael Hersrud, Levi Hammett, Simone Muscolino and Richard Lombard try to explain the funfilled yet creative experience in their own words. “The word ‘3ajeeb’ emerged through conversations with students and faculty as a humorous local expression that is difficult to define, but signifies the curious, quirky and unconventional,” says Hersrud. “There is great power in the uncanny, the playful, and the unexpected to perhaps evoke curiosity, or just make us smile,” says Hammett. “Tasmeem 3ajeeb is really about promoting a discussion centered around playful processes as a creative practice, and how those processes can generate new knowledge, technologies and discoveries. Primarily, Tasmeem 3ajeeb was about shifting perspective,” says Muscolino. Qatar Foundation and VCUQatar funded this year’s eighth annual Tasmeem conference that took place during March 8-12. The design-based conference engaged all the students, faculty and staff at VCUQatar as well as groups of students and faculty from VCU in Richmond, Virginia and from the region. The team that designed the Tasmeem 3ajeeb conference worked on the development for two years and planned every move and action and captured all the moments that occurred during the event. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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THE

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GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN


Here are some thought-provoking questions...

how to change my expression significantly but also that painting my face changed how I felt in response to others. This was so How is design serviced by play? Can play complex an action and reaction that I really be thought about seriously? What is there needed time to understand what it was all to learn and how do people learn to create about. Learning included so much about 3ajeeb situations that facilitate sharing? the importance of communication and body The conference started with workshops language, especially facial movements and lead by 25 multidisciplinary studio artists, voice communication. designers, musicians, writers, tinkerers, I walked around the VCUQatar building and playful thinkers, who came from to meet others so that I could observe their Japan, the United States, Egypt, Italy, reactions to my face and to see the amazing Australia, France, Spain, the UK, and happenings going on in the workshops. many other places around the world. From While all the workshops were interesting designing and creating a 9-hole mini golf, to me, the ones that engaged students were action projects, robots with character and the best. Arabic scriptwriting with light, to lectures The presentations by the workshop by amazing artists and designers who leaders allowed the students to understand incorporate 3ajeeb-like play into their how their own work was informed by discovery processes and work, each of the 3ajeeb-like explorations that led to designers brought in their creativity. We innovative ideas, learning and using technological as well as human-centered interactive experiments. The main-stage “THE ENERGY AND CREATIVITY THAT THE speakers were involved in WORKSHOP LEADERS BROUGHT WITH using an adventurous way to get results. They were creating the tools to connect THEM FROM THE MINUTE THEY ENTERED with people and amaze THE BUILDING BLEW ALL OF US AWAY,” them while leaving a lasting impression. “The energy and creativity saw the creation of nomadic dolls, bamboo that the workshop leaders brought with bicycles, magic stories in wonder boxes, them from the minute they entered the Arabic script light typography, floating building blew all of us away,” says Lombard. architecture and the house that knew too Hersrud echoes the same thought, much! We were amazed to listen to the adding, “The Shawarma Sessions are a tasty legendary fashion designer, Valentino mix of slow-roasted creative personalities Garavani, as he was interviewed by Sandra rolled into a savory wrap of inspiring Wilkins, the chair of Fashion Design at goodness.” VCUQatar. Hammett touches on the spectacular I took part in the Face Painted People closing presentation by filmmaker and workshop by Ailadi Cortelletti (designer) social media phenomenon Casey Neistat and Gao Mingbo (Peking Opera performer). who landed in Doha and leapt onto the The idea of this workshop was to explore stage for a one night speaking performance. face make-up as a tool to exaggerate facial All were engaged in explosive and expression and make theatrical acting humorous Design Thinking. visible at a great distance. We first painted Weeks after the conference, I see that our faces as the Peking Opera performers students are nimble and explorative, openso that we could learn about the design of minded and able to use technology, colour transformation. We then experimented and creative ideas. They understand the with our own ideas using our faces as need for hard work but also recognise that active messages to all who looked at us-and to be in touch with their audience they must everybody did look at us. I learned not only also evoke 3ajeeb! GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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EXPERT

COLOUR USAGE IS A

PERSONAL PREFERENCE Lemya Osman is the regional communication and interior design leader for IKEA UAE, Qatar, Egypt and Oman. She has been part of the IKEA family for 10 years and she believes that beauty and commerciality are equally important in all furnishing inspirations. “This means mixing home furnishing competence with retail skills to create smart solutions that appeal to people. Commercial solutions that combine function, beauty and value for money are highly inspirational to create satisfied customers who return again and again,” she says.

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PICTURE: IKEA


Not sure how to spruce up your kitchen or use rugs to decorate your home? From creative lighting techniques to space-savvy ideas, the experts at IKEA help you resolve your concerns with some top tips and advice on organising your home. What is the difference between spot lighting and diffused lighting? How should we use these? Lighting varies depending on the type of space, purpose and lifestyle. A combination of task, mood and general lighting is usually required to create functionality and a pleasant atmosphere. The way you light a room will completely change the space, and having multiple lighting sources allows you to control ambience, mood and how you use the room. There are two types of light: directional light and diffused light. Directional light comes from lamps that direct a concentrated beam of light over a limited area. Diffused light comes from lamps that distribute light uniformly throughout a room. A combination of both gives a complete structure to the room and is also preferable. One of the biggest missteps is overly bright lighting. Make sure you maintain a good balance of lighting. Space-saving is a technique that is IKEA’s Unique Selling Proposition. Can you give me some space-saving ideas for the dining room? Irrespective of how big or small a home is, everyone needs some clever tricks to utilise the available space to the maximum. Here are few easy ideas which you can use for the dining room: + Use stackable stools and folding chairs for occasional guests. These can be neatly put away at other times and they take up less storage space when they are not in use.

+ If you have restricted dining space, consider using a table with a dropdown leaf structure. A flexible dining area can be created with a table that can be expanded or made smaller depending on the number of people. + If you’re looking to seat a large group of people, try using two tables instead of one. They can be arranged sideby-side or end-to-end depending on the function. The side-by-side arrangement provides lots of flexibility and allows more people to face each other for a cozier atmosphere. + If you are entertaining a smaller group of guests, get yourself a round table. It creates a cozier atmosphere and also allows people sitting around it to face each other. Also, the shape allows one more chair to be added if necessary, thus helping in space-saving. + Utilise your kitchen space smartly by using kitchen tops for multiple purposes. It can be used as a breakfast bar for quick meals, a buffet table when you are inviting people home, or a work space for chopping vegetables. Adding chairs at the breakfast bar also enables guests or family members to sit and socialise while the food is being prepared. How do we spruce up our kitchen area? The kitchen should be a functional space. The first step to a clean and efficient kitchen is to have a concrete structure plan in mind. Depending on the type of cooking done and the amount of time spent in the kitchen, it is important to create separate areas for preparing food, cooking and washing

up. Storage or maintenance can then be done depending on each section’s specific requirements. Dimensions, safety and placement need to be given consideration to achieve a fullyfunctional cooking area. You can update a backsplash or add colour by painting one or two walls or installing new lighting fixtures. Depending on your personal choice and budget there are several options to spruce up your kitchen area. What are some of the colour schemes that work well in the Middle East? There are no set rules on how to use colour for different regions. Colour should be used based on personal preference and personalities. Basic knowledge about how colours work can help achieve the desired effects. Different shades in a room can alter the character in many ways. It can visually change the size of a room, affect the atmosphere and how light is reflected. Warm colours such as reds, yellows and oranges make spaces seem cozy, welcoming and intimate. However, they can also make a space look smaller, So it is not advisable to use these colours in small spaces. Cool colours such as violet, blue and green seem to recede or feel more distant. They can create a sense of space and a cooler atmosphere. The same affect can be achieved with light colours. A cool colour in a light tone will create maximum illusion of space so it’s perfect for small spaces. Light colours are also great for open spaces such as balconies so they can make the outdoor feel almost like an extension of your home.

W R I T E TO U S I F Y O U N E E D E X P E RT A D V I C E , D R O P Y O U R M A I L T O S I N D H U @ O M S Q ATA R . C O M

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REGIONAL FOCUS

WITH METICULOUS CRAFTSMANSHIP, CLASSIC FUNCTIONALITY, BOLD DESIGNS AND STUNNING INSTALLATIONS, INTERNATIONAL DESIGNERS HAVE GIVEN FUNCTIONAL DESIGN A WHOLE NEW PERSPECTIVE AT THIS YEAR’S DESIGN DAYS DUBAI.

Wood is simple, versatile, unique and natural and, when placed in the hands of an artist, it is transformed into something beyond the imagination. Inspired by nature and its different facets, the recently concluded Design Days Dubai featured some visually stunning statement pieces of furniture created by global designers. The exhibition portrayed how the art of nature and man can be merged, with wood being used as the chief material for creating functional and worldclass designs. Each piece depicts a journey and gives a different interpretation and meaning to the medium. The following furniture designs have been carefully sculpted either by hand or laser machinery:

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T H E WO R L D , M Y OYS T E R

A show-stopping design was “The World, My Oyster” love seat by Lebanese designer Khaled El Mays, designed and produced exclusively for the exhibition. Resembling an oyster shell, this piece is a visual representation of man shaping

nature to fit his vision. The designer has used only natural materials like wood and mother of pearl. This piece not only enhances the visual effect of an oyster but also addresses the subject of nature in its different forms.


M A L LO W

A unique series of chairs called “Mallow” was presented by the Lebanon-based design trioHawini (Haytham Hreiz, Wissam Moubarak and Nisrine Nasr). Named after a type of flower, the chairs merge the art of nature and man and were created using natural finished oakwood and a steel base with a gun-metal finish. These chairs are also available in black python snakeskin, mauve ostrich leather and spiky calf leather.

WINGS OF LIFE

A piece from one of his famous Millenial Consoles Collection, the “Wings of Life”by Máximo Riera is made using lifeless debris from authentic millenarian olive trees found in the south of Spain. They are sourced as a whole and a maximum of three consoles are manufactured from each tree. The preparation

process involves removing the tree sap, drying the tree and stripping it of its bark. The ancient wood is then treated and polished and placed on a custom-made contrasting metallic structure. This console has taken a traditional element and transformed it into something unique, thus giving a fresh perspective to art.

S TO C O R K ’ S B E A K

A baby crib carved in the shape of a nest from a single cork block, Pearl Cork’s “Stocork’s Beak” was an eye-catcher this year. The use of cork not only showed commitment to the environment but also exemplified the future of design. This piece can be viewed as the crux of the Cities collection. “Stocork’s Beak”, a contemporary creation that is nonetheless timeless, marrying sophistication to the grandeur of cork. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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REGIONAL FOCUS

Other designs seen at the Cities exhibition included, the “Dream Chaise Lounge’”by Atelier Rouge; the stunning “Acra Horn” by Filippo Dini; “The Oda Lamp” by Sebastian Herkner; Ruediger Weidemann’s Konsair desk and Jérôme Pereira’s intriguing floor lamp titled “Einstein Was Right”. These pieces were exhibited within Cities’ Dubai. With a vision to introduce exceptionally crafted contemporary design and art, Cities first opened its doors in 2006, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. After successfully building a solid reputation in its first location, a second showroom was introduced in Dubai, U.A.E. Today, Cities exists as a concept space, which takes clients on a journey through the design landscape of the world. Sourced from all around the world, each piece within the Cities’ collection is handpicked from a variety of international and Middle Eastern talents. 56

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REGIONAL FOCUS

INTERPLAY OF FORM,

FUNCTION AND “DESIGN IS EVERYTHING OR, ACTUALLY, EVERYTHING IS DESIGNED”,SAYS IVAN PARATI. CROSSING DIGITAL FABRICATION WITH ARTISANAL COMPETENCE, PARATI’S DESIGNS SPEAK VARIETY, BALANCE, SPONTANEITY, FLEXIBILITY, CONTEMPORARY AND MORE. BY AARTHI MOHAN

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AESTHETICS

MASTER MIND Exemplifying passion and creativity through his designs, Ivan Parati is the winner of the Middle East Emergent Artist Prize GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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REGIONAL FOCUS

An interior design teacher at Ajman University of Science and Technology, Ivan Parati won the Middle East Emergent Artist Prize 2015, organised by the prestigious Van Cleef & Arpels, Tashkeel and Design Days Dubai, for his winning piece, “TileTable”, a modular coffee table with traditional Islamic elements. Parati aims at creating awareness of Islamic heritage with contemporary challenges through his designs. But it is not an easy process; a design conceptualization takes a while and requires a lot of dedication. He says, “Creativity doesn’t happen instantly, most of the time it is methodical”. An idea to Parati is like a question with hundred different answers, and to bring all that into perspective, he creates a concept. “With clarity in mind, I start to sketch, then I test it using several trial and errors, to come up with unique perspectives based on different views,” he says of his creative process. “Tile Table”, Parati’s winning design seems like a simple piece of furniture, but on close scrutiny one can see the complexity that is woven in to give 60

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the end product an uncomplicated contemporary look. “TileTable”, according to Parati, reflects a metaphor for humanity where each piece cannot stand by itself but, once arranged in group, a stable and functional configuration can be achieved. “It is a stand-alone design which consists of three elements with different geometric layouts making possible infinite scope for creative arrangement. In geometry, it is referred to as ‘semi-regular “Sometimes, the most tessellation’, the pattern unfashionable detail fascinates used is a focal point for different cultures and me and I would ponder over it civilizations. Inspired by for days until I find a way to Islamic traditions, I have create a story around it.” taken elements such as the mosaic pattern grid and given a contemporary makeover in this design,” he says. Inspiration comes from everywhere to this teacher. “Sometimes, the most unfashionable detail fascinates me and I would ponder over it for days until I find a way to create a story around it. To me, creativity is all about story telling; writers

do it through words, I do it through objects,” he says. Parati has not one but many favourite artists. “I like the works of Jan Van Eyck, M.C.Esher, Giovanni Bellini, Olafur Eliasson, Ernesto Nieto, Bosh,Valerio Adami, Jean Dubuffet and Gustave Coubert,” he says. Parati’s fascination for Islamic art comes through his love for digital arts. “Generative and computational design intrigues me. Islamic Art is a mix of all this, hence I chose to pursue it. I find it interesting to examine how close a Quick Response code is to a square kufic calligraphy which probably represents the most ancient typeface in Arabic tradition. I am not sure about the influence but definitely traditions need to be mastered and revived and I am hoping to bring them to the spotlight through my designs in future,” he says. Parati is not alone in his journey in pursuit of design gratification. His life partner, Emanuela Corti, is also a designer and won the prestigious Lexus Design Award. “Together, we are working on a prototype to be exhibited soon,” he says. For now they will be travelling to Milan Design Week and then the world is the canvas for this artist.

EXPERT CREATORS Right: Selection committee included Alban Belloir, Managing Director Van Cleef & Arpels Middle East & India; Cyril Zammit, Fair Director of Design Days Dubai and Khalid Mezaina, Project Co-ordinator of Tashkeel GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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OUR HOME

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“THE STORY

A HOUSE IS SAID TO BE A REFLECTION OF WHAT YOU ARE AND THIS CANNOT BE TRUER THAN IN SHALEEN AND DEVEN KARNIK’S INTERIORS THAT WEAVE TOGETHER A STORY OF THE COUPLE’S JOURNEY.

OF OUR LIFE” BY SINDHU NAIR PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANGEL MALLARI

The mood is created from the entrance door. The monk figurines placed at the doorstep are an indication of the creativity one can expect inside. The door opens and the first thing you are aware of is of the setting created at the foyer. An intricately woven Kantha work (a type of embroidery popular in eastern South Asia, especially Bangladesh and the Indian states of West Bengal and Odisha) is used as a draped canopy near the entrance. You get a cool respite for a moment before your eyes trace out the subdued colours on the side walls. Here is an explosion of culture through classical South Indian Tanjore paintings; paintings that are characterised by rich, flat and vivid colours, simple iconic composition, glittering gold foils overlaid on a delicate

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CULTURE ATTACK: Top: The entrance door flanked by two Chinese wooden chairs, the Kantha work covered canopy and the colourful woolen carpet make the foyer a mishmash of ideas and artefacts. Below: Modern acessories make a statement in this corner. 66

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but extensive gesso work and inlay of glass beads and pieces that adorns the wall on the left as you enter and makes you stop and take it all in. We have just entered the house of Shaleen and Deven Karnik. The couple moved to Doha from Hong Kong in 2013 and their house is a reflection of their journey in life. Each wall reflects a part of their expedition, memories captured through accessories, paintings that speak of a passion shared, heritage and heirlooms passed down through generations; and it all comes together to form a beautifully choreographed interior space. The Tanjore paintings have been a family heirloom, passed on to Shaleen from her maternal aunt, a lady who had a keen eye for art and culture, and “whose house was almost like a museum,” according to Shaleen. “The semicircular Tanjore painting is quite rare,” she explains. “A lot of furniture is old, handed down from my Masi (aunt).” The two bulky wooden chairs framing the entrance door are Chinese antiques, part of a wedding furniture. Coming out of the cozy entry way, there is a

profusion of sun and light in the grand foyer which predictably features one of the most prized possessions of the family, the wooden piano, again passed down by Shaleen’s aunt. Old and regal, with chipped edges, the piano attracts attention for its antiquity and the yellow silk-covered seating completes this corner. No corner of the room is devoid of an interesting accessory nor is any part of the wall free of a painting. While warm reds and bright yellows categorise the living space, the dining space has a cooler colour blend with blues dominating the walls. The paintings have been collected over the years, from the first painting bought in Mumbai to the ones the Karnik’s collected from around the world. “We started collecting from the time we got married and have not stopped. The Indian and the Chinese painting collections are my choices while Deven bought the Vietnamese painting when he went there for work,” she says about this common passion. “Our first painting, the one we bought just after our marriage, is one of Devdatta


“We started collecting from the time we got married and have not stopped.”

WHAT IS YOUR STYLE? Artefacts from around the world come together in Shaleen’s house: the Chinese stonework lamp; an ironwork acessory that is just too interesting to ignore; and the Buddha head and the Chinese medicine cabinet with a treasured Baiju Parthan painting above it. “This was one painting that I insisted we buy and now the artist is a much sought-after painter, proving that I do have an eye for talent,” says Shaleen.

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“I might like antiques one day and contemporary pieces the next, or I would love a mix of all these designs in harmony- that’s the sort of person I am.”

THE BLUE FORMS Top: Devdatta Padekar’s paintings line one of the walls of the Karnik’s house. 68

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Padekar’s initial works, long before he became one of the most prolific artists in the country,” she says, taking us into the dining room which is in a palette of cream and dark wood with paintings providing a slight dash of colour in blues and greens. Padekar’s paintings take up most of one wall; the first painting acquired by the couple is the centrepiece, a most interesting composition of a man with the emphasis on his arms, a painting that is simplistic while being academic in nature. “This was one of the artist’s most beloved paintings, one that he did as part of his studies at Sir J.J School of Art in Mumbai and even won him an award. We picked it up for a mere 4000 rupees (QR240) and now it is so difficult to get a painting of his,” says Shaleen. The dining tables and chairs are a Doha-buy. Additional pieces that can be added to the fabric of memories that Shaleen is intent on collecting. The chests at the corners of the room are again old wooden antiques from India. “I wanted to change the mirror of this wall cabinet. The carpenters advised me against this, saying this work is almost nonexistent and is best preserved.” There is no particular pattern or design


HERITAGE VALUE left: The entrance foyer extends to this doubleheight lobby where a piano takes centre stage; Right: detail of a Chinese artefact; Below: The living room produces a profusion of colours with the paintings and accessories.

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“I do not buy any piece to fit into my scheme of interiors, I buy things because of their story or their design aesthetics and then try and figure out how they fit into the space.”

COLOUR-CODED A confluence of Chinese and Indian artefacts makes this side of the living room a visual delight. 70

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THE MELTING POT: (Clockwise from top left in this page):The Tanjore paintings on the wall on the left of the entrance door is an exquisite collection of traditional art; detail of a modern Chinese artwork the dining room and the paintings on the wall; Chinese furntiure. .

theme that the Karniks have followed. The living room is an amalgamation of diverse threads; Chinese medicine cabinets; a Buddha head; Chinese redlacquered chests; brass accessories; woolen carpets; and bright red chairs which are Indian with a Chinese design. “I do not buy any piece to fit into my scheme of interiors, I buy things because of their story or their design aesthetics and then try and figure out how they fit into the space,” she explains. “The centre table was also acquired from an antique shop in Hong Kong and is part of a Chinese wedding trousseau, a box with a clasp to open it,” she adds. Shaleen feels that her house is a reflection of her personality; a mix of all facets, not of one conventional thought process. “I might like antiques one day and contemporary pieces the next, or I would love a mix of all these designs in harmony- that’s the sort of person I am,” she says. While Shaleen is the brains behind the setting, she doesn’t negate the influence of her husband in her interior space. “He has an eye for beautiful things”, she says. “I always bank on his decisions when I want to buy something though some of the things I have bought have also been very instinctive because I just liked them. But the paintings have

mostly been Deven’s choice.” Shaleen loves the comfort each of her pieces provides and has mostly travelled around the world with this set of memories. “But the space I set aside for them differs and it gives them a different meaning, a new interpretation, perhaps. I love the comfort these artefacts bring as they grow along with us.” The carpets in the Karnik house have a story to tell too. All of them are woolen, soft to the touch and wearing off to recount their experiences. “Some are from India, some are from Hong Kong, but we have also acquired a few from Doha. The carpet makers here have explained to us that woolen carpets are the best to acquire as they have a stronger yarn and, since they are so difficult to make, they are also quite rare.” There might be some days when Shaleen feels a tad intimidated by the same setting and tries to imagine a new canvas, but she cannot bring herself to start anew, wiping away the engravings of comfort that her artefacts bring. “The house has a blend of all my experiences. All that we have been through is here, there is an experience attached to every piece. All this wasn’t put together in a month and the space is almost like a story of our life,” she says.

THE BEAD BOX: The Bead Box is designed to store up to 66 traditional Qatari prayer beads.


GID GLAMOUR

BEST OF BOTH IN HER LIGHTFILLED, AIRY MANHATTAN APARTMENT SHIRA SUVEYKE, VICE PRESIDENT OF GLOBAL BUYING, THEOUTNET.COM, BRINGS IN A TASTEFUL, FORMMEETS-FUNCTION APPROACH WITH A CONTEMPORARY SPIN. BY AARTHI MOHAN

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TREND SETTER Shira Suveyke has an eye for design, both in interiors and fashion. GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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GID GLAMOUR GLOBAL TRAVELLER Suveyke mixes memories from around the world with classic old furniture.

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SIMPLE PLEASURES Suveyke’s personal favourite space in her house is her kitchen, where she has her study table too.

It is as chic and sophisticated as it is functional and friendly. Grounded in neutrals, with clean lines, lively hits of colour and vintage accents, Shira Suveyke’s, Manhattan apartment resembles a portrait which captures a perfect balance of elegance and practicality. Converted from an old sewing factory, it is a compact studio situated in a prewar apartment building on Park Avenue. Charmed by the building’s cast iron façade, large windows, double highceilings and overlooking the busy streets of Manhattan, Suveyke remodeled the place into her “home”. The house is a minimalistic dream and is both functional and comfortable. Filled with glamorous touches and simple furniture, the apartment is a breath of fresh air. The neutral colour palette makes the home soothing and inviting. Subtle pops of colour perfectly contrast the crisp white walls. “The dark floors are luxe and create a feeling of warmth. Lightening the colour of the walls brings in spaciousness to the home which is sought after in New York. By creating this neutral base, I’m able to keep accents like my red armchairs and colourful artworks and collectables”, she says. Designing a home is very personal. It’s the place you go to unwind, relax and recharge and hence should be an extension of your personality. As a fashion buyer, Suveyke has a keen eye for design. Drawn to both traditional and contemporary, her effortless personal

“The dark floors are luxe and create a feeling of warmth. Lightening the colour of the walls brings in spaciousness to the home which is sought after in New York.”

style translates seamlessly into her home’s décor, giving it a classic oldmeets-new charm which is accentuated with statement pieces. Suveyke loves to take cues from around the world and incorporate them in her home. She says, “The house has a very contemporary feel to it with many vintage pieces which I have bought over the years. I like to keep it balanced and not over the top. I enjoy mixing old with new, like pairing a contemporary chaise or end table with a mid-century object”. Most of her design inspiration comes from travel. “I travel to Milan, Paris and GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN

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GID GLAMOUR OLD WORLD CHARM The 19th-century Belgian farm table in Suveyke’s dining space is huge and just right for entertaining her friends and family; (opposite page) collectables from around the world.

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continue to remain very relevant”, says the fashionista. The nature of her work includes frequent travelling but when she is in New York she loves to entertain friends and family at her home. According to her, a big “I like to keep up with the evolving design dining table and plenty trends; there’s a big revival of seventies of seating space are décor which parallels what’s happening in essentials. She says, “I fashion at present. Bubble lanterns and love my mid-nineteenth century Belgian farm chairs, low tufted sofas and ottomans and table, which is inlaid with Saarinen tulip chairs work beautifully.” a large bluestone slab. It is perfect for entertaining London several times a year on market a large crowd. Be sure to have adequate trips. These cities have so much to offer china and stemware to host a large in terms of architecture, art and design party. I always use my Bernardaud and these elements always inspire new china, Baccarat stemware and Christofle ideas for decorating my home,” says this flatware for formal events”. global buyer. Everyone has an area in their home She explains, “When it comes to where they feel truly relaxed. For personal style, I follow the works of my Suveyke, it’s her kitchen. “My kitchen favourite style icons like Steven Gambrel, is the perfect example of ‘formwho has a beautiful aesthetic, and I also meets-function’. I purchased a vintage think Miles Redd is an iconic designer industrial table from an antique store in with an incredibly unique point of view”. Philadelphia. I do most of my work in “I like to keep up with the evolving the kitchen. On any given morning, I’ll design trends; there’s a big revival of be at the table checking emails, sipping seventies décor which parallels what’s coffee and watching the news on CNN. happening in fashion at present. Bubble On the rare occasion when I cook, the lanterns and chairs, low tufted sofas and appliances are all state-of-the-art and the ottomans and Saarinen tulip chairs work ample counter space is just perfect for beautifully. I’ve also noticed a trend preparing food and entertaining”, says towards pulling pieces from different the socialite. eras and regions and piecing them Suveyke opted for classic furniture together in a unique fashion, which is pieces in her home that have a similar to what I’ve done with my home. contemporary quality to them and Moroccan rugs and furnishings also can fit into today’s interiors whether,

traditional, transitional or modern, and that add personality with accent items which can be swapped out at any time. She says, “I love to shop at Nathan Turner in Los Angeles or ABC Carpet and Home in Manhattan’s Flatiron District. For smaller items and fixtures I love John Derian in New York’s East Village or unique vintage finds from the Paris flea markets. I also love to shop for fabrics and textiles on Kings Road in London”. “Some of my best pieces are ones that I have inherited and re-purposed. My great aunt passed her set of boudoir chairs to me, which I reupholstered with red Ikat fabric that I purchased from Madeline Weinrib”, says the Manhattanite.

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THE

SPACE

PERFECT STRUCTURES Ben Barbour is intrigued by these strange-looking structures and this is one of the first things he has sketched in Doha.

DOMES

OF

DOHA

Artist and Curator at the Msheireb Art Centre, Ben Barbour talks about some curious structures he has chanced upon in the city. Ben Barbour’s artistic sojourn in Doha began with a commission to memorialise in art the old Msheireb that was about to be razed for a swanky new neighbourhood. Soon it became something of a habit; exploring Doha’s suburbs and recording the sights that were vanishing into the hurricane of redevelopment, saving a glimpse of days gone by for posterity. This is probably how he chanced upon these intriguing structures. “After much thought one of my favourite buildings in Doha are the strange domes out on the Old Airport Road in Matar Qadeem. I have no idea what they were originally intended for - they look like some kind of nuclear shelter - but they’re currently being used to store junk furniture. They were one of the first things I drew when I arrived in the country; they have a sci-fi feel to them that seems somehow appropriate to Qatar.” 78

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Gid 4th issue  

GLAM INTERIORS + DESIGN 4th ISSUE. APRIL 20, 2015.

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